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Level 82

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Contents
Page

welcome to the course

To the teacher

lf you are using this book on your own

Exam Factfile

H
H
Unit

E
H
E
E
E
@

Lesson

Page

Exam Task

1.

What's in the Exam?

Listening Task 2; Making Notes

12

2.

What's in the Learner?

Reading Task ]: Paragraph Headings

18

1.

Surviving as

Speaking Task

Tourist

2. Bridging the Communication Gap

Mediation Part

3:

Transactional Dialogues

2:

Dialogue

24
30

3.

Souvenirs

Listening Task

4.

Travel Stories

Speaking Task 2: Picture Story

40

1.

Filmmakers

Listening Task 3: Radio Programme

48

2.

On Location

Writing Task 2: Discursive Writing - An Article

54

1:

Short Conversations

35

3.

Shooting a Film

Reading Task 3: Multiple-Choice Reading

60

4.

The lnteractive Audience

Speaking Task 4: Discussion

66

'l

Pursuing Adventures

Speaking Task 2: Picture Story


Reading Task j: Paragraph Headings

72

Writing Task 2: Discursive writing - An Essay

83

Listening Task 3: Radio Programme

89

Writing Task 2; Discursive writing - A Letter to the Editor


Listening Task 2: Making Notes

,l00

3, Eating Well or Not Eating Well

Reading Task 2: Scan Reading

105

4. cultures and cuisines

Speaking Task 4: Discussion

110

Reading Task 3: Multiple-Choice Reading

117

2. Bad Habits
3.

Ways of Living, Ways of Thinking

4. ln and out of Homes


1.

Food Blogs

2.

The Sweetest Thing

1.

online communication

2. Living in Cyberspace
3.

Online Language Learning

4. Shopping Online
1.

Handling Exam Stress

2. Facing the Exam

Where do we go from here?

Speaking Task

1:

Mediation Part
Writing Task

'l

77

96

lnterview

123

Translation

129

Transactional Letter

135

Reading Task 2: Scan Reading

142

Writing Task 2: Discursive Writing - A Review

148
154

Answer key

156

Audio scripts

177

Materials for pairwork and groupwork activities

186

Photocopiables

20o

Marking schemes

214

lntroduction

welcome to the course


This book is a complete preparation course for the Euroexam
at the Council of Europe's 82 level.

candidates are expected to spend completin9 the five


writing tasks, which are recommended as HOMEWORK
assignments.

The 82 Euroexam

o The units are organised around topics (e.9. travelling


|Globetrotting] or ihe world of the lnternet le.g.CyberWo_rldl)

Many traditiona| exams mainly test a candidate's accurate


use of language. ln contrast, the Euroexams focus on
how effectively candidates are able to use their English to
communicate in a variety of everyday situations,The exam
uses a ran9e of tasks that relate directly to rea|-life language
use. Because of this, study for the exam is not only useful
for taking the exam, it i5 also valuable preparation for using
English in authentic everyday situations.

The

book

which shoul appea| to should appealto the majority of


users ofthe book, regardless oftheir age or background,
Each lesson in a unit covers a separate sub-topic.

o Following the |ast lesson (Unit 7.2), a special section has


been added (Wheredowegofrom here7) which encoura9e5
you to look through all of the materia| once again and to
make a preparatin plan with specific steps and activities for
the period leading up to the exam.

What you can frnd in the lessons

Eurocity 2.0 will:


r introduce you to the 82 Euroexam so that you are fami|-1ar
With all the tasks types;

Wbrm-up activities

o give you practice in doing these tasks so that you can

fur sorrre tuning in, speaking practice and gettin9 into the
grore of t}re English lesson. No label is attached to these

lrriprove your ability to complete them successfully;

o offer you plenty of opportunities for skills development

and language revision, which will help to develop your


ability to communicate in English.

T}ge introduce the topic and offer opportunities mostly

xtivit-s

str< pl.ce

How you could use this book


This book is intended for students Wantin9 to take the 82
Euroexam. lt could be used:
o as a main coursebook, for a class of students preparing fior
the exam,
o as supplementary course material, to provide exam
practiceTor a class of students on a General English coursa

as a coursebook for a single student who wishes to pass

as a self-study exam practice book for a student working

the exam.
on their own without a teacher.

How the book is organised


o There are 7 units in the book, divided into 24 lessons, UniB
1 and 7 contain 2 lessons each, while each of the other 5

units has 4 lessons.

o Each of the 24 lessons contains one EXAM PRACT|CE task


which means that you get an opportunity to practise some
of the t 4 tasks of the bilingual 82 exam more than once,
o Each lesson provides a minimum of 90 minutes of
classroom woik, so the total length of the course will be at
least 36 hours. This time frame does not include the time

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Introduction
Exam wizard

language and usage, or notes on cultural issues,

ways
)
complete *'/r.-

o the Audio scripts for all the recorded material.

This shows how you can improve the


in which you approach and
the exam tasks, Apart from this primary -}i
aim, this type of activity also offers you
EXAMWlzARD
language practice, mainly to help you
remember the suggestions, ideas and methods more

o information and/or prompts for a variety of


communicative activities in the Materials for pairwork and
groupwork activities section.
o information and materials the teacher will photocopy for
the communication activities and for the Speaking test tasks
in the Photocopiables section.

thoroughly.

Exam practice task


A chance for you to try your hand at

ExAM

every single exam task. These tasks


PRAGTlcE
give you exposure to the exam rubric
(procedures and instructions), while
giving you an idea of the level of difficulty presented by the
82 exam.

Usefu!!anguage
Under this heading, you will find a list of expressions you
can use in the speaking activities they are related to. Once
you have used some or all the communicative phrases
during the activity, they remain there to be learnt and
practised for further use in real life or in exam tasks.

These hints and suggestions are there to help you improve


both your language and exam-taking skills, They also
provide cross references to other exam tasks in which
certain skills or language materials could be of use and
relevance.

move.

These boxes contain reminders about useful language


points worth bearing in mind.

Audio files
;7.

At the beginning of the book


o a contents page - organised in the order of units and
lessons of the book, specifying which exam task each lesson
focuses on.
o an Exam Factfi!e, which provides detailed information
about the 'l4 individual tasks of the 82 Euroexam.

Atthe end ofthe book


.

Eurocity 2.0, whether you are studying alone or in a class,


provides comprehensive preparation for the exam. But for
additional practice there is a free online exam preparation
course.

Use Facebook to practise your English while you are on the

Remember

n
that i

Online preparation

Facebook (www.facebook.com/euroexam) offers daily posts


covering interesting and fun topics giving you listening,
vocabulary and reading practice in text, audio and video
formats. Also through Facebook there is our app Nyelvi
Fitnesz Trning, extended with three tasks every week, with
hundreds of language practice tasks in text, audio and video.
Each activity will take about five minutes.

Tips

The headphone symbolwith a number in the middle


always refers to the recording in the audio files
you need to listen to.

o detailed information about the marking principles and


procedures for Unit 2.2 in the Marking schemes section, as
well as the evaluation criteria for the writing and speaking
tests.

answers to all questions, tasks and issues raised in the


lessons in the Answer key. This section will often provide
you with further explanations, suggestions or comments on

To the teacher
Eurocity 82 2.0 does not have a Teacher's Book, since it was
designed with both the learner and the teacher in mind.
This means that the instructions for each and every activity
or task are worded in order to indicate as clearly as possible
what procedures teachers could follow. At the same time,
the Answer key serves a special purpose, which is otherwise
partly assumed by most teacher's books. lt works as a
resource pool: apart from providing keys, clues and solutions
where necessaryr the Answer key also offers extra lists of
expressions, explanations, tips etc., which help teachers
extend the core material.
Before acquainting yourself with the book in detail, the
following points should provide you with basic information

and guidance to it.

As the material is designed to cover at least 36 hours


of classroom time, this coursebook naturally lends itself
to longer courses which may include first lessons, last
lessons, assessments, evaluation of written tasks, further
exam practice and feedback. The book's format is designed

to allow you to extend the basic course material with


additional material of your choice, allowing for individual
needs and the appropriate pace for the 9roup.

e With the exception of the five writing tasks, all EXAM


PRACT|CE tasks are integrated into the 90-minute lessons, in

order to simulate exam conditions and timin9.

the pairwork or 9roupwork stages of the activities, learners


are always required to return to the lesson to carry out some
kind of recap or feedback-giving task, which will help round
off the activity.

r The Photocopiables section

at the end of the book


has been created primarily for you, the teacher (and for
those learners who are using the coursebook on their own
Without outside help),Thus when you see a photocopying
machine label (in Units 1.1, Z.1 2x],2.2 |2x),
2.4{2x],3.4,4.1 |2x),5.4 and 6.3), you will
need to make the relevant photocopies of the
materials in the required quantity. For each
piece of photocopiable material you will find
more detailed instructions. ln most cases, the

materials will also need cutting up before the lesson.

r One

of the most important pieces of information for


both teachers and learners is the evaluation criteria
for the Writing and Speaking tests.These sets of criteria
appear several times and in several places in the book,
always reminding teachers and learners of what the
developers of Euroexams consider effective written and
spoken communication. Accordingly, their role is not solely
evaluative; they also function as checklists, or in other words,
as reminders: if you want to interact successfully, consider
these points,To make preparing and evaluatin9 writin9
tasks easier, a set of simplified evaluation criteria has been
created for you and for the learners. These keep the original
points of evaluation, but present them as simple, awarenessraising questions (e.g. in Units 3.2 and 6.4).

o The five EXAM PRACTICE writing tasks, as well as


some other writing tasks, are to be done as HoMEWoRK

assignments. This means they will be handed in to you,


the teacher, for marking and feedback. During the lessons,
the students go through preliminary skills development
practice, before they write the texts at home.

We hope you find Eurocity 82 2.0 easy to use, as well as rich


as an exam-preparation and teaching resource. lf you wish
to give us feedback about your experience of working with
the book, let us know what you think by writing to

o When you or the learners read the instruction'Check


your answers/ideas.,,i this mean5 that the specific answers
or recommended solutions are given in the Answer key
section for the same unit and activity reference number
(e.9. Unit 3 > Lesson 2 > 4. [Name of Activity] or 4/bJ. ln
the lessons, no page number reference is given for these
answers. lt iS su9gested that you familiarise yourself with
the Answer key section in order to get more ideas for other

info@euroexam.org.

activities where there is no reference to checking answers.


o There are a lot of opportunities to set up pairwork and

groupwork activities of many kinds. Most of these are based


on the material you and your learners will find within the
lesson, To create real information-gap situations for speaking
practice and, particularly, for EXAM PRACT|CE speaking
tasks, the language input and procedures are given in the
MateriaIs for pairwork and groupwork activities section
in theAppendixforfive lessons (2.1,3.4,5,2,5.4 and 6.2).
ln each case, this involves the learners (who are working
in pairs or groups of three)turnin9 to different pages in

the section and using the different language prompts but


similar or identical instructions for their role. At the end of

lntroducton
If

you are using this book on your own

This course is mainly designed for students working in


classes alongside other learners, so many of the activities
involve instructions such as "Work in small groups" or " Discuss
with your partner...". However, you can also successfully use
this book when working on your own. Here are a few ideas.
g. You can do many of the exercises just as they are. This is
also true for the activities requiring you to speak (e.g. in Unit
1.1 you can complete every single activity on your own).

* Do not take "shortcuts" by immediately checking the


answers for everything as soon as you finish a task, Take time
after you have completed an activity to look at your answers

and think about them one more time.

useful, perhaps you will too. Find out more or register for the
course at: www.http://euroexa m.orglelearning

Good !uck!
The editors, the authors and the publication and exam

development teams hope you enjoy doing the course and


we wish you every success in the exam when you do it.

Michael Hughes, Pter Rdai and Peter Bowing

When an instruction says "Compare your answers with


partner" you are not in a position to do this. lnstead, try
to see your answers as another person might see them.
Sometimes "seeing with new eyes" can give you new ideas,
help you spot mistakes, draw your attention to new areas,
a*

etc.

With listening tasks, do not take the "shortcut" to


the Audio script section. When you have done the
activity, play the recording a few more times to try
and check your answers by listening rather than by
just reading the Answer key,

r Completing this coursebook on your own - even without a


teachert help - will increase your chances of passing the 82
Euroexam. lf you feel you have more time and energy, don't
forget our free online exam preparation course. More than
70.000 learners have already completed it and have found it

,a

n
l 1. l
{ l

* You can use the materials in the Photocopiables section


on your own too. Make sure you follow the instructions for
copying, cutting up, shuffling, etc,

e For the Picture story speaking task (see Unit 2.4 and 4.1),
or for any other activity where you are encouraged to speak
on your own, practise speaking aloud. even if there isn't
anyone around to listen. Be creative and use your mobile
phone to record your voice, You can then listen to the
recording, change a few things and then make another, a
better recording. lf you are less sure of your own evaluation,
show the recording to a teacher or a friend, whose English is
better than yours, to receive some useful feedback.
* One huge advantage of working on your own is that for
the Speaking test tasks (e.9, in Units 2.1 and 2.4) you can
practise each task two or three times on your own.

e Clearly, there are some things you cannot do as a person


working on your own (e.9. when a speaking activity needs
two people). However, you can often be creative! For
example, practise speaking with someone else even if
they don't speak English!They can speak in Hungarian and
you can reply in English (and then repeat what you said in
Hungarian). lt is not quite the same as doing the real exam
task - but it is certainly better than nothing and will force
you to use your English,

l
Exam Factfile
The Euro and Europro exams test communicative competence by measurin9 success in real communication. Exam tasks are
directly based on the Common European Frameworkof Reference document of the Council of EuroPe. Passing the Euro or the
Europro Exam indicates that the candidate can undertake a variety of rea1-1ife tasks in English at the given level.
Both at Euro 82 and EuroPro 82 there are five types of examination the candidate may attempt (see also table below).
o Monolingual written (written examination without the Mediation test

BilingualWritten (Written examination with the Mediation test -

o Oral (Oral examination only

tests in all)

tests in all)

2 tests in all)

o Monolingual Comptex (Written and oral examinations without the Mediation test

o Bilingualcomplex (written and oral examinations with the Mediation test

4 tests in all)

5 tests in all)

To pass any of these examinations, the candidate must have an average mark of 600lo over all the tests attemPted and score
at least 40o/oin every test.

the candidate fails a complex examination, but has satisfied the conditions for passin9 either the Written or the oral
examination, they are awarded a separate written or a separate oral examination certificate.
lf

Written
exam
Oral
exam

Test

Number of tasks

Time

Mediation

ca. 35'

Reading

35,

Writing

60,

Listening

ca. 35'

'l0 + 20'

Speaking

Total time

Approx.3 hrs

breaks

Components of the 82 Exam

Throughout the book we use the term test whenever we refer to one of the 5 main parts of the exam. Thus Mediation test
refers to the set of 2 tasks, while by Speaking test We mean the 4 tasks in the second part of the oral exam.

Using a dictionary

Candidates can use a printed dictionary - or dictionaries - of their choice in all the fiVe tests of the 82 Euroexam. Usin9 a
dictionary in the exam requires practice and skill.That is why, Eurocity 82 2.0 offers tips, suggestions and Practice activities
to help candidates improve their dictionary skills (Unit 3.3/Activity 3 and 5 and Unit 6.3/Activity 7).
Here are the details of dictionary use for each test:

Mediation: Part 1 Candidates may use a dictionary throughout this test.

Mediation: part 2: Candidates may use a dictionary in the final two minutes of the test after the recording has finished.

o Reading: Candidates may use a dictionary throughout this test,

r Writing:Candidates may

use a dictionary throughout this test.

Listening: Candidates may use a dictionary in the final five minutes of the test after the recordin9s have finished,

Speaking: Candidates can use a dictionary whi|e preparin9 forTask 2 (Picture Story).

lntroduction

written exam

Mediation

(Time: ca.35 minutes)

Part t. Translation from Hungarian to EngIish


The candidate receives a formal or semi-formal letter of 8090 words written in Hungarian and translates the letter into
English.The candidate may use a printed (i.e. non-electronic)

Task 2 - Discursive Writing


There are three text types with three different topics from
which the candidate chooses one. The candidate must write
a text (ca, 150 words) within the genre specified. The type of
text could be an article, a review a letter to the editor or a
discursive essay.

dictionary.
Part 2. Dialogue
The candidate hears a dialogue of 10 turns (including

two examples) between two participants, a Hungarian


(speaking in Hungarian) and an English speaker (speakin9 in
English).The candidate writes down the main points of the
conversation in the opposite language to the one they hear.
Two examples are given, so eight turns are evaulated.

Reading
Task

(Time:35 minutes)

- Paragraph Headings

There are six paragraphs for which the candidate must


find the most appropriate heading from a choice of eight
paragraph headings.Two headings are not needed. An
example is provided.

Task2-ScanReading
The candidate reads four texts on a single topic and seven

statements containing information from the texts. The


candidate's task is to decide which text each statement
relates to. An example is provided.
Task 3 - Multiple-Choice Reading
The candidate answers seven multiple-choice
comprehension questions based on a single text of 350-450
words, normally an article, letter or narrative,

Writing
Task

(Time:60 minutes)

- TransactionalWriting

The candidate reads several pieces of written or


diagrammatic text extracts (leaflets, notes, letters, maps,
timetables) providing a context and information for the
task, The candidate is required to write a 100-1 2O-word
transactional formal or semi-formal letter or email using the

information provided.

OraI exam
Listening

(Time: ca.35 minutes)

Task 1 - Short Conversations


The candidate listens twice to six short recordings made
in the same location, and matches them with six pictures,
diagrams or short pieces of text from a selection of 8 (e.9. a
list, email extracts, advertisements).

Task2-MakingNotes
The candidate listens twice to an extended monologue.
There are notes based on the text which contain nine gaps,
which the candidate must complete in no more than three
words per gap.

Task3-RadioProgramme
The candidate listens twice to an excerpt from a radio
programme and answers ten multiple-choice questions
while listening.The programme may be a news broadcast,
documentary or a formal discussion.

Speaking

(Time: 1)-minute preparation + 20 minutes /


per pair of candidates for 4 speaking tasks)

Candidates are examined in pairs by an interlocutor (in this


book we use a synonym: examiner) and an assessor. Each
candidate has ten minutes before the test to prepare Task
2. During this preparation period the candidate may use
printed (i.e, non-electronic) dictionaries.
Task 1 - lnterview
The interlocutor/examiner asks the candidate one
introductory question and then two questions on another
topic. Possible topics include travel, work, family, sport,
cinema, hobbies, education, relationships, housing, eatin9
habits, the lnternet, the environment and current issues of

lntroduction
general interest.

O ra

l exa m/Speaki

g (co nti n ued)

Task2-PictureStory
The candidate receives a picture story with an opening line;
the task is to tell the story. Before meeting the examiners (i.e.
the interlocutor and the assessor), the candidate has had ten

minutes to prepare the story.The candidate may make notes


in the preparation stage, but should not read aloud from a
prepared script.
Task 3 - Transactional Dialogues
The candidate receives a role card. The card describes
a situation and gives instructions. The instruction for
each card also indicates the roles that the candidate and
interlocutor/examiner are expected to assume in each
short conversation. The candidate speaks, the interlocutor/
examiner gives a scripted reply and then the candidate
responds to the reply. Each candidate will have three role
cards. candidates take it in turns to do this task.
Task 4 - Discussion
The two candidates as a pair receive a topic card which
contains a discursive point or question (e.g.'What are some
of the problems of living in a foreign country?'), First they
think of and brainstorm issues which answer the question
or contribute to the debate. Then the candidates discuss,
expand on and prioritise these issues. Task 4 is the only task
in the speaking test in which the candidates talk to each
other.

Unit

1:

Exam Setting
Lesson

What's in the Exam?

Lesson 2
What's in the Learner?

llnit l: Exam Settng

Lesson 1:What's in the Exam?

Lesson 1:What's in the Exam?


EXAM TASK
Listening Task
Making Notes
(also in Unit 5.2)

2:

SKltLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUS:

l
l

l
l
l
l

Reading: scannin9 for specific information


Speaking: talking about
and discussing experiences
Listening: identifying details
Speaking: describing and
evaluating personal characteristics
Vocabulary: collocations and
phrases related to exams
Exam skills: identifying information
in a text you hear

What's n the book?

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A Competton

fast as
Work in groups of 3 or 4. Find the following information on the pages given in brackets as
call
team
to
first
claps,The
you can. Dnot'lookfor the next piece of information untilyour teacher
out the right answer gets a point. Your teacher will keep the score,

&,

1. What

is

"the sweetest thing" in Unit 5.2? (p. 100)

2.

A European capital city famous for its canals. (p. 41)

3.

How many of the extreme sports activities in the pictures are related to water? 1p.73)

4.

Which element of our speeach is the focus of the model interview? (p.127)

5.

Where can you go in Paris to learn about a great French singer? (p, 56)

6.

Find two popular tourist sights in a European capital city? (p, aa)

7.

What's the simple name of a simple food blog? 1p. 96)

8.

Which bad habit is the focus of the reading task in Unit 4.2? (p. 81)

9.

There's a photograph of a wooden animal in Unit 2.3, (p. 35)

10.

The two most popular websites about movies. (p. 61)

,l.

Which effective method of reducing exam stress appears at the end of Unit 7.1? (P.

l47)

fu" Look through the book on your own. Find two interesting things on different pages. Write them
is.
down as questions or statements tike in 1/a. Note down the page number where the information
page number. The
Work in the same groups. Cal! out one of your statements or questions and the
point,The
student
a
wins
page.Thefastest
student
given
on
the
others try to find thenformation
group,
your
in
winner
is
the
rounds
two
with the highest score in the

Le,sson

l: What's in the Exam?

Unit

Speakng, reading and thnking about language exams


Think of something good or bad that happened to you in an exam (e.g. your pen ran out of ink).
Work in groups of 3 or 4.Tell each other your "exam stories",
Tell your teocher and the whole class how many of your group's stories were positive and how
-nany were negative. As a class, discuss the reasons for the overall numbers of positive and negative
experiences.

Read these statement; about language exams on your own. Choose the three that you most
lgree with, and the one that you most strongly disagree with.
* Exams really help you to improve your English.

e Exams test what you can't do, not what you can dol
+

Language exams are about communication skills, so they are easier than subject exams,

e Exams are just grammar, grammar, grammar!


* l don't hate exams, but they can be stressful,
=

Exams are quite fun. l like the challenge.

a l can usually do the questions, but the time limits are difficult.
e l can communicate well

but exams seem to only test if l can be accurate.

lt's good to have a target and to feel that l can reach a hi9h level,

,:.

So many exam questions are boring!

The more you study for an exam, the less sure you are what answer they expect from you.
l'm an exam junkie

do as many as l can!

e l find it diffrcult to concentrate for several hours.


=

Exams are a necessary evil!


Exams help me to focus on useful things to study and practise.

ln groups of 3 or 4, discuss your opinions briefly and see if there is any point everyone in your
,roup agrees about. Then collect opnions held by everybody in the class.

1:

Exam Setting

Lesson 1: What's n the Exam?

l,/
,*
EXAMWlzARD

?)
{,

Focusng on key inormation


you will hear some rules and pieces of advice for the Making Notes task of the Listenin9 test, a
task which candidates often find difficult. This recorded text describes how the task works and
what you have to do to complete it successfully.
to the recording about the Making Notes task, and fill in each gap in the following
sentences with one word. Write the missing word on the line in each sentence.

?_j:,,,

Listen

1.

Before you hear the recording, you look at a list of

2.

This list contains

3. You can

9aps.
.words in each gap.

write up to

Only

is marked; your spelling, punctuation and grammar are not

marked.

5.

you have one minute to read the notes

6.

The words and sentences in the recording are not the


written in the notes.

7.

You hear the recording

the recording begins.


as what is

Checkyour answers. Discuss whether the task was easy or difficult. Why?

Listening Task 2: Making Notes


You will hear a short talk about the 82 Euroexam.

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{,

ffi Look at the notes.The notes contain nine 9aps.

# you have one minute to read the notes.


ffi Now listen to the speaker and write a maximum of 3 words on each numbered gap in the
Answer box.
ffi Do not write more than 3 words in one gap.

# You will hear the recording twice.

Lesson l: What's in the Exam?

The Euroexams

.
.

level.
_1_
differ in some ways from _2_exams.

The Euroexams check that you are at the


The Euroexams

what the Euroexams test

.
.

_3_
message needs to be

We are not only testing your


The overall

in English.

4_,

Extra practice and preparation

.
.
.

ln the preparation course a teacher provides

_5_.

There is a full 82 Euroexam available free on the Euroexam


The Euro 82 PracticeTest Bookcontains

_7_full

_6_.
exams.

Online practice and preparation


. New materials in the Facebook application are added every _8_.
. You will soon be able to practise for the exam on your own _9_.

Answer box:
1.

7,

2,

3ffi*
B,
ts
ffi

4.

8.
9.

5.

Compare and discuss your solutions with a partner.


Listen to the tape again and ask your teacher to stop the tape when you hear the clues for the
gaps.

ot,

Discuss, as a class, what was easy or difficult for you.

lesson

1: What's

in the Exam?

the 82 Euroexam
Readng about and discussing
Workingroupsof3or4.Youwillgetl4small.piecesofpaper,eachcontainingsomespecific
82 exam,

information about one of the

14

exam tasks of the

in
Lookatthepiecesanddecideinyourgroupwhichoneofthe5examtestseachtaskdescription
tasks for each test is given
in ,n" r|ii"iin, nrru", of
torx
_"ririo,
non,
Make
belongs to.

brackets).

Mediation
(2 tasks)

Reading
(3 tasks)

Writing
you can find even
more detailed

information about

each exam task in the

Exam Fa<tfile section


on p. B, as well as at
WWw.euoexam.or9,

(2 tasks)

Listenin9
(3 tasks)

Speaking
(4 tasks)

Checkyoursuggestedgroupingoftasks,withtheclass.lfyouneedanyfurtherinformationor

ask your teacher,


details about the exam tasks,

sa
DlscU ssloN

You and the exam

sel,assessment

.:.Thinkaboutthelevelofyourlanguageknowledgeandskills,.and,put.the5Euroexamtests
you feel strongest

sproi'nl;,;;i;,, Put the te,st which you think you are


(Mediation, Reading, wriri,|i, t ,i"rng^na
if
,ov p|,,i o ,"u, next to each other
and mostconfident about the top. tvo, those tests),
by
level in the skills required

it

l,iZrii" rore
0J
o)

l.

l.

0.)

35.
=

b.

practise
what you need to focus on and
pairs or small groups. Decide
compare your answers in

most.

c.Collectthewholeclass,sstrengthsandweakn.essesonaposrcrands,tickitupontheWall,Donot
the course to see your development,
forget

tr

to

check them

dr;;;;,i;;;;;; tie ina of l

IJ

Lesson I: What's in the Exam?

Exam collocatons and useful words related to exams


ln Eurocity 82 2.0 the word 'exam' is often found next to other words (e.9. '. .. passed the exam', or
'exam preparation room'), ln such expressions'exam'collocates with'pass'and 'preparation'.

a.

Fill in the sentences below with one of the following words to form bxam' collocations or phrases
related to exams.

mock

revise

practice

Stress

fail

retake

mark

fee

oral

candidate

e You will

(e. ?a$

the exam; l can tell from the excellent results of your practice tests.

rlfyoupayfortheexam(].)-thisweek,youwillgeta5o/odiscount.ButonlyuntilFriday.
e The best preparation for the real thing was trying myself out in a
a9o.

(2.)_

exam two weeks

clneedto(3.)-theeverydayexpressionsindialoguesforthe(4.)-exam.
cEverybodyneedsalotofexam(5.)-regularly.
eExamsareimportant,butexam(6.)-mayaffectyourconcentrationnegatiVely.

rYouwillneVermeetthepeoplewho(7')-theexampapers.

(8.)_
o Every (10.)_
* lf l

the exam, when could l

(9,)_

|t?

must arrive at least 30 minutes before the starting time.

Checkyour answers with a partner.


Stay in pairs. Putyour'exam'collocation phrases in time order into the box below,Think of a
sossible logical order (you may put more than one item next to each other; see examples). When you
lave finished the task, compare your order as a class, giving reasons for your choice.

1.e.g, un*n
?ffi"ctl,c,

uanck exam.

2,
3.
4.
5. e.9.

f,a*s

t/u/an exa*t

Unit

1:

Exam Setting

Lesson 2: What's in the Learner?

Lesson 2: What's in the learner?


EXAM TASK
Reading Task
Paragraph
Headings
(also in Unit 4.2)

1:

SK|LLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUSI

l
l

Reading: scan reading or key information


5peaking: describing and discussing
personal experiences

l
l
l

Reading: ir-lentifying contexts


Reading: identifying key words flom context
Exam skills: identifying overall meaning
through key words

How do I like learning English?


,ri,.

Stand together at the front of the classroom.

i\3, Your teacher will read out four pairs of choices for language learning activities. ln each case,
depending on your preference, go to the left or right side of the room. Discuss with the others around
you the reasons for your choice. (Form smaller groups for the discussion if there are a lot of you on
one side.) After the quick discussion, come back to the front again for the next round. Repeat this

step 4 times.

Left

Right

Speaking in English

Writing in English

2,

Reading texts in English

Listening to English speech

3.

Doing grammar exercises

Acting out dialogues

4.

Memorising word lists

Guessing the meaning of words in texts

f-,, After the last round, stand in one bigger circle and discuss as
of the activity was (see Answer Key).

f//
,*

EXAMWlzARD

,:]

class what you think the purpose

Key words in a text


:: , Read the 3 short
texts about some useful activities you can do to help you learn English, ln each
of the following paragraphs find three or four keywords which tell you what the paragraph is about.

Lesson 2:What's in the Learner?

Paragraph

1:

Exan

- Heading:

"ou probably already know your way around your phone pretty well, so why not change the settings so it's in English?
Seeing English pop up every time you look at your device - which, let's face it, i5 pretty often for most people - can help
<eep it in your memory, and the regular exposure will keep you thinkin9 about it throughout the day.

Paragraph 2 - Heading:
not write your shopping list or your to-do list in English. This is another great technique to incorporate into the
"/hy
anguage learning process. Practising writing things gets you used to the spelling and formation of words and, if you
:cn't know the word for something you need, you can look it up and add a new word to your ever-expanding vocabularyl
Paragraph 3 - Heading:

-ris

is one of my favourite daily techniques because you can easily see the progress you have made after a couple of
eeks if you keep all your daily writing routine in the same place. You only need to write a couple of sentences about
.at you got up to, things you saw and things you read or heard and it will keep the creative juices flowing in English. lf
".
. ;u do it quickly before bed you can review it the next morning to keep the language fresh in your mind for the rest of
^e day.
,,

)iscuss your chosen words and phrases with a partner, and then, in pairs, give each paragraph a
,:
heading which will contain some of the chosen keywords.

::dre and discuss the headings in class.


_]iscuss as a class what
.

you think of these language learning techniques, Collect other ones you
learning and exam preparation.

1 use effectively for your own

Useful tips or the Paragraph Headings task


some practical ideas for Task 1 of the Reading test. Put the pieces of advice in the order
you would need them, when doing the task in an exam situation (which would be the first,
. .:cond. . . the sixth). Write these numbers into the box on the left next to each tip.

- 2re ore
, ich

f-/

rl

EXAMWlzARD

you are not sure, make a mark on the question paper about your best guess, but do not fill in the answer sheet.
Move on and come back to it later,
lf

Follow the same procedure, read through all the paragraphs, first very quickly, then more slowly and thoroughly.
Take a quick look at the headings and try to work out what the text is about and what text type it could be.
Read through the first paragraph quickly and decide what its topic is. Confirm what you think by readin9 it through
once again more slowly. Don't worry about unknown words or unfamiliar grammatical structures.

NoW read through all the headings. Select the right heading for each paragraph.Think about your reasons, as well as
your reasons for dismissing the other headings.
Look at the title and illustration.Try to guess what the text as a whole is about before readin9 it.
Speed read the whole text to get an idea of what it is about.

Check and discuss your answers as a class,

:
-

ciiona ry to look up a word, if you thin k that the word is blocking your understanding of the topic of the paragraph - or if you
Cerstand one of the headings.

1:

Lesson 2:What's in the Learner?

Exam Setting
Reading Task

1:

Paragraph Headings
'

glvln 9 advice on learning English,


You will read an article about a person
headin9,
# Match each paragraph to the correct
ffiWritethenumberofthematchingparagraphnexttotheheadinginthetablebelow.
ffi One has been done for you,

that you DO NOT NEED,


ffi There are two extra paragraph headings

Paragraph headin9s
A. Serious study
B. Associating picture with

C.

Learning Engtish is

sounds

e.g.

about being surrounded by it

D. Using other people's conversations


E. Having a laugh watching and listening
F. Exploiting social networks

your speech
G. Something to do on your own to help
H. Lookin9 while abroad
l. Lots of choice of things to hear

-.]
(Example)

y:,:;:::r2,rT ,?I::;:x::i::;Z:'r::,1ilil#I;;;;:!;;;;i;ii!;::;,;
to make learning
so l puttogether ten steps thotyou can flow
immersed.

itiou sme

quick and easy ways to ,tart getting

Engtish faster and a whole lot morefun,

il

d podcasts ,l_]1"j;]|jf:;",:::,"""'J.::fi,"1,:,".:::':l?o'"
podcast from a radio channel
Way to find one is to look for a
g"Ja
n
politicS;;;*r,
imaginable these days: entertainment,
train your ear that way!
You'll
driving.
to it in youi..' while
yulnd-listen
int"r"rt,
that
one
for
Look
to.
you usually listen

2.

..

minutes. Most of them are


witl
aren,t familiar with,
you aren't

for at least a few


tr,"rotU'd:::_:::T*T:: watch
.^mp
rrur.ls
to pick up some words and sentences
;iTiJllifl fii;::l[T,.li i:;ff::lil.iii;;"mments
in youTube comments,

Something else l did

**

to

,hEk

out

stuff
but be careful there are all kinds of bizarre

3.ealoneathome,orofcourseintheshower,start

[ffini'.;1j:ij:i:'':T,iJljiJ.1i!;".theroranyother."pii.b"thisfrequentlyand
improve - guaranteed!
;;;;ron";li.tioi

4'

will diastically

in the park, Okay, now don't be a


*ho were speakin9 English cn the bus or
you
When travelling, t ur"d6iit
of the conversation, How much do
gut, see what words you .un pict up ino ttun to the flow
uP
look
to
want
creepy eavesdropperl
might
talk;; uuu,i Did you t,,"uiun interestin9 word You
understand? What general topic were they
after?

nffipl"

Unit

Lesson 2:What's in the Learner?

1:

Exam Settng
--_-l

5.

ln England, while walking along the street, l had another option. l stared at billboards, signs, advertisements, magazine
stands and establishment names. Look and think about what these ads mean. How many words do you recognize? Did
you see that same word elsewhere? Make up sentences about what you're seeing.
A

Then of course l used Facebook and Twitter. l started conversations on Facebook with friends who post in English. When
you have English speakers in your timeline or in your feed, you see their posts daily and get inside information about
news and viral videos in English. Your friends can be your teachers! They basically sort out the best material for you to
study. But whatever you do have fun doing it.
Check and discuss your answers. Also discuss the sentences, phrases and words in each

paragraph which helped you select the correct heading.


Discuss in small groups which tips, pieces of advice you have found most useful and why.

Now read the tips about the Paragraph Headings task in 3a and discuss as a class which ones
you have made use of and which ones you have not.

How do you like learnng English?


There are several ways of studying a foreign language, such as English. Try this quiz to find out
more about how you learn.

&, Think about your own language studies so far. Rate the following learning activities from t to 5
according to the scale below.
lt's not at all helpful,
lt's very important,
lt's usefulsometimes.
,l

1-5 Learnin9 activity

A.
B.
C.

Doing gramma exercises at home using books or online resources


Reading texts and answering comprehension questions
Doing speaking activities in pairs or small groups (e.9. role plays, discussions)

D. Learning lists of vocabulary items from my notebook

E. Witing essays and studying the teacher's corrections

F.

of and comments on my writing

Listening to or reading music lyrics

G. Watching TV

or YouTube videos in English

H. Reading and Writing posts in blogs

l.

Rewriting grammar and vocabulary notes into a special notebook

J.

Having the teacher correct all my mistakes when l speak

K.

Listening to teacher explanations in Hungarian

L,

Looking up vocabulary in monolingual dictionaries

M. Listening to teacher explanations in English

N. Reading online and/or printed magazines or books for fun/interest


O. Sharing comments or chatting in English on social networking sites

(e,9. Facebook)

Now work in groups of 3 or 4 and look at other people's preferences. Can you find anyone in your
group who is similar to you?

the Learner?
Lesson 2:What's in

lJnit 1: Exam Settng

g styles
Characteristics of learnin
: ..

.workinthesamegroups

'ir,rir
need.

,i'iu i,

choosef,::|?^,::+;2i:Ii;Z|::::ff,i;:I#l::-:::,T;:;::,

tn"able below

logical

linguistic /
verbal

auditory

diagrams, and picturing


physically,
^h.,cirallv

%
You prefer using imagel
i"

independent

aural /

intuitive /
instinctive

mathematical /

solitary /

visual /
spatial

physical /
experiential

social /
interpersonal

;:l'ffi;;;;i,1"

(see exampte),

l _aL^_
"r,.' other

more effectively through


You process information
sounds and music,

and
words, both in speech
You learn better by using
Writin9.
Vou

plt",

and sense of
using your body, hands

touch.

logic, reasonin9 and


You learn best by applyin9
systems.

e.g. sacinl

people,
groups or with other
You prefer to learn in

/ i,ntuy+rwruL

when
you process information more effectively
;;'i';;;"e and using self-study,
your answers with the
i,T, Checkand discuss

rest of the

{,onvourown,lookatboththislistagain1nd

class,

helearningactivitiesyo,umarkedwitha4ora5

,:,I,:::,::i:"I!l,,,"nli,i,|"'j:,,,,:"#i::;l,,::::,2ri;ilji::,i:,,m:lr:;:,*an.ationstothe

p e.h a" .,,_,


: :,:T"[;
" (e,9,y(
of some of them
peo

,,intelligencey,t".g. nutJLi,ri.i.

;l,! :"" iilii:.',


:il il :T :"Tfi1.:ibut fili
less relevant in language
are
theY
1

"'.

int.rr"i:", "r..i
"r.',.ur

learning.
o

the others,
learnin9 is better than
No way or style of

to chnge
Peoplemayfindthatthewaytheylearnataparticularstageinlifemavnotbesousefultothem
n..o,ain'v|'; ;;ed

their approach,

situations.
later on in other learntng

Unt 2: Globetrottng
Lesson 1
Surviving as a Tourist

eb"*

fr

i4=a

*',
"
.:jH

Lesson 2
Bridging the Communication Gap

Lesson 3
souvenirs

Lesson 4
Travel stories

llnit 2: Globetrotting

Lesson
EXAM TASK
Speaking Task
Transactional
Dialogues

a
O

Surviving as a Tourist

rt

.f;

SKILLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUSI

3:

l
l
l

Speaking: telling a stoy


Reading: identifying overall meaning

Speaking:identifying and using


functionil language in situations
Speaking: initiatin9 and maintaining
fu nctional conversations
Exam skills: working with functional

Grammar: word order in polite

indirect questions

l
l

language in role plays

Tourst challenges
&" ln

questions,
groups of 2 or 3, discuss the following

lWhat,stheWorstthingthathaseverhappenedtoyou(ortosomeoneyouknow)asatourist?
Who else was involved?
When and where did it happen?
resolved?
Did anyone help? How was the situation

l
l

b.

ffi

story with the


shor" yorr group's most interesting

Qu"rtons and answers


ffi,

Lookat these ten

portner,

__

*ork

Wr", to questions

out wh,ici cities

asked

rest

of the class,

With a
by tourists.in various European countries,

or countries are being talked about,


o

.^rlllzinn

The

CharlesBridge over the

' ffit:i:ffii;;.H,,Jii[i'jff, *Jili[,,,""j:l,,"^Ti,?j;"


:l;i"JJilT:i:T::,lTi,,
;ho*l,ngapriestbeingthrown
;i;;;i.;iln",";q;"llLv ""'{Iir,'
::i;:":"#3:ili:i*x"#
L'Ul
suPPosed to
The Anne Frank House

(Anne

;;;;k,ui,lJ,u."ll',l""n*;:
you have an interest ln

nlsTory,

l(

off the bridge' lt's

T],i:"?;,""'J;::Xi:";,")
& "#iji:iil*::1'"#:,
Athenian
every
seems
when it

is

selling,
Nothinq is faster than the
-t* ;;;i;'"i; ira,throw rrpres'
ffi*
T]ra l.roqt nntion is to take the
directto paddington Station.lt ffie
*FB l:;.n't.|$;:;'tJ|una",9rouna),
everv hour.
4 times
ur
runs
::'""::'^:::i::#;'il;;i";"and don,t miss the Art Nouveau' '"' '=f,;h)L,l
there either buying or

r>

station,
LllYnaL,
*
T'

style Stadtpark

oepenas oW#ft you *un,.

rhougll
i" u", i.

Ecseriis not like it used


amazed me: row

of wooden tables
after row"irr
overflowing with old dishes,
toys, linens, old watches,
paintings and bric-a-brac,

Lesson

_
L

1:

Unit 2:

Survivng as a Tourst

a
on
Station

_
&

A taxi to the centre costs


fortune, forget that. Jump
the train to Termini

instead,

lalh

Try the mussels and chips in

any bar or restaurant, naturally

accompanied by any of the

r#:.1x?:jiil!';"',.Y o.r,

Adapted from blog posts at http://www.virtualtourist.com/

b" Checkyour

answers as

Mhl1,1^p

and from http!//www.nytimes.com/

a class,

, Match

the responses above to the questions below,There are two responses for each question.
Then check and discuss your answers,

*t"f;JJ:;"n'ni::x;Z::;:::WFlcfi *"ili:6;.ix:rt:i,"f.:'JJfr"'
'
think? "- ,D
)t
rye [:l"J::J::i];i:"xlyJ:i,o,fh, { L
*
v ffi^ Wrr;twouldyou sayisa'mustsee'?

ffi,3:Ji,"#:::.:j:i:-,j,i:K
specialsouvenirs?

>t

F ,

Askng polite questions


As a class, discuss the difference between these two questions:

:|': :,

o 'Where's the railway station?'and'Can you tell me where the railway station is?'
,:,* Here are some grammatically incorrect polite indirect questions asked by tourists. Find one
mistake in each sentence. Write the correct version on the right. One has been done as an example.
|

E.g. Can you tell me where#the nearest

bookshop?
'l

...arlttre

ti

.;,, Llll"

Can you tell me what does "romkocsma"


mean?

2.

Could you say me if there is a pizzeria


near here?

3,

Do you know that it is possible to use my


/ rn\

4.

Would it be possible to tell me how cfn


get&my youth hostel?

5.

Can you el6ft{ln me how lcan access my


email account? ry

6.

Excuse me, l wondering if l could send an

hL

-?,

l'.

{rw

email from this computer.


Check your answers with a partner.

l-u il,e +r.b

|nilulu7 isl
!i,,,i},u:,:,;,c,,

li:tu|

i,,:

1,rr l#,, ,,.v q{ ls^|,; t* 7ill1Ll,t


;*iL,t i*ii,

1.{,!u".

international student card?


l

t.c ruarest

,i'ut1rrn,

L,rw l@t4i

fP &lt lr".,

';*tl 1lrinUiL iJ
} Sacl

,L.uuI;ttt,,|ul.-lYvL l;,tti'tlL

Unit 2: Globetrotting

Lesson l: Surviving as a Tourist

&" on you, own, rewrite the questions on

the left as polite indirect questions. One has been done as

an example.

Polite question / request

Direct question
when does the next bus
leave for Cambridge?

I'd L&r to

what do the locals call

E.g. Can

this weird statue?

out.

!4{nlt, /; v'i

bu

''

for the Sagrada Famlia?

,g,

3"o

/1i)

',,

g",
,;.t
'u

;1.1

uvr-

Where should l get off for


the Basilica?

5.

How does this GPS work?

6.

ls

7.

Why do all the shops


close so early?

,,,r

8.

Which special pass should


l choose for a 3-day stay?

,^./

can7ou 9hnw
Exc,u,.sa

",'7

t,<! i"*

Jli.-.^,u, ",,,(,
,!l l"1 i" i
,1.
i(,t1,,,4
,!
Coil7owtr(lmt...Lt|, rt.

4.

there a hot-spot
nearby?

Lt * o'

tmk caUadr,l4ftird statua?


7au tr{,l u.s... rAttu

COuLleau^eorutr{,lrur..,i {u",l i,

ls this the right metro line

3,

f,a

%42.,.|1; l,;u,_l ,t'

rul, I war

1'

j,ulii,l,,,,

u,t'}c,J

tmly'*na7 ;; lr- ' l l i"

t,|n

;-i,""ft

iY,.

{r

Compareyour answers in groups of 3 or 4, Discuss any questions or queries as a class.

What s unctonallanguage?
language you use to achieve your aims
ln everyday life we often use functiona! language
in a particular situation; in other words, language to get things done, which is also known

f./
l*

EXAMWlzARD

as transactional language, There is a wide range of functions, e.9. you might need to make a
suggestion,9ive advice, apologise, etc. ln all these cases, it is how you express the function tha'

matters.
Match each sentence on the right with the function it expresses, Write the letter of the sentence
next to the function (one has been done for you as an example),
.:,::,,o

1.

appreciating help

2.

offering a drink

3.

explaining how to do something

4. suggesting something to do

5.

forgiving a mistake

^-

At

ltl

oK, don,t worry about the

.. That sounds

igYrau

like a logical suggestion, thanks.

The extra two hours were awfully kind of you, really,

Yes, that's the way you can insert the photo.

E.

Oh, you should have been much more careful with that
knife!

Lesson

1:

Surviving os a Tourist

6.

complaining about noise

F.

Oh, no, l think you'll find this CD was scratched already.

7.

requesting to pay

tr

Would you like a coke or some grape juice?

H.

lf l were you, lU

8. refusing a request to help

l-

g.ti

-r,

:r?, '

^co

m p la

,{ffi;:## romebody for somethin g


1

1.

12.

choose'Midnight Cowboy';

Could you please turn down the volume! lt's way past
midnightl
l1bk!LL&,biL,?

& r

ld like the bill, please, after the coffee,


l.,n !

recommending

K.

accepting advice

L.

t..

./

6fr-.fitffora bike ride along the Danube

l'm afraid l've got to dash off now. l can lend you a hand
later, if you like, though.

Checkyour answers os a class. Can you think of any other phrases for each function?

C.

Write a statement or question to express each of the following functions. Be as polite as you can.

l Rejecting an offer of cheap accommoflplioq:


Culnu* nl* W a^ft{,%rrr^*

/^jtrt(
W?o?,flfO/t,

Ta

1,1, ful,

Ja!/,v

e 0q uln

affi,Ynd#fr#

Asking for information about train departure times:

{h;r 4W'at*WhJ '.kitJh

Expressing surprise about the price:

lt

jw

Warning about safety risks:

Offering help to a lost

nJrilb(

ft l /,:

la*l,rrt

fr,rt

mlLe

Ul"01l,

tourist _,

tnw,l.

?
l

Giving advice on buying souvenirs: ,

aa,l

ffil/t)

,l wO ln,il' F h,r'r,,L
Qw
, ChJck, compare and correct your onswers in group{ of or S. Nte down any new pieces of
4

.:']

t?a

uJtlL-

language which you think will be useful for you.

this

afternoon?

b.

it's a classic.

Lesson

llnit 2: Globetrottng
Quck responses

1:

Surviving as aTourist

practisng unctonal language

your teacher will give you a set of situation cards, keep them face down, Take turns,
pick up a card, read and fottow thejnstrucition on it.your partner should respond appropriately,

d.

u./
,*

work

in

pairs.

Example:

l !!l!i

just bought,
Find out about the uses of the City Card you've

EXAMWlzARD

Student A:'Could you tell me what l can


use the City Card for?' or'Do you know
what kind of discounts l can get with the
City Card t've just bought?'

Student Bz'l'm sorry but ldon't really

know. Perhaps you should check it on the


lnternet.' or'l guess you can travel more
cheaply and get discounts on museum
tickets.'

Choose one dialogue and role play it to the class,

The Transactional Dalogues task

f/
t*

d.

EXAMWlZARD

three questions.

Work

in

B,Then answer these


pairs. Read the fotlowing transactiona! dialogue between A and

l Where do you think this conversation is takin9 place?


l Who is speaker A and who is B?
I What function is expressed in each of the 3 utterances?
Transactional dialogue:

l use the wi_fi connection?


A: l would like to send an urgent email to my boss. can
your own laptop or ours,
B: Of course.The daily rate is 5, and you can use

5 to my room?
A:That's great, l'll use my own laptop. Can you charge the
B: Certainly,

the Speaking test, Fill in the missing


The role card below is like the ones you receive in Task 3 of
words to get the full description of the situation in 6la,

b"

you are at the


an email to your boss.

desk of your hotel. You


out about the wi-fi

to send

Transactional Dialogues task: samp|e role card

script, and answer these three


check your answers for the gaps. Then read the examiner,s
questions.
ffi

who starts the conversation?

ffi How many times does the candidate have to speak?


the candidate says?
,ffi Can the examiner improvise a reply to what

Unit 2: Globetrotting

Lesson I: Surviving os a Taurist


Examiner's script (to be read out):

Examiner: '(Name), Read this card. When you are ready, please start a conversation with me. l am
the hotel receptionist.'

(Candidate speaks)
Examiner: 'Of course you can,

The daily rate is 5, and you can use your own

laptop or ours.'

(Candidate speaks)
E:raminer: Thankyou.*

tTlpi
a
a
a
a
a
a

ln each conversation the fourth and final utterance is a|ways


'Thank youJ by the examiner, even if it does not fit the diaIogue!

The examiner will expect you to sta]t the conversation using the prompt on the card.
Check the role card: think of who you are talking to and what function you need.
Do not say more than the prompt on your card requires.
Once you are ready with your first sentence or two based on the role card, put down the card so that you can
concentrate better on the examinert response.
Listen carefully to what the examiner says and reply in a natual, logical way.
lf you don't understand the examiner's reply, ask them to repeat it, but stay in character, if you can. The examiner
cannot rephrase the sentence but they are allowed to repeat it.

Speaking Task 3: Transactonal Dalogues


Now practise the dialogues in groups of three, taking turns to play the roles of "examiner",
:andidate" and observer. After each round of three short dialogues, the observer will give feedback
.: the candidate based on the checklist below.

Student A: "examiner" (turn to p. 188)


Student B: "candidate"
student c: observer
Student A: observer
Student B: "examiner" (turn to p. 192)
Student C: "candidate"
Student A:'tandidate"
Student B: observer
Student C: "examiner" (turn to p. 190)
observer's checklist for feedback
While listening to the dialogue as an observer, make notes about the candidatet
performance focusing on these questions. When they have finished talkin9, give your

feedback.

'l.
2,
3.
4.
5.

Did the candidate express what the task required?


Did the candidate get their meaning across clearly?
Was the functional language appropriate to the situation?
Was the language accurate?
Did the candidatet stress and intonation 5upport their intended meaning?

As a class, discuss what you found easy and/or diffrcult in this task as "candidates". Also, check
,/ou managed to follow the Tips above.

if

r,ffi
\

Gap
Lesson 2: Bridging the Communicatian

llnit 2: Globetrotting

Lesso n 2:Bridging
EXAM TASK

Mediation Part
Dialogue

the

Communication Gap
*+
fffl

SKILLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUI

2:

ffi

personal experiences
Speakin9: exchanging
from
Mediation: conveyin9 messages
versa
vice
and
English
iungarian into
Mediation: identifying differences
verstons
between statements and mediated

l
ll

ffiffi
ffir

liJ

key
Exam skills: writing down the
you
hear
message of what

see

your pont

Nlr rtelek!

texts
Nowadays,twodifferentterms(translationandmediation).areusedtodescribetheactivityof
with each other or to understand
i;,;;;;nicate
lan9uag",
oiait"rent
helpin9 ,puut"r,
languages,
or ipect", in each other's

e in the gaps,
andwrite translate or mediat
Read the two short definitions

i.1.,

lan9uages to establish
you enable the speakers of different
y'u
When
wnel you
each other,
vvl
communtcdLl(Jl l with
and maintain some form of
one
spoken or Written texts from
We restate or reformulate
2. When we
language into another language,
write M or T,
requires mediaton or translation,

1.

ffiunication

h.

Decide whether each

of these situations

a guidebook
A. Your English friend wants to buy

B. Your Hungarian-speaking boss


C. You summarise

audience,
is giving a talk to a Scottish

to your American friend,


a short article in Hungarian

to pick up
D. You help your Swedish roommate

E. You explain

in a bookshop in Budapest,

a parcel at the post office,

to your grandmother,
a budget airline! email reply

F'YouproducetheEnglishversionoftheonlinemenuoftherestaurantyouworkfor.
&"Checkyouranswersasaclass,Discusswhetheryouwouldfindanyoftheactivitieseasyor
diffrcult and why.

r:,'j,,Workinpairs'Discussoneormoreofthefoltowingquestionswithyourparffier:

workj
What was it for? Was it a lot of
had totranslate anything?
you
time
last
a
the
or
was
When
something in HungarY,
a foreigner accoplish
r,"rp"a
tirnl'vu
rurt
the
was
When
Was it easy?
Jorn"tr,ln9 in a foreign language?
Hungarian to
what theY write? WhY?
,uv_o'
"..o.pli,r,
n"t oth"r'p"op
i"rr.,"
easier-t"
it
find
you
Do
in mediat'ron situations?
How often do vou nn yourself
with in Hungary?

l
l

l
l
l
l

do foreigners need help


What kinds of thingr,li ri*u,,ons
or translate from Hungarian?
rngrish, do you ,r,int in English
in
*ii,"
or
speak
you
When
Why?

,i,:,Shareoneidea,storyorconclusionfromyourdiscussionwiththerestoftheclass.

llnt 2: Globetrotting
What tourists say (in Englsh or in Hungarian)
(e,g, 'Kivncsi
1 , Work in groups of 4 or 5. Stand in a line. Pass o message you get on a piece of paper
think we
'How
do
long
or
kerletben.'
a
ebben
You
kvz
,:1yok, miirt van olyan kevs internet
-a to queue for the picasso exhibition?') from your teacher along the line, mediating it from
i-glish to Hungarian and/or from Hungarian to Engtish, The last person in the line should Write it

:cwn, and it can then be compared to the original message.

,.

Rearrange your line and repeat the process with a different message you get from Your teacher.

From Hungarian nto English, from Englsh into Hungarian

make
Read the sentences in Hungarian or English in the right-hand column. With Your Partner,
sentences
original
that
the
Remember
language.
other
in
the
j Jesses about the original sentences
(Note that the results of the
-ay be longer and more detaited than the results of the mediation,
punctuation,
but this is allowed in the exam
and
grammar,
spelling
mistakes in
:ediation

f-/

:s long as the message is clear!)

EXAMWlzARD

contain

{*

Result o mediation

Original sentence(s)

Ma inkbb opert nznk,mint balettet.


can't gire E1ooddescrtpttbn it was a brandnew
camera-case.

:
,

n ret nem mkdtt


utna meq n.

mr jl, aztn leesett a lnc,

The english pages of the websrght of this natjona\


park doesn't contain any usefull informations.
Ez a kocsi kategria tl kicsi neknk, ngyen
vagyunk, sok csomaggal.

A roaming djak az USA-ba minden mobil

szolgltatnl majdnem azonosak,

Listen
, hat

to the recording of the original sentence(s) and try to write down the general meaning of

you hear. This is NoT A DtCTATloN activity. Grammar and spelling are not important,

,].

2.

3.
4.
5.

6.

again to check your answers. As a class, note the main differences between the original
sentences in the recording and the mediated results in 3la above,
Listen

nt,

Lesson 2: Bridging the Communication Gap

RoIe

playing dialogues wth medation

person in the middle is the mediator (Student B),


your teacher, and decide who will be the
choose one situation card from the pile of s you get from
(Student C),
English speaker (Student A) and the Hungarian speaker

, Work in

f-/
,*
EXAMWlzARD

l*

EXAMWlzARD

to each other.The

-kl"

into the mediator,s ear,The


student A begins the conversation by whispering a message
Student Cwhispers a
language.
other
in
the
C
mediator then mediates the message to Student
A, Continue the exchanges
student
to
mediates
in their own trigio,gi, *irh rh" ,"diator
response

until some kind

of answer or

coclusion is reached,

g*" choose further situation cards, making sure that everyone in each group gets the chance to be
the mediator at least once.

fi

f/

groups of 3. Sit close

As

situations.
class, discuss the chatlenges the mediator faces in these

Dos and DoN,Ts of the Mediation Dalogue task


&,

Work

in

pairs. Read each piece of advice and write either

Do or DoN,T before

it,

as you
try to write down the full translation in complete sentences,

don't have much time.

general
try to work out the meaning of unknown words from the
message,
speake's
the
of
rest
the
context, or from

2.

panic if you don't understand a word from the recording,

3.

the message,
listen to what the speakers are tryin9 to express; translate
not the words,

4.

by the
make sure you focus on the meaning and message conveyed
speaker; accuracy is not very important,

5.

worry about being

6.

00o/o

correct or accurate all the time,

carry
put down only or mostly the key content words and phrases that
the necessary message.

7.

translate word for word.

8.

b:}_

'l

point, matching each Do recommendation


Fird th, pairs of statements that focus on the same

with a D)N'Twarning,

&,
key

in pairs, Test each other to see if you can remember the 8 pieces
piece of advice,
word oi phrase, and the other one recalls the whole

Work

of advice, One of you says a

Lesson 2: Bridging the Communication Gap

Mediation Part 2: Dalogue


l ""dl.:"l |a12:

Dialogue (-'l5 minutes)

J
t,

Help your friend, who doesn't speak English. Mediate between the two people.

lf the person speaks in English, translate into Hungarian. lf the person speaks in
Hungarian, translate into English. The first two have been done for you.

l
l
l

Do not translate every word. Concentrate on the basic meaning.


Remember that the quality of your language is also important,

Each person will speak five times. You will hear each line twice. There will be a fifteensecond pause between each line for you to write down the translation.

E At the end of the conversation you will have two minutes to check what you have written.

E Remember, you will not


Ex

Write in

Hungarian

Ex

Write in

English

Hunlaria1

have time to translate every word,

Nful.ft/ nnpat Sutaq+stmthttbk - aalala)

Certal.il|. Wh* sort

eftflts fu /* haae

@lturat* 7rErawtkeruek.
i.lt

mlar

7/42

cturce l

Write in

Write in
English

Write in
Hungarian
Write in
English
Write in
Hungarian

Write in
English
Write in
Hungarian
Write in
English

]reck and discuss your answers

as a class. The

Marking scheme for this Mediation task

is

on p. 214.

fu.

l'nit 2:

sa
DlscUssloN

Gtobetrottng

GaP
Lesson 2: Bridging the Communication

MistransIatons
Workingroupsof3,LookatthepairsofEnglish/Hungarianphrases,Whatisthecauseofthe
mistranslation

(e. g.

if necessary,
vocabulary, gramma0? tJse a dictionary

1.

2.

There seems to be a leak in the lab,

3.

She went into labour early in the


mornin9 in the hospital,

4.

Jenna spends her 1 3th birthday party


locked in her closet, "

5.

A gondolsoktl Mestrben bcszott

feel like an ice cream.

Fagylaltnak rzem magam,


9y tnik, valami lk van a laborban,
a
Hajnalban ment be a munkahelyre
krhzba.

'l3. szlinapi bulijt


Jenna a

WC-be zrva

tlti,...
lt was at Mestre he stopped thinkin9"

"

el;...
Ad

b. A, o

pt

d f r o m : http:/ / l e iterj a ka b,bI

g,h u

or popular
Do you know of any other famous
class, share and discussyour interpretations.

mistranslations?

Unit 2: Globetrottng

Lesson 3: Souvenirs

Lesson

3:

Souvenirs

SKILLS AND LANGUAGE FOCU:

l
l
l

Speaking: expressing probabilty

r---------:
4

ffi

rcffi

f-FT
**-

ExAM
PRAGTlcE

_pd

Listening Task 1:
short conversations

l
l
l

H
t
Where n the world?
groups of 4 or 5. Taking turns, look at the following pictures and say where you think
,
",, Work in
one of the souvenirs might come from, The others guess which souvenir it might be. Use one of the
expressions from the Useful language box below, to indicate how sure you are,
(E.9, 'Ihls might be from Brazil but could also be from Ethiopia. But it can't possibly come from
Finland; >'Oh, itb the coffee,,,)

Useful language:
possibIe
can't (possibly) be/come
,: couldn't (possibly) be/come

e might (well) be/come


e may (well) be/come
a could (well) be/come
,* might not be/come
* may not be/come

:.

ir mUst (surely) be/come


e has to be/come

UA4/H

o u r ce :

http ://fI i ckrcc.b

em o

ntai

n s. n

et/

As a class, check and discuss your guesses.

3. k

'-

Unt 2: Globetrottng

Lessan 3: Souveni

Stressing key content words

f/
\*

content words are the important words in a conversation (usually nouns, verbs, adjectives an
some adverbs), which carry most of the meanin9 and which are usually stressed in speech.

EXAMWlzARD

&" ln the extract below, a customer


Dialogue extract:

is

speaking to a travel agent. Underline the key content words

Excuse me, l was wondering if you could help me. l'm going on holiday to Spain and ld like
some information on where to go, what to do and what to see. l'm visiting Madrid for a few dl
and then l'd |ike to spend a week next to the sea.

b. Work with a partner. Read out the text to each other, putting the stress on the words you have
underlined.

. Compare your underlined words with your partner's and see where the differences are. Agree o
your final version. Checkyour answers.

f./
,*

Workng out meaning from key content words

EXAMWlzARD

1.Whoistalkingtowhom? 5

d. Read

2.

the

following three dialogues and answer these 4 questions.

Dialogue

Where are they?

3. ls

blah
Blah blah Reception
complaint blah blah
B: Blah btah blah
blah broken btah blah
Oi.n
blah sorry
'"Lr'"on
A: Blah blah immediately

there a problem?

A:

4, ls the problem solved?

blah btah Room?


blah
26 blah blah blah thank

Dialogue 2:
A. _*_*_*_
B'

delicious *_*_*_*_*_* recipe?


-*-* supermarket *-*-*-*-*_

A' Nol

1:

*-x-*-"-*-

', ''.n

Dialogue 3:

microwave!

don't believe *-*-*-*-*-

Discuss your ideas with o partner.

A:zzzzz zzzzzzzzz cinema zzzzzzzzz tonight?


B: zzzzzlove zzzzz can't zzzzzzchildren
A: Joh n 7zzz77 a$y5it zzzzzz zzzzzz
B: Great 7
zzzzz when zzzzz zzzzz start?
"77zz
A: N ine zzzzzz zzzzzz see zzzzzz zzzzz|.

&" Choose one of the incomplete dialogues. W|THOUT writing down the missing words, prepare l
act it out for the whole class as a complete conversation with meaningful words in it (you can adt
take away a word or two).

When you listen to someone talking, concentrate on the words which are stressed, and try to put the
meaning together on the basis of the content words you hear.
The words which are unstressed (and which are also spoken faster and at a lower volume) are usually the
"little" grammar words (e.9. is, but, on, the his). While these are indispensable for accuacy, they are not so
important when it comes to the meaning.

Unit 2: Globetrottng

Lesson 3: Souvenirs

Hummng sentence stress and intonation


E:, , Work in pairs and study the sentences on the left. They have the same number of syllables but the
stresses and the intonation of the sentences are different. Discuss what the melody of the sentences
should sound like.

,.i. Try to hum one of the sentences (no words spoken, just the rhythm and the melody) in full and
see if your partner can identify the sentence you had in mind by giving the right response to your
sentence,

Student B

Student A
l like chocolate, popcorn and fruit.
(list intonation)

Not all together, l hope.

Would you prefer ice cream or cake?


(choice intonation)

lce cream, please.

Would you like some tonic or juice?


(double-rising intonation)
)l
Next week l'm not going to work.
(falling intonation)

No, thank you. l'm not thirsty,

z!

Try to pay attention


to sentence stress
and intonation in
the EXAM PRACT|CE

vv

listening task. These

often help you to


identify the key

)>

Really? Are you going on holiday?

))

Yes, he's hurt his ankle rather badly.

content words.

ls he going to the doctor?

(rising intonation)

Lstenng Task l: Short Conversatons


Listening Task

1:

Short conversations (-10 minutes)

You will hear two friends who have been on holiday talkin9 about different things.

;)

,.i_:

You will hear six short conversations.

.:.,:

Listen and decide which present they are talking about.

,E

There are two items which you will NOT need.

Write the number of each conversation


:=

('l

t,

-6) next to the item it refers to.

you will hear each recording twice.

List of items:

A.

a plate

B. a clock tower

c.

D.

a post box

train ticket

H
H
H
t,l

E.

a Euro coin

F.

a small |eather bag

G.

a guide book

H.

a post card

H
H
H

Check and discuss your answers as a class, Listen to the dialogues once again if you need more
practice.

()

t,

Lesson 3: Souvenirs

Unit 2: Globetrotting
BIog

wrting - Souvenir competition

you can if they have received or given any


the class and ask as many people as
You have 5
f rieds coming back f rom trips abroad,
unusual souvenirs, presents f rom relatives and/or
table,
minutes for this. Make notes in the following

walk around

Who from/to?

Souvenir/present

Why unusual?

Country of origin

strangest souvenirs you have heard about,


5hor" with the whole class the best, most exciting,
or presents you heard about in the
_ lmagine you have just received one of the unusual souvenirs

'fu.

previous activity. Write

post for a blog in 4 or

5 sentences with the story of :

(first paragraph),
o how and from whom you received it
to it (second paragraph),
happened
what
and
. rlo* you reacted to it

Example:

,Last year l was given some roast ants as a present by a colleague_who had been to columbia,

rii

u"rv

""p"iu"

it before.
local delicacy there, but l had never heard of

what those little black things were,Then l


when it was first given to me l didn,t even know
take the beasts

First they shouted at me to


offered them to .y r"n.,it/ und friends at dinner.
even my mother had to admit that they
delicacies,
black
away, but when they,,.i" ir,," small
tasted delicious]
{." Work

in

entri.es to decide whose post you


groups of 3 or 4, Look together at your group,s blog

category
would enter into a, ont|neitoi roiprtition.ihinwhat
craziest / most expensive /
the class,

they

would fitinto: (e,g"'the

your favourites with the rest of


most unimaginative present'i etc.).-Share

Unt 2: Globetrotting

Lesson 3: Souvenirs

The skills of producing such a chronological account, like the one you have just written in the blog entry, may
be useful when you are expected to present your Picture Story in the Speakin9 test (Task 2).

Deciding on vrtual souvenrs/presents


" Work in pairs. Coming home from abroad, you want to bring a present, a souvenir for the whole
English group you are in now. You may choose from the items in Activity , or anything else you
prefer, Decide about a gift which can have the most possible functions to make the most people
happy in the group,
1

Example:
'We've decided to bring back some coffee for you because, apart from having a cup before
the lessons to wake everyone up, you can make them into a necklace and also use it as an air
freshener. Our teacher might want to give the coffee beans out as rewards after a task and if
you collect 10,..'

'3. Shrr" yorr pairb

choice with the group then decide together whose present would be the most

welcome by everyone,

You can use the same brainstormin9 and decision-making skills and language in Task 4 of the Speakin9 test
(Discussion). For further help with the Discussion task, check out Units 3.4 and 5.4!

se
DlscUs5loN

Unit 2: Globetrotting

Lesson 4:

Tr

av el

Storier

Lesso n 4:Travel Stories

l
l

EXAM TASK

SK|LLS AND LANGUAGE FOCU:

Speaking Task 2:
Picture Story

l
l
l

(also in Unit 4.1)

Speaking: telling a story


Speaking: linking parts of a tory effectively
Vocabulary: creating associations between
words, phrases related to travelling
5peaking: giving opinions
Writing: becoming aware of a

texttype-astory

Exanr skillsl producing useful notes


for story telling

ry

Stories to teII
, Write five words on a piece of paper which could be in a travel story (e.g, cliff, sea, brave, hurt,
mobite phone). Get into groups of 3 and give the piece of paper to the person on your right,

,..

l.i,, you have1 minutetothinkof ashortstorywhichincludesallthefivewords.Theneachof

you

presents your story to your portners.

Example:

,on or last holiday in Croatia, two of my friends decided to jump into the sea from a high cliff,
which was near our campsite. We all thought this was a great idea, so we all walked to the cliffs
in about 15 minutes. First we looked down. That was the moment when l decided that l was
not brave enough to jump. But both of my friends wanted to try it. Steve jumped in first with a
loud scream, and came up with a smile. However, when James was about to jumP, mY mobile
phone started ringing. As a result, James slipped on the rock and hurt his back badlY. We had
to carry him back to the campsite, which took much longer than 15 minutes]
i."Tell your group's best story to the whole class,The others should try to guess thefive words that
prompted the story.

Linkng words and expressons


When telling or writing a story, linking words can make your story easier to follow and more
interesting. They offer the story-teller a tool to establish and maintain cohesion in the text, in
other words, to show how the ideas and events relate to each other.

"//
*

put these linking words and phrases in the correct column. Some linkers may go into more than
one column, One extra example is given to you for each category.
.,,:,,.,

ExAMWlzARD

REMEMBER
Note that the majority of words and phrases in the first three columns of the first table (regardless of their
function) are often used at the beginnin9 of sentences to link ideas from one sentence to another. ln writin9
they are usually followed by a comma.

Unt 2: Globetrottng

Lesson 4: Travel Stories

After a while,

Suddenly,

ln spite of this,

which is why

Because ofthis,

Therefore,

too

although

Next,

As a result,

as well

Later on,

After that,

while

Surprisingly,

but

in order to

ffi

ln the meantime,

ffi

Ab,

HOwtuer,

'*O

90

,h,,ffi

=F.

lu.ryv.nt
:.u v'4i,'.r"l,tlu,"

!,ial,t |lirt'
['," ,i 1-rltt

tLt L,iirrr h'


.:t}./i.,fl*,1

luor

ttlucl, ,t ttij

: u,tll '

//4_

l
n
'l,l.'Lt^,f(

ulvy

|,L,t&t [,

b!;r-,/

t{ll

.,

-fu

'l ftqJ {.l^yl,r,


i\,//,

r,,,,74ru

tt4 .lnu 7t!

[t{,lr,

l:,iantitl

tt/rv

'

t/7;| ,

/J

/,n r,,

W" Checkyour onswers as a class, and add one more linking word to each column.

" Read the travel blog post below. Focus on the following points, then discuss them as a class:
writer! plans for the weekend in Amsterdam
o his impressions during his first evening walk
o the

&, Read the text once again and choose the linking word or phrase that fits the text best for the 7
numbered options,The frrst one has been done for you as an example.
Blog post:

@/ so / after the sky over Amsterdam was turning a cold dark blue and the uncurtained
light from shops and homes.9lgwed a vibral_t yellow, tJ_ght breeze was skimming the water on the canals. A few couples
Early last Friday evening, 1rxample)

wereenjoyingthesun,stastffitt@afthoughinthenearbycafessmartlydressedAmsterdammers
were drinking pale amber beer. lt (A aitwerr(dq) therefore happened to be my birthday, yet l was aimless, alone and
chilly. But above all, l was thirsty.

tsr4 2,
"/,'

Unit 2: Globetrotting

p.WAl*"

,uaa"n

Lesson 4: Trave| Stories

,,M.ffiiYl

walked up weteringstraat, not far from the city's most famous museums. l
spotted a corner bar, its entrance te'rean vines. lnside it was narrow with a low ceiling, and a fireplace at the back with
burning logs. Sofljqzz played on the stereo, a melodic contrast to the Dutch spoken by the dozen regulars. l (4.) however
2immtFterf{abo)ordered a Belgian white beer and soon found myself discussin9 used-book stores with the bartender.
tsefe+erolTgnethe regulars was buying r3lss-e-o{.rnever (Dutch 9in/Qffilking about recent developments in
Amsterdam's different neighborhoods. (5J l/r the meantimV ln order to KAft*, sipped my drink and felt a flood of
warmth and not just from the alcohol.This-bET wUrprisingdy gezellig, a Dutch tbrm that means tosily homelikeland this
was just what

//

Deed$l

at that moment,

(6.{h\git surprising-iVRs a resut}after almost three months on the road, l had been looking forward to a low-key
*""n}inAWalongthecanals,admirethewell-keptmerchanthouses,investigatesomeof

the city's smaller museums and reflect quietly on the adventures of the pas9,(@eq!*Trug relaxation in one of the most
pleasant cities in the world was the only thing on my mind, (7.) despite l"q{$" /'befor} heading off for one final week in
,___-/
Edinburgh,
Adapted from the 6 August 2008 post of the FrugalTraveler blog by Mat Gross for the New York
Times: http://frugaltraveler.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/08/06/going-dutch-in-amsterdam/#more-89

\)

Scotland.

Check your answers as a class. Explain your choices but also discuss why the other options are
wrong (e,g, because either their meaning is inappropriate or they do not fit grammatically).
#",,

Key words for story tellng


Here is the first part of a picture story about Jenny's first day in Budapest, but the pictures have
been mixed up.

f/

,*

Work in pairs. Put the pictures into a logical order. Discuss your reasons.

EXAMWlZARD

EtcOilE To BUDAPE9T

\lffi
lle{rmnae,

.(6uecl|

\:L-

fu

--

Unit 2: Globetrottng

Lesson 4: Travel Stories

Here are some verbs that might be helpful when you are telling this story. Match each verb to the
most suitable picture, by writing the letter of the picture next to each verb. Then think of two more
verbs that would be useful for describing any of these pictures.

7t
'?

,o burst into tears

C,'to return
tospot 4

?
E

.}

to compIain
to drop

tor"9r"t

r"il,u-c

,ocome across
to gaze *) rrr"TU/
to
to

Check your work as a class. Now make two more lists in the same way: think of some nouns and
adjectives that would be useful when describing what happened in each picture,

:Y74Lt_

,l,,l6iL/ ,

(ultt7',,

h,"rt,J/

|,t(u.leru-'

qltbfua ,/ W,

{,*Oi

L:,!'T,lLz*

,T,J.t4 *.,.t
t
,l /""

ilt

"

l,,
r:",,)-
^-rr /, ,

),24r, ;,

|1t rai!;:L,,

r kEl
tt:tttt

i, Compare

your

Ll t;fl'llit!:1

ta,

i.rt(
lists of words as

class, Extend your

own lists with any words or phrases that

other people suggest.

,*, Work in groups of three. Tell

taking turns and focusing on one picture at a time, Use as


many of the key words you have noted down in 3/b and 3/c as you can.
the story,

Speaking Task 2: Picture Story

Preparation with a dictionary: Do not try to write down the whole story, You will not have time for this,
and the examiners will not allow you to read out your notes. Therefore, in your preparation time, think
about the key verbs, nouns, adjectives and even whole phrases you will need, and about the story line.
Note down these words and phrases.
Easy-to-use notes: lf you write too much, you can get lost in your notes. lf there is a word or sentence
that you would like to use or read out, make it easy to find by highlighting it (for example with an
underlining, a circle, an exclamation mark, a star, etc,).

Lesson 4:TravelStorie

Unit 2:
o

variety of linking words (see Activity 2 in this lesson) to make Your


Story more enjoyable to listen to and easier to follow,

Linking words and phrases: Use

PlcTURES, Focus on
Narration:Tellthe story starting from the openin9 Sentence, Do NoT DESCRlBETHE

fluently you can tell a story,


the story line and not on plctur details. Make an effort to show how

your story more colourful by using the Past


Tenses: You need to use the Simple Past but you could make
dialo9ues, if You can handle
Continuous orthe past perfect.you can also use Reported Speech instead of
past forms of verbs you are not
it confidently. During the preparation time, you may want to check the
sure of.

to an audience and this


stress and lntonation: use your voice effectively. Remember that you are talkin9
is a story!

examiner and cannot


Timing: You only have 2 minutes, so do not worry if you are interrupted by the
problem;just make it clear that
finish your story. Finishing before the end of 2 minutes is not necessarily a
you hve finished your st;ry, by using a clear ending phrase and appropriate intonation,

Lstenngto stoy telling

nouns and phrases


ffi,- Look at the second part of Jenny's story, Note down two or three key verbs,
about linking the ke
each picture. Remember, yo, ,o, ig o dictionary if necessary, Think carefully
poinis of the story and, if there are conversations, what people will say to each other,

!erU-w-

tJv,,!,t,w
.f,omt
ltt(

l,LL

Cal4

ly

<<-

ffi

Lesson 4: Travel Stories

ot,

|"3*

Now listen to an exam candidate telling the second part of the story. While listening to the story,
think about the following questions.

l
l
l

Do you think she does well or badly?

Does she read aloud from her notes?


Does she describe each picture, or does she'tell the story'?

fi As a class, evaluate the candidate's performance thinking about the three questions above,
"
Checkwhich words that you collected in 4/a the candidate used,

Speakng Task 2: Picture Story


You have 10 minutes to prepare and to take notes for the 2-minute story telling. Feel free to
use a dictionary if you need to. You are expected to tell your story to your partner in 2 minutes.
While one of you is telling their story, the other person should pay attention carefully as if they
were the examine1 so that they can give feedback afterwards.
7, Checkthe
i!,,

Remember box after 5/d to help you focus on the task,

Work in pairs. Student

tooks at the picture story on

p. 205, Student

at

the

picture

story on p,

206, start with the 1}-minute preparation with a dictionary and then tell each other your story.

i"

When you have both presented your stories, give each other feedback using the following criteria:

o Was the story fluently presented?

o Did your partner use a wide range of words and expressions?


o Was there a variety of linking words used to establish cohesion?

o Did your partner use past tenses appropriately?

class, discuss what you found difficutt or challenging in the picture story task.
advice can you give each other for doing this exam task effectively?
,,

As

what other

REMEMBER
Preparation with a dictionary:

o
o
o

key verbs, nouns, adjectives, phrases

story line
irregular past forms or past participles

Easy-to-use notes:
o not too much text, short chunks
o clear hi9hlighting of key elements

Linking words:

variety of linking words appropriate to function

Narration:

o
o
o

starting from the given opening sentence


no picture description
focus on story line and on fluency

Tenses:
o Simple Past + other past tenses where possible
o reported speech for conversations

5tress and lntonation:


o use of voice to highlight main points of story
development
o telling story to maintain audience interest
Timing:
o sequencin9 story to fit time limit

Unit 2:

se
DlscUssloN

Lesson 4:TravelStoril

Inventng a different endng


& Work in pairs, Choose one of the 2 picture stories you worked with in Activity 5 (on p. 205 or p.
"
206).Together invent a different ending for it.
i&,,

Shareyour ending with the rest of the class. Decide which one the class likes the best and why.

Writing a story
HoMEwoRk task, write an email to a friend which starts and finishes as shown below.
Remember to use linking words and phrases and a range of key words which make your
story interesting and colorful. Write 120-150 words. Hand in your work to your teacher, who
will provide you with detailed feedback on it.
As a

"Soon after getting on the train l knew it was a mistake to sit next to thot

man/woman...
YOUR STORY

You can imagine how happy lwas to arrive at last in Barcelona!"

Unit 3: Makng Moves


Lesson 1
Filmmakers

Lesson 2
On Location

Lesson 3
Shooting a Film

Lesson 4
The I nteractive Aud ience

Lesson l: Filmmakt

Lesson
ExAM
PRAcTlcE

1:

Filmmakers

SKILIS AND LANGUAGE FOCUS:

l
l
l
l

Listening Task 3:
Radio Programme
(also in Unit 4.4)

Speaking:givingopinions

ffi,

Vocabulary: words, phrases related to films


Listening: understanding details
Listeninq: selecting betwecn relevant
and irrelevant information

l
l

Reading: scanning for specific information


Writing: becoming aware o a text type
* an application email

Exam skills: understandinq


how distractors work

The Oscar Panel Nomnation Dscusson


id. ln pairs, discuss and make 2 nominations for each of the following award categories. you
can come up with one more category of your choice (e.g.'The best dog in a frlm') and make 2
nominations for it.
1. The best film of the

past 5 years

2. The greatest actor of


the past 5 years
3. The greatest actress of
the past 5 years
4.

l
i
I

Share your nominations with the v,thole class, and together vote for the best nomination.

FIm words
7.

Work in pairs and put each word or expression in the appropriate category.Then add one or
more words for each category.
'_,1,9

to cut

a scriptwriter

to make sb up
a historical epic

thriller

to rehearse

|,l-

to shoot

"/i tr,
a stuntman
,l/,^

./d |VVltIVYv!

costume
designer

special effects

a Set

a casting director

ij

/9"l,Jt,,,^u, ylu,h'

props

a romantic

comedy
to perform

a camerama

tJttr:/l*,l

a bluelscreet
a soundstag

lesson

1:

Filmmakers

People

Genres

rk

jobs

Film words

Activities

other

f3" Checkyour answers as a class.Then compare and discuss the extra words that have been

suggested.

'i, Choose one of

the people / jobs and describe their duties, tasks and responsibilities in 2 or 3
sentences in writing, W|THOUT mentioning the job itself,

E.9. 'This

person creates the conditions

for making films. He/she manages things,


raises money, hires people, and arran9es
the distribution of the final product,
People in this 1ob are involved in alI

Thls person.., /This task ]nvolves

phases of the filmmakin9 process from


,he begir.ing lo tHe cor.O,et'on of a

projectl

>,PRoDUCER,

Work in groups of 4. Read out your text and let the others in your group guess.

Unit 3: Makng Movies

Lesson 1: Filmrnaket

Understanding dstractors

f./
*

ExAMWlzARD

,,,

.|_,,,. ,.,.

/1

,i

,!

ln the EXAM PRACT|CE task you have to anSWer multiple-choice questions about a radio
programme. Before you first listen to the recording, you have 2 minutes to read the questions.
lt is too early to start making guesses, but you can focus on what you expect to hear in the tex
ln the multiple-choice questions, you are given the right answer and two wrong answers (the
DlSTRACTORS). They are called distractors because they are desi9ned to distract you away fro
the right answer. lt i5 up to you not to be distracted!
Look at the following multiple-choice question with three options. Consider these two focusing

questions.

R What do you think the topic of this part of the text

is?

.What are the possible jobs described?

Question: The interviewee in his position is responsible for...

A.
B.
C.

calculatin9 the budget and financial risks of a film.


making what actors do look as realistic as possible.
using effects with trick photography to improve scenes.

Read the following text the Question and the three options refer to. Which is the correct option

.o
.,.off the set l also spend a long time at my desk calculating wayto minimise the risk in
a scene. Using trick photography or special effects may do some of the job, but my boys

would rather take very dangerous risks in order to give movies an added sense of rea!m.

Theyarehi9hlytrained,skilledprofessionals,who6elievethereisrftffiffiffi
that an't be overcome in

film...

Read thetext again and:

circle the words and phrases that help you identiry the right answer;

cross out the words and phrases that the distractors are based on.

"

As a class share and discuss the clues you have identified.

TlP
While looking at the questions in the EXAM PRAcTlcE task, try to identify and underline key words that will help you focus on
what the qu"ltion is actually asking. You should bear in mind that the key words you identify could be clues either to find the
right answer or to exclude the distractors.

Unit 3: Making Moves

Lesson l: Filmmakers

Listenng Task 3: Rado Programme


I

Listenin9 Task

3:

Radio Proglamme

minutes)

!-15
You wil! hear part of a radio interview with two people who act in films.

ot,

On the test paper you have ten multiple-choice questions about the programme.

Choose the best response (A, B or C) for the questions.

Circle the appropriate letter.

G You will hear the recording twice.

You have two minutes to read the questions/prompts before the recording starts.

1. Helen's and
A.
B.
C.

6.

Dave's job is to...

look after stars,


stop the public from disturbf ng${nl^in1.
play minor roles in films, U '/

''

roo many scenes are set in cafs.

't "
much. ,X

rn"y..nlt .h.t

with the stars on the set.


,rr,ey have to wait around too
[C.

\-/'

3. David was offered his first job as an extra...


A, through Helen's ex-boyfriend.
job agency.
,., after he had phoned a
from
somebody
he
had
only met once.
(y'.

4. What kind of productions


ar?

\./

5.
,f

salaryfor

earns...
herwork.

have they worked in so

'/

7.

How often do Helen and Dave speakto film stars?

{B.

Sometimes at parties, when a film is


Sometimes during filming, while the sets are

finished.

changed,

l ,,/'
being -/

c. Rarely, because the directors dislike extras talking to


Stars.

8. Concerning becoming a major actor, Dave says...

4, he would like to, but it

possible.
past,

is not
he has tried to become one in the
C. he prefers the relaxed life of his current work.

9. Which

^/-

-,/

of the following would best describe the

interviewer?

e.9. for soap,

David explains that he doesn't speak in films,

because...

the directors don't think he has a good e2dugh voice.

.p1 viewers might remember him.


c.' his contract does not allow him to.

,/

enough money, but she is not paid regularly.


about 150 pounds for each film.

B.

U/
4, rit*, and TV series.
B. Mainly gangster films.
C. Advertisements,

}a monthly

,'i.
'

2. Which disadvantage does Helen mention?

Helen said that she

,,/

A.
B,

More interested in Helen than in Dave.


lnterested in film stars but not small-part actors.
,''e) lnterested in Dave and Helen's work.
*.,

iz

10.Concerning their jobs, Dave and Helen...

A. feel they haven't been very successful.


,.,
B. enjoy their jobs with reservations.
.r/
C. ret very dliferently from each other. ,/
-l

d. Checkyour

answers with your teacher.

b. Lirt n to the recording again. Ask your teacher to stop the recording when you hear the clues
that helped you.

6)
t,

llnt 3:

Lesson

Making Moves

1:

Filmmakers

Readnganewsitem,scannngforspecificinformaton

to be near a location
is fairly simple.You only need
Becoming an extra in a film or television
where a film is being shot,

on the website
foltowing article by a casting agency you
will have
article,
the
uy ,nning

see the
d.while on holiday, imagine that you
ro rn"",,i,,t'ioi,
oir*"o
of theloca! newspaper.iiin"

me to read it in more detail

later,

How many extras are they looking

,/

for?

2, Whatisthelocationoftheshooting?
3.

What day is the shooting scheduled

4.

What's the name of the Extras

ll,

-'
,
-,' "',

l,

"
for? 7:r, 't,',

l
Coordinator? l

|":,

::

''

;,'",,-

"_(

_,:,

become an ex-tra?
glve them lf you want to apply to
What information do you need to

5,
7.

Who js Chaz

Alien?

,',

going to 9ive away?


Horv manyT-shlrts are they

'',,

t,ry

])_^____--4*-1--r:-r--n-

',

l..

B, Whati5thetltleothefrlm?,|;,1,1,,,]l_i,'i,|,i

',/:,

,,|, Il

6. Whatisthenameofthefrlmcornoany?

:_

.roru :-uan r,l"ltne e\Lrds ce

oaio' ;

.l

'

i j'-.r

_,

']'.',. ,\

|,r,\

;,:j:: i*; i'i


at
"Underground", which is being shot
producers are still searching for extras for the film
the Maytag Plant 2 Buildin9,
u pu,,:l scene, Although
extras for people to appear il
They are seeking more than 400
of the
*u"[na of,tile t 2th and 1 3th, shooting
was originally scheduled for the
,..

shootin9

only,
,lunu *irr now b on Saturday 19th

Producershavealreadyaskedseverallo.cal.residentstoactinthefilmandworkontheset,
scene for the movie,
already shot a small
includin9 Mayor Chaz hrr"", *t.l"

Anyoneatleastl6yearsoldiseligibletobecastaSanextra,thoughthereisnopayforthe
the first 200 people cast will
ij_i'nch LCDTV f* ;;";-i" and
work.The film will ,.m"

"tr-.
T-Shirt,
receive the official Underground
lnc" at:
Extras Coordinator, Master Films
To apply, contact Jason C, Corr,
name, contact
headshots/photos,
frtmmat<eriwili need

Masterfilmse*rrurag.uil..rr,u
number, email, and age,

Adaptedfrom:
http://www'newtondailynews.com/artictes/2009/07/31/r.mylyrytysdqkdmk7y8ivca/index.xml
Checkyour answers with your teacher,

Unt 3: Making Movies

Lesson l: Filmmakers

|',ffi

Writing an applcatonemail
Read the arcticle again. Now, write a short application email (70-80 words) to the Extras
Coordinator of the film "Underground", with all the required information.

'6 S S

C]

|-lello.
,"o!:

! a

end ,-:;,l. Attach Address Fontl Colo:t

Save As Draft

masterfi l msextras@9mail.com

To:

Cc: 1__
Extras for Underground

Subject:
Dear Mr Corr,

lu

a,k tM

ru

@ftr ntr,k1il
.l. t *

...

anl,,ffi@d

a.. h. r ttl ..(l|rq:dfubr_..,.,,a

1?-{a
;

.!

j,, :icr.,., (
j

!,(.:k , / i

l ,;'

,''

".

Work in pairs. Exchang your workwith your portner, read each other's email, as well as a
possible model text on p. 161 . Give feedback to each other on the emails you
/

wrote.

.i,,. Now choose a

few useful phrases from the three emails, share them with

collectthe most useful ones on the board.

[+/l,m

the

*noP

-'ii.

cUiai

l,

rJu/

au,NJ

'lprq. /Wa",|-

Lesson 2: On Location

Movies

Lesson
ExAM
PRAGTlcE
Writing Task 2:

Discursivew
riting
An Article

2: On

Location

SKILLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUS:

l
l

Readirrg: identifying overall meaning

l
l
l

Speaking: argLring for and against

@
F*,
*,l

Reading: identifying the main point of

a paragraph

ffi

peaking: discussing and decision makin9


Writing: becoming aware of a
text type * an article
Exant skills: identifying key stages of
the writing proces and understanding
tl. e

E$,

evaluation criteria

What locatons?
tn pairs or small groups, discuss what type of films theY could be (romantic
_ might be
_
comedy, documentary, etc.) and imagine what possible locations more than one
you
come uP with
can
but
possible
locations,
used in each film.The list below ,ontim a variety of
different ideas
manY
give
for
as
you
reasons
and
have 3 minutes to brainstorm
different ones as well.
"{:,1

,, Here are 4

film

titles.

as you can.

Rose on the

Doorstep

Back on
the Road with Jack

a castle
a haunted house
a

desert

an orchard l

'..:,

Journey
into the sun

cave

a pub

an airport
a

caf

a motorway

a bookshop

an aeroplane

a pyramid

a bank

temple

a restaurant

flower shop

a school

a cathedral

a spaceship

,,l'^

1001 Years

an office

Buiied for

forest

a waterfall

Now compare and explain your ideas with another pair or group,

Unit 3: Making Movies

Lesson 2: On Location

Reading - a famous location


Read the following description of a house where a famous film was shot, Which one of the four
pictures fits the description best?
-

^n
-

As hard as l've tried, l really can't come up with anythin9 to say about this house. lt hasn't n
been rebuilt to disguise its appearance. lt wasn't destroyed in an explosion of special
il
effects at the end of the film. lt really doesn't have any interesting stories about it at all. At i l
least, none that l've been able to uncover.
]l
Ll
lt's a nice house, lsuppose. Located in the elbow of a quiet street, it sits atop a little
slope, with the roof imitating the skyline of the San Gabriel summit, which towers behind ,
it. Although it's not the sort of building that makes you 90'wow; it does attract some
attention. l guess it would be just the sort of place that an alien that has been left behind
might choose to hide in.
.

Still, apart from the fact that it was literally sealed in plastic for the climax of one of
the most popular movies of alI time, there really isn't anything to say about it. But, it
photogenic and makes for a nice drive a|l the same,
Ad

a pte

d f ro m

:h

ttp ://www,b i gw

a st

e.co m / p

ot

i,

s/ ca /et/

,ii,

ffi ffi
_1:*

uH

#,g#i*

r#" Check your suggestion, and discuss which


words or expressions helped you choose the right
picture.

{i- Look at the text again.lt is divided into 3


paragraphs, focusing on 3 different aspects of
the house, ldentify the focus or topic of each
paragraph.

Para ].

Para2.
Para 3.

Note! You can find some information in the Answer key about a classic film and the role of this
house in it,

Ilnit 3: Making Movies

$a

Arguing jor and against


is becomtng lncled>ll l9ty
called a
::::i[T
his is sometimes
ffi;;",*,^,",".o,L,o",o"'19.'1..::i:i:,;ij."*:11j,i:lTii,llil:fi
Visiting famous film locations
pr',", where films were shot,Tl
packages that take

Dl5cUssloN

visi;ii;,,1alln"

irgri;ug"" (from fi lm+pil9rimage),


& . As

to people,
this rype of tourism appeals
class, discuss why you think

,l)L J r"
o:1'?y:':::::l'lii,Jli,'i!i,,!,:,!!:,;:!,Oo1
th.e grid
ln tne
4,ln
9rlu ueluvvl
work in groups of 3 or 4,
Work
nt, fans, local residents, local businesses,,

i,

ar*o,rir.irniikofvariouspointsof .view:t|::,.,,,,, ii<nl,<pfi]lsktttt"i,t,riiiy,o,"p,opt..

i:::,:;;::'::::ii,x:i;:"::;,:::,;::i,ii,,iii,"",,,,i,,,ntt,,,o,n,:,whysomepeople
,iiiv *nrvou don't and vice,versa),

;",*

As

class,

shareyour points,

about filgrimages
Agreeng and dsagreeng
&.Readthe3advertisementsanddecideonyourownwhichofthethreetripsyouwouldchoosefc

sa

a filgrimage and why

Dl5cU ssloN

"ffit

ffi fl-a
*.*:

Muse _
Edith Piat

Gloucester
cathedral

t",f;Yj trffiYnoneofman,
"Harrypotter"filmtours,The

,im*:*x*:[i,r!iix,;;,

i"';"l']-!l,.."'Pl.t'rr"""tePsbY

lil"*P114,*lu* ll=glr*,ffi;i,,fi ,l:iffi


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Grai| A**ll;;,;
:;*'";;i;

Dan Brown

l:1
book was pu;ior,"o,.r,"

:#r"J;;;;,o9o],,]:]:'.1:.],r"T'

:::,:H!n*l:**n:[:::
visits to oxford university,s

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christ

:Xl::.::],Eff^:nfi.""j""'":::"',

y,";jffi*tffi

iil,"7x1;concerthall,whereshe
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atthe Pre Li

stonework, All'9"'j.i::,:;iln
matches took place).
,,,", , ot tct t tr,ut"rt;,
guides who remind lou
ction, folksl"
l1ll.r

Adaptedfrom:http://www.ehow,com/how-2311g24-visit-famous-film-locations,

one

fron
Workingroupsof3or4.Presentyourcho.icetotheohersandcom.ercajointdecisionabou
orrrpis tn.- arar,ion.IJse the Phrases

of

thetrips. uaxe sire

iioi

rrrrv*, i, ,nr'iior'i

your agreement and/or disagreement,


lJseful language box to express

lJnit 3: Makng Movies

Lesson 2: On Locatian

Useful language:

for agreeing
a

* l strongly disagree.

That's a good point.

.s l

or

* Well, that sounds quite convincing but...

agree.

* l think / suppose so, too.


* ld go along with that.

that's partly true but don't forget...


a l see what you mean, l still think...
* That's quite possible. But the way l see it,.,.
* Well, you have a point there, but...
e That's interestin9, but don't you think...?
+ Yes,

* l couldn't agree more.

That'exactly what l think.


* Yes, you're absolutely right,
* Yes, that's true, l haven't thought of that.

e That's one way of looking at it, but..,


e You're right, but...

e How true,
* l was going to say the same.

e Yes, but don't forget that. ,.

When you have reached a decision, summarise what you have chosen and why for the rest of the

^
class.

la\

llhlli"rirg your

TIP
You can use any
one or all ofthese

expressions for
agreeing and
disagreeing in the
Useful language box
in Task 4 (Discussion)
of the Speakin9 test to
make your ar9uments
more effective.

purpose in wrtng

|.-/
*

Effective writers use a variety of strategies and techniques, and follow certain steps to achieve
their aims through written texts. As you can see from the descriptions of the stages of the
writin9 process, a lot of focused thinking is required, which precedes and accompanies the
process ofcreating the text (on paper or on the screen).

EXAM WlzARD

Before the final version is ready, the 3 most important stages of the writin9 process are:

1. pre-writing A
2. drafting W |?na/l|
3. revising afu'u' 1 tllt,tl,t t

. Reod the 7 suggestions in the table and decide which stage each of them belongs to. Write the
name of the stage (pre-writing, drafting or revising) next to the suggestion,
,..l

A.

Look again at your writing to add, to delete, and/or to change the content to make sure
that your meaning is clear.

B, Consider what conventions the text type

C.

ffi;,

and keep to them.

Make a list of possible words, expressions and idioms which could make your ideas and
meaning clear and colourful.

D. Focus

on "what"you are writin9 about (topic), "who"you are writing to (audience), and

"why"you are writing (purpose).

Wn#k
.-t, , '.l,-i

'

@11i,l/
t'li),,',)

ideas, and plan a logical structue for your argument. Decide


you
need and what the main focus of each one is.
paragraphs
how many
-

E. Collect your thoughts and

r.

"

l'

PtJrJaayour text for spelling, punctuation (including the use of capital letters) and

sentence structure to make sure you writin9 is accurate.r._..

ii)

G. Work on the logical development of your thoughts from sentence to sentence and from
paragraph to paragraph. usin9 meaningful and purposeful linkin9 devices.

Checkyour answer as a class and discuss briefly why each one is important.
Now discuss the following question, too.
-*;

can the 5ame steps be followed

if

you only have 30 mins to complete a task in an exam?

*ttt

''H:-,h,t,

r+"r*i

i-

llnit

3:

Lesson 2: On Location

Making Movies

Pre-writing: jont thnking and planning

fr/

work in pairs or groups of


read the task.

trl
EXAMWlzARD

j.

1 50 words, First
lmagine that you have to write an article of about

to
you have been asked to write an article recommending a class trip for local schoolchildren
and
useful
be
would
trip
a
Say why such
a nearby (real or imaginary) film shooting location.
enjoyable for school-a9e students,

Write an article for a local paper,


Keep in mind that you are writin9 for an audience,
N.B. Make sure you present your position clearly,

check pre_writing

suggestions c and E

in Activity

5, and

plan the article with your partners in

and the key words and expressions you are


about 10 minutes. Make-iotes of the planned structure
going to use.
present your
a different group from 6/a,
work in new groups of 3 or 4, each of you representing
plans,
plans to each other and help each other improve your

f./

ll

,*

de r stan d n g th e wr iti n g ev aI u ato n Gr

in the form of questions,


The table below shows you a simplified set of criteria

EXAMWlzARD

&"

the name of the categorY on the line above


Read the questions for each set of criteria and write

the questions,

Task

"ni;;,ii,^,,

Achievement
1-5

itera

1-5

points

points

Coherence
1-5

binii

Range and accuracy


Ranqe and accuracy of
Cohesion oramatical structues
vocabulary
1-5 points
1-5 points
1_5 points

of

1:
ran9e to suppot your communicative purposes? Are
you
used the right 9rammatical structures with the necessary
Have
punctuaiion) ieft in the text which hinder comprehension?
thereirammatical or accuracy mistakes (e,9, word order,

Criterion

Lriterlon
ls

2,.

],

'\

ideas?
the text made up of logically structured, well-connected

Criterion

l,

to 5upport you communicative purposes? Are there

appropriate
Have you used the right range of vocabulary which is
comprehension?
hinder
which
text
in
the
left
any vcabulary mistakes

4:

-\
Criterion
achieve its communication purpose in real life? would"the :,1"_,],*[.y*::1,:*]r:J]ntentions,
your
writing
would
the relevant information?
followed all the instructions and included all - and only -

;:::i:fiil;;.;".il
,)

[ii"Ji3ij;,-.me,yourint-entionandtheimaginedreadership?Haveyoufoundtheright
Have you referred to alI relavant points in the instruction?
forms)?
level of formality (e.9. contracted Vs. non-contracted

?
,)
Criterion 6:
the
phrases, reference words and phrases, in order to establish
Have you used purposefully chosen linkin9 words and
well-connected
into
ParagraPhs?
text
text? Have you divided Your
inner cohesion of both the paragraphs and the whole

and ques.tions are clear to you, Kee


Check your answer os a class and discuss if all the categories
writing the article at home,
you
are
when
thes;e quetions in mind as a checklist or reminder
p, 216,
A copy of the complete set of marking criteria is on

Unt 3:

Lesson 2: On Location

,&

)W

Task 2! Discursive Wrtng


] rast

2: Discursive Writing - An

An Article

Article (30 minutes)

You have just seen a film being shot in the centre of the historic town
where you live. Write an article for a local magazine saying how your
town and the area could be further used for film making.

TlP
ln the Discursive
Writing task of the
Writin9 test you

Write an article of about l50 words for your local newspaper,

N,B, Make sure your article presents your case clearly. Keep in mind that you are witin9
for an audience.

Write the article as a HOMEWORK task, keeping strictly to the time limit of 30 minutes. Your
teacher will evaluate it using the simplified criteria and will provide detailed feedback on
your text.

choose between
four text types to
express your views
and arguments. ln the
EXAM PRACT|CE tasks
in this book, you will
prepare for ali four
possible text types: an
articIe (in this lesson),
an essay (in Unit 4.3),
a letter to the editor
(in Unit 5.1) and a
review (in Unit 7.2).

Famous locatons
ln the history of filmmakin9, some films have made certain countries, cities, villages, places, or
even natural beauty spots really famous, or more famous than they had been before.
,.:' ,.

Work in small groups. Match the film title with the location. Have you seen any of these frlms?

'l.

A.

Budapest

B.

Matmata, Tunisia

c.

New Zealand

D.

The Trevi Fountain, Rome

E.

Christ Church College, Oxford

F.

The Louvre Museum

G.

Prague

The Lord of the Rings


2. Rocky

3.

Mission lmpossible

4.

The Da Vinci Code


5. Star Wars

6. La Dolce Vita

)-

7, Evita

8. Harry Potter

H. the museum steps in Philadelphia

#- Checkyour answers as a class.You can find more information about both the frlms and the
locations on the lnternet,

sa
DlscU 55loN

:,
Lesson

3: 5h

;,:,

ooting Films

EXAMTASK
Reading Task 3:

Multiple,Choice
Reading

(also in llnit 6.1)

Words and

meanngs

w"-i#!i;ii:li:ii:^::i"::tri,::i-.i:,::i:i
{- ; ;;'''""^

h a t lo ca t o

n,

an

d,

Th e

dnapp er ha

da

gu

*::o

pairsto each other,


pair.Take turns_reading out your two.,sentence
arii iir,tead, They will guess which word is missing

b,

Now team up with another


leaving out the *ora, tnJm,rrtrIes atnd saying

from the pairs of sentences,

The greatest movie webstes


d.Thewordsinthepreviousactivityallappeareverydayonlnternetmoviesites.Asaclass,
most important such websites: lMDd

_ you know about

brainstorm what if anything


(lnternet Movie Database) and Rotten Tomatoes,
_

th

two

lnit 3: Makng Moves

Lesson 3: Shooting Films

below
Read the texts about the two sites. Then complete the True-False-Not mentioned task
a
use
You
can
statement,
to
each
next
the
circles
into
NM,
T,
F
or
letters,
right
the texts. Put the
dictionary, but do ot look up more than three words. Select what you look up caref ully,
The lMDb consumer
the world,s most popular and authoritative source for movie, TV and celebritY content.
of more than
audience
mobile
and
web
combined
with
a
site (www.imdb.com) is the #1 movie website in the world
'l30 million data items, including
than
more
of
database
160 million unique monthly visitors. lMDb offers a searchable
cast and crew members, Users
more than 2 million movies, TV and entertainment programs and more than 4 million
user reviews, personalized
and
critic
trailers,
ticketing,
rely on the information lMDb provides - includin9 showtimes,
feature sections and a
editorial
data,
box-office
qUotes,
trivia,
recommendations, photo galleries, entertainment nu*r,
version of
is
a
subscription
(http://www.imdbpro.com)
Pro
lMDb
universal Watchlist - when makin9 viewing decisions.
industrY.
entertainment
in
the
work
lMDb designed exclusively for professionals who

lMDb

is

to reviews, information, and


Rotten Tomatoes (www.rottentomatoes.com) is a hi9hly popular website which is devoted
published reviews for those films
news of films. Founded in 1999, RT allows visitors to search for films and view all of the
films at the box office
written by widely-accepted critics and journalists, The RT home page features the ranking of toP
movie trailers, and manY other
during the past weekend, upcomin9 films, new Blu-Ray/DVD releases, news headlines,
at stage performers if a
features. The website,s name comes from the idea of throwin9 tomatoes or other vegetables
it is Positive ("fresh" =
performance has been particularly weak. Rotten Tomatoes staff decide for each review whether
lf the Positive reviews reach
small icon of a red tomato) or negative ("rotten" = small icon of a 9reen crushed tomato).
approve of it. lf the positive reviews represent less than
600/o or more, the film is marked "fresh,l since most reviewers
600lo of the total, then the film is considered "rotten]'

1.

The names of both websites come from typical viewer reactions to stage performances,

2.

Both websites offer information on TV programmes.

3. The

T:

views and reviews of professional critics and viewers are basic features of both

one site provides data for the public and the film industry; the other one
5.

Both RT and lMDb can boast of having more than

, Checkyour

so1utions in pairs and identify

e.g. by

,l00

sites.

is mostly for ordinarY

million unique monthly visits to their

viewers. tP

sites.

Uh

underlining it -the Part in the textwhich has

helped you decide,

d.

As

class, discuss the fottowing point, giving reasons for your pros and cons.

When you read a text for detailed information, you should always read the text first and then
look at the questions.

Reading carefully - Usng a dictionary


the Reading test, multip|e_choice reading, you must read a text of about 400 words
and
and then answer seven multiple-choice questions: six on detailed information in the text
books
testing
and
Many
teaching
whole,
a
text
as
the
the last one on your understanding of
contain this type of task. You may wish to use your dictionary, but be careful.
ln Task 3 of

r*
EXAMWlzARD

lesson

Unit

3: Shootng Films

Look at the multiple-choice options. Which gives the best advice?

1. which

4. What do you think

is the best order to approach the task?

dictionary in this task?

A.

Read the multiple-choice questions first.


{'B.) Read whole text first at least once and ignore the

C.

questions,
Start reading text and see which part the first question
refers to.

2. Once you have read the whole text


A. You should

G.

rry to answer the questions one-by-one.

',.-ni'

B.
C.

If

A. Look up
, _ text.

-B.

for all of them,

you meet unknown words or phrases:

rry to work out its meaning with the help of the


context, the text around it,
Look it up in the dictionary immediately.
Mark it on the exam paper and decide about it later.

all or most unknown words and phrases in the

'Look up only those items in both the text and the


questions without which you cannot complete the
task.

C. Only look up items which

are repeated in the text or in

the questions.

read through the seven questions together.

C. Guess the answers quickly

3.

at least once:

is the best strategy for using the

5. The last question tests your understanding


text as

a whole. you

of the

should:

A. do

(a.

t.

it before you attempt any of the other questions.


,onty consider it after you have done everything else.
look at it before reading, but do it at the end.

W" Check and discuss your solutions, ideas as a class. ln some cases, more than one solution can
easily be justifred, explained, so see what works best for you.

Reading Task 3: Multple-Choice Reading


I

neaaing Task 3: Muttiple-Ghoice Reading (15 minutes)


You wil! read a text about the filming of The Lord of the Rings.

Read the following text.

Answer the multiple-choice questions about it and choose the correct answer: A,

B, C

or D,

Circle the appropriate letter in each question.

The Making of Lord of the Rings


The trouble with filming is that there is a host of things which can 90 wrong.

Exterior filming of The Return of the King was going well, on in the well-chosen location in Queenstown, New Zealand,
when suddenly the town was hit by very bad weather. As a result, outside filming could no longer take place, so filming
had to switch to interior filming instead. The only problem was that then and at no time before did Queenstown have film
studios,
Eventually, after much verbal to-ing and fro-ing, it was decided that the squash court of a local hotel would be the right
place for indoor shooting. To that end, work was started on turning the court into a studio set and, after a short delaY,
filming recommenced. After a while, they reached the stage where they needed to shoot the intense moment from the
third film when Frodo and Gollum send Sam on his way. All Sam's scenes were successfully completed usin9 the squash
court but they did not finish getting all the shots for Frodo, while using the court.

The next day, however, the sun came out and the rain stopped, so they could resume work on the exterior shots.They
decided that this was the best thing to do, as the weather is never very reliable in New Zealand and they wanted to work
outside while they had the opportunity. The plan was that they would return to the squash court, with the same set
standing, to do Frodo's scenes at a later date. As things turned out, however, Elijah Wood was only able to do his side of
the scene in the same location twelve months later.

Unfortunate|y, this meant that the squash players of Queenstown had to wait a whole year to get their squash court back,
as the studio 5et had remained in place for the entire period. Frank Jenner had been given twenty hours rental of a squash
court, as a sixtieth birthday present from his wife. "Of course l was fully compensated, but l was pretty upset that l could
not stat playing squash and losing weight]'
The final reel of the film to be completed was done only five days before the world premiere in Wellington, New Zealand.
lt was actually still wet from the developing process because there was no time to dry it. The premiere was the first time
that Peter Jackson had seen the completed film, He was relieved as a 9reat deal more could have gone wrong.

Other changes were made later. For the Special Extended Edition, the scene in which Pippin is looking for Merry after the
battle on Pelennor Fields was digitally altered so that it appears to be night instead of day. According to Peter Jackson
on the commentary track, this was done to make it appear that Pippin has been lookin9 for hours instead of minutes,
underlining the friendship between the two Hobbits. ln the original edit, because it appears that Pippin has only been
looking for a few minutes his reaction to finding Merry seems like he's overreactin9,

Mu lti ple-Choice Questions


1. Queenstown, New Zealand...
A. has predictable weather conditions,
B, was chosen by mistake for making the film.
C. had closed its facilities for inside recording.
D. never possessed film-making studios.

2. As a makeshift studio, the squash court was...


A. only chosen after some debate.
B. converted into a film studio with difficulty.
C. used to make minor parts of the film.
D, the |ocation for filming

3.
A.
B.
C.

a|l

the characters.

When the sun Game out they...


continued working in the squash court.
decided to film no more in the squash court.
changed the scenery on the squash court,

D. were delayed in using the squash court.

4. Concerning the playing of squash...


A. the court could not be used for a year.

5. Concerning the premiere of the film...


A. filming had only finished a few days before.
B. the film was damaged because it was damp.
C. Peter.Jackson had only seen the whole film briefly
beforehand.

D. Everything that could go wrong went wrong.

6.

A.
B.
C.
D,

ln later changes to the film...


original night scenes were made day ones.
some scenes had to be re-acted.
the changes were made electronically.
a serious mistake was made.

7. Overall the articIe...


A. details a disaster of film making.
B, shows various difficulties being overcome.
C. is hostile to the film.
D.

is mainly about the themes of the film.

B, filming prevented use of the court for months,


C. Frank Jenner had to play squash elsewhere.
D. Frank Jenner abandoned his plan to take up squash.

&. Check and discuss your solutions in pairs and then as a class.

b. Mentify

the sentences or sections in the text that have helped you frnd the solution for each

question.

, As a class, share what elseyou know aboutThe Lord of the Rings film trilogy.

ovIes
a

f/
*

ExAM WlZARD

Improve you guessing and dctonary sklls


For this activity, you will need your favourite monolingual and bilingual (the English-Hungarian
version in this case) dictionaries, preferably the ones you plan to use in the 82 exam.

:i , Try to guess the meaning of the following words from the context in the text above:

resume

recommence

reel

Discuss which words, clauses or sentence fragments have helped you guess the meaning.
Now, use your monolingual dictionary and find, as quickly as possible, the meaning of the
following words and phrases which are connected to frlms, movies, film reviews etc.
creW

approve of

develop
devoted to

authoritative
quote

subscription
trivia

C" Dlscuss as a class if you have found the looking up of the words easy or difficult, and why.

d Nor, repeat
"

the quick looking up of the same vocabulary items with your English-Hungarian
dictionary, then discuss the following questions:

Which dictionary was easier to use to find the right meaning for the item: the monolingual or
the bilingual dictionary? Why?

ln the Reading test of the 82 exam, would you rather use the monolingual or the bilingual
dictionary? Why?

Wrtngintervew questons and roleplaying interviews


&- Read

the story of the New-Zealand shooting of The Lord of the Rings once again, and underline
the topics, issues that a reporter might want to ask about in an interview with the set designer who
was in charge of the squash court which was used as a film studio,

fu, hagine

that you are going to make an interview with Mr. Brian Shaw, the set designer, for
www,rottentomatoes.com (remember the text in Activity 4) about the details of the shooting. Write
5 or 6 questions to ask him. lnclude at least one question about a topic which the text does not
mention.

Roleplay the interview, one of you taking the role of the reporter, and the other one taking the
role of Mr. Shaw. lmprovise further questions and answers os appropriate, When your teacher
claps, change roles and continue with the interview. The new interviewer will have to use their own
questions.
]",

Lesson 3: Shooting FiIms

Workng in films
: " Match the words of specific film crew jobs with the pictures you associate them with. There are
more jobs listed than you need.

make-up artist
5tuntman/stuntwoman
props master
camera operator
set designer
sound technician
pyrotechnician
script Writer
costume designer
director
choreographer

H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H

tl

,1'.=
,;.::;R

'JJJ.r.-)oo-

Check and discussyour answers as a class.

C. Choose one of the


you have chosen.

1l

jobs in the list and imagine that this

is your

job.

Tell

your partner which job

d. hterview your partner about the job that they have chosen, using some of the questions that
you thought of for Activty 6. Think of other interesting questions as well,
Example:
'Why did you decide to make this your career?'
'Was it difficult to find a job?'

'What kind of training did you have to do?'


'What do you like most/least about your job?'

ltnit3:J
-

ovies
a

Lesson 4:The lnteractive Audience

Lesso n 4:The lnteractive Audience

ExAM
PRAGTlcE

SKltLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUI

Speaking Task 4:
Discussion
(also in Unit 5.4)

l
l

Speaking: suggesting ideas for a topic


Grammar: identifying grammar words

Speaking: brainstorming and using


eipressins for giving and asking or

l
l
l
l

in a iext

opinions, turn-taking, clarification, etc,


Speaking: discussing a specific topic
Reading: identifyin9 overall meanin9
Writing; producing a response to an article
Exanr skills: initiating and maintaining
an argument

Let's go to the moves


&,

movie-going habits, Try to talk to as


stand up and walk around with this list of questions about

manypeopleasyoucan,discussingadifferentquestionwitheachperson.Takenotes'

Where do you get information


about films?

which online film databases


or forums do you visit?

What kind of films do you


watch at home, and in what
format?
What kind of films do you
watch at the cinema?
What is your opinion of illegal

downloading?
How often do you go to the
cinema?
Where do you normally
go with your friends after
watching a film at the cinema?
How much do film stars
infl uence your lifestyle?
with the PeoPle
share with the class any things thatyou have in common
it,s too
,Mark
and l only watch movies at home; we never go to the cinema,
fou s;poke to. (e.g.

b"stand in a circle and

expensive.').

Lesson 4:The lnteractive Audience

Branstormng deas for a topc or queston


brainstormin9
ln the first part of the Discussion task (Task 4 of the Euro 82 Speakin9 test), in the
to the
response
in
ideas
of
number
a
or suggesting stage, it is important to come up with
your
choices,
question and to give reasons very briefly for
give reasons for
Work in pairs. Brainstorm 4 more ideas for any 3 questions of your choice, and
partner,
each of your ideas.You may agree or disagree with your

1.

What are the most important cl,ur


things in a good cinema?

2.

What factors are importan


when choosing a film
watch?

to

uLy falnurtte

* i, a n

3. , Howcanyoukeep

rea.d)n-a

: up-to-date about films?

.I44"OU12

ret Ulrl

u.,cb*itx
:

a. i Why do you think

t*/ 1r

some actors

: become big stars?

5.

: Why do some people

atra"ctwe

prefer

'. u.o

worrbs

going to the cinema?


check your ideas os a class. continue giving reosons for your choices.

Guessing words in context


grammar words
Read the examiner's instructionS for the Discussion task. Fill in the gaps with
(e,g.

prepositions, relative pronouns etc.).

Examiner's script:

(1,)_

talk
the final part of the test, you are goin9
Your
topic
just
listen.
going
you.
l'm
topic l will give

,For

(3,)_

(2.)-

each other about a

is:

cinema very often,Why?


Nowadays people don't 9o to the
home
* e.9. they download the films at

a
a

Discussion task: sample topic card

(4.)_You

have done that,


First make a spoken list of four or five things. Then,
give
reasons for
to
Remember
one is the best or most important.
discuss
agree, All
(7,)
and
you ,uy. Vou have three minutes altogether

(5.)-.-.-.(6.)_
right?'

_try

sa
DlscU5sloN

Unit 3: Makng Moves

Lesson 4:The lnteractive Audience

, Checkyour

onswers as a class.

pairs. Practise being the examiner: read aloud the steps of the complete instructions
above, Emphasise the important points, pausing where necessary and looking up at the candidate.

"Work

in

Swap roles and repeat the reading out.

Taking part n a discussion

f/
\r

EXAMWlzARD

During the Discussion task, you can make your contributions more effective by usin9 some
,ready-p"6"'phrases for giving opinions, structuring, clarification, etc. You can find Phrases for
agreeing and disagreeing in Unit 3.2, Activity 3/b. Check that list quickly before you Start this
actiVity.
partner. Put each phrase below into the appropriate column. One example has been
given for each category.

&,Workwith

In

r?

aryh)m,...

ltall an ",%nue zrL


t0 tlu ?Lett/tl4t?

o What dn you think

yau

otry to unte{rupt
/o, fut...

a,tea,lt... ?

Wlut

d^o

7outhhk

a}tut...l

o What's your opinion of...?

about...l

o Are you saying that...?

o Let's try and agree.


o l'd just like to say that...

o l definitely think that ...

o lf l have understood correctly..,

o Can ljust add something here?

. Sorryto interruptyoo

rso+oltsffif.--

but.::

o Don't you agree that...?

o Personally l believe..,

o Let's start with.

o Shal

, .

o what was the next idea?

o l'm convinced that ...

r Um... um,.. um...

o Have you got any comments on...?

rJnmypffi

o Could you explain that, please?

t3. Check your answers as a class. Add one more phrase to each category.

,"work in groups of 4. one of you looks at your own table and reads out a phrase, and the others in
say which category it belongs to.
without looking at the table
the group

Unit 3: Making Moves

lesson 4:The lnteractive Audience


Analysing a Discusson task

ffi, lrsten to two exam candidates doing a real Discussion task. Try to decide which is the better
candidate, the boy or the girl?
W, Here is a checklist for the second listening
(Yes) or N (No) for each question.

r Did both people

to

see

,*
EXAMWlzARD

6)
{)

how effectively the candidates perform. PutY

in the pair contribute equally?

o Did they first name a number of possible answers?


o Did they later discuss which was the best answer?
o Did they give reasons for their ideas?
o Did they negotiate?
o Did they listen to each other and not talk over each other?
,. Compare your assessment and discuss your reasons as a class.

Speaking Task 4: Discusson


;.|, Work in groups of 3. Each of you will play the role of the "examiner" once, and will act as an
exam 'tandidate" twice, so there will be 3 rounds. ln the frrst round the "examiner" reads out the
instructions and the card as they appear in the script on p, 191 ITOPIC 1]. Follow the rest of the

instructions there.

Rememberto:
contribute equally;
first name a number of possible answers with reasons;

Avoid:
talking over each other;
domi

ati ng the di scussion.

discuss and decide on the best answer;


give reasons briefly for all your ideas;
give ideas to each other;
listen to each other carefully.
.,::,, Once you have completed all 3 conversations in your groups, as a class, discuss the whole
experience from the point of view of the "candidates".

Unt 3: Makng Movies

se

Lesson 4:The lnteractive Audience

Reading and wrtngabout blockbusters and busts


d.

Tickthe titles of films in

DlscU5sloN

the

listthatyou have seen.Which of

these

films isthe "odd one out"? Why?

Matrix
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

Twilight:New Moon
Men in Black
Slumdog Millionaire
]

Star Wars: Return of the Jedi

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince


Tomb Raider:The Cradle of Life

b.

Work

in

smal! groups

and discuss

these

two questions. Try to use as many of the expressions

from Actvity 4 as you can.

l
r

Why are some film sequels more successful than others?

c,

Read the fotlowing text and find the answers to the two questions in 7/b.

Do you think a sequel or a follow-up film is always guaranted success?

l_.ir, Oj
Mathematicians have found the formula for a hit film sequel, and are able to Predict
whether a sequel will be successful or not. Film makers have known for a long time that a
follow-up is a fairly safe bet and franchise slike Pirates of the Caribbean or theTwilight Saga
are good examples. The academics'calculations are based on factors such as whether keY

film stars are kept, how long it has been since the last film, and how well the last film did,
Waiting too long or changing the key stars seems to be a big risk. Since not only follow-up
films but DVD sales or possible computer 9ames can also contribute to earnin9s, financial
investors often pay a lot of money to get the rights to a sequel.

ii

Follow_ups sometimes do better than the original, especially if they continue the storyline,
as people who go to the cinema clearly like new stories which take their favourite
characters on new adventures. What is more, blockbuster sequels brin9 an added benefit
as DVD sales of the original movie also increase with the release of the new film, However,
stories at the cinemas. Films like Oscar-winning Slumdog
there are still many
', original
-"J"'-'
Millionaire or one of the most successful British films ever, Ihe FuIl Monty, make it clear that
, tl_____^l____
!^^
sequel mania does leave room for creative filmmakers, too.

''-'

"';

Adapted from: http://www.guardian.co,ul</film/2009/nov/08/movie-sequel-profit-formula

You have already read about Rotten Tomatoes (www.rottentomatoes.com) in Unit 3.3, Activity
2, one of the leading interactive lnternet sites on films and filmmaking, with an incredible
amount of information about films of the past, present and future.
task, write a comment on the article above for the RT community. Express
your opinion, 9iving reasons and including examples of your experience of sequels (or
prequels). Remember that your writin9 needs to be interestin9 to your readers as they maY
As a

HoMEWoRK

comment on

it.

Write as much as you feel like writing.

Bring your comment to the next lesson and stick it up on the wall on a Movie Poster.This Will
allow you to read each other's comments, so you can offer corrections and further comments.

Unt 4: Lfestyles
Lesson 1
Pursuing Adventures

Lesson 2
Bad Habits

Lesson 3
Ways of Living, Ways of Thinking

Lesson 4
ln and out of Homes

llnit 4: Lifestyles

Lesson

Lesson
EXAM TASK
Speaking Task
Picture Story

2:

1:

1:

Pursuing Adventures

Pursuing Adventures

sxt1-1s AND LANGUAGE FoCUs:

Speaking: presentin9 and discussing


personal experiences
Vocabulary: words, expressions related
to adventures

(also n Unit 2.4)

Listening: understanding the overall


message
5peaking and listening: identifying messages
through intonation, emphasis and pauses
Exam skills: colouring a story with adverbs
and linking words

Adventuo u s exp erien ces


about the most adventurou;, exciting, dangerous, adrenalinehave ever done, or experiences you have ever had,They do not necessarilY
have to be extreme sports; any activities involving some adventures and risks will do.

.,3,ln groups

of 4, te!! each other

prrprg activities you

}. share the activities with the whole class and write the complete list on the board. You can refer
back to this list during the rest of the lesson.

words related to adventures


pairs. Look atthe eight photos, identify the eight extreme activities or sports, and write
you, as an examPle.
the name of each one below the appropriate picture, One has been done for
Then checkyour ideas with the rest of the class.

[:}",;

Work

in

i},., Stitl in pairs, look at these 1 6 words and phrases, Which words do you associate with which
your partner
activity? Why? Write each one under one or more of the pictures, as appropriate, Give
you
to,
need
reosons for your choice. lJse a monolingual or bilingual dictionary if

base

brake

collaboration

coral reef

cruise

downhill

ecotourism

fear of heights

fingertips

9rip

oxy9en

rapid

tree root5

safety gear

slide

summit

Lesson

1:

Pursuing Adventures

Activity:

Activity:

Activity:

Activity:

Words/phrases:

Words/phrases:

Words/phrases:

Words/phrases:

-"fl

4o

Activity:

Activity:

Activity:

Words/phrases:

Words/phrases:

Words/phrases:

Activity:

fuwrft!
Words/phrases:

collaboraint

rafu

o Form groups of 2 or

j pairs. Compare and explain your answers to

step 2/b above.

- stay in the bigger groups. Take it in turns to say the name of one of the sports or activities, ond at
group members should immediately formulate a sentence in the first person singular
with one of the associated words/phrases (e,g, A: 'rafting'; B:'l fell out of the boat in the biggest

least two other

rapd.'),

ln the 10 minutes you have to prepare for the Picture Story task in the Speaking test, remember first to scan
your own brain for key words that you could use (remember Unit 2.4, Activity 3). This is quicker than uSin9
dictionary,

tures

se
DlscUssloN

How brave are you?


. choose one from this list of adventurous activities and mime it in front of the whole class, The
others willtry to guess which activity it might be. Check the activities or words you do not know in a
dictionary or ask your teacher!
bmx

extreme mountain biking

bungee jumping

mountaineering

rock climbing

storm chasing

snowboarding

canopying

skateboarding

caving

downhillcycling

extreme kayaking

scuba diving

whitewater rafting

water skiing

inline skating

Work in groups of 3 or 4. Everyone chooses from the list one extreme activity or sport that they
would like to try, or one that they would not (real experience from the past is also welcome). Give

reasons for your choices.


Share with the whole class the most interesting choice from your group and the reasons for
Wanting or not Wanting to try it.

r:"..E
(e
t,

stores o extreme activities


Listen to the short recordings and decide which four extreme activities from the list in 3/a the
people are describing. Do not worry about unknown words, try to focus on the key words and
phrases you do understand.

1,

2.
3.

4.

Check your answers with a portner.


Listen to the recording again and write down the stressed words and phrases. Discuss the reasons
for these words being stressed. Think about the messages, in other words, what the speakers want to
h i g h l i g ht, e m ph asi se, etc.

TeIIing the story of an extremely extreme activty


d" Speed read the following story about Jackie in 2 minutes and produce a or-lfltnc
summary
for each paragraph about the writer's experience, The first one has been doln fu you as an example.

Lesson

1:

Pursuing Adventures

Well, it all started during my travels in Australia, where l heard from other
travellers of the most exciting (and also exaggerated) stories about Bungee
Jumping in New Zealand. l knew, of course, as an experienced thrill seeker
what Bungee Jumping was. l had seen a handful of people screaming loudly
as they threw themselves off a crane. Unfortunately, my budget had never
allowed me to try it out. But l knew that if there were an opportunity to jump,
l would finally grab it with both hands.

l t Lij'

,;^. 1

No wonder, then, when enterng a pub in New Zealand and seeing the
words BUNGEE CREW on the back of a T-Shirt, my head started spinning.
Now that l was reminded of all those wild stories that people had told me,
my organisational instinct started to work in full mode. A lot of stories and a
couple of beers later, l was dropped off at my hostel with an invitation to a Bungee Jump.

Not entirely unexpectedly, the following morning, with a hammer pounding in the back of my head, l met the owner of
the T-shirt according to plan. And that plan involved something no one l know has ever tried: to jump from a helicopter,
three hundred meters above the ground, with only one rubber band tied to my ankles. My adrenalin rushed, just
from thinking about it. lncidentally, it was going to be the first permitted jump of this kind, after the government had
prohibited them for security reasons, Defeating the local bureacracy, l had given the go-ahead at last, after si9nin9
several declarations stating l was doing it at my own risk. Risky it certainly was, but l didn't care.
All that remained was the jump. At the airport, following a sleepless night, the helicopter's doors were removed; the
bungee cord - weighing 70 kilos - was tied to my ankles. There seemed to be no way back. Take it from me: you could
not have measured my adrenalin level at that moment. Once we made it to an altitude of more than 300 meters, we
checked my radio to see if the most important communication channel worked properly.
So far so good. Then the person next to me started the countdown...One, ...l started to tremble, two,.,.the trembling
in my body increased, three.... ****, the doubt of "Why me? Why now?" came up, four.... oh, what the hell, l am going

for it, five....., BUNGEE!!! 'Ooooohhhyaaaaheeesss!!!'these

were the "words" that l cried out as l threw myself from a


helicopter three hundred metres above the earth - with only a rubber band tied to my ankles...

ParagraPh

1: yckll

flr,t

r"euer tru}.

h*l*d. about ettreu.u

a lufoe.

fu^ U"g* juul7g

ul Neu-Zealana arill

,t4

Paragraph 2:
Paragraph 3:
Paragraph 4:
Paragraph 5:

Y, Check your answers in groups of

j, and discuss which key words helped you identify the content

ofeach paragraph.
again, this time in a more relaxed way, allowing yourself at least 5 minutes. Focus
on whether this is a story well told or not. You can mark sentences or parts you like or dislike,
&* Read the text

d Do.rr, ,, a
"

class your reasons for the effective and for the less successful bits.

Arl,9traliA,

th"@ ,/u

ha.d.

llnit 4: Lifestyles

Lesson

1:

Pursuing Adventures

Cotouring or " jazzng up" a story


d

First check the table on p, 1 60

"

in

the Answer key (lJnit 2-Lesson4/2a,b) of linking words which

are usefulfor story telling.

b.

Read the text again and underline words and phrases,

o which jazz up the story: e.9. 'unfortunatelyi 'finally'or


o which link up parts of the text: e.9. 'No wonder,, "'

c,

check as
story telling.

what they do to help the


class the words and phrases you have underlined and discuss

taking turns, each of you


No* yo, know the story pretty wet!.Work in pairs, and briefly nar.r9te.it,
and feel free to use your own words
saying eiery other sentenie.'Thiitime, tell the story ABO|JT HER,
as well:'Jackie first heard about extreme...'

d.

Speaking Task 2: Picture Story


story telling, Feel free to
You have 10 minutes to prepare and to take notes for the 2-minute
your story to your partner in 2 minutes,
use a dictionary if you need to. You are expected to tell
pay attention carefully as if they
While one of yu li telIin9 their story, the other person should
were the examiner, so that they can give feedback afterwards,

the task.
Check the Remember box in lJnt 2.4 (p. 45) to help you focus on

p, 208, Student B at the picture story on p,


Work in pairs. Student A looks at the picture story on
then tell each other your story,
209. Start with the 1}-minute preparation with a dictionary and

b.
C.

l
l
l
l

When

you have both

presented your stories, give each other feedback using the following criteria:

Was the story fluently presented?


Did your partner use a wide range of words and expressions?

was there a variety of linkin9 words used to establish cohesion?


Did your partner use past tenses appropriately?

Picture Story task, What other


, o class, discuss what you found difficult or challenging in the
advice can you give each other for doing this exam task effectively?

d.

Vocabulary and grammar quiz


have in common,Think about the
Djscuss in pairs what the words from the text in Activity 5
(or
be),
can
kind of word (part of speech) each one is

channel
increase

defeat
level

drop
measure

experience
pound

hammer

wonder

Check and discuss your ideas as a class,


one, Think up a sentence which uses
Choose one of the words f rom the box, but do not soy which
life.|). TeIl your sentence to the class
in
my
thrill
any form of this word (e.g.,t,ve never experienced such
thrill in mY life.|),The others will
such
(e.g.'l've
BEEP
never
sayng the word,BEEp, iistead of the word.
guess the word in its accurate form:'experienced',

Lesson 2: Bad Habits

Lesson 2: Bad Habits


EXAM TASK

SKltL AND LANGUAGE FOCUS:


l Reading and vocabulary: identifying key

l
l
l
l
l

Reading Task
Paragraph
Headings

content words in context

Speaking: sharing and discussing


personal experiences
Reading: skimming or key information
Speakrng; giving advice

Vocabulary; collocations related to habits

.*

(also in Unit 1.2)

*,t

xamskills: identifying overall meaning


through key words

Guessng the actvity:'cofee potting'


Think of a bad habit that people often try to give up. Choose any bad habit except smoking, it
is too easy to guess! Write 3 connected sentences about it in the box below, Don't write the name
of the habit; use coffee pot instead in the necessary grammatical form (e.g. 'Coffee potting can be

dangerous for the people around you,'),

l.

2.

3.

8,

Now work with a partner. Read out your 3 sentences to each other and work out the meaning
each other's "coffee pots'!

of

&. Collect on the board all the bad habits mentioned by the class in 1/a, Can you think of any more
add to the list?

to

1:

Unt 4: Lfestyles

Lesson 2: Bad Habits

Reading and guessing key words and their meanings


following text is an extract from a blog entry on a bad habit.The key word (i.e. what the text
in 60 seconds and try to guess this first word with a partner. Can you
think of more than one possible answer?
The

is about) is missing. Read it

, we've been in this "on and off again" relationship for a long time, l've
relished your sweetness during good and bad times. Since secondary school, you've been
at every family dinner, every business lunch, and you've even been there for breakfast.
But we have both always known that this relationship has been bad for me. l depend on
you way too much. You no longer revive me when l'm tired, you are just a delivery tool for

mySu9aaddiction.Please,letmegonow'Youmaykeeptemptingmewithyourbrightly

coloured packaging, reminding me of your potentialdurin9 the holidays, but


away. Goodbye sweetness

lwillturn

Adaptedfrom: http://WWW.inspire.com/groups/dietand-fitness/discussion/break-up-wth-your-bad-habit-write-itoff-now/
Posted December

1 1,

2a08 ot 1 :56 ammylyrytysdqkdmk7y8ivca/index.xml

Check your ideas and discuss in pairs or small groups the following question:

ffi How did you work out your answers in 60 seconds?


Read the text aglin knowing what it is about. Focus on this question now.

# What makes the text so personal, strange and funny7


Share and discuss your ideas as a class.

Defrning meaning
A"The words or expressions in the table (1 -6) are all from the text above. tf you do not know one,
first try to work out the meaning from the context.

b. Motrh the words with the appropriate definition. You do not need to understand every single
word in the longer definitions to be able to do the matching.
A.

the possibility of successful


development in the future

depend on sb

B.

to get great pleasure or


satisfaction from sth

potential

c.

1.

2.

3,

relish

(v.)

for

a habit or practice

D.

to attract, appeal strongly to, or


invite sb to do sth risky

addiction

E.

to rely on sb, especially for


suppot or success

tempt sb (with sth)

F.

give renewed well-being,


energy, or strength

4. revive sb or sth

5.

6.

a very strong, often abnormal desire

. Check your onswer as a class. lf you have difficulties with any words in the defrnitions, ask the
others about them or check them out in a monolingual dictionary,

R
l

?
i
i

Lessan 2: Bad Habits

sa

Do you have a smlarbad habt?


Think of one of your bad habits or a bad habit of someone in your family. Stand up, go round
and telt the others about it.Try to find 2 or 3 others tolking about the same or a similar habit. Form a
group with them.

DlscUssloN

small group with the same or similar bad habit, discuss why it is dangerous, and why
yourl or someone else's life would be better off without it.
ln your

minute to summarise your small group's discussion for the rest of the class. Link your
ideas with some of the following words and expressions from the Useful language box.
Your have

Usefu! language:

adding further ideas or

inormation

showing a difference or
Cont]ast

showing a reason or cause

r also

e but

c because

. too

* although

o as a result

* as well

e however

c because of

c in addition

a despite

c50

f/

One-mnute speed readng

\*

You have exactly 1 minute to read through the following 5 paragraphs and get the general idea
of what the whole text is about. Then, think of a title for the whole text. (At this stage do not worry
about the empty lines before paragraphs 2-5.)

Title:
description of the task
Reading Task 1 Paragraph Headings involves matching paragraphs to headings. To do this
you do not usually need to understand the whole text, but you do need to have a good
sense of the overall meaning of each section.
1: General

2,-

lt's usually a good idea to start by reading the whole text through quickly and getting a
sense of its general meaning. Avoid reading word for word. See if you can identify the main
focus in each paragraph. You could underline any words which seem to be central to the
meaning of a paragraph,
3:

When you have done that, read through the list of headings for each paragraph. While
reading these, try to predict what they might refer to. Are there any obvious matches with
the text you have just read?

EXAMWlzARD

TlP
You do NOT need

to understand
every word, or even
many of the details
to understand the
general meaning of
a paragraph or of a
whole text.

Lesson 2: Bad Habits

4z

Now get down to doing the task. Read each paragraph again and find the appropiate
headg. Deal with problems arising from having more than one possible headin9 for
a paragraph or using the same heading more than once. You may need to read some
paragphs more carefully a few times in order to be certain. focussing on the words You

underlined earlier,
5:

What are the catches? Well, remember there are two extra paragraph headings that You
do not need. Also, some headings may be very similar in meaning, so check that You have
caught the right shade of meanin9,
Check your answers and the titIes you have given. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages
such a speed reading task,

f/
,*
EXAMWlzARD

of

Identifying paragraph headings about paragraph headngs


The 5 paragraphs above have information and tips for doing the Paragraph Headings task
successfully, Match each paragraph with the headins (A-F) which refers to it,There is one heading
you do NOT need. One has been done for you as an example,

iii.

Heading

A.

Paragraph no.

Dangers
Don't give up!

C. The mechanics
D. E,g, General

description of the task

Thinking while reading headings


F.

b.

HoW to begin

, o class, checkyour answers and discuss the sentences, phrases and words of each paragraph

that helped you in the matching.

Reading Task l: Paragraph Headings


You will read a text about smoking.

# Match each paragraph to the correct heading.


ffi Write the number of the matching paragraph next to the heading in the table below.

S One

has been done for you.

* There

are two extra paragraph headings that you DO NOT NEED.

: Lfestyles

Lesson 2: Bad Habts

Paragraph headings
A. Reduce your stress levels
B. Educate yourself about the physical problems
C. Change your lifestyle
D. Reward yourself
. Acknowledge your

e.g.

dependence

F. Get medical assistance

G. Establish a support system


H. Know your weak points
l. Find a strong source of motivation

(Example) * ckrpw{"pfue y alu dprennmrz


you must uiapde*phinuwly you smoke. Is it to be able

to deatwith anxiety and stress? ls it to fit in with Your sPouse or


co-workers? lt may be hard for you to admit your addiction to Cigarettes, but you can't change what you don't make known to
yourself and others. lf you're in denial, you'll never get where you need to be.
1.

to be iuccessful in your efforts to quit, you must be ready for the withdrawal period. The sYmPtoms include headaches,

tiredness and even dizziness, and they can last up to a month,This is the most difficult Part of the Process. So before You
start, read and find out all you can about the medical consequences of quittin9. Knowledge is power.
2.
There are some times when you're more likely to smoke than others. Recognise those times, and do something to Potect
yourself. you needn,t be strong and powerful all day long every day. Just do somethin9 to distract Yourself when You're
most likely to smoke. For example, if you usually smoke during work breaks, use that time for a short walk instead.
3.

nows, intellectually, that smoking is bad for your health. But what you need most is a good reason to quit. lt
might be money, o your children, or your health. But whatever your incentive, it must be powerful enough to keeP You
going through the physicaland mentalsymptoms of withdrawal.

ru"ryo*

4.

expert Dr. John Mays. To eliminate your smoking habit, You will have to alter
probably
mean transforming your day-to-day existence. For example, you may
wiIl
other habits and routines as well. This
you
spend time with, at least temporarily.
who
you
for
fun
and
do
have to reconsider What
,,lt,s

noi willpower, it,s programmin gl'

says

5.
vou .orLt quit smoking alone, Whi|e it's true that a doctor's advice may be helpful, what you really need is a community
that will embrace your decision to be healthier. Get your family and friends involved in your efforts to kick Your habit,
you,ll need their encouragement, and they'll need to get tough with you and tell you the truth when You're feeling weak.

6.

overcomlng an addiction is difficult, but it can be done. Yet you have to find ways to motivate Yourself. When You make

progress/ 9e yourself credit, or even a gift. For each small step on the road to success, make sure You treat Yourself well.
Quitting smoking is dfficut, but it sn't a punishment.

Checkyour answers.
Discuss the sentences, phrases and words in each paragraph that helped you select the

appropriate headings.

Unt 4: Lfestyles

Lesson 2: Bad Habits

Gvngadvice
Find expressions in the text in Activty 7 which give advice and complete sentences
sentences l0-1 2, think of other expressions for giving advice which are not in the text,

&

E 9.;

You'll have

to.,, f"

-9.

For

ways to..

1.

2.
3.

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1,1,

12.

b,Working in groups of 4, think of any bad habit or addiction you have, and ask other students in
your group to give you advice on how to get rid of it. tJse some of the expressions above (e.g. 'You will
have to be careful not to. . .) or the extra ones in the Answer key on p. 165.

CoIIocatons
&. Work in small groups, each group choosing only one of the words in the middle column. ln your
group, collect at least 5 words that are used in partnership with your word to form collocations (see
the exa mples with'smoki ng').

cl)n -, pa,rswe -,gun

qrit -, tab

u.p

-,

u,p -,

smoking

-campa,rtw-ent, -ban,

\,

h^azard,r, -

-re/"atd. djsca,s.ts

(an) addiction

(an)effort

(a)symptom
Finalise your group's collocation list on a poster and place it on the wall for the rest of the group
for further reference.

Unt 4: Itl

ing, Ways

Lesson 3: Ways of Living, Ways ofThinking


ExAM
PRAcTlcE

SK|LLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUS:

l
t
l

l
l
l

Vocabulary: adjectives describing lifestyles

Writing Task 2:
Discursive Writing
An Essay

Speaking: brainstorming and

planning arguments

Reading and writing: identifying

key features of essays

Writing:buildingcoherence

with linking words

Speaking: arguing for and against


Writing: becoming aware of a
text type - an essay

What kind(s) of lfestyle do we lead?


&, Work on your own. Look at the list of adjectives describing lifestyles and/or character, Choose
one adjective and make notes of the following points:
o identify the typical key features of this lifestyle or character,
o think of examples for your adjective of famous (or infamous!) people, or anyone that you know.

materialistic self-centred
withdrawn down-to-earth

monotonous
glamorous

exciting

naive

altruistic
adventurous

fJ. Work in groups of 3 or 4. Briefly share your descriptions and some of your chosen examples, Feel
free to raise questions about each other's points.

Plannng an argument
The editor of a student magazine has asked you to write an essay like article in which you

express your views about the following topic:'Positive thinking will help you over(ome any

obstaclesi

Agree with your partner on a number of points for (pros) or against (cons) the
opinion you want to express in the task, Note them down in the table.
:.i ,, Work in pairs.

For

l Pros

Against l Cons

Unt 4: Lifestyles

Lesson 3: Ways of Living, Ways of Thinking

Wu Present your arguments to another pair and see if they agree or disagree with your points, Add
new points to your list, as appropriate.
*." As a class,

discuss the following questions:

ln what ways can such a collection of pros and cons help you when writing an argumentative
or discursive text?

What should the next step be in the planning process before any writing takes place?

Writing starts with thinking and planning (see Unit 3.2, Activity 5).

f-/

Checklist or efifectve essays

,*

id. On your own, decide how important you think each of the following criteria is when writing an

EXAMWlzARD

essay, Tick the a p prop

ri

ate col um n.

Criteria for effective essays

lmportant

Not

important

lt depends

lmportant

Not

important

lt depends

The essay should have a logical structure.

There should be exactly 5 paragraphs.


Each paragraph should focus on just one point or topic.
Each paragraph should contain just one idea.
Each paragraph should have a topic sentence.
Pros and cons should appear in each paragraph.
The opening and closing paragraphs should be very dramatic and

striking.
The writer's position should be made clear in the first paragraph.
The conclusion should confirm the writer's position

The conclusion should contain no new ideas that have not been
considered earlier in the essay.

There should be appropriate linking of ideas between sentences and


between paragraphs,
There should be examples to support the main ideas,
The style should be quite formal, or at least neutral. There should be
no contracted forms or informal phrases.
There should be a line space between paragraphs.

As a class, check your answers and discuss any differences of opinion. You can find further
practical comments and suggestions about essay Writing in the Answer key on p. 165.

Lesson 3: Ways of Living, Ways of Thinking

Analys ng dscursive writng


Read this essay once. Then, as a class, discuss to what extent you agree and/or disagree with the
writer's views.

k itlor4.t/nl

to /,tae ailtil"ottt

Yau coa( h/d/ a,rk


to

a"

cal

tunre egurd. questinn todau, yrtt/ttt d^oesnt .t0, rul 4tb/2


L
ftr;^,.rlft ?u/ a/oa

thun it I.rl" ttrzak'worb.d

fry*yyg
a/thfusr it certal,n|/

wonnt

Oru uajm r,ta"c|e t0 outrcerue anu/

4*

^tr!r"l?*t
druarfutta

a,h

trn,'

|le ea,ry.

/rc ou,r hn"tt

hil coU r^*l

rf payl,?4 fty th)lr4s, a*t


't/t4'1ft drff uLfu ,w!Ltt.,

do\t
ttFos<+b/z.'

euuydny lrcs. uowua

Tl,Le ft{t kqe s.teP unuli be to hate yarw ?l.tu 'nm-ca,sh'ha,}tts a.c"btp bv t^oq
arnl1 7ou"il4d. th. /n/ cnu444/u'. Naturala, tk prmels woub i"f* o
ulwyfn*r.l to cttuvrau.wsc an coo?han|.ou'aU

7araes.

A,u,l.tedly, tfu /nqt{tt6

f dal.ft.q, qrl.iruq, a4kjna, buil744 aaj. exclunnuta

tlu.n^as

wauH l,e'il.u4r-co&44. Hnufu, a/,l't/lk k ec-rtn&4'wj,lz rru-{r,!'"xnrh


ant autdnr a"chbiti.es;phmt, qrute a h2/4
'

fnryt

tn a//, a/t/4au*h 's tn ,rrE f* ,ul to cfta,bark an t.ts ,ioruney atw, thz bttufts are
xrrng el4ru*h to"wn*t pnplt'cott*id*r q*rrlj tt a try *u'4. Ii^e., tl4at
t"
J
,+//

clirur th4/4V0l{, or I, ur4hi

@'r-y

thjJl,k,

(178 words)
This essay was inspired by an article by Mark Boyle in The Guardian:
hx p ://www.g u ard i a n,co. u k/env i ro n m e nt/2009/n ov/79/ m a r k- boy l e- m o ney

Read the text again and tick the points in the essay-writing checklist below that you think the
text meets.

Checklist (with

8 criteria selected from the table in

Activity

Criteria for effective essays

3):

/tx

Logical structure

Writert position made clear at the beginning


Strong opening and closing
Coherent paragraphs, each dealing with one issue
Topic sentence in each paragraph
Formal/Neutral style, no contracted forms

Appropriate linking between paragraphs


Conclusion confirms writer's position without repetition
As a class, discuss your evaluation of the text. Compare them with the comments in the Answer

Key on p. l66.

Underline any words or expressions in the essay that you think may be appropriate in essaywriting (e.g.'You could hardly ask...'or'Naturally,...'),Then share your ideas with the class and
discuss what function they have in the text.

f./
!*

ExAMWlzARD

Lesson 3: Ways of Living, Ways of Thinking

Ilnit 4: Lifestyles

lffi
f/
*

Lnkina words and expresions or connectng deas across


se nte n-ces a n d p a r a g i aph s
tinking words or phrases from the box in the appropriate row in the table according
to the function they serve. (More often than not, they open a sentence or paragraph and then are
followed by a commo, or they may also appear in the middle of a sentence,)
:;,.:,,.

Write

ExAMWlzARD

the

Accordingly,

Additionally,

AIternatively,

As a consequence,

As for...,

At the same time,

For instance,

However,

ln other words,

ln particula1

ln spite of this,

ln short,

lnstead,

Moreover,

on the other hand,

on the whole,

On top of that,

Specifically,

To put it in another way,

To sum up,

With regard to,..,

Comparing &
contrasting
Adding info
Concluding,
summarizing
Linking words
of all kinds (with
different ones being

Giving examp!es,
focusing
Reformulating,
clarifying

appropriate in

different contexts:
informal or formal,
Written or spoken, etc.)
are very important in
every test in the 82
Euroexam.

Referring to or

changing subject
Cause & effect;
reason & result

oyou have to

recognise them in
order to understand
and follow the logic
of the texts e.g, in
the Reading, the
Listening and the

Mediation test tasks.

oYou are expected to


use them to create

coherent language
in the Mediation,
Writin9 and
Speaking test tasks,

Giving alternatives

b.

Checkyour answers as a class.

Look at the box below. Circle only those linking words and expressions below that are typically
With
used in forma!/neutralwriting (both in emails and essays).Then quickly checkyour selection

C.

the whole class,

actually, consequently, by the way, definitely, anyway, in comparison, to telI the truth, sure,
speaking of..., for example, to some extent, considering..., 9uess what,

Lesson 3: Ways of Living, Ways of Thinking

Writing Task 2: Discursve Writng

An Essay

Writing Task 2: Discursive Writing -- An Essay (30 minutes)


choose one of the following essay topics and follow all the instructions.
ffi Write

TOP|C

Unit 4:

approximately 150 words.

1:

'AlwaYs live for the moment and never worry obout tomorrour," To
what extent do you agree
with this statement?

Write an essay.
N, B. ExPlain Your Points for and against the given statement and give a conclusion
at the end. Make sure you state
your argument in a logical way.

TOPIC 2:
"Giving is the most important thing one can do." To what extent do you
agree with this
Statement?

Write an essay.
N. B, ExPlain Your Points for and against the given statement and give a conclusion
at the end. Make sure you state
your argument in a logical way.

Write the essaY at home as a HOMEWORK task, keeping to the time limit of 30 minutes
as
strictlY as Possible. Hand in your work to your teacher, who will give you detailed feedback
based on the simplified criteria below.
Before starting the 30-minute process at home, read the whole Answer Key for Activity
simplified evaluation criteria for writing tasks as a
checklist and reminder of what to focus on during the planning and writing process.
3 again on P. 165. Also, read these

Task Achievement
(1-5 pts)

Appropriacy
(1-5 pts)

coherence
(1-5 pts)

Cohesion
(1-5 pts)

Would Your writing achieve its communication purpose in real life? Would the reader fully
understand Your intentions, point of view? Have you followed all the instructions and included
all - and only - the relevant information?
ls the laYout and style of your text appropriate for the text type, your intention
and the imagined readershiP? Have you found the right level of formality (e.g. contracted vs. non-contraited
forms)? Have you referred to all relavant points in the instruction?
ls the text

made up of logically structured, well-connected ideas?

Have You used PurPosefully chosen linking words and phrases, reference words and phrases,

in order to establish the inner cohesion of both the paragraphs and the whole
text? Have you

divided your text into well-connected paragraphs?

Grammatical Range
and Accuracy (1 -5 pts)

Have You used the right grammaticai structures with the necessary range to support your
communicative PurPoses? Are there grammatical or accuracy mistakes (e.9. word orde1 punctuation) left in the text which hinder comprehension?

Lexical Range and


Accuracy (1-5 pts)

Have You used the right range of vocabulary which is appropriate to support your communicative PurPoses? Are there any vocabulary mistakes left in the text which hinder comprehension?

tJnt 4:

Lesson 3: Ways of Living, WaYs of Thinkng

Lfestyles
"OraI essays"

brief
& Work in pairs, and choose one of the topics below. Consider and write down some
"
and a short
introduction
a
one-sentence
of
arguments for and againts the topic for yourself. Think
conclusion.
'Positive thinking will help you overcome

'you cannot succeed without sometimes

any obstacles1

taking ri5ks]

'Some stress is good for us.'

'Virtual reality is not the same as real life]

your
a different partner. present your ideas with your introduction and conclusion and
partner should respond with at least one comment or question,Then swap roles,

b"workwith

&" As

class, discuss the main differences between presenting an argument in writing and in

speaking.

Unit 4: Lfestyles

Lesson 4: ln and out of Homes

Lesso n 4: ln and out of Homes


ExAM
PRAcTlcE

KILLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUSI

l
l
l
l
l

Grammar: quantity expressions

Listening Task 3:
Radio Programme

Vocabulary; words related to types


of homes

Reading

blso in Unit 3.1)

scanning for spee ific infornration

Speaking: arguing for and against


Listening: understanding

detailed information

Writing: lrecoming aware of a text type


* an informal email

}:,

Exam skills; analysing multiple-choice


questions and answers

Group survey: True or not?


&"Workwith a partner.Your teacher will allocate both of you one of the statements below. With
your partner, work out what question you need to ask the others in the class in order to check
whether the statement is true or not (e.g.'Have you ever lived/been .,,?' or'Do you or your parents
plan to move house...?'). Checkyour question with your teacher.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1

1.

12,

At least 3 people in the group have lived away from home for longer than half a year.
There is someone in the group who will move home in the next 6 months.
Fewer than 5 people live in the same home they were born in,

Hardly anybody has lived abroad for longer than a month,


Most people in the group live in a flat.
There are exactly 2 people in the group who have lived in student hostels.
Only

few people in the group have ever felt homesick.

There is at least one person in the group who is planning to start living on their own soon,
Only one or two people have ever lived in a rented flat or a house.
More than half of the group have moved house at least twice in their lives.
There are 3 people in the group who are currently living away from their families.
Nearly everybody in the group knows where they are going to be living in one year's time.

b. Walk rornd and ask the other students in the class your question, taking notes of the answers.
Make sure that the two of you, as a pair, ask everyone in the class. When you have finished, compare
your answers With your partner to see if your statement is true or not.

rF

Lesson 4: ln and out of Homes

Share Your findings with the rest of the class, using expressions from
"
the llseful tanguage box
below (e.g. 'our statement was ".. .'i and it is/isn't tru because hardly
anyone. . ,').
'::,

Useful

the

+ nearly / almost everyone in the group..,

e the majority of the people here...


* about two thirds / three quarters of us...
* (exactly) half the group..,

=-

"
:.

in1
quite a few o us...
(only) a few of us...
hardly anyone...

nobodY / none of us...

Discuss as a class whether any of the survey results surprise you.

Descrbing places to lve


&'

Work in Pairs. Look at the 5 words or phrases under each of the


following pictures and choose the
You could use to describe that kind of housing. IJse a dictionary if necessary. Then check
your onswers as a class,
2, 3 or 4 that

spacious
terraced house
3. suburban

.ahousingestate

1,

'l

2, a

housing
development
3. identical
2. a

4. detached
5. a

1.

detached

2, a
3.

front garden

front lawn

well-kept

4, a cottage
5. inner-city housing

4. rural
5. isolated

'i

rural

cottage
3. detached
4. modernised
5. a communal
2. a

garden

7|-

1.

privacy

2. run-down

student hostel
4. a garden
5. shared facilities
3. a

'l

a block of flats

2. a

residential area

apartment block
ayard
a communal

3. an
4.
5.

garden

], next-door neighbours
2.
3.

semi-detached
twinned

4. red-brick
5.

upstairs

1.

high-rise blocks

2. lots of space
3, red-brick
4. identical
5.

shared facilities

lesson

llnit 4: Lifestyles

4: ln and out of Homes

The following four texts are extracts from emails written by people who live in four of the eight
different types o7 homes shown above, Read the extracts and decide which extract goes With Which
type of accommodation. IJnderline the keywords in the texts which helped you decide,
'.,,,,

1:

...lfeellreallyhavetogetoutofhere,gethomeforaweek,atleastiflwanttopassthe
home
just pack up and
retake, l,m telling you.

don't
really can,t understand why people

9o

forthebreaks.lt,simpossibletogetdowntoanyrevisionwitheveryoneactinglikecrazy
just leave the
after the other ", so if you
party animals upstairs, all turning twenty, one
pot",
at the usual place under the flower
front door key

2z

...not bad at all, of course,

l miss

to do much
the big garden but l wouldn't be able

gardeninganymore,wouldl?Withthe9randchildrencomin9overjustonceamonth

atthemost,there,snoreasontohaveallthatspace.Anyway,lstillhaveonebedroom
upstairs,whichmakesmefeelasiflamlivingintheoldhouse,thoughnoisedoescome
frombothsideshere'..andRobinandDoreencanstayinthesparebedroomoverlooking
to visit",
the smalI back yard when they come

3:

'..yes,lhonestlygotlostonthefirstdayinthislabyrinthofbuildings...justwalked
John
look like carbon copies of one another,
round and round, since all the buildings
saidthatlshou|dalwaystakeapocketfulofbreadcrumbswhenlgoouttohelpmefind
myWaybacklTheonlygoodthin9aboutthistypeofhousin9isthatmaintenancecosts
we were
are incredibly low with

io

that,s what
many people sharin9 the expenses. And

looking for really...

4z

...justfinishedunpackin9actually.l,mcompletelyexhausted,ofcourse,butldoenjoy

course, it
no compromises, no nothing", of
the independence; no next_door neighbours,
once the
still all over the place, but it,ll be all right
looks a bit untidy with the electric wires
_ it,s just
l can tell l,m goin9 to love it here
rewirin9 is finished and all this mess disappears.
low ceilings and, of course,
with the stone floors, the wooden beams,
9ot that air of history

thatgorgeousfireplace;l,mactuallylookin9forwardtoWintersolcanuseitl..'

Check and discus5 your answers as a class.

DO
Work in the same pairs again, lmagine that you live in one of the homes in the 8 Pictures, but
job,
(nationality,
age,
NoTTELLY}LJR PARTNER which one you have chosen. Make up a character
your partner will ask
family, etc.) that you think goes with the type of housing and take on that role.
questions about your home and about the advantage5 and the disadvantages of living there.
you
'Answer
the questions (use some of the appropriate words that belong to that tyPe of housing from
2/a), and see

if

your partner can identify the type of home. Then swap roles.

Lesson 4: In and out of Homes

!'-/
*

'i;"r?i!rtoradioProgrammes,answerngmultiple-choice

ExAM WlzARD

are some tips for doing Listening Task 3. Read through the list of ideas and decide if
each
one rePresents good or bad advice. Put a tick (1 if you think it is good advice and a cross (x) if you
think it is bad.
:3" Here

Exam tips
1.

Look at the questions before you listen to the recording and try to predict what you might hear.

2.

Think about what you already know about the topic.

3.

The first time you listen, concentrate on the general flow of the conversation.

4.

Write down as much as you can of what the speakers say.

5.

choose the answers that contain words that you hear in the interview.

6.

lf a question is too hard, write a note to the examiner explaining why you can't
answer it.

7,

Take notes of keywords, names of people, what they think, etc.

8.

Decide which multiple-choice answers are definitely wrong.

9.

Between the two rounds of the listening, look again at the questions you haven't answered
so that
you can give those parts of the recording more attention.

,l0.

/tx

lf you really don't know an answer, guess! Don't leave it blank.

11.

cough and sneeze a lot to stop other people from hearing the answers.

12.

Double-check your answers at the end of the test.

13.

lf Possible, look at the question heads and decide on your own answer. Then
choose the answer
which is closest to yours.

14.

lf

you have no idea which is the correct answer, leave it blank.


check your choices as a class. which three pieces of advice are the most useful?

se
DlscUssloN

To

leave or not to leave

ln the EXAM PRACT|CE task in this lesson (Activity 5), two youn9 people will be describing
their
experience of leaving home.

&. on your own, write two reasons to support the idea of leaving home to study or work, and two
reasons for staying with your family while studying or working.
My 2 reason to tay

.Work
like them

My 2 reasons to leave

in Pairs. Share

to

and discuss your reasons with each other, Add your partner,s ideas _

your own list.

if you

Lesson 4: ln and out of Homes

Lstening Task 3: Radio Programme


You will hear part of a radio programme about two young people who have left home.

On the test

13.

paper, you have ten multiple-choice questions about the programme.

Choose the best response (A, B or C) for the questions.

Write the letter of the appropriate answer in the Answer box below.

You will hear the recording twice.

You have two minutes to read the questions before the recording starts.

1. Sarah's father...

6. Danny went to college because...

A. wanted Sarah to join him in his business.


B. wanted Sarah to study business.
C. changed his mind about what Sarah should study.

A. it was the logical step after leaving school.


B. because he preferred studying to working,
c. because he could not find a job.

2. Sarah moved

7. Danny chose

A.
B,

c.

to the north of the country because...

A.

it was the only place she could study drama.


it was a less expensive area.

B.
C.

she could find work there.

3. On moving to the north, Sarah felt...

he could not find anywhere nearer home to do the


course,
there are no colleges in his home town.
he wanted to study in a bigger city.

8. What does Danny

A. free and happy.


B. homesick^
c. sad at having to live in an attic.

A.
B.
C.

4. After some time living in the north, Sarah...

say about his friends?

He has not made any friends in his college town.


He still prefers to be with his old school friends.
His home town friends come to visit him regularly.

9. Sarah and Danny...

A. broke up with her boyfriend.


B. moved into her grandmother's flat.
c. shared a flat with someone else.

B.

had simiIar childhoods.


both moved away from their home town for similar

reaSon5.
C, have different feelings about living away from home.

5. While Sarah was living in the north...


A. her father refused to talk to her.
B. her mother told her about her grandmother's death.
C. her mother supported her.

1.

3.

5.

7.

9.

2.

4.

6.

8.

10.

&" Checkyour answers

his current college because...

10.The interviewer...

A,
B.
C,

is objective and neutral.


is more sympathetic towards Sarah.

has difficulty at times understanding Danny.

as a class. Listen to the radio programme again to check details, if you need

to.

b. Dlr.rss

l
l

the

following questions:

Do you a9ree or disagree with Sarah's and Danny's decisions and attitudes? Why?
Compare them with your personal experience and/or plans concerning leaving or staying at
home.

at,

Unit 4: Lfestyles

f-/
1*

EXAMWlzARD

Lesson 4: In and out of Homes

J ustifyng m

ultp I e- choi ce a n swers

&, Work in small groups. Look at the audio script of the interview on p. 1 82, and underline the
phrases and sentences in the text that justify the right answer;. Also, find some support in the text for
why the distractors are wrong,

b. Checkyour

answers with the other groups,

Dscussing deas for email writng


j
,
'.,. Work in groups (A, B and C). Choose a picture from Activity 2. lmagine that you have just
finished house-sitting for a month there, while the owners were away on holiday. You are going
to write an emailto a friend about the good and bad times you had during the month. Use the
language and ideas from Activity 2, and writeyour content and language ideas into the box below.

The place where l've been house-sitting for a month:

content ideas:
Positive experience:

Negative experience:

Language ideas:
Useful words, expressions and structures:

Take your notes and get into new groups where each group has one member from the previous
groups (ABC, ABC, etc.). Share and discuss your ideas, adding to your own notes.

Using your notes, write the email of 100-'l 20 words on your own as a HOMEWORK task and
send it to your teacher.

Unit 5: Food for Thought


Lesson 1
Food Blogs
l*

-ffi

Lesson 2
The Sweetest Thing

Lesson 3
Eating Well or Not Eating Welt

Lesson 4
cultures and cuisines

Unit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson
EXAM TASK
Writing Task 2:
Discursive Writing
A Letter to the Editor

1:

Food Blogs

KltLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUI


l Spt akirrg: exprcssing contparison
l Speaking andvocabulary:

l
l
l

defining and explaining words

Vocalrtrlary: creating associatiotts


between wor,ds, phrases related to ood
and eatirrg
Exam skills: identifying tlre key featttres
of a letter to the editor
Exam skill: structurinq arr
argume ntative text

Food blogs, gastro magazines, cookbooks - or what?


&,

Work in pairs. Discuss in small groups what you think are the differences between food
blogs, gastro magazines, cookbooks or gastro TV-shows. Think of at least 2 advantages and
disadvantage for each of them.
ra. Shorc

yorr

reasons for using either of them with the rest of the class,

Taboo game and vocabulary-focused gapfiIl


"

Work in groups of 4, Each of you willget a different cg7j (p.210). Explain the word atthetop
partners W|THOUT using any of the taboo words given, or any other forms of
those. For example, if 'cooker' is one of the taboo words, you cannot say 'cook' or 'cooking'. Your
partners will try and guess your word.
of your card to your

F3. Whrn the explaining and guessing is over, showyour taboo cards to each other.You wilt need
them for the next step.

, Read

this text and fill each gap with one word from the 4 taboo cards, You may need to make

minor changes

(e,g.

singular-plural). Sometimes more than one answer may be possible.

About Simply Recipes

(1.)-

created by me, Elise Bauer. Unlike


Simply Recipes is a blog or a personal
most similar sites on the lnternet, Simply Recipes contains only a few hundred recipes,
all tested by me, my family or my friends. We invite you to try them, and if you like, leave
the dishes multiple
constructive feedback in the comments. As we (2,)
times, we often think of improvements and (3.)
. the recipes. lt was a few
year5 ago when l started writing down the (4.)
l had grown up with and
posting them on my website. l had just turned 40, and had spent most of my adult life

Lesson l: Food Blogs

workin9 as a

Unt 5: Food for Thought

(5.)--

Silicon Valley consultant with little

(6.)---

to cook, let alone learn how to cook. As l come from a big loving family, l decided to
document our famiy recipes. My blog started in 2003 and now reaches tens of thousands of
(7.).
each day and was voted Best Food Blog Overall in the 2006 Food Blog
Awards. Many of the recipes come from my family, many we make up, and many of them

(8.)

are those that we pull from


, magazines, and newspaper clippings we've
collected over 30 years. The recipes shown here use mostly whole food (9.)

and onlY occasionally a few things from cans or prepared foods because we believe in a
varied and healthy diet.

, check your answers in class. Discuss briefly which other words could go in each gap.

Choosing the right vocabulary for your texts


When You write a text of any kind, your best strategy is to build on your existing vocabulary,
though You maY also use the dictionary you have chosen. Always think about the most
effective vocabu|ary option to express your meaning as preciseiy as possible. Thinking about
synonyms, opposites, words of related meanings is always useful.

&. Organise these sixteen words into four groups based on the meaning of the words - not parts
speech.

recipe

ingredient

instruction5

feedback

stir

steW

add

boil

deep frozen

preserVe

expire

Vegan

healthfood

nutrition

diet

f//

f*

EXAMWlzARD

of

W, ComPare Your categories as a class. Discuss how you chose your categories and the reasons (e,g.
similarities and/or differences) for putting the words into them,
". Choose anY 3-4 of the t 6 words you could use in different kinds of posts in your own gastro
blog
or magazine for each of the following purposes (you can use the same word more thannce):
o presenting a recipe;
r writing a review about a restaurant you have just visited;
o sharing experience about a street food festival.

meaningful and purposeful sentence with the chosen word for the chosen purpose (e.g.
Presenting a reciPe:,,l stumbled upon this great recipe book in my grandmother's attic among ol,
shabby clothes.").
TrY to saY a

What is a Letter to the Editor?


Readers of newspapers and magazines sometimes Want to react to a published article
or news
item. UsuallY theY want to criticise, but sometimes they want to show gratitude, agreement
or
aPPreciation. For on-line publications, in place of letters to the editor, there is often a place for
comments after an article or news item,

r'//
*

EXAM WlzARD

llnit 5: Faod for Thought

Lesson 1: Food Blogs

Read the three short Ietter-to-the-editor extracts from a gastro magozine and write down the
topic or the type of text of the original articles to which the writers of these letters have reacted to.
To the Editor,

Dear Editor,

your
|'ve iust read with interest

,ecnt review about the latest


of Corey Smith's bestsellin9
"airion
Joys of the
series,'The
online
of the
Caiun BBQ1 Bein9 a member
l'd like

ulun .orn.unity myself,


in
to point out a few inaccuracies
easily
could
you
which
i" r.uui"*,
.oiru.'in your online version, if
you a9ree with my points",

To the Editor,

your feature
in last week's issue
about the new tasting menu
ot our beloved and freshly
reopened ''Taps and More'' pub
was unacceptable and lacked

l strongly hope that


another visit
and review follows soon in your
magazine which will show
the
varied flavours of this new
and
exciting menu.

yummier.

Topic 2

Topic

of
.iti.t" ,Oout the history

cuisine you

ouraronoay and local


online
iuilrirr,"O in you,latest

any
objectivity. l was wondering
if the
reviewer has really tried
the dishes
on the menu at all, or only
based
the article on hearsay..,

presented
l admit that most of the
delicious;
and
simple
recipes are
will
the changes |'ve suggested
and
onry mare them even easier

for your
Thank you very much

from the
i-r;;;. i h."" learnt a lot
as
t'".t, una anecdotes, as well
the
By
included,
;;;; ih" recipes
particularly
*.u. m" illustrations,
added a special
ir,Jt*o
"ia"os
Now, let me
text,
the
to
fluuou,
*,t.r you what the highlights

,n.r"

for me were",

and
After readin9 this colourful
l look forward
"ature,
;;;..*'r"
other
i" ,i.ii., new articles about
history,
regions' culinary
Topic 3

b.Share and discussyour solutions

in small groups.

Discuss as a class which letter to the editor is formal and which one is informal in style. Underline
any form or text which clearly supports your view of the level of formality (e.g. formal: 'Let me share

C.

with you.,.').

f/
\t

EXAMWlzARD

d.

coilrrt the

(e.g

about aims, structure, style etc.).

most

important features of

letters

to the editor as a class with the help of your teacher

Basic guidelines for writng a Letter to the Editor


Like most short texts stating a point of view, letters to the editor (LTEs) can be divided into three

sections: introduction, body and conclusion.

for each of the 6 pieces of advice below which part of the LTE it belongs to. Write the
name of the appropriate section (tntroduction, Body or Conclusion) next to each suggestion,

&, Decide

pieces of advice
A. Give evidence for your opinion briefly, limiting your views to 2-3 short points or paragraPhs,
B.

Mention as specifically as possible the article you have read and are planning to argue with.

C. Briefly outline the issue and your overall view that you are going to writing about.
D.

Summarise your opinion without word to word repetition.

E.

Express an overall appreciation about the pape1 magazine.

F.

Ask for something to be done - e.9. a etaction to be printed,


Check and discuss your solution in pairs. Give reasons for your choice.

Lesson

1:

Unt 5: Food for Thought

Food Blogs

Let's make a cheese sauce, shall we?


Dtscuss in class what dishes need a cheese sauce,
and who in the class likes such dishes, Find out if
anyone in the class can make any kind of cheese sauce.
i:{ u

Put two large spoons of flour into a


hot frying pan.
Add some butter and mix up
Blend in milk
Heat and stir. lt will thicken into a

a cheese sauce, (Do not look at the recipe on the right!)


", ln the monthly magazine Cookery World you have
read a recipe by Michael Jenner for making cheese
sauce,you are not satisfied with his instructions.
Discuss in class what you think is wrong with it.

5ti rri

ng,

A Letter to the Editor

A Letter to the Editor (30 minutes)

The monthly magazine CookeryWorld published MichaelJenner's recipe


for making cheese sauce.You find his instructions misleading andwrons.

Writealettertotheeditorofabout150wordscriticisingJenner,s{"..
recipe.

EXAMWlzARD

Add grated cheese and let it


dissolve on a low heat. Keep

F*

5auce.

WrtngTask 2: Dscursve Wrtng


Writing Task 2: Discursive Writing

cuA6us

Michael Jenner's recipe

r',ffi

''H{

-J

);';.ff5ijJ.",ourartictepre5entsyourcaseclearly.KeepinmindthatyouareWriting'",!.#
Write the letter at home as a HOMEWORK task, keeping strictly to the time limit of 30
minuteS.
Your teacher will evaluate your letter using the simplified criteria on p. 58, and will provide
you with detailed feedback on your text.

After you have written and handed in your text, read the Model answer on p. 167. Consider
why it is effective.

Mime race
,ik" Work in two or three large groups. Members of each group sit or stand close together at the back
of the room. Each team has its own pack of word cards (all packs containing the same words but
shuff]ed differently), face down on the teacher's desk. (All the words have appeared in this lesson.)

rffi

'b"

On" ,"rber of each team runs to their own pack of cards, takes the top one, reads it, puts
down and runs back to their own group to mime the word to their partners, illustrating the
meaning of the whole word, The group tries to guess the word as fast as possible. Another group
member gets another word to mime,This continues until the group has tried to mime all the cards
or until the teacher calls 'Time's up!!The winner is the group who has successfully guessed the most
words in the time available.
it

i:* As a recap, the teacher checks with the class any words that have not
been mimed or which gave
any of the groups diffrculties,

llnt 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thi ng

Lesson 2:The Sweetest Thing


EXAM TASK
Listening Task
Making Notes

SK|LLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUSI

2:

Speakingl arguing and exchanging

opinions

Listening: scanning for key words and

(also in Unit 1 ,1)

detailed information

l
l
l

Writing: reconstructing a text from notes


Reading: predicting missing information
Reading and grammar: spotting and
correcting spelling mistakes
Speaking: developing a story from prompts

l
l

Exam skills: focusing on details


for accurate note taking

AII the ue of
d.

l
l

honey

As a class, discuss the following questions:

Do you use honey at home to sweeten drinks, food, cakes, etc.?


What other purposes do you think honey can be used for?

small groups. Look at the list of possibte uses of honey, one of the most ancient nutrients
in the world. Discuss and decide which you think are true about honey and which are not, How do
you know? PutT or F for each of the statements below.

b.

Work

1.

lt speeds up the healing of wounds.

in

2. Mixed with sugar, it gives you softer lips.


3. lt can make you feel a bit better when you have a hangover.
4. ln an open container, it can keep other food in a cupboard fresh
5. lt makes your spots disappear faster.
6. lt has ca|ming effects and it can help you sleep better.
7. lt can |essen allergic reaction.
8. You can use it as instant paper glue.
9. lt offers a readily available energy boost.
10. lt

can improve the way you look, as it is good for your hair and skin.

C. Compare and discuss your answers as a


potential uses of honey?

ffi

class. Can you add

anything else to this list about the

riste ning to and completing quotes


,Workin pairs,Youwil!workwith eight

"sxl*

for longer.

86,

quotes containingtheword'honey! Student Alooks at P,

and student B looks at p. 1 95. Follow the instructions you find there.

llnit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thing

you have matched the halves and identifred the quotes, try to guess With your partner
which quote belongs to which "author",Try to explain what brings the quote and the "person"
together.

h.

Norar that

"Author" or source of quote

Number & letter of quote

(e.g.9-M)

Albert Einsten, German physicist


Winnie-the-Pooh (book character created by A. A. Milne)
Ogden Nash, 2Oth-century American humorous poet
Jonathan Swift, 18th-century lrish writer
Abraham Lincoln, US president
Willie Nelson, American country singer
Quincy Jones, American music producer
A. N. Wilson, English writer and newspaper columnist
ii,. checkyour answers as a class, and discuss which clues helped you, either in the content or style

ofthe quotes,

Listening, note-takng and text reconstructon


&" you are going to hear a news item, the headline of which is: 'Suspicious honey closes
California airporti What do you think the news story is about?

h.

L,ste, to the story twice and quickly write down as many words and/or chunks of text as you can.

. Work in pairs or groups of 3, From the notes you have taken, try to reconstruct the text you have
heard as accurately as possible. You do not have to be word perfect, but try to get as tlose to the
original text as you can,

(e
1,

Now /ook at the audio script on p. 1 8j, and compare your version with it. See in what ways yours
is different, and discuss the possible realons for the differences.
.

Readng, predicting and gap,fiIling


d.

Read through the fotlowing text about the joys of beekeeping, Do not worry about the gaps. With
your partner, choose the most appropriate title for the text from these 3 options,

A.

Keeping bees is a tough job, but somebody has to do it.

B.

Beekeeping: an easy way to make a living.

C. What can beekeeping

offer you?

,1[t}*

Unit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thing

Beekeeping is a noble occupation that enriches you both physically and mentally. At the
same time it is a very important part of our food production system. For instance, did you

know that bees pollinate one third of our food crops? Also, working in an environment with
such creatures, which are considered to be sacred bein9s in many cultures, is actually
and this feeling is only increased by the smell

(1 .)

of a freshly opened beehive. And the reward is hard earned honey, which is truly a food of

the gods, along with other incredible products of a healthy beehive: wax, pollen, royaljelly,
and even bee venom, which are all highly prized. All in all, a beehive is a source of

(2.)

My personal goal is to achieve financial independence with my small, or9anic, sustainable

beekeeping endeavour. This means following the methods of natural beekeepin9, to find
again the strength inherent in bees, which have survived for so many thousands of years.
in

While learning the basics of beekeeping is

order to master the finer points you have to keep learning and developing all your life. l am
'l0 hives left from the 15 l
trying to start small and grow with time. Right now l have only
used to have before last winter. ln the long run l need to reach

(4.)

hives in order to make a living from bees. But even if l don't achieve that,

IamprettysurethatmyloveofbeekeepingwillstayWithmethrou9hout(5.)now that l've become so hooked on its magic. After all, as


someone once said, beekeeping is more than a science; beekeeping is really an art.

Ad

a pted

from

H on

ey Beeke

ep in g :

hx p ://www.ho ney beekeepi

g.co.u

ld

Five chunks have been removed from the text. As a class, make guesses about what you think the
missing chunks might be about. The contexts will help you.

on your own, consider the j options for each gap and choose the one that fits best . The
unsuitable options (distractors) may be inaccurate and/or may not make proper sense for the gap.
4,

1.

So many

A. incredibly enjoy,

incredibly enjoyable,
C. incredible enjoyment,

B,

c. about

2.

5.

B.

at least 'l00
5

A. health and pleasure

A. the whole life

healthy and pleasurable


c. wealth and youth

C, my whole life

B.

B.

my hole life

3.

A. enough complicated
B.

extremely complicated

c. not very complicated

As a class, discuss briefly why, in each case, the wrong options do not fit the gap.

Lesson 2: The Sweetest

Th in

Unt 5: Food for Thought

TlP
Think Ahead! ln several activities in this course. we ask you to spend some time predicting topics or ideas, answers before you read a
text or listen to a re<ording. Obviously, in a real exam situation, you have a limited amount of time to do thi5. However, it is still worth
thinking quickly about what you can expect to read about or listen to. As soon as you see a title and/or can read the notes, spend a few
seconds imagining what the content may be. Researchers have found that it is much easier to catch information if you have clear
expectations about what you might read or hear. Use your guessing and predicting skills wherever possible!

Lstening Task 2: Making Notes


|!!tening rask

2:

l{t.,

Making Notes (-10 minutes)

You will hear part of a radio programme in which a honey expert, Laurence Woodruff,
speaks about ways of keeping honey at home.

fi

16.

Look at the notes. The notes contain nine gaps.

H you have one minute to read the notes.

Now listen to the speaker and write a maximum of 3 words on each numbered gap in the
Answer box.
*

Do not write more than 3 words in one gap,

You will hear the recording twice,

How to keep honey

.
.
.
.

Darker honey has

_1_

than light-coloured honey.

Honey can lose its flavour and aroma if the container


Honey that has

_3_

is_2

can still be used.

To make hardened honey soft again, we should place the container

.
.
.

Don't use honey that

_6

Cooking with honey

is

Children younger than

good because honey

is

_7

_9_shouldn't

be given honey.

Answer box:
6.
2.

3.

8,

4.

9.

5.

Compare and discuss your answer;.

_and

in
cakes stay

4_
_8

but make sure that it isn't

Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thi ng

at,

l. Listen to the monologue again and askyour teacher to stop thetape when you hear the
information for the gaps,
C. As a class, briefly summarise what new information you have learnt about honey or how to keep
it.

dentfyi n g spel l n g mstakes

.ln

the gapped sentences below there are six spelling mistakes. Can you find them and correct

them?
'l

Fossils of honey bees date back to about

bears ago,

2.

Cave paintings in Spain from

3.

People have collected honey for at last

4.

Bees have been producing honey the same day for

5. Honeybees'wingsbeat
6.

_worker

BC are the earliest records of beer-keeping.

years.
year5.

times per minute, making their distinctivefuzz,


miles to leather 'l pound of

bees would fly approximately

honey.

Put the correct number from the box below into the gapped sentences to make true statements.

7,000

11,400

9,000

35,000

'l80

mil|ion 556

150 million

Checkyour answers as a class.Which fact do you find the most surprising?

se
DlscUssloN

Stngngstories
.Work

in small groups. Discuss and decide a) where the speaker was, b) what was happening. Use
your imagination (the key words in the statements will help you). Give reasons for the points you

make.
t

'Suddenly l was surrounded by thousands


of bees, so l threw myself into the lake]

just got to the key point when a bee


landed on my noseJ

'l d

'The jar of honey opened in my rucksack.


lt was terrible.'
As a class, share and discuss the groups' ideas.

C" lf anyone in the class has a real bee or wasp story of their own, they should tell their story to the
others and answer their questions,

Unit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 3: Eating Well or Not Eating Well

Lesson

3:

Eating Well or Not Eating Well


ExAM
PRAcTlcE

l
l
l
l
l

Reading Task 2:
Scan Reading

making suggestions
Vocabulary: words describing

ood and cooking

Speaking:giving opinions
Reading: scanning for specific information
Listening: understanding overall
meaning and key information

*
.B re

Exam skills: identifying scan


readng technique5

Types of food
:}. Work in pairs. Look at the pictures and guess what exactly you can see in each of them. Add
whether you like it/them or not. (E.g.'D might be cold cherry soup, l love it on a hot summer's day.')

(D

rt

"

t.

-l

ffi
.-

-.-

-.,'

,_- ]+

--

:_

Types offood:
a.
b.

d,..Gqa). reft/ r.frfut r.o.w?.

h.
Check and discuss your ideas and suggestions,

Unit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 3: Eating WeIl or Not Eating Well

Readng for specfrc nformation and vocabulary practice


Read the following 5 text extracts taken from recipes in food blogs. Guess which picture in
1 each text refers to. Underline 2 or 3 key words in each text that help you decide.

Activity

.rjTi:i [T?,:.i# * o, lTti,,ff

i:ffi:i$l1j$:lii:::,"
simmer.tor
ir," r,eat and

li"""ii., ""tes untila slightly


Pour into shallow
']l^'ji^*r and refrigerate until
serving, stir in
wine,
the cream and

fil\ets
.Season the

",,

#:,T;#l!il:,i
,"ii,;i,x;;'Hii":,,:;r;,.,*:*"1,:lTi!'":i[:"'

oeeruntit

iiu"
B rninJ;::io
alr
-'J-'
"" se,
Picture
*\
tooout

Picture

",

lil

,:i;:n,;l*',"#r*_",

ffik;;;.

il,il;.;;'"*

l ],,1li,|i

and
with sa\t

io-u"t coot

ln^a

medium-sized

L,trdrn tooefh,

Ti,**,*:_::"
.i$,t1,i5tn:"-t,:1

ff

ffiiJ1];

dough. Fl,

a Oisk, wrap

refrr'g.e ra
te u

much oil, l actually find that


by baking, you increase the
amount of lavor,

pictue---

mil

*L .,<ing bowl,
i',i i3i;?l''"'

-=o'oftesive
i-t''n"'*oough

n,,'

irto

iiil.r'"i,"

Picture
Pictue

se
DlscUssloN

ffi. s o class, checkyour answers and discuss the words and phrases that helped you, Note any new
words and phrases that you have meL

Creating a menu
Work in groups. Compile an English-language 'Menu of the Day' for a small local restaurant. Use
the dishes from Activity 1 or any other one of your favourites. During the discussion, use some of
these expressions. Write your menu on a large sheet of paper, similar to the one in the pictures.

Useful language:

think we should begin with...

* To be honest/ Quite honestly,...

* l don't think this can follow that.,.

* l agree,,.. is awful/wonderful.

* The best combination would be..,

* l also do not like...

e Yes, in a way, but l don't reaIly like that.,,

c l am not

a Hmm, possibly, but...

+ l

Can you imagine.., after,..?

lf

you ask me,.

. .

e l (don't) think,.. goes well with...

a fan of really spicy

food...

don't like,,.

e l have never tasted.

e lcan't stand,..
+

Hmmm, llove...

Present your group's menu to the class briefly with the reasons behind your choice of dishes.

Unit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 3: Eating Well or Not Eating Well

Reading skills overview


We read different types of texts in different ways. For example, we do not read a telephone
directory all the way through to find one telephone number, but we
well, most of us
do
read a novel from the beginning to the end.

f-/

\.l

EXAMWlzARD

F.l}" Look at the j different types of reading skitts below, Give an example for each skill or
technique in
a rea1-1ife reading situation.

Reading Skills
Skimming (SK): reading
scanning (sc): reading

a text quickly to get the


a

8ist'or overall meaning,

text quickly to find a particular piece of information.

lntensive reading (lR): reading

text carefully and more slowly for detailed information.

Now look at these different types of texts. Discuss with a portner whtich of the above skills we are
most likely to use when we read each one. Mark each text type with either sk, sc or IR.
TV guide

a workplace memo

a newspaper article

an economic report

a concert poster

a short story

job advertisement

an online advertisement

a train timetable

a webpage

medicine instructions

a news portal

Sometimes we read the same kind of text for different purposes and this might also change the
reading skill we need. Circle the appropriate skill for each of the different uses of a menu.

lf

you...

you -.-_-.......-- the menu

to know what a certain dish is exactly,

skim

read intensiVely

...Want to see what there is on offer in general,

skim

read intensively

...want to eat fish,

skim

read intensively

Compare and disscuss your answers as a class,

Readng Task 2: Scan Readng

How to succeed?

&u Below are five tips on how to do this task in the exam successfully, mixed up. Rearrange them so
that theY are in a more logical order: write a number (1-5) in the circle in front of each pragraph to

show the right order.

Never leave a statement unanswered. lf you don't know the answer,


9uess!
Make sure you read the texts and statements very carefully. Sometimes a few words can
make the difference between an answer being right or wrong.
Then work through the statements, checking whether you have marked the correct section

of text by looking at the text again. Fill in your answer in the space provided. lf you don't know
one Yet, leave it and go on to the next one. Come back to it at the end - it may be easier then.

f-/
\*

EXAMWlzARD

Unit 5: Food for Though

Lesson 3: Eating Well or Nat Eating Well

Next, skim read the text right through and mark the parts of the text that you think tell
you about statements 1-7. Remember, there may be parts of the text which you don't need to
understa nd com pletely.
Read the statements 1-7 , so you have an idea of what to look for in the texts.

b.

|,,ffi

Check your answer os a class, Discuss further details with the others and your teacher if necessary.

Reading Task 2: Scan Readng


lryrasktwo:
E+eEsFryffiF

Scan Reading (10 minutes)

You wiIl read about four girls with eating disorders.


ffi Read the texts and decide if the information is in text A, B, C or D.

# Place the appropriate letter in the circle


Example: This girl didn't realise she had

at the end of each statement.

problem with eating.

lnformation to find
This girl...
1. sometimes did not eat for several days.
2. collapsed at school,
3. was concerned with weight and eating from early childhood.
4. found moving increasingly difficult.

5. received institutionaI care.


6. overate to the point of vomiting.
7. used hunger to stimulate study,
Text A: Anna
l never really thought l had an eating disorder until l was told about it by other people.
As a child l was always rather fat. lf food of any kind was put in front of me, l ate it. Even in
my teena9e years l was probably less concerned about my appearance than many of my
friends. l remember thinking how comfortable l was in my clothes because at that time l
was'flowerie'which meant l wore long loose dresses. l always did well at my studies and l
decided to study philosophy at university. lt was there that l stopped eating. Being hungry
gave me a rush of energy so l could carry on reading all through the night; l didn't feel that
there was anything wrong, but after a few weeks some of my friends started to worry and
said that l should see a doctor.

lltll_":tlil

have been worried about my weight and what l ate ever since l was a little girl. But things
started to get really bad in my last year at school. l had always eaten one bar of chocolate
a day, but then l felt l wanted to eat one in every break and then it became two. l tried to
'forget'my money but it was no good as l always ended up borrowing money from friends.
After school l always felt hungry and treated myself to a cake in a caf on the street corner.
l tried to hide from my parents the fact that l was eating so much, but of course l was
becoming obese. l would be out of breath just goin9 upstairs. Finally after a row with my
parents l agreed to see a doctor about the problem.
l

Lesson 3: Eating Well or Not Eating Wett

Unit 5: Food for Thought

l.didn't have anY kind of eating problems until l split up with


my boyfriend, Bruno, last year.
After he left me and started going out with someone else, my
lfe;ust fell apart. l couldn,t
sleep at night and l couldn't concentrate on anything duringihe
ay. rvry schoolwork was
a.ffegted, but so was my eating. l would go for a .oul"
aays witnoui eating anything and
drinking onlY strong coffee; then all of a sudden l would feel hungry
and would eat nything
and everything that l could find. ln fact l would eat so much
that iwould make myself
PhYsicallY sick. ljust felt so alone. My parents did nothing to help because they couldn,t
understand me at all. l stopped meeting people and bec-ame
relly depressed.
Text D: Denise
MY eating disorder started when l was thirteen and l have
never known why. ljust started
saYing no to food because l felt it was making my body fat
and l didn,t wani trrat to happen,
Things just got Worse and worse as l ate less. The u"ry
,ight of food made me sick. My parents
Weren't verY helPful at all; my father just told me to eat and
when l didn,t, tre becam ngry.
Mother just told me that l was being stupid. lt was my teachers
who finally did somethin"g.
was in the middle of my sociology lesson and l felt dizzy andthen
l fainted. When l woke"up
l was in hosPital With a drip feed, l left hospital
after a eek but then l spent a further month
at a clinic where l received psychological counselling.
t

Check your answers as a class.


Take the statements one by one and quickty find evidence
for the right answer;. lJnderline
sentences or expressions which helped you identify the right answer.

Lstening and discussion: the media and our eatng habits


d' Listen to this short summary of a science podcast twice, Take notes of the most important points.
b. h

smatt groups discuss the following points:

Do you agree with the main idea?

what do you think can be done to lessen this influence? List 2


or 3 things.

C. Share and discuss your suggestions as a class.

(e
tl

Unt 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines

Lesso n 4: Cultures and Cuisines


ExAM
PRAcTlcE

SK|LLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUSI

Speaking Task 4:
Discussion

(also in Unit 3.4)

l
l

Speaking:giving reasons,
arguing for and against
Speaking: using phrases for
effective discussions

l
l
l
l

Do we eat to live or live to eat?


ls eating one of the most enjoyable parts of your life or is
the purpose ofeating for you?

First read some

it

just necessary for survival? What is

comments from a blog,

lt's simple, if you eat to live then you live to eat.

l love

to eat. l sometimes eat because "it's there".

Eating is all about happiness, believe me.

lf you wanna live happily, you need to eat... chocolate!

Work in pairs. Discuss one or more of the blog comments with your personal reasons.

Share some of your ideas with the rest of the class.

f/
1*

EXAMWlzARD

Collectng useful expressions for a dscusson


& - Work in pairs. Check out the given expressions for each function (some of them have already
appeared in Units 3.2 and 3.4) and fill in the missing words, Add one more expression to each
category.
l

definitely think that...

ln my

Giving your

opinion

(1.)-,...

Personally, l believe...
|'m

convinced that...

lf you ask me,.,

Unt 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines

think / suppose so, too.

ld go

Agreeing

With that,

(2.)

Yes, that's true, l

haven't thoU9ht

that.

(3.)

How true.
Let's start with...
Let's try and agree.

Structuring

what was the next idea?


Shallwe

on to the next one?

(4.)

Both... and...

Comparing and
contrasting

Neither of them,

..

the other hand...

(5.)

..,but / while / whereas...


Could you explain that, please?

clarification

5o you mean...

you saying that...

(6.)

lf l have (7.)

correctly,...

Sorry to (8.)

Turn-taking

you but..,

just like to say that...

Can ljust add

here?

(9.)

Well, that sounds quite convincing but..,

Disagreeing

Yes, that's true but don't forget...

lsee

you mean, but l still think...

(10.)

That's quite possible, But the

lsee it...

(1 1.)

What do you think about.,.?

Asking for an

opinion

What's your opinion on/about...?


Have you got (i 2,)

comments on/about...?

Don't you agree that...?


As a class, checkyour answers and the extra expressions added by each pair.

Use some of these expressions appropriately when you are expected to discuss a topic, for example in the Discussion EXAM PRAcTlcE
task (ACtivity 6).

Unit 5: Food for Th

rffi
se

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines

Derentcusnesand eatng habts


Work in groups of 3 or 4. Match the names of dishes, typical ingredients or key words with these

well-known culinary cultures. Some items can be used in more than one category,

a wok
boiled vegetables
oysters
seafood
goulash souP
salami
hot s,ices ^:___
'
P.LL
croissant
stew
poppy seeds
Pancakes
pies
bacon
steak
.
fried fish
wine
noodles
rarelmedium/well done
tiramisu
raw
aubergines
a hundred_year_old egg
chips
olive oil
sweet and sou soup
, black tea lard pasta SoY sauce
rice
breadcrumbs
balsamic vinegar curry
chopsticks
cauldron sausa9eS

DlscUssloN

cottagecheese

British cuisine

ltalian cuisine

chinese cuisine

Hungarian cuisine

French cuisine

As a class, share and discuss the words you have collected in your groups

Back in your groups, tell your partners which styles of cooking you like or do not like, and give
reoson; for your choices. IJse some of the phrases from Activity 2/a. Share some of your ideas with
the rest of the class.

Listening and dscussn$ Gomparing American and


Hungaian eatng habts

,;)

{l

&.

Listen twice to a recording about American eating habits, and answer these questions.

1.

How have eating habits changed recently in America?

2.

Why do some fast food chains offer international menus nowadays?

3. which

regional cuisines are mentioned as part of the American diet?

llnit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines

W, Checkyour answers as a class.


what do you think are the differences and similarities between the
American eating customs described by the radio programme and Hungarian eating habits?
(Remember to ieep using expressions from Activity 2, especially for comparing and contrasting,)
,E* work in small groups.

#, -

a
a
a

Shrrc yorr ideas with the

rest

of the class.

person - not
ln the Discussion task of the speakin9 test, you need to show that you can communicate with another
the examiner - and remember: your partner is also a language learner!
Unlike in the Transactional Dialgues task (see Unit 2.1), you are not playin9 a role here. Be yourself.
lan9uage and
The examiner is not going to focs on the points you make (however interestin9 they arel) but on the
points.
those
style you use to make
speak about 50olo of the time.
tttat<e sure you let your purtn"l. speak too but don't let them do all of the talkinglTry to
prepare roi tr,i, tar by'brushing'up on the En9lish words and phrases used in giving opinions, agreein9 and
(see ActivitY 2).
dis9reeing, seeking larification, interruptin9 politely, 9iving reasons for decisions, etc.

f./

llnderstandng the evaluation critera for speaking


We have already dea|t with the Discussion task in Unit 3.4. This time the process will involve

l*

EXAMWlzARD

working on the assessment criteria too.


Pronuncation
own (the fourth criteria
you,
clear
to
is
not
point
idea
which
or
Mark
any
focus of llnit 6.2).

#,, Read

the three sets of criteria on your

will be the

Range and Accuracy

Fluency and Coherence

Communication strategies

(F&c)

(css)

Wide range of gramma1 vocabulary


and linking words used effectively
to complete the tasks. Comfortable
with more complex structures and
vocabulary although errors may still

Maintains a smooth flow of language


with hesitation only to formulate
ideas, not language. Links ideas into
clear, coherent pieces of speech,
even in longer contributions.

lnitiates, maintains and ends turns.


Uses repair strategies (clarification,
describing the meaning of words)
effectively where necessary, Style
used is always highly appropriate to

Sufficient range of grammar,


vocabulary and linking words used
adequately to complete the tasks.
Few errors in simple sentences
and when trying more complex
structures and vocabulary. Mistakes
generally do not interfere with

Some hesitation while formulating


language, but can effectively
maintain flow of speech. Links
ideas into clear, coherent discourse,
although with noticeable stops
and restarts, especially in longer

lnitiates, maintains and ends turns


satisfactorily, although not always
smoothly. Evidence of ability to
use repair strategies (clarification,
describing the meaning of words),
although not always applied. Able to
use appropriate style for a variety of
situations.

Range of grammar, vocabulary

Frequent hesitation and inability to


link ideas coherently, which makes
the speech not easy to listen to or
understand.

Generally, fails to initiate, maintain


and end turns satisfactorily. Does not
use repair strategies (clarifi cation,
describing the meaning of words).
Uses styles inappropriate to the
various situations.

(R&A)

occUr.

contributions,

understanding.

and linking words insufficient to


adequately complete the tasks.
Repeated errors even in simple
sentences.

allsituations.

Discuss any unclear points or issues as a class, asking your teacher for clarification if necessarY.

llnit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines

Speakng Task 4: Discussion


Work in groups of 3, Each of you wilt be the "examiner" once and an exam "candidate" twice,
exactly as you did in lJnit 3.4, Before starting each discussion, the "examiner" tells the "candidates"
which one of the 3 sets of criteria (R&A or F&C or CSS) will be observed. Now decide on the first
"examiner", choose the criteria and follow the instructions on p. 194.

As a class, discuss briefly the experience of the three discussions: e.g. the topic cards, how easy or
difficult it was to observe and use the criteria, etc.

F::iix,
&, Read

making notes and roleplaY

More than just

the foltowing text to find out what Fifteen is and then complete the sentences With your

own words.

Fifteen

"Having not been the


brightest banana in
the bunch myself,

ln 2002, Jamie oliver combined two ambitions: to open a top-class

Gillil,J,ffi

realised that my biggest

weapon in lifewas
the determination,
enthusiasm, handson and "actions
speak louder than

r_,-ffi

words" approach my

)a# - '

father taught me,

and l wanted to get

J
s-

this across to others,

especially those
interested in food."

ffi:B,
HS* !
.
t
i

Jamie Oliver,
founder and
trustee of Fifteen

1. Jamie Oliver's goal

ilJft l{fu1i,#*:3J;jifr

ll'ii}[,llilili}l"'"

ollu
erul,y
ii;fffi;#trffi,i5ffiii""H:,,lilti,,*ffl;l"'
lcllllcl>..lL l\,(,Ll

The Fifteen restaurants serve food of the hi9hest quality made from
the best ingredients and they are committed to using seasonal
ingredients from the best suppliers throughout the UK and ltaly. The
Foundation is also drivin9 forward the dream of building Fifteen into
a global social enterprise brand inspiring young people all over the
world,

ted f rom : http ://www.fi ftee n.n et/ mi ssio n/Pag es/defa

ullglp1

is partly to offer good quality food to customers and a|so to

2.

Disadvantaged young people can change their lives by

3.

The Foundation's plan for the future is to


W" Compare your answers in pairs.

.Work in small groups. All of you are journalists for the Life & Style section of an online magazine,
produce 6-8 questions to ask Jamie Oliver, focusing on both aspects of his work: raising awareness of
healthy eating and helping disadvantaged young people,

d" Now form pairs. one of you is Jamie and the other a reporter. Rote play the interview, When
your teacher claps or gives a clear signal, change roles immediately and continue the interview as
smoothly as possible.
. s a class, share any funny, interesting or surprising stories or ideas you have heard from "Jamie"
in the role plays.

Unit 6: CyberWorld
Lesson 1
online communication

Lesson 2
Living in Cyberspace

Lesson 3
O n l i ne

Lang uage Lea

Lesson 4
Shopping Online

rn i n

Unt 6: Cyber World

Lesson

1:

Online Communication

Exam preparation can be a positive online (SoClAL) experience, too.

Connect
People we like sharing ideas with

faceboo k.com/eu roexa m

lrepare and learn


Online preparation course with writing
tutorial

elea rn in g.eu roexam.org

Downloadable listening, videos


Exam tips

useful exam information

"1

WWW.euroexam.or9

Lesson

1:

Lesson

1:

Online Communication
EXAM TASK
Reading Task 3:
Multiple-Choice
Reading

irJ*ntify overall nreaning


lt
nfornration,
identifying specific nfornration,
l. R*ading;
ffi;J-:fiffi*;:.ific

(also in Unit 3,3)

Gettng onlne
list all the things you con use a computer or mobile phone, especially
(e.g.:
for
writing
emails, using a social networking website like Facebook, etc.). Share
smartphone,
a
your findings with the rest of the class.

&" Work with a partner and

h.

Ih"re are two lists of different forms of communicating online in the boxes below. Discuss with
partner
what the basic difference is between these two types of communication. Once you agree,
a
add at least two more forms in each box.

Readng and vocabulary

Identifyng the man topic

&. Put the same word into all the gaps, changing its form where necessary (e.9.verb, noun, singular,
plural, -ing form, etc.).

_is

website in which items are posted on a regular basis and displayed


is a shortened form of
in reverse chronological order. The term _
maintaining a _
or adding an article to an existing
Authoring a _,

A
postsi"'posts" or "entries". A person who posts these entries is called a" ___".
(to
pages
and to video,
other web
comprises text, hypertext, images and links
audio and other

files).

use a convesational style of writing.

__often

focus on a particulararea of interest, such as political goings-on inWashington, D.C. Most


discuss personal experiences.

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson l: online communication

_,

_s

_s?

On your own, think


from the text
word,
either
to
this
moderate a -) connected
of expressions and collocations
your
with
teacher,
a
class
above or from your own knowledge. Checkyour expressions as
,': , Do

you ever

or read

or write posts for

(e,g. to

tools listed in Activity 1/b. Working in small groups,


" Now think of one of the communication
say 2 or 3 sentences describing this toot W|THO|JT mentioning its name, Your partners should guess
whatyou have in mind,
.:':

i"-ngunag

Co m p uter
]

reI

ate d expr essi o n s

. These are some of the molt frequently used multi-word verbs connected with computers. Do you
know what they mean? lJse 6 of them in the sentences below.
i;l:

to print sth out

to back sth up

to hack into

to plug sth in

to log (sb) in

to set sb/sth up

to scroll down

to sign out

to pop up

1.

You won't believe how many,,How to


found with one search!

2.

Every time l open this site, a new

3. There

someone's account?"type of websites l've

window

saying that l have won

was a long list of names on the webpage and l had to

4.

asked my friend to help me

5.

6.

She forgot to

EXAMWlzARD

free prize.

to view all of them.

my twitter profile,

to my bank account every week to check my account balance.

her printer and was wondering why it didn't work,

How many of the 9 verbs can also be used as multi-word nouns or adjectives
pop-up window)? Write them down and checkthem with a partner.

f/
,*

(e.g. a

print-out, a

Seven steps to readng success


Here are 7 recommended steps for doing a multiple-choice reading task effectively. Match the
recommended seven steps with the descriptions, writing the letter of the description next to the
name of the step it refers to. Underline the key words that helped you identify the right steps,

6:

Lesson l: online communication

Cyb er World

Read the text again more thoroughly,

A. thinking

about the questions and


where the answers are located.

Step

1:

Speed read

Step

2:

Questions and key words

Step 3: Read more carefully


Step 4: lntensive reading

Step

E
&

5:

B.

Read through the whole text once and


get a general idea what it is about.
What sort of text is it? An article? A
report? A letter? A story7

c.

lf there is time, 9o back and review


your answers.

D.

Read the questions (but not the


multiple choice answers yet). Underline
the key words in each question.

Check the option5

Step 6: Cross out the wrong options

E.

Repeat steps 5 and 6 for each question.


Step

7:

Check!

F.

lf you are still not sure which option is


correct, try to choose the right answer

by first deciding which options are


definitely incorrect.

Look at the multiple choice options.


Can you find one that is similar to your
own answer?

ro

G.

Go through each question, one by one,


read the text systematically and find

your own answer to each one.

Checkyour answers and discuss the following question:


ffi Have you got any other tricks or strategies that help you with reading comprehension tasks?
lf so, share them with the class.

Speed reading for overall meanng


To help you apply the'Seven Step'technique, in the case of this exam task, you can have a
separate first encounter with the text itself, ln a real exam situation, this is not possible, step
speed reading - is part of the whole process.

f/
.*
'| -

EXAMWlzARD

ii. Speed read the whole text about Twittering in the following EXAM PRAT\CE task. You have a
"
2-minute time limit, so do not read it word by word, skip over difficult or unknown words.

;j, Dir.rs with a partner what sort of text you think it is and what type of publication you think it
comes from. Compare your ideas with the Answer key.

When answering the multiple-choice questions in the Multiple-Choice Reading task, try to use all steps of the'Seven Steps'technique!

Unit 6: Cyber World

$lt.,

Reading Task

3:

Multple-Choce Readng

(l5 minutes)
You wilI read a short summary about Twittering by a journalist,

E.

V. Porter.

ffi Read the following text.


ffi Answer the multiple-choice questions about it and choose the correct answer: A, B, C or D,

# Circle the appropriate letter in each question.

Twittering
By

E. V.

Porter

Twitter, sometimes called the SMS of the internet because of its 140-character limit, entered
the world in 2006. A podcast company in the United States felt that it was in a creative slump
and a meeting was held to create a new idea, The director of the company came up with the
idea of PeoPle sending text messages to a large number of people through the net. The idea
of Twitter was born.

Coming up with a name for the new service gave the company many headaches. An initial

suggestion was Stotus but this sounded too dry and unexciting. A further proposal was
Twitch, based on the idea of what a mobile did on discreet mode in someone's pocket.
Twitching, however, did not seem to invoke the right image. Finally someone hit on the
nameTwitter, conjuring up the idea of birds talking.

At first, the micro-blogging service was limited to the employees of the company to see how
it worked. Gradually more people were invited to use it and it was felt that the project was a
success. ln 2007 a separate company for Twitter was established. The breakthrough came in
that Year whenTwitter messages wee streamed onto two 60-inch plasma screens at a major

conference.

Major security breaches have occurred. ln 2007 spoof users, after discovering the phone
numbers of some celebrities, sent a number of Twitter messages in their names. ln response,
Twitterintroduced PlN codes. However, in January 2009 hackers broke into the system by
cracking the administrator's passcode and then sent false and embarrassing messages from
celebrity accounts.
Twittering from mobile phones has also had a major political impact. ln April 2009,for
instance, the behaviour of the police at the demonstrations surrounding the G20 meeting in
London was the topic of much twittering, thus providing information for the news netwoiks.
Similarly, civil disturbances in lran following the disputed June 2009 elections led to an
explosion in the number of people twittering,
However, Twittering can have its downsides as well. Twenty-six-year-old Annemarie Dooling,
a bank employee, was at work in a New York bank when it was robbed. From the corner of

the banking hall she twittered on the robbery as it was taking place, but made no attempt
to contact the police. At first she was regarded as a cyberspace celebrity, but as the fullfacts
emerged she became an object of ridicule.

Regardless of its ups and downs, it is clear lhatTwittering has become a global phenomenon.
ln 2013, the number of tweets surpassed all previous records - the record was in fact set by
all citizens of the Japan Standard Time Zone as the new year began, reaching a record of
33,388 tweets per second, lt has definitely become an integral part of many people's daily
lives, but for how long? ln this age of shifting trends and ever-developing technology, how
long will it last? ls it here to stay or will it be overtaken by the next new bright ideai

Lesson

M u lti

1:

ple-Choice Questions

1. What does the article say about where the idea for
Twitter came from?

lt came from the content of a podcast.

was one of several ideas under consideration at the


time.

D. lt

2. What does the article say about how an


appropriate name for the service was found?
A. Twitter was thought up immediately.
B. Stctus conveyed the core thinking of the idea.
C. Twitch could not be associated with mobile phones.
D. Twitter

incorporated the notion of non-human

communication.

3. What does the article say about the expansion of

Twitter?

A.

lt was initially tried out on company employees.

B. There were doubts about its future success


beginning.

5. What does the artic|e


at pub!ic events?

A. lt appeared by accident during work on a podcast,


B. lt was thought up by the head of the company,

c.

Unit 6: Cyber World

Online Communication

at the

say about the use o Twitter

A. Twittering has not been significant.


B. The police in London used Twitter,
C. Police conduct was made public through

Twittering,

D, The role of Twitterwas very different in lran and


London.

6. Why does the article mention Annemarie Dooling?


A. She was visiting a bank during a robbery.
B. She alerted the police through Twittering.
C. She was ignored by the public after the robbery.
D. She experienced

7. what

a major fall in her reputation.

is the article's overall attitude towards

Twitter?

A.
B.
C.
D.

lt ridiculesTwitter,
lt considers Twitter fromseveral perspectives.
lt is written in praise of Twitter.
lt concentrates on the future developmen t of Twitter.

C, The concept was sold

to a separate company to raise


money.
D. A major step forward was twittering among
conference delegates.

4. What does the article

say about the security and


integrity of the Tilliffer system?

A. Famous people sent messages under false names.


B, Hackers discovered users' PlN numbers.
c, The secret codes of a Twitter service worker were
discovered by hackers.
D. Embarrassing messages were sent to famous people.

ts!B.

ry
i..

,1.a

:]'.:,".4,!aF

^/

Check and discuss your answers.


As a class, share what else you know aboutTwitter.

Watching for distractors


Ju5t to remind You, a distractor is an incorrect option (see Unit 3.1), but it
can be very close
to the correct oPtion. lt is designed to make you read both the question and
the text very

carefully.

Look again at Question t and the text extract that gives the answer. Remind yourselves
which is
the right option.

1. what does the article say about where the idea lor Twitter came from?
A. lt appeared by accident during work on a podcast.
B. lt was thought up by the head of the company.
C. lt came from the content of a podcast.
D. lt was one of several ideas under consideration at the time.

f./
*

EXAM WlzARD

llnit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 1: Online Communication

The Text Extract

,Twitter,sometimes called the SMS of the internet because of its 'l40-character limit, entered
the world in 2006, A podcast company in the United States felt that it Was in a creative slump
and a meeting was held to create a new idea.The director of the company came uP with the
idea of people sendin9 text messages to a large nUmber of people throu9h the net, The idea
of Twitter was born]
Discuss with a partner or in small groups:
ffi What makes A, C and D good distractors?
ffi Why is B the correct answer? ldentify the key words.

Altogether, 3 lessons
deal with distractors

Work in pairs. Look at the question below about Twitter and read the relevant section of the
article again.Then write 3 multiple choice options: 1 correct one and 2 distractors.

(Unit 3.1/Activity 3,
Unit 4.4/Activity 7 and

unit 6.1/Activity

7).

Q. what does the writer of the article think about the future of Twitter?

Before sitting the exam,


check all of them out
once again to review the
most important issues
involving distractors:
how they work and how
they may even help
you identify the right

A.
B.

C.

ansWers.

Show or read out your whote multiple-choice answers to another pair and ask them to find the
right answer. Discuss each other,s answer| and the distractors as well.

More computer words


Match each twitter message with one of the possible sources (A-D). Give reasons for your choice.

1.

Need help on foreign policy. Any suggestions out there? Barack.

2.

Check out this interview with Johnny Depp about his new movie...

3, Breaking:

another break-in to the Pentagon's databases and missile control systems!

4. l had no idea l was going to be all over the net, even on YouTube, after saving .,loanna from

suicide via our computers!

Word, expression

Twitter messa9e

A. podcast
B. cyberspacecelebrity
C. spoofusers
D. newsTwitter site
Check and discuss your answers as a class.

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesso n 2: Living in Cyberspace


EXAM TASK

SKlLtS AND LANGUAGE FOCU:

r
l
l
l
I
Ir
I
J
|,
Il

Speaking Task
lnterview

Speaking: presenting an opinion and


arguing for it
Reading: skimming for overall meaning
Vocabulary: words, expressions
related to the lnternet
Reading: guessing the meaning of
unknown words from context
Vocabulary: word-formation
Speaking: initiating and maintaining
short exchanges about personal daa,

experien." a,d opinion

rxam skills: focusing on and answering


n, toctinnc
qlestions

lt's an ePidemic. lt can strike anyone. lt begins harmlessly enough...


maybe with a mobile
Phone, an online social network profile, or instant messaging. But before long, electronic
screens invade everY corner of your life. There's a name for tis tragic
and extiemely
annoying condition: Screen Addiction.
http://u nplugyourfriends.com

Are you a screen addict?


Work with a Partner and discuss the pros and cons of using lnformation
Technology for
communication. one of you will argue as a believer in its benefits, while
the other wil|warn of the
dangers, When Your teacher claps, both of you should change your point
of view and represent the
opposite opinion.

Student Az'There are too many


youngsters suffering from obesity,
because they don't do enough exercise.'

Student B:'There are video games that


encourage physical exercise. You just
have to choose the right ones.'

Summarise your arguments to another pair near you.

1:

Unit 6: Cyber World

r,ffi

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace

Readng about lvngn cyberspace


s,

Read thrs extract from a discussion forum post and create a heading (maximum 6 or 7 words) for
each of its paragraphs. Remember: the heading should offer a very brief summary.

Paragraph heading 1:

Have you ever felt that you have apparently crossed the border between reality and virtual reality? And not virtual reality

as we see it in the movies or that's being developed for gamin9 and simulations (you know, with the headsets, etc.). l'm
talking about the virtua| reality of the mind, the part that draws us humans into the entire computer universe, People are

attached to their computers, sitting in front of a screen either in melancholy or in eager excitement.

Paragraph heading 2:

ls it boredom that triggers this behaviour? We are facing a revolution of a human generation that is connected to
technology in more than a physical sense. A click of a button enables humans to initiate and maintain relationships with
each other on such a wide scale that reality in the physical sense is diminished sli9htly.This su99ests that the connections
between humans and computers are becoming ever closer to one another,

Paragraph heading 3:

l Sit at my computer daily, l live off it, l eat at it sometimes, l've spilled soda on my keyboard, but is it a requirement to my
survival as a human? No. ls it conflicting with my ability as a person to socialise in a normal fashion with my peers in a
'face_to-face'situation? No. Has it interfered with my life in such a way that it gives me a constant feelin9 of guilt? Yes.

Paragraph heading 4:

lt is still a confusing relationship to those humans that prefer to live out there in the real world of civilization and

communication. Those who don't understand the relationship between man and computer tend to view it with
contempt, and stick with a more'primitive'medium of social contacts. lf l had a choice, and could only pick one, between
going out with my buddies or chilling at home on my computer, which do you think l would pick? My computer. .. What

about you?

Adapted from: hftp://www.flyninja.netftp=8

b.

Checkyour suggested headings as a

class,

and

Posted December 1sth,2007, by Circuitbomb

say the words and phrases that helped you

in

each paragraph.

words and contexts


d.

Collect words and phrases from the text which characterise the cyber and the real worlds. List at
least 5 items for each group.

Gomputer or cyber world


eg. ttrtu"a.l ren/,tty

real world
eg. renl,ta7 tntlrc

vltyiral sma

As a class, check your lists together and discuss any of the items that you disagree about.

.,2I4|

Lesson 2: Li

Unit 6: Cyber World

Cyberspace

Workng out meaning from context


&" Find each

of the 9 numbered words from the tabte in the text in Activity 2/a., and see if you can
work out what theY mean by looking at the context around them, Discuss your interpretation with
your partner,

b" rh. following definitions for the 9 words come from online dictionaries. Match the word with its
definition. One has been done for you.

A.

to take part in social activities; interact with others

eager (adj.)

B.

to set 9oin9 by taking the first step; introduce to a new field, interest

interact

C.

to make smaller or less o to cause to appear so

D.

showing keen interest, intense desire

E.

not clear

6. initiate (V.)

F.

sadness or depression of the spirits

7.

diminish

G.

the feeling o attitude of regarding sb/sth as inferior or worthless

8.

contempt

H.

to act together or towards others or with others

9.

confusing (adj.)

1.

melancholy

2.

3.

(n.)

(V,)

4. socialise (v.)

5.

interfere

(v.)

(v.)

(n.)

C. Checkyour answers

as

to disturb the affairs of others

a class.

word formaton and Gontextualisation


.

Work in Pairs. Complete the grid below by filting in the boxes with verbs, nouns and adjectives
built from the given words. Also, underline the stressed syllabte in all the words (see exa^pp fo,
'prefer').

verb

adjective

e.a, refer

l+ furabh,,
T---7
e

,
i

excttew^ent

confunn1
eaa?r

lr

errntial

J7

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace

tn)tiate

tnttrart

bttrftre
wuali,se
tel4

ift. Compare your answers as a class. Discuss if two or more forms written into
meaning and/or use?

the

same box differ in

lndividually choose any 2 items from the grid, write a meaningful context sentence for each,
but leave a gap for the word chosen (e.g. a possible sentence for'confused':'l was
because
everYbody l asked told me something different,'). Make sure the ltructure and the context of your two
sentences help the reader to guess which part of speech the missing word represents.
{""

* h Pairs, give the two gapped sentences

to

your

the table into the two gaps.

f-/

l*

ExAMWlzARD

Answering the queston

partner who will write the appropriate word from

Answerng the question?

Barbara has decided to learn English on an online course, She is speaking to her teacher online
for the first time, in a pre-course interview.

&. Look at

the 7 questions below. Cross out the ones you think Barbara's online teacher will not ask?
Why not? Compare your thoughts with those of your partner.

(e
t)

l
l
l
l
l
l
l

How long have you been learning English?


How much does your father earn?
Which coursebooks have you used?
Do you have a boyfriend?

Where do you live?


Do you prefer speaking or writing English?

What religion are you?

Now listen to the following online interview twice. As you can hear, Barbara misunderstands
the questions. Write the questions she thinks she answers in the boxes on the right next to the real
questions of the teacher. The frrst one has been done for you as an example.

The question which the teacher asks:

Are you comfortable?

Why do you want to study English on-line?

The question which Barbara actually


anWers:
Is

ou,r

hnua^e

/roaaa cnalfnta,blz

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace

Unit 6: Cyber World

How many hours a week do you want to


study English?
How many times a week would you like to
study?
Can you pay for the course electronically?

Work in Pairs and ask each other and answer the questions from the left-hand column above.
These are the kind of questions that might come up in Task t of the speaking test.

A model ntervew
&.

l
l

llsen to

the model interview with Flix and Sra. Focus on the following two ssues:

Do they answer the examinert questions?

ls their pronunciation (individual sounds, word stress, intonation) accurate and clear enough,
and does it support what they are saying (see criteria below)?

Speaking exam assessment criteria

pronunciation

Although there may still be an evident foreign accent, pronunciation is natural and
places little strain on the listener,The candidate often uses features of connected
speech and English intonation patterns.

Pronunciation is clearly intelligible in spite of evident foreign accent and occasional


mispronunciations, putting some strain on the listener.

Mispronunciations and inability to produce certain sounds frequently impede


communication of the message.
As a class, discuss your impressions of Flix and Sra's performance. Remember, they are not
Perfect but quite strong candidates, so you may hear them make mistakes which ordinary 82
Euroexam candidates sometimes make, too.

Speaking Task l: Intervew (Open dialogue format)


:',: ,, Work in groups of three, Decide
who is the first to take the role of the "exQminer" and who wit!
be the "candidates" (as you did in lJnits 3.4 and 5.4). Only the "examiner" looks at the script of the

interview on p, 187 and follows the instructions there.

you

have finished the 3 interviews, discuss as a class what you found easy or diffrcult.
Compare ideas of how best you can prepare for the task.
':'

::, Once

Always answer the


question you have
been asked precisely
and briefly. Do not
give a pre-prepared
answer, as it is very
unlikely that this
would answer the

question.

f/
i,*

EXAMWlzARD

nl,

Unt 6: Cyber WorId

l]ffi

Question and answer


below, and write 2
from the
stay in your groups of 3. choose one of the everyday topics
,list
the same topic as your
choose
you
not
do
que:stins onsierinig the foltowing two points. Make sure
partners,

&.

,What is your favourite",?,),


(e.9.
o The first question is about the candidate,s personal experience
(e.9, 'People eat too much junk food these
o The second question is always about an issue for debate

days. Do you agree?').

public transport

the lnternet

books and reading

eating habits

travelling

social habits

sports and fitness

language learnin9

music, concerts

entertainment

school, education

family relationships

caring for the environrnent

arts, museums

dealing with money

to be the examiner,
Now ask both your partners your 2 questions, taking it in turns

Unt 6:

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning


EXAM TASK

K|LLS AND LANGUAG FOCU:

l
l
l

Mediation part

Speaking: discussing viewpoints

1:

Translation

Reading: identifying specific information


Mediation: summarising an English text
in Hungarian

Mediation: identifying "false friends" in


English and Hungarian
Writing: identifyin9 appropriate functional
expressions in formal letter, emails
Mediation: conveying messages from
Hungarian into English
Exam skills: using a dictionary effectively

Learnng languages: in the classroom or online?


&," lmagine doing an English language course online. Work in smal! groups. Each group will collect
ideas for one of the blank boxes (e,g, Advantages of face-to-face learning). Collect the class's ideas
on the board,

Type of language learning

Advantages

Disadvantages

Face-to-face learning

Studying online

W. Read the following article on various forms of online learning, and tick the ideas in your
l /a as you read along. Complete your list with extra ideas from the text.

list

in

Resources for Learning Languages Online


There are several ways to learn languages online with the vast range of resources available, and your success relies on how
motivated you are, and whether you can find the ones that suit your learning styles, time and personality best. The following
are just a few of the many to choose from:

1. online language learning Gourses

With a teacher (e.9. using Skype or similar applications) maintain some of the
features of traditional teaching and generally cost less than other methods, since you will not have to pay for class fees or
transportation. Such courses give you the opportunity to learn according to your own schedule and at your own pace. A
more recent development is the emergence of MOOCs (Massive Open On|ine Courses), which offer large-scale interactive
participation and open access.

2.

The lnternet is a treasure box of language learning portals, which are websites offering a huge variety of tasks,
exercises and games for language and skills development. Most of these are designed for self-study, so you can find the
keY to check your solutions. Since you are working on your own a lot with these tools, you need to maintain your selfdiscipline in order to stay focused and to develop without outside help.

J7

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning

3. Online messaging or chatting is one of the most interesting ways


to learn languages on the lnternet from preintermediate level uPwards. Chat rooms are excellent u"nu"ifor. Lngu"9"
exctringe, since a lot of other language
learners and native sPeakers are willing to help you; all you have
to do is just ask. lnteraction in the chat rooms (which
are mostly free of charge) will enable you to write, read. and most
likely speak the target language. However, chat rooms
could also be places where dishonesty and deception rule.
4.

You can improve your listening skills through podcasts which


are available for downloading or online listening. ln
podcast courses you can proceed to the next lesson if you
have completed the initial ones sluccessfully. Almost all major
news sites offer PlentY of Podcasts about any topic, though you n"ul.
know in advance how difficult they will be,

5.

The so-called web 2,0, otherwise known as the social web, is a


term used for websites where users contribute the
content and where social interaction dominates. Well-known examples
are youTube, Facebook, Flickr, Google+ and
Twitter, to name just a few. A|though these sites were not created
with the aim of teaching English, they all provide
learners with excellent lan9uage development and practice
opportunities of your languale skills.

AdaPted from: httP://www.abroadlanguages.com/blog/resources-for-learning-languages-online_491/feed/


Posted on Monday, June l st, 2009

CheckYour answer for t/b as a class, then discuss as a class whether you have
tried the tools and/
mentioned in the text, or any other one thatyou know.

or resources

& Work in grouPs. lmagine a friend of yours, who cannot understand


'
English, has asked you to sum
uP the content of this text for them in Hungarian. Speed read the whole
text again, then summarise
it in Hungarian, each of you in the group saying one or two
sentences at a time.

se
DlscUssloN

online language learnng tools in support of Euroexams


BY now You have a fairly detailed picture of the 82 Euroexam, its principles
and tasks.
A" Look at the four 82 Euroexam tasks below, and choose
one or more tools or resources which
You think could be esPeciallY helpful in your preparation for these tasks (apart from the new online

prep

rat

n co

u r se :

www.e

le

a rn i n

g.eu roexa m.org ).

ln a discussion, a negative choice or oPinion (e.9. saying that you


cannot think of any useful resource for a particular task, or that a
resource is not aPProPriate for an exam task) is equally useful, so do
not hesitate to bring up n"g.tiu" urguments.

82 Euroexam task

Useful online language learning resources

Paragraph Headings
Writing

Discursive writing
Listening 3
Radio Programme
Speaking 2
Picture Story

Share and discuss your ideas briefly as class,

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning

Un it 6: Cyber World

Does ths word exist n Hungaran?


The following terms are relatively new in the English language and are connected to the "cyber

world" (e.9. website).

&o Write down the Hungarian equivalent for each of them.

English

Hungarian

website
distance learning

online messaging
chat room

chatting
podcast
social networking site

blog post
Check and discuss your answers a5 a class.

False friends n Englsh


Some English words are often misused by Hungarian learners because some Hungarian words
do not translate into English in the way that learners might think,
i-;i. Find the right English word (in other words, the word
that should be used) and produce a
sentence using the false friend correctly (see examples for classical vs. classic). lJse a printed
or
dictionary if you need help.

E.9.

classical

This was

("kla5szikus" & "tipikus")

directly
menu

non-stop

("ejjel-nappali" &
"egyfolytban")

salad
("salta": nvny & tel)

'tbla")

c/4r4h

I akg cl,r4ha/ nill,k.

dir.311|.y.

went shopping at the non-5top.

didn't have carrots. ljust had salod.

She helped me with my homework, which

sympathetic

("aszta l" &

it

online

can l have a chicken sandwich rylenu?

("men"&tt|ap")

table

example.

lt was not an accident. She did

('direkt" & "szndkos")

("szi m pati kus" & " egy ttr z"

a classica|

was very

synplihetic.

lrene, please write the answer on the


tabIe.
Ad a pted fro

m :

http :// m ood l e.es p - c.o rg /m od/ resou rce/v i ew. ph p?

Check your answers as a class with the hetp of your teacher,

onou^o,

d= 1

088

Unit 6:

f//

\r

EXAMWlzARD

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning

Set phrases n formal letters and emails


Translating Hungarian letters and/or emails into English is something you may do in your
private and professional life. You might need to translate a letter of complaint about a faulty
machine you have bought, or a letter thanking your hosts for the accommodation they have

provided.

d As a class, work on the following tasks:


"

List situations where you might have to write formal letters or emails in English. Collect the
whole class's ideas together on the board.

Discuss which type of letter or email you think would be the most difficult to write. Why?

b" Now translate the following set phrases into English on your own, Then compare your answers in
pairs.

'l

Tisztelt Uram!

2,

Kedves Hughes Professzor r!

3.

Panaszt szeretnk tenni...-val /-vel kapcsolatban.

4.

rdekldniszeretnk...

5.

Azrt rok, hogy megksznjem

6.

Szeretnk jelentkezni az... llsra.

7.

rdekldsrereaglva,..

8.

Kaphatnktovbbi informcikat...?

9.

Hivatkozssal.,. ...-i levelre...

a...

0.

Legyen szves, gondoskodjon rla, hogy mindenki.

1.

Hadd ragadjam meg ezt az alkalmat...

12. Vrom mielbbi vlaszt.


1

3.

'l4.

Az elrhetsgeimet illeten..

Tisztelettel

Now quickly check your translations against the English phrases given in the Answer key.

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning

Mediation Part

1:

Unit 6: C ber World

Translation

Your friend has asked you to translate his letter into English.
ffi Write your answer on a separate sheet of paper.
ffi When you have completed the writin9, hand in your work to your teacher,

Clifton House Online English


i

nfo@

cI

iftonhouse.co.uk

Tisztelt Uram!

You can u5e a printed


dictionary of your choice in
this task.

rdekldni szeretnk, hogy letlthet formtumban is hozzjuthatok-e az ingyenes online


tantsi anyagaikhoz.
Egy ve hasznlom a szolgltatsaikat a nyelvtudsom fejlesztsre,s minden perct

lveztem. Klnsen szeretem a csetel oldalt, a nyelvtani gyakorl feladatokat, a szkincs


fejleszt jtkokat s a rejtvnyeket. Nagyon hasznosnak talltam a hres irodalmi mvek
nye|vtanulk szmra knnytett vltozatait is (,,Graded Readers'' link),

Mivel m9 tbbet szeretnk gyakorolni, szeretnm letlteni a gyakorlatok egy rszt,


mieltt lecserlsrekerlnnek a honlapon. Ez a funkci jelenleg nem engedlyezett, ezrt
rdekldm, hogy van-e lehetsg egyni engedly krsre,
Mielbbi vlaszukat vrva dvzlettel:
Garay Tams

tamas.g82@gmail.com

Usng a dctionary
Using a dictionary can help but it might also hinder you in completing a task. Therefore, it is
worth considering how you used one in the task above.

&.

l
l

Think about the following points on your own:

How many times did you use the dictionary during the 20 minutes available for the task?
Write down which words or expressions you looked up.

b"

work in groups of 4, share and compare the information you have collected.

With the help of your teacher, discuss briefly and draw some conclusions about your dictionary
how its efficiency could be improved,

use, and

f//

t)t
EXAMWlzARD

Unt 6: Cyber World

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning

A living letter
lmagine a huge sheet of paper on the floor in the classroom on which you are going to "lay out"
parts of a formal letter.

i:,l." Iou will get one slip of paper with a functional expression typical of a formal letter or email
(photocopiable slips on p. 21 3,). Read and memorise it quickly, and
W|THOUT showing it to the
others
silently walk to the place where your phrase could be used in the imaginary letter. Do not
talk, and do not discuss with the others whereyou should stand,

i:," orre ereryone is in place, say your phrase aloud and checkwhether all of you are standing in the
right position,

lFa==:

Unt 6: Cyber World

Lesson 4: Shopping Online

Lesso n 4: Shopping Online


K|LLS AND LANGUAGE FOCU:

l
l
l
l
l
l

Speaking: discussing personal experiences


Reading: identifying specific information
Grammar: identifying and correcting
9rammar mistakes
Writin9: becoming aware of functional

expressions

Writing; becoming aware of a text type


". a transactional email of complaint
Exam skills: understanding and using
the criteria of effective writing

&

1fl

How to shop online


Your neighbour and friend, with whom you can only communicate in English, has never done
any online shopping before.They have asked you to explain to them how online shopping
works.
'&. Read the following list of steps for shopping online. As a class, arrange the steps in a logical
order,

.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
.
o
o
r

put your selection in a virtual"Shopping Cart"


review the contents of the shopping cart; delete items if necessary
keep the printed copy of the purchase order and confirmation for records
fill in you payment details
choose what you want to buy
search the catalogue or search for the specific product categories

modify or cancel the order


register (if required)
enter the address to which you want the product to be delivered
log in using a username and password
wait for the confirmation of your order
select your preferred method of payment

&, Work in pairs, Read the steps again. Now one of you, the friend, asks questions trying to figure
out the procedure (e.g.'How do you delete the contents of the shopping cart?'), and the other one
explains the process of online shopping.
,* Still in pairs, discuss what kind of goods you would or would not buy online and why (e.g.'lwould
never buy fruit online because l'd like to see how fresh it is,!).

EXAM TASK
Writing Task 1:
Transactional
Writing
A Formal Email

Unit 6: Cyber World

rffi

Checking for and correcting grammar mistakes


This online ad was clearly not written by a native speaker of English.
Find the 8 grammar mistakes (2 in the 1st paragraph - plus the example -, 2 in the 2nd, 1 in the
and 1 in the 5th paragraph). The ninth one has been done for you as an example.

3rd, 2 in the 4th

Effective proofreading

.,jjr:,Q.li=. 1qilr'-__

means that you


improve all the qualities
of your text from
one draft to the next.
When you produce a
first draft, it is quite
natural to do it slightIy
mechanically, thinking

se
DlscUssloN

:-'.'-_ _" '----

cq-

Welcome to our web shop!


We would like tellyou why it is worth to use our food delivery service of the 200-300 basic
products in almost every household.:,.
This food and chemical products are always of the same type and brand, the type of
products that you simply want to buy to restock your pantry when you will run out of them.

while developing the


text. After completing

the first draft, you


should look at the
inrhole text as one
meaningful piece of
written communication.
Check message, logic,
structure, as well as
variety of expression,
accuracy and style.
Then feel free to
change, delete or add, if
that is what is required.

Lesson 4: Shopping Online

Our web shop service is ready to relieve you of this time-consuming task. On our site, you
can find 3000-4000 products, a range we are constantly broadening and developing in

response to our customer's wishes.

The shopping list, favourite products, and detailed seach functions make shoppin9 more
easier and more comfortable. You will be awarding bonus points for remaining a loyal
customer, Our helpful staff will deliver the requested items within 48 hours of registering
your order. You may place an order by phone on 061 476 36 80 or online,
We hope you enjoy using our service and that we can welcome you to a regular customer
in the future.

if,

'-'-

L;

Compare and discuss your corrections as a class.

What can go wrong with online shoppng?


Work in pairs. Read the advert below for a different food delivery company and discuss what
could go wrong if you wanted to use this online shopping service. Make a list of 3 or 4 possible
problems (e.g. You might not get the ordered goods within the promised time.)

Fast & Reliable Delivery Service!


Receive your goods within a maximum of 5 working days of receipt of your order. Click
Here to determine delivery time to your area. Confirmation of arrival time via e-mail.
No gimmicks, no coupons, no membership fees; just great deals every day!
o A 40 minimum purchase is required for any order,

o
o
o
o
o
o

|.

l.
E

Single unit and bulk purchasing pricing is available,


We ship to the entire U5 region, except Alaska and

Hawaii.

View a copy of a printable Price List.


Nutritional facts & ingredients are available for most products,
All food produce is carefully packed to ensure no damage in transit.

24-hour helpline and website service is available for order-tracking and problemsolving.
All online transactions are encrypted and password protected.
You may also order by phone, by calling our toll-free number (8OO)

7g1-2114.

:
:r_,

Share your ideas and predictions with the rest of the class,

Unit 6: Cyb

Lesson 4: Shopping Online

Complainng in writing
lmagine you have ordered some food from one of the advertised services in this lesson.
Unfortunately, something went wrong with your order and you have decided to write an email
of complain.

&.

eI
f//
\*
EXAMWlzARD

With this email in mind, put the following functions of the formal email in the right order.

Make the complaint: state your dissatisfaction and how you were inconvenienced.
State your suggested solution.
Refer to what action you might have to take unless your request is responded to appropriately.

State some positive things about your normal experience with the organisation concerned.
(This step is optionalbut often worth including.)

Explain the problem in detail in the main body of the letter. lnclude such details as dates, times, the names of people
involved, etc,
State the reason for writing the letter.
Check and discuss your answer; as a class,

F u n cton a I

expo ne nts for com pI a i nts

?.

Here is a list of expressions that you could include in your formal email or letter, Work in small
groups and identify which 5 of the 6 functions in Activity 4 each expression belongs to. (Note that
there are NO specifrc phrases for function 3: explaining the problem in detaill) The first one has been
done for you as an example.

E.g. l wish to

complain about

...

l,

am writing to complain about ...

o l am generally satisfied with the good service.


o l would appreciate your looking into this matter.
o l really must complain about . ..
o l shall have no choice but to seek legal advice in this matter.
l regret to say that

you have not

..

am upset about the inconvenience caused.

o l suggest that in order to avoid . .., you should

, . .

o l have no wish to go elsewhere and hope that a solution can be found.


o Normally l am very happy with things ...
o l regret that, unless my request is granted, I shall be forced / obliged to
consider taking further action.
o l would like to draw your attention to the fact that . ..

b.

am upset aboutthe ..,.

Checkyour answers as a class.

f./
*

EXAM WlZARD

o l think something should be done about . ..

LANGurr__

Unt 6: Cyber World

Lesson 4: Shopping Online

Use some of the expressions from Activity 5/a in a formal letter or email of complaint (e,g, in the EXAM PRCAT|CE ta5k at the
end of this lesson). You can find more phrases which could be useful and approriate in tansactional writing tasks in Unit 6.3,

Activity 5.

f/

\rA

EXAMWtzARD

Evaluating a sample emaI of complaint


Read the sample emaiI below. Does it use the expressions from Activity 5/a appropriately?

'6*s

_
,^.1? :
i {g
-o:[
L_
,,::,:.i.
-.j

Send

{,-J

Hello.

Attaclr Addresr

A
Font

Co!ors

];
i::

ave As Draft

To:
Cc:

Subject:
Dear Sir / Madam,

want to complain about the unusually awful delivery and package l received from you
yesterday. l ordered a pack of bio stuff 2 weeks ago. Usually l'm quite satisfied with your
effective service, but not this time.The box arrived about 8 days over your 5 working
days deadline. What's more, the packaging was broken, as well one of the bottles of
peanut butter.The label on the bio asparagus tin didn't contained nutritional data. ln
conclusion, l'm really upset about the inconvenience which has been caused by you.
l want you to send the whole order again within 5 days beginning from now, free of
charge. Unless you do, l'll seek legal advice.
l

Looking forward to your quick reply!


Jnos kovcs

b"

class, discuss your impressions of the writer's use of functional exponents,

u ln pairs, read again and evaluate the email using the simplified writing marking criteria on the
next page, Justify your scores by underlining positive features and/or problems in the text,

Criteria
Task Achievement

(1

-5 pts)

scores for email


points

Appropriacy (1-5 pts)

points

Coherence (1-5 pts)

points

Cohesion (1-5 pts)

points

GrammaticalRange and Accuracy (1-5 pts)

points

Lexical Range and Accuracy (1-5 pts)

points

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 4: Shopping Online

Evaluation criteria

Short
Would your writing achieve its communication purpose in real life? Would the reader fully
understand your intentions, point of view? Have you followed all the instructions and included
all - and only - the relevant information?

Task Achievement
('1-5

pts)

the layout and style of your text appropriate for the text type, your intention and the imagined readership? Have you found the right level of formality (e.9. contracted vs. non-contracted
forms)? Have you referred to all relavant points in the instruction?
ls

Appropriacy
(1-5 pts)

coherence

ls

(1-5 pts)

the text made up of logically structured, well-connected ideas?

Have you used purposefully chosen linking words and phrases, reference words and phrases,
in order to establish the inner cohesion of both the paragraphs and the whole text? Have you
divided your text into well-connected paragraphs?

Cohesion
(1-5 pts)

Grammatical Range
and Accuracy 1t-S pts)

Have you used the right grammatical structures with the necessary range to support your communicative purposes? Are there grammatical or accuracy mistakes (e.g. word orde1 punctuation) left in the text which hinder comprehension?

Lexical Range and


Accuracy (1-5 pts)

Have you used the right range of vocabulary which is appropriate to suppot your communicative purposes? Are there any vocabulary mstakes left in the text which hinder comprehension?

As a class, discuss the points you have given. Check them and the reasons for those points given
to this sample letter in the Answer key.

Writng Task
]

Writing Task

1:

7:

Transactonal Wrtng

Transattional Writing (30 minutes)

You have just bought three books for your university course from SuperBooks.com

after reading the online advertisement below.

SuperBooks.com
wide choice of books
All books in excellent condition
Orders delivered next day
You have made the following notes:

Your notes:
One book was the wrong title
Another one arrived damaged
Only arrived 2 weeks later!

ls Write an email of complaint to SuperBooks.com.

fi

Write 'lO0 -120 words.

ffi Write your answer to this question on a Separate sheet.

Write the email at home as a HOMEWORK task, keeping strictly to the time limit of 30 minutes, Before writing anythin9,
check the Remember - Avoid advice box on the next page.
Your teacher will evaluate your email using the simplified criteria above and will give you with detailed feedback.

After you have written and handed in your email, read the possible model answer on p, 175. Consider why it is effective.
Also, underline phrases and expressions in the model answer that you like and would like to use in the future.

Lesson 4: Shopping Online

state your purpose at the beginning;


be sufficiently polite (but firm, when necessary);

stay impersonal;

make it clear what you want the recipient to do;


include only relevant and appropriate information;
use paragraphs;
use appropriate opening and closing phrases;
use appropriate and varied linking words / phrases.;

"1

l
using contracted forms (e.g.
can't, don't etc);

being aggressive;
being too chatty or

conversational;
using long and complicated
sentences;

going away from the topic,

Unt 7:Yes, I Can!


Lesson 1
Handling Exam Stress

Success
xExT xl1

'

Lesson 2
Facing the Exam

Unt 7: Yes, l Can!

Lesson

Lesson
EXAM TASK
Reading Task 2:
Scan Reading
(also in Unit 5.3)

1:

1:

Handling Exam Srress

Handling Exam Sfress

SK|LLS AND LANGUAGE FOCUS:

l
l
l
l
l
l
l

Reading: scanning for specific information


Speaking: discussing personal experiences
Speaking: interpreting ideas, expressing
preferences
Reading: identifying inappropriately
used words in texts
Speaking: initiating and maintaining
an interview
Speaking; recommending ideas
Exam skills: focusing on specific details,
key words in texts

Copng or not coping with exam stress?


Since millions of students take hundreds of exams all over the world every year, individuals and
comPanies offer hundreds of suggestions to cope with the stress that is a natural part of both
preparing for and taking exams.
* Look at the 5 tips and

1.

Talk about things other than the


examination. This will have a relaxing effect,

2.

Develop your own study habits, which will


make everything feel more organized.

3.

4.

Any conscious effort to relax physically and


mentally - from stretching to singing in the
shower - will reduce stress.

frrst

half of each one on the left with its second half on

lto

of the exam.

You are less likely to miss out the important


things you should learn, develop or practise.

C.

This way you make sure your body and mind


are not expecting sleep or food when you want
them to be concentrating on the exam.

D.

of relaxation, which is important in

L'
=

Such exercises can bring about a state

counterbalancing the body's response to stress.


Share some jokes, some interesting anecdotes
of your day to lighten the atmosphere.

check your answers in small groups, and discuss which words or clues helped you.

right,

v.

you feel good and successful.

expected routines ofexam day at least one


day before, Try to wake up and eat at the
same times as you will be able to on the day

the

They can be cards or objects that matter to you,


kept in your wallet, pocket or handbag. The
more personal they are the better. Their main
job is to inspire you.

Carry with you/ or have near you, reminders


of personal achievements, things that make

Simulate as precisely as you can the

5.

match the

Lesson

llnt 7: Yes, I Can!

Handling Exam Sfress

Working in the same groups, discuss the following points:

|i|,,"

l
I

1:

with them?
Have you ever tried any of these techniques? lf so, what was your experience
you?
can you add any other techniques or methods that have definitely worked for
1.

2.

Share the added techniques or methods with the others in class,

Finshngother people's stories


handle
small groups. your teacher will read out short examples about how some PeoPle
or
story
instruction
the
language exom stress, When your teacher stops reading, each of you finishes
possible
the
and
text
with 1 or 2 sentences according to your own preference. Read the example
Work

in

student reactions below and then CLOSEYOUR BOOK!

Example:

your teacher's first statement:


have 5 minutes of chat in
warm-up chat. Hopefully you can meet one of your friends in person or online, and
English, which will help you feelthat you are ready for the exam right from the beginningJ

,Have

as
Student A:'This will be particularly useful before the speaking exam. l prefer the online chat,
it can be managed more easilyJ

Student B:,The chat can be about anything. The topic we should avoid

is

the exam itself]

Student C: etc.
Your teacher will read aloud the following statements:

lYrics a bit
doing something relaxing in English on the way to the exam. l listen to English music focusing on the
mode'l
"English
into
put
mind
my
me
more, or read jokes or comics. They help
l like

you are used to doing


Do something relevant in or related to English, but at only half your usual intensity level. Even if
make sure you don't
to
in
order
the
exam
before
hours
24
in
the
it
easier
,"ke
to
something inglish every day, try
know
about.
you
already
light,
somethin9
get tired: read or listen to somethin9

just finished writing a checklist in English of all the thin9s l'll need (e.g. photo lD, dictionary, pens, pencils, erasers,
for text
bottled drink) or need io do (reminding myself of the sequence of exam tasks, remembering the checklist
thin9 off before
types in the Writin9 test or reminding myself of linking words in writin9, etc,) on the day. Ticking each
the exam or in breaks can be a great way of reducin9 my stress,
|,ve

Now

read

the

texts on your own and

and which are not. Give reasons too.

then discuss as a class which pieces of advice are useful

Unit 7: Yes, I Can!


Readng about and discussng sgns of stress

d.

Read the ten signs of a candidate experiencing exam stress. These signs very often have nothing
to do with the candidate's language proficiency, Tick the ones you have already experienced yourself,

Comments to markers:'Sorry, the right answer is B'


Showin g lack of confi dence:'.

ta ke/ma

ke/get. .,'

Undeleted comments in mother tongue or English to oneself:'Check answer sheet again'


Unclear corrections, crossing out, bracketing
Leaving tasks incomplete
Feeling the need to eat or smoke during the exam
Needing to go to the toilet
Hot flushes and/or sweating a lot
l

nability to concentrate

Misunderstanding instructions: e.9. shakin9 hands with examiner

b. A, o

class, compare

your

ticks

and discuss your interpretations of these

signs

of stress.

Msplaced words
You have already read and thought about reading skills, such as skimming or scanning, in Unit
5.3, Activities 4 and 5.
Read this short reminder about two reading skills. Five pairs of words (2 pairs of nouns,2 pairs
of verbs and 1 pair of adjectives,) have been swapped between the two paragraphs. ldentify the
swapped words. lf a sentence sounds a bit strange, the reason may very well be the misplaced word.
(One pair of swapped words hos been marked for you as an example; 'RUNN/NG' <> 'LOOKING').

Skimming

is used to quickly search the main ideas of a text by

looking your eyes over

it, noting important information,

often at a speed three to four times faster than normal reading. You often skim when you have a Iimited amount of time
and want to see, for example, if an article may be of answer for you. Remember, it's not specific to understand each word

when skimming. Some people read the first and last paragraphs using headings

(e.9.

subtitles, subheadings), phrases and

other organisers as they guide down the page or screen/ or focus on the illustrations.

Scanning

is a technique you often apply when running up something in the telephone book or dictionary. You basically

identify for key words or ideas. ln most cases, you know what you're looking fo1 so you concentrate on findin9 a particular
interest. A good example for this is the Scan Readin9 EXAM PRACTICE task, where the 7 statements move your

reading. Scanning involves moving your eyes quickly down the page seeking essential words and summaries.

lf

you see

words or phrases that you don't understand, try to ignore them as much as possible.

b.

Checkyour answers and read the text again with allthewords in their right places.

. Work in pairs. One of you reads the text on skimming again, the other the one on scanning. Write
down 3-4 key words or phrases from the text in any order on a piece of paper and hand it to your
partner.

d,

Look at the key words and phrases that your partner has given to you and produce a quick
verbal summary of that reading skillto your partner, using allthe given language prompts in a

logicalorder,

Unit 7: Yes, l Can!

Lesson I: Handling Exam Sress

Reading Task 2: Scan Reading


I

Reading=T_ask 2: Scan

Reading (10 minutes)

|,

You will read about how four girls deatwith their exam stress.
ffi Read the texts and decide if the information is in text A, B, C or D.

# Place the appropriate letter

in the circle at the end of each statement.

Example:
This student believed that passing an exam depended on how she thought about it.

lnformation to find
This student ...
1. finds it helpful to take it easy before sleeping.

2. didn't acknowledge a problem to herself.


3. was helped by knowing that others had the same problem.

4. made use of an idea from a school

friend.

5. found thinking about nothing in the exam room could help.

6. is reassured by the idea that she could do the exam again.


7. finds that using time management skills helped.

Text A: Abby
l used to reallY hate Written language exams, but now l think l have really got to grips
with
them. I think the real change came when l started to recognise my own stress and talked to
friends and teachers about it. Just knowing that other students were in a similar situation
really helped. oh, and something else. Eating was really important. l used to survive
throughout the revision period on breakfast cereals and coffee, but l learnt that this was just
Stressing me out even more. Eating properly is the key. Another thing is sleep. l learnt
tht
it Was not a good idea to stay up all night and try to cram long lists of irregular verbs,
but
instead it's better to draw up a revision table covering several weeks and iti.t to it 5trictly.

Text B: Belinda
think l have got over most of my language exam stress. The key moment for me was when
gave uP alcohol and cigarettes in the exam period; any relief from stress that wine
and
nicotine give doesn't last very long. Another big thing was relaxing before bed. ln the old
daYs l would study right up to going to bed, and found that l couln't sleep at all, These
days,
l stoP work one hour before bedtime and go out for a short walk before getting
into bed.
l

lf l still can't get the exam out of my mind, l phone a friend and talk about anything
except
exams. As a general thing, l always try to keep in the back of mind that failing an exam is
not the end of the world. There are things l can still do without the exam, and of course it
is

always possible to re-take it.

Unt 7: Yes, I Can!

Lesson l: Handling Exam Stress

Text : Caroline
My problem used to be dealing with panic. Just before going into the room l would stat to
hyperventilate; you know, breathing too fast and too short with too much oxygen getting
to the brain! l often thought l would faint. Even the fear that this might happen, particularly
before oral examinations, caused me to panic, lt took me a long time to admit that l was
having this problem even to myself. l was reluctant to summon up the courage to talk to
my teacher about it. ln the end l did speak to one teacher, and she told me to pause for a
moment in the exam and take five deep breaths through my nose, and let my whole mind go
blank, l found that it worked.

think that exams all depend on how you look at them; it's just a question of attitude. ln
the past l thought of exams as great ordeals; but in the end, life goes on after the exam,
however well or badly you might do. l slowly came to realise that prioritising exams in favour
of everything else was actually a major cause of stress. l went to an exam stress club at my
school and one of the ideas from a girl there was particularly helpful. She told us about the
visualisation method. With this, what you do is to imagine that the exam has gone well and
that you sat there knowing all the answers. The theory is that this boosts your confidence
and you actually do well. lt works for me at any rate.
l

Check your answers as a class and discuss briefly the key information in each text that helped
you find the answers,

Preparng for and roleplayng interviews

;[t}i*

&.Work in pairs. You should both choose a different person from Activity 5 to interview, As the
reporter, read that text once again carefully, and write 4 or 5 questions (e,g. Text C: 'Have you ever
seen a doctor aboutyour panic symptoms?') to find out more about their experience and the reasons
for the chosen stress-release methods.

h" 8"for" the roleplay, this time skim the text that you will be interviewed about. Now roleptay both
interviews with your partner,
&oShare with the whole class one piece of interesting information from the improvised interviews
that was not included in Activity 5.

sa

Stress-release actvtesfor the 82 Euroexam


nWork in small groups and think about possible stress-release methods when preparing for and
taking the Euro 82 written and oral exams.

DlscUssloN

Your groupt recommended stress-release methods

(Mediation, Read ing,

W riting, Li sten

inq)

Oral
(Speaking)

Share your group's ideas with the rest of the class,

Lesson

1:

Unit 7: Yes, l Can!

Handling Exam Sfress

stress Reduction kit

BANG
HEAD
HERE

Directions:
on FIRM surface.
2. Follow directions in circle of kit.
3. Repeat step 2 as necessary, or until unconscious.
4. lf unconscious, cease stress reduction activity.
1. Place kit

Unt 7: Yes, l Can!

Lesson 2: Facing the Exa

Lesson 2: Facing the Exam


EXAM TASK
Writing Task 2:
Discursive Writing
A Review

SKItt AND IANGUAGE FOCUS:

l
l

5peaking: expressing opinions

t
l
l

t
l

Reading; identifoing specific information


Speaking: describing personal
characteristics and experience
Writingl describing personal
characteristics and experience
Speaking: arguing for and aqainst
Writing: becoming aware of a text

type-abookreview

Speaking; brainstorming ideas and


giving opinions

l
l
!

Exam skills: identifying the key


teatures of reviews

Looking back
&"Work in grouPs of 3 or 4. First, leaf through the book
on your own and find j-4 pages thatyou
remember either for Positive or for negativireasons.
Write down the page numbers for yourself.

Euerfone in
grouP tells the others which pages they have choosen,
as well as their reasons,
,Yh.e
establish a'Qroup.opinion" as quickly as possibl,
and write the'page references in the
table in the appropriate column.

P'
Together

Things we liked, ound useut, etc.


(page no., topic or other reference)

C' Share

Things we did not tike, find useful, etc.


(page no., topic or other reference)

onlY Positive eXPeriences with the other class members


showing the pages mentioned. See

which units get an overall positive response.

Unit 7: Yes, I Can!

Lesson 2: Facing the Exam

Reading and speaking about your own language skills


lf you have reached level 82 of the Comm on European Framework of Reference, the following
four descriptions should give a fairly accurate picture of your language skills.

#u Read each description and decide what score you would give yourself : assess the current level
you thinkyou have reached, and also how much you have developed during the Eurocity 82 2.0
course,

Adapted from: http://www.coe.int/t/d94/linguistic/Source/Framework_EN.pdf

Language

The description o the 82

skill

leve!

Reading

l can understand articles and reports about contemporary issues


when the writer takes a particular position on a problem or
expresses a particular viewpoint,

Writing

l can write clear detailed texts on a wide range of subjects related


to my interests. l can write an essay, article or report, presenting
some information or arguments for or against a particular point of
view, l can write letters hi9hlightin9 personal significance of events,
intentions and experiences.

Listening

l can understand longer stretches of speech and lectures and follow


complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar.
l can understand mostTV news and current affairs programmes.

skills
1-5

Your

can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes


regular interaction with native speakers quite possible. l can take
an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, expressing and
maintaining my views. l can present clear, detailed descriptions on
subjects related to my field of interest. l can explain a viewpoint on
a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various
l

Speaking

options.

b" Work in pairs, Explain to your partner why you have given yourself those scores. Emphasise in
your discussion the areas in which you feelyou still need to improve,

_&

Prese ntng your language skills n wrtng


A small student job agency has advertiied some positions which require strong 82 language
skills. As part of the application process, you are expected to produce a written report
summarising the level of your skills.
On the basis of the requirements, do the thinking, planning and note-taking tasks necessary to
l
"
produce an effective draft (check Unt 3.2, Activity 5) on your own. Consider the following:

l
l
l

Your text should be about 200 words.

Divide your ideas into at least 3 paragraphs,


Make sure that you provide concrete information without gettin9 lost in detail.

b, Work in groups of 3, Present your individual text plan from your notes to your 2 partners, and
discuss each other's plans, providing constructive feedback to one another. Together try to ogree on
the details of a logical structure for the text.
n Share and discuss as a class each group's suggestions for the structure and content of this writing
task (e.g. 'We think that one paragraph could be about speaking skills and another one about

writing skills;).

Your development
1_5

Unit 7: Yes, l Can!

se

Lesson 2: Facing the Exam

Do you believe revews?


Tick the things that you read or !isten to reviews about, where the reviews help you
decide
whether to see, read, watch, buy or, at least, show more interest in something.

Dl5cUssloN

Reviews

about...

,/

books, audio books, ebooks


films, DVDs

computer 9ames
radio orTV programmes
plays, balletsl opera

music

exhibitions
concerts

electronic devices

(e.9.

cameras, media players, mobile phones, etc.)

cafs, bars, restaurants

hotels, holiday services


a

rchitectu re, furnitu re

food, recepices
Work in small groups. Discuss what you have ticked and why. Also consider the following

questions:

# where do you usually find the reviews that most influence your choices?
What influences you most in reviews (e,9. the source, the style, the writer, etc.)?

Working in the same groups, collect the most important general characteristics of effective
reviews (e.g. dYnamic adjectives, recommendations based on evidence, informat style, etc.).
As a class, share the ideas collected about effective reviews, and write them on the board.

r-/
1*

EXAMWlzARD

Features of effective revews


Read the following short text about reviews in general. tJnderlirte those points that you had
also
thought of in Activity 4.

A review is a special type of text with a dual function: it provides information but also
combines facts with the views and opinions of the writer towards the subject of the review.
Of these two functions, it is the factual aspect which is often missing in reviews written by
exam candidates. Since a review is supposed to persuade people or warn them off a film,
PlaY, etc., it should always give the reader enough specific information: for example, the title,
the name(s) of the main actors/writer/director/designer/painter,
and the venue. The key facts
could also be the subject of opinion or criticism,
Work in small groups. Think of a famous film, book, exhibition, building, etc. Give
3 c!ues about it
Partners who will guess what it is, and then you can briefly express your views and opinions
about it (e.g. 'Heath Ledger, New York, Oscar' > 'The Dark Knight'). Each member of the grouip
offers
at least one set of clues.
to Your

Unt 7:Yes, I Can!

Lesson 2: Facng the Exam

Analysng a film review


&.

f/

Read this short film review and think about the following two questions:

i*

ln what ways does it meet the requirements you collected and the ones presented in the text

EXAMWlzARD

above?
&t ln

what ways does it not meet them?

The Full Monty is about gettin9 cash, havin9 a laugh and

*ffGffi'#aeb.hffi&-.

being unemployed. A group of friends hatch a plan to


launch a male striptease act in order to ean some muchneeded money.

Gaz is a fun-loving, slightly irresponsible father. His best


friend David is overweight and a little down-in-the-dumps.
Gerald needs the money to pay for his wife's shopping habit.
Guy has no sense of rhythm. But despite these problems the
group practise for the big ni9ht.
The film cost under four million dollars to make but has
taken over 300 million at the box office. No-one predicted
that such a low budget film would be such a world-wide

smash.
lt's incredibly funny but also very sad. lt's the story of men trying to cope with a society
that has forgotten them. lt really is worth catching if you haven't already seen it,
144 words

As a class, discuss your evaluation of the review based on the two questions above.

WrtngTask 2: Dscursive Wrting


You are about to finish workin g with Eurocity 82 2,0.

A Book Review

Write a book review of approximately 150 words about Eurocity 82 2.0 for the readers
of a student magazine for language learners.

Write the review at home as a HOMEWORK task, keeping to the time limit of 30 minutes
as strictly as possible. Hand in your work to your teacher, who will evaluate it using the
simplified criteria and provide you with detailed feedback.
n

REMEMBER
Try and meet as many of the criteria for an effective review as you can (see

bear in mind the simplified writing criteria on p.58.

Activity

5). Also,

;ll+t*

Unit 7: Yes, l Can!

se
DlscUssloN

Lesson 2: Facng the Exam

How wII you keep up the level of your skIls?


We have every reason to believe that you will soon take the 82 Euroexam successfully. And

then?

&. Work in groups of 4. Brainstorm and discuss concrete ways of practising your English for the sake
of maintaining or further improving on the level you have already reached (e.g. 'l will read / scan the
news page of the BBC news website every day', 'l should find a chat partner whose mother tongue is
English;)

b. Shorc yorr group's ideas, methods and suggestions with the rest of the class. Listen to each
other's ideas and make a note of those that you like or agree with.

This is still NOT the end of the book!


On pages 'l54-155 you will find a task with the help of which you can make yourself even better
prepared to take the exam!

,]

Extra
Where do we go from here?

Where do we go from here?

ffi

As the last task in the book, think back and forwards as wel|.Spend as much time as you like
going through the book, thinking about the task of taking the Euro 82 exam some time
soon
or perhaps later,

Write a list of resolutions that you would like to keep both during the final stages of preparation
before the exam and during the exam itself. To make them as concrete as possible, you can
organise your resolutions in categories.

My 82 Euroexam Resolutions
Final stages of preparation

a
a
a
o

Mediation

a
a

Reading

a
a

Writing

a
a
a
a

Listening

a
a
a
o

Speaking

a
a

.::

General
_j]

.t

Once You have filled in the boxes for yoursel{ these facing pages ought to be pHoToCoplED
as a set of reminders!

"1

Where do we go from here?

Guidelines for using the list of resolutions:


The following ideas are not instructions; you may
choose one or more that you like and carry
them out, but You maY decide that the liits you have written
in the table are enough. lt is
entirelY uP to You. However, if you choose to try them
out, tell

info@euroexam.or9,

1.

2,

As the exam approaches, you can reread the list frequently,


and decide to add new
resolutions or change some of those already in the
list. Ths mi9rrt be a logical move when
you prepare for one of the exam papers (e.g. for
reading or wriiing) in a used way.

Find someone, a friend or a relative who speaks English,


and sum up your resolutions to
them, You don't have to mention each point of youis
in each category, simply give

detailed account which will show your partnu. o* *.rr

3,

us about your experiences at:

pop.i"J

you are.

fairly

You can do the summing uP in Hungarian to a friend


or relative whose English is not good
enough to understand it in English. ln this case, it will be
the content that is importani, and

not the language in which you express it,

a,

5,

can carrY With You the photocopied final version and


read it anywhere; the more
Jou
frequently as you get closer to the exam, the better.
Such a document corresponds with one
of the stress-release ideas listed in Unit 7.1, Activity
2.
lf there is some sPace_left on your fridge door
among your beautiful fridge ma9nets, you
could stick Your list of resolutions up next to them. A-lernativel!.put
it up anywhere where
you can glance at it with some regularity.

Now, this lS the end of the book. Good luck!

once You have filled in the boxes for yourself, these facing pages
ought to be pHoTocoplED as a set of reminders!

Answer key

Answer key

Task

ol
c

; #xcggpt ef fro,tg
Lesson l:What's in the Exam?

Task 2

qJ

f".?f

"What's in the book? - A Competition


'|
-honey; 2-Amsterda m; 3-2;4-pronunciation; 5-the
Muse Edith Piaf;6-the Parliament and the Chain Bridge
in Budapest; 7-Simply Recipes; 8-smoking; 9-a camel;

o-

Candidates respond promptlyto some introductory


questions from the o<aminer
Each candidate tells a picture-based story they have

prepared

Task 3

Candidates make responses in short everyday dialogues

Task 4

This task i5 a discussion between the two candidates

about a topic

'il,

10-1MDb and Rotten Tomatoes;

. Focusing on

key

1-banging your head

informaton

-notes; 2-9; 3-3;4-meaning; 5-before; 6-same; 7twice


1

&., Listening Task 2: MakinglVofes


1 -right; 2-traditional;
3-accurac y; 4-clear;5-online
support; 6-website; 7-3; 8-week; 9-smartphone

7 Exam collocations and useful words related to


"
exams
ffiu
E.g. pass the exam

1-exam fee; 2-mock exam; 3-revise; 4-oral exam;


5-exam practice;6-exam stress; 7-mark (the) exam
papers;

8-fail the exam; 9-retake

it; 1O-exam

candidate

This is a suggested order only, as certain activities and


characteristics cannot easily be separated from each other, or
put in sequence,

-exam practice; 2-mock exam;3-exam fee;4-exam


stress;S-revise for; 6-exam candidate, oral exam;
7-pass the/an exam or fail the/an exam; 8-retake the/an
'|

exam

- Reading about and discussing the 82


Euroexam
Test

,E
.

Tasks

Candidates listen to
Task

Task 2
Task

ol

Ea

There are 7 multiple-choice questions about the


content and details of a longer text

Task'l

The task is a formal letter or email of 100-]20 words,


which is written to achieve a particular outcome

Task 2

Candidates choose 1 from a choice of 3 text types


and write an essay, a story, a reportt a review etc, of
approximately 150 words in length

Task

candidates match short recorded conversations to


titles, texts or pictures

.9

Task 2

Task 3

3. How do l like learning English?


The aim of this activity is to show you that learners in a
classroom are different and there are individuat preferences in
language learning activities. ln each option, both alternatives
could be equally acceptable, and it is up to you what reasons
you give for your preferences.

Candidates match paragraphs to headings

Task 3

.s

co

English

Task 2

E
=

Candidates translate a letter from Hungarian into

candidates decide in which of the four short texts


certain pieces of information can be found

0J

o)

a dialogue in an everyday situation


and write translations from English to Hungarian or vice

Versa

o
=

What candidates are required to do

Lesson 2:What's in the Learner?

Candidates fill in gaps in notes based on the


information from the recording
Candidates answer lo multiple-choice questions about

a radio programme they hear

&- Key words in

a text

#*"
The following 3 lists of words are suggestions only. You may
find other key words and phrases more important. Make
sure you can give reasons for your choice in the discussion.

Paragraph 1-change settings, pop up, keep it in memory,

regular exposure;

Paragraph 2-shopping list, to-do list, writing, get used to


spelling and form,look up;
Paragraph 3-daily writing routinq same place, things

seen and heard and read, review, keep fresh

Answer key
';;,

llseful tips for the Paragraph Heddings task

The order below is probably the most effective but it i5 not


the only one. For instance, you may decide to skip the very
first guessing. Of course, you can look up words any time
during the completion of the task (that is why that tip has

not been included in the list).

Unt 2: Globetrotting
Lesson
'.,,

1:

Surviving as a Tourist

Questions and answers

The countries or cities referred to:

Look at the title and illustration. Try to guess what the text as
whole is about before reading it.

Speed read the whole text to get an idea of what it is about


Take a quick look at the headings and try to work out what

A-Porto (Oporto), Portugal; B-Amsterdam, Holland;


C-London, UK; D-Barcelona, Spain; E-Athens, Greece;
F-Vienna, Austria; G-Prague, the Czech Repub!ic; HBudapest, Hungary; |-Rome, ltaly; J-Brussels, Belgium

the text is about and what text type it could be.


Read through the first paragraph quickly and decide what its

Confirm what you think by reading it through once


again more slowly. Dont worry about unknown words or
unfamiliar grammatical structures.

topic

is.

Ql-1 & C; Q2-R & J; Q3-E & H; Q4-D &

allthe headings. Select the right heading


paragraph.
for each
Think about your reasons, as well as your
rea50n5 for dismssing the other headings.

t';,,

lf you are not sure, make a mark on the question paper about
your best guess, but do not fill in the answer sheet. Move on
and come back to it later,

Reading Task

1:

Paragraph Headings

Q5-B & G

Asking polite questions

Follow the same procedure, read through all the paragraphs,


first very quickly, then more slowly and thoroughly.
Now, read through

F;

The first question is more direct, while the second question is


more indirect and therefore more polite. lt does not assume
that the other person knows the answer.

ln terms of grammar, the question word order (auxiliary verb


before the subject, also known as inversion) comes in the
question head ('Can you tell me ...') and not the main body of
the question: '. . .where the railway station is?' (NOT: Eanyoa)

A-Not needed!; B-Not needed!; C-Example; D-4;E-2;F-6;


G-3; H-5;1-1
i.:,,"

l::::::::::::l,mewherekthe |l

Characterstics of learnng styles

neae5lUooKsIlop{
bookshop?
I nearest

Names of learning style

Characteristic of learning style


You prefer using images and diagrams,
and picturing how things relate to each
other physically.

visual / spatial

You process information more


effectively through sounds and music.

aural / auditory

You learn better by using words, both in


speech and writing.

physical / experiential

You learn best by applying logic,


reasoning and systems.

logical / mathematical
other

people.

The one
i ntu

e.g. social

interpersonal

You process knowledge more effectively


when working alone and using selfstudy.

pair of names that does not

it i ve/i n sti n ct ive

frt

Can you tell me what

does

"romkocsma"
rorllKoLsld tledrl
mean?

I Z.
l
I
3.
l

Could you say me if there is

pizeria near

here?

Do you know that it

is possible

to use my international

solitary / independent

any of the categories:

...where the nearest bookshop is?


l
l

|l

...what "romkocsma" means?

lll

Loulo
vou Iell
me. 1
Could you
tell me...

Oo rou know if it is possible...?

4. Would it be possible to tell


I me ho*."n l get to my youth
l hostetl
I S. Can you explain me how l can
| ..."r, my email account.
|

O.

Excuse me, l wondering if

computer

how l can get to.

..

. .

.explain to me.,.?

could send an email from this

l
l

student card?

verbal/ linguistic

You prefer using your body, hands and


sense of touch.

You prefer to learn in groups or with

r.

Il

'*.ur"

me,

was wondering if

Answer key
,fr"

|:"

Polite questions/requests
1, ld like to find out when the next bus leaves for

Cambridge.

2.
3.

E,g,Can you tell us what the locals callthis weird statue?


Could someone tell me if this is the right metro line for
the Sagrada Famlia?
Could you tell me where l should get off for the Basilica?
Can you show me how this GPS works?
Excuse me, l was wondering if there's a hot-spot nearby.
Can you explain to me why all the shops close so early?
Do you know which special pass l should choose for a
3-day stay?

4.
5.
6,
7.
8,

Rejecting an offer ofcheap

Functions

1.

2.
3,

Thanks a lot,

help

You've been a great help.

-H;

Asking for information about


train departures:

5.

Can l getyou a...?

5uggesting

We could...

HowAilhat about -ing..,?

to do

Why don't we.


a

7.

9.

due to

Could you go down a bit?

offering help to a lost tourit:

. Can l help you? Where

You should leaveyourvaluables


in the hotel safe.

lf l were you, l wouldn't carry my

camera on its strap.


Be careful

|'m sorry but that really is

Do you mind not making all that noise?

quite loud.

are you

trying to get to?


lf you

tell me where you want to

go, l might be able to give you

notto keep yourWallet

directions.

in your coat pocket.

Asking or permission to use


something:

about noise

Could l borrow your bke for an

Giving advice on buying


souvenirs:

Do you think l could use your

mobile internet modem?

. Would you mind

Why don't you trythe famous

Ecseri Market for antiques?

you d better check out the

museum shop first.

if l borrowed

your pen?

Would you mind turning it down a bit, please?


requesting to

The Transactional Dialogues task

Could l have the bill, please?

refusing a

Sorry, but l'm sort of busy right now.

request to help

rejecting a

Are you sure?

complaint

Where do you think this conversation is taking place? At


the reception desk of a hotel.
Whot talking? A guest and the ]eceptionist.
What function is it? Asking for permission to use the

d love to, but.,.

l see

what you mean, but l'm not sure l agree with

you.

10, blaming
somebody for
something
1

more basic model?

. Oops, thatt beyond my budget.

hour?

complaining

pay

8.

i5

a bit on

the pricey side! Have you got a

Warning about safety risks:

No problem - forget it ever happened.

mistake

6.

. .

Expressing surprise about price:

. Goodness me - that's

leave from7

And then, you just have to...

something
forgiving

the next train to vienna

2-C

something

4.

please? This one is too close to


the smoking area.

train to Debrecen is?

explaining
how to do

rare.

. Could we getanothertable,

lt sounds reallycheap, but l need

. Do you know which platform

That! really very generous ofyou.


offering a drink

a more central room.

. Could you tell me when the next

11

me, but this steak is

medium, and lasked for it done

more facilities, Thank you anyway.

Other possible phrases

appreciating

. Excuse

. Thank you, but lthink l would like

-D; 2-G; 3-A; 4-K; 5-B; 6-1; 7 -J; 8-L; 9-F; 1 0-E;

Complaining in a etaurant:

accommodation:

What is functional language?

e.
3
6;:

These are only suggested answers, intended to highlight the


functional exponents, You may come up with a wide range of
ot h er a cce pta bl e res po n se s,

1. recommending

lt was entirely your fault.


you could have been more..

ld recommend (-ing)...
l

'l2. accepting
advice

d say... would be the best one to choose.

That! really helpful.


That makes sense - thanksl

wi-fi system.

b.
You are atthe reception deskofyour hotel.You have/
need to send an emailto your boss. Find out about the

wi-fi connection.
Transactional Dialogues task: sample role card

Answer key

.
.

who starts the conversation? The candidate


How many times does the candidate have to speak?

ii'

Twice

2.

Can the examiner improvise a reply to what the


candidate says? No, they read out the reply as it
appears in the script.

3.

Lesson 2: Bridging the Communication

4.

Gap

5.

1.I seeyou point - Mr rtelek!


&.

6.

-mediate; 2-translate

OO*'r,r, to write down the full translation in complete


sentences, as you don't have much time.
DO try to work out the meaning of unknown words from
the general context, or from the rest ofthe speaker's
messa9e.
DON'T panic if you don't understand a word from the
recording

Do listen to what the speakers are trying to express;


translate the message not the words.
DO make sure you focus on the meaning and message
conveyed by the speaker; accuracy is not very important.
DoN'T worry about being 1 00o/o corrCt or accurate all
the time.
DO put down only or mostly the key content words that
carry the necessary messa9e.
DON'Ttranslate word for word.

b.

8.

3, From Hungarian into English, from English to


Hungarian

Pairs of DO and DON'T type recommendations:

A-M; B-T; C-M; D-M; E-M; F-T

a_b.
.

Result of mediation

As for this evening, l'd rather go

Ma inkbb opert nznk, mint

to see an opera performance

balettet.

Egszen rszletes lerst nem

can't give good description, it was

tudok adni

a brand new camera-case.

a fots tskrl,

vadonatj volt, az induls eltt

3.

Afterthe brakes started to go

A fk nem mkdtt

funny, the chain suddenly fell

leesett a lnc, utna meg n.

off, and then ldid. off the bike

Ex
2

Vettem.

mean. Ouch,

Nhny napot Budapesten tltk,

in Budapest and l'm looking for

s valami kulturlis

some culturalevents.

keresek.

Te

rmszetesen, Mi lyen prog ram ra

gondolt? Igen nagy a vlasztk.

programot

certainly. What sort of events do


you have in mind? The choice is
huge.

Annyit hallottam mr arrl, hogy

Budapest being a festival city.

Budapest fesztivlvros, Mit

What does that mean in practical

jelent ez

terms? Can you recommend

valamit ezzel kapcsolatban

a gyakorlatban?

Tudna

The english pages ofthe websight

anythin9 along those lines?

ajnlani?

parknak ugyan van honlapja,

ofthis national park doesn't

Nos, hrom olyan jelents

Well, there are three major

de az angol nyelv oldalai

contain any usefull informations.

fesaivl van vente, amit mi

annual festivals that we organise

szerveznk, de egyik sem

but none ofthose is on at the

hasznos informcit nem


This car is smaller than the
size l booked. lt won't be large

enough for the four of us with

Ez a kocsi kategria tl kicsi

moment. And you have to order

most zajlik. Ezekre amgy is

jval elbb kell megrendelni


jegyeket.

tallok.

tickets to these well in advance


anyhow.

neknk, ngyen vagyunk, sok

What about the spring? l'll be

stavasszal mi a helyzet?

csomagga|.

back again for a week then,

Akkor megint itt leszek egy

all our luggage.

6.

l'm spending a couple of days

Sajnos ennek a nemzeti

szinte teljesen resek, semmi

5.

possible translation

|'ve heard so much about

mr jl, aztn

Mediation PatTwo: Dialogue


Dialogue

Ex

than a ballet.

2.

1-7;2-3;4-8;5-6
lx-

Original Sentence
'l

$;p.

l've checked the roaming tariffs

A roaming djak az USA-ba minden

of each mobile company for

mobil szolgltatnl majdnem

travel in the U5, and they seem

azonosak-

htig. Szvesen elmennk


egy koncertre va9y e9y

modern ballet performances.

tncsznhzba, hogy megnzzek


valami modern balett eladst.

to be virtually identical.

5. DOs and DON'Ts of the Mediation Dialogue


task

l'd love to go to a concert or


a dance theatre to see some

Adok eqy programfzetet,

Let me give you a programme

amit tnzhet, Benne van

guide to browse through. lt

minden szksges informci,

gives you all the necessary

idpontokrl, helysznekrl s

information about dates, venues

rakrl. Meg rvid ismertetsek

and prices. And summaries of

is az

eladsokrl.

the shows/performances.

Answer key

Sounds great. l see you have

Nagyszer, Ltom, van email

an email address so l can easily

cmk, gy knnyen kapcsolatba

contact you. And what's on now?

lphetek nkkel.

Are there tickets available for

ajnlata mostanra? Kaphat

anythin9 that's Worth seeing?

valamire jegy, amit rdemes

smi az

megnzni?

Mit szlna egy kis jazhez? pp

What would you say to some

most zajlik egy j azzesztivl,

jazz? There's

klnbz

now with 9roups representin9


different styles. Theret a concert

irnyzatokat

kpvisel egyttesekkel. Este


is van egy koncert. De

nagyon

hossz, 6-kor kezddik, s

l might

2 in the

morning.

Tulajdonkppen inkbb valami


go

to the opera. By the way, is there


7

on this evening. But it's Very

about

ld prefer

something classical.

jazz festival on

long, startin9 at 6 and finishing

krlbell jjel 2-ig tart,


Well, actually,

ticket booth where you can get

klasszikusat szeretnk. Esetle9

elmennk az operba. Jut


eszembe, van nknl olyan

last-minute bargain tickets for a

jegyiroda, ahol az aznapi

performance?

eladsra lehet olcsn jegyeket

kapni?

Sajnos nlunk nincs ilyesmi,

|'m afraid we

de esetleg megprblhat

anything like that here. But you

jegyet venni a sznhzban, az

mi9ht try gettin9 a ticket at

elads kezdete eltt fl rval.

the theatre about half an hour

don't have

Nha vannak eladatlan vagy

before the perormance begins.

visszahozott jegyek.

sometimes there are unsold

|:;,

but other interpretation5 are acceptable, too.

Dialogue 1: A guest is complaining on the phone to the hotel


receptionist about something wrong with theTV in their room. As a
response, the receptionist sends a mechanic to Room 26.
Dialogue 2: One friend finds the other one's cooking delicious
and asks about the recipe. Then she can hardly believe that the
food was bought ready-made at the supermarket and was finally
prepared in a microwave. No problem. no solution.

Dialogue 3: Two friends are on the phone discussing their plans


to 90 to the cinema. But one ofthem hesitates because they have
no babysitter available. The other recommends John to babysit, so
the problem is solved, and they end up going to the film.
:,j
1

2.
3.

4.
5.

6-A

i:] '

Linking words and expreion


,1,";'u

Further options for each category are given below the


Addin9 nformation
Also,; Furthermore.; too; as well

However,

Besides this, ;On top of this, ; What

Mistranslations

Out ofthe blue,; All ofa sudden,;

ln this context, the word 'leak'refersto a person who has

revealed some laboratory results without being asked to or


allowed to.
The idiom Qo into labour'reers to the pains or spasms a
woman experiences before and during delivering a baby.
The 'closet'is a small room attached to bedrooms where a
personl or a family's clothes are kept, and has nothin9 to do
with the Hungarian slang word for'toilet!
This is from Sndor Mrait novel Vendgjtk Bolzanban.rhe
word'gondols'refers to the gondoliers who must have been
rowing the person all the way from Venice to Mestre, the town
closest to venice on the mainland. The translator must have
misread the word'gondolsok' for Qondolkods'.

" Sressngkey contentwords


Key content words are in bold, and stressed syllables are underlined.

Exeusc me, lwas wondering if you could help me. |'m


going on holiday to Spain and ld like some infornnation

on where to go, what to do and what to see. l'm visiting


Madrid for a few days and then l'm spending a week next
to the sea.

5uddenly,

ln spite of this, ; but

; Surprisingly,

Despite this,; even though

Showing a cause, effect or


eason
so

Because of this, ; which is why

since; For this reason

Eventually,; Up to a point,; After


all,

Showing the sequence of events


immediately; After

while,;

Next,; Later on,;


ln the meantime,;

After that,; while


+

as soon as; when; meanwhile;

before long
s,g ?
"

1-whi!e; 2-also; 3-After a while; 4-immediately; 5-1n


the meantime; 6-Not urprisin9!y; 7-before

Mrl

for story telling

D>B>c>F>A>E

Therefore,; As a result,; in order to

now; above all ; As for; Actually;

3 " Key words

not only. .., but also

Adding colour to naative

like...'refers to a desire to eat or drink something: 'Szvesen


fagyiznk egyet;

sign.

although ; while

is more,

Showing a contrast or difference

'l feel

Lesson 3: Souvenirs

,:]

-F; 2-G; 3-C; 4-B;5-H;

';',,,

returned.

, Listening Task 1: Short Conversations

Lesson 4: Travel Stories

tickets or tickets that have been

Working out meaning from content words

The three short summaries offer one interpretation of each dialogue,

Answer key
b.

burst into tears-B; return-C; spot-F; complain-E; drop-D;


regret-A; come across-F; gaze-A

C.

possible answers:
Nouns

Adjectives

luggage/passpo rtl airport/

excited/happy

Picture
D

officer/passport/bag

angry/desperate/

worried/

friqhtened
lady/passport/officer

grateful/ kind/relieved/

man/sign/view/hotel

A
E

horrible/ugly/d irtyl

chimnev

desDerate/disaooointed

receptionist/guest book/

angry/disappointed/

complaint

indifferent

Do you think she does well or badly? She does well.

She tells a we!|-structured story using different past


tenses, even future in the past, linking words and
logical key words. She also plays with intonation. Her
occasional hesitation is NO problem. Her range of
vocabulary is a bit limited, but sentence structures
show a much wider variety.
Does she read aloud from her notes? No.You can hear
that she hesitates here and there, mostly when
looking for words.
Does she describe each picture - or does she'tell the
story'? She tells the story with acceptable, though not

outstandin9, fluency.

i,l_-,,lir

"1l; ,fu#;e,d,?# .N{$#$yJ't?

Lesson
.,:j:,,,

.
.

&. Listening
1

Task 3: Radio

-C; 2-C; 3-C; 4-A; 5-B; 6-8;

Programme

-A; 8-A; 9-C; 1 0-B

9reat/l ucky/friendly

room/luggage/spider/view/

- Listening to story telling

The right response is B, the job: stunt coordinator


Clues for the right response: e.g. minimise risks,
d a n gerou s, phy si ca l ch a l len ge, etc.
Clues for the disctractors: e.g. desk, calculate, effects, trick
photography, etc.

impatient

d.

Ilnderstandng distractors

arrival/baq

,i"":

3"

1:

Flmmakers

Filmwords

5.

Reading q news item, scanning for specific


information

'|-4OO; 2-Maytag Plant 2 Building; 3-Saturday 19th;4Jason C. Corr S-name, telephone number, email, age

(+ photograph);6-Master Films Inc.; 7-The Mayor of


the town; 8-Underground; 9-2OO; 'lO-The winner of the
rafle; 11-Nothing

6.Writing an application email


Model text for application email:
From:...
To: masterfi l msextras@9mai l.com

Subject: Extras for Underground


Dear Mr Corr,

My name is... ,..and l am writing in response to


an internet advertisement for extras for the film
Underground. l am almost 19 and l will be avai|able all day
on the 'l9th. l am attaching a recent photograph. You can
contact me at the email address above or on the followin9
telephone number:... The official T-shirt will be a 9reat
reward for my work as an extra. l am really looking forward
to being involved in the shooting.
Best wishes,

People /jobs: cameraman, actor, producer, director,


scriptwriter, castin9 director, art director, set designer, hair
stylist, make-up artist, props master, costume designe1
sound technician, 9rip, etc.
Genres: romantic comedy, drama, comedy, musical, action
film, adventure film, western, thriller, science fiction, war,
historical epic, etc.
Activities (mostly verbs): to shoot, to cut, to make sy up, to
perform, to rehearse, etc.
Other: soundstage, camera, lights, make-up, microphone,
props, special effects, bluescreen, frame, a close-up, location,
set, screen, etc.

Lesson 2: On Location
.. Reading: a famous

location

s,,

Picture c: The house in Tujunga, California "played the role"


of Elliott's home and E,TJs hiding place in Steven Spielberg's
classic 1 992 film, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestria l.

Paragraph

1: lt explains how ordinary lookin9 the house is


(especially considering its importance in film history).
Paragraph 2: lt describes how well the house, ideal as the

Answer key
hiding place for an alien being, blends into its mountainous
surroundings.
Paragraph 3: lt repeats the lack of really outstanding

Film makers will be thri|led to shoot their historical movies


here, particularly considering that several of our shops
and cafs have maintained their original interiors and
furnishings,

features ofthe house.

ln addition to this, the 2 nearby mountain peaks, each


with a small fortress as well as the thick forests all around,
provide perfect settings for a range of film types.

Arguing for and against


Attractions
Visitors (filgrims) can further

The features l have mentioned above could attract local

Drawbacks

identifo with favourite characters

Limited programme and activity


options for filgrims if place cannot

and films once they have seen

offer other attractions.

and internationaI producers and directors. Becoming a


part of the film-making community should bring us some
fame and recognition, and will create dozens of new jobs
for residents. The next step is up to the authorities.

where they were standing, moving,


actin9, etc.
Fairly unknown places are put on
the map, which raises the self-

Overcrowded places with noi5e,


pollution.

"l

confidence of locals,
Through the lnternet, even the
smallest places can gain fame and

:i.

Profit from filgrimages 9oes to


outside a9encies and not to locals.

popularity.
DeVelopment of transport

Smaller places receiving masses

connections and infrastructure.

of visitors will have their roads,

infrastructure damaqed.
More visitors could bring more

False or embarrassing image

investment and jobs.

through the film that a place is


featured in.

Achieving your purpose in writing


A-revising; B-drafting; C-pre-writing; D-drafting; E-prewriting; F-revising; G-drafting

Famous locations

-C; 2-H; 3-G; 4-F;5-B; 6-D;

-A; 8-E;

Lesson 3: Shooting Films


,Words and meanings

":,

Possible sentence pairs:

director: The company director has a business meeting


tomorrow. /The director went over to the camera operator

for a minute.

set: l used to have a complete set of playing cards but l lost


the Joker. / Before the set for a film production is made, the
set designer produces drawings of it.
cast: All members of the cast performed brilliantly. /When l
broke my leg, all my friends had fun signing their names on
my plaster cast.
scene: Some people think that the criminal always returns

U ndersta n di n g th e writi n g eva I uat i o n cr itera


Criterion 1 -Range and accuracy of grammatical structures

Criterion 2-Coherence
Criterion 3-Range and accuracy of vocabulary
Criterion 4-Task Achievement
Criterion 5-Appropriacy
Criterion 6-Cohesion

Writing Task 2: Discursive Writing - An Article

A possible answer:

l've just visited the location of the shooting of the film

Chocolate mouse in Caf Central, and found the process


fascinating. On top of that, the experience has made me
think about how profitable and useful such projects could

to the scene of the crime. /The actors had to rehearse the


scene again and again until the director was satisfied with it.

roll:They rolled out the red carpet before the film star. /The
director shouted "Silence - we're rolling!"
release: The prisoner was released on 'l 8 Februa ry, / One
day all films ever made will be released on the internet.

trailer: The horses were transported in

a trailer. / l haven't
seen the film ye! only its trailer on TV a couple of times.

i:,;,,

l. Thenamesofbothwebsitescomefromtypicalviewer
reactions to stage performances.

2.

Both Websites offer information on TV programmes.

3.

The views and reviews of professional critics and viewers are


basic features of both sites.

be for our town.

We have got a 1th-century town-hall surrounded by

similarly old buildings and facades on the main square.

The greatest movie websites

One site provides data for the public and the film industry; the
other one is mostly for ordinary viewers.
5.

Both RT and lMDb cn boast of having more than 100 million


unique monthly visits to their sites.

Answer key
.i:;..

Reading carefully - Ilsing a dictonary

ii ,,Working

Q1. What is the right order to approach the task? - B (Read


whole text first at least once and ignore the questions.)
There is not much use looking at the questions before you
understand the main message and topics of the whole text,
even if not allthe details. At the same time, a quick look at the
question heads - without reading the options for each question
- will tellyou about the text and it willfocus your mind on the
information thatyou are looking for.

Q2. Once you have read the whole text at least once... (you had better read through all the 7 questions)

Now that you have read the text and get the main ideas,
probably it is more useful to go through allthe 7 questions
once, they might give you further details for understanding.
Q3. What if you come across an unknown word or phrase
in the text during the first reading? - A (Try to work out its

meaning with the help of the context, the text around it) or
C (Mark it on the exam paper and decide about it later.)
Both approaches, in other words, advice A and C could work.
lf you are good at guessing words in context, try to rely on it,
Marking for later checking is also useful, but looking up words
could wait.
Q4. What do you think could be the best strategy for using
the dictionary in this task? - B (Look up only those items in
both the text and the questions without which you cannot
complete the task.)

Looking up words in the dictionary takes time and often only


confirms your guess, Don't overuse your dictionary,
Q5. The last question tests your understanding of the text as

infilms

a-pyrotechnician; b-stuntman/stuntwoman; c-camera


operator; d-director; e-script writer; f-make-up artist;
g-choreographer; h-sound technician

Lesson 4:The lnteractive Audience


|:j. Guessing words
1

in context

-to; 2-to; 3-to; 4-when; S-which; 6-what; 7-to

:4"Taking part in a discussion


Giving opinion: ln my opinio n,..,

/ | definitely think that... /

Persona|ly, l be|ieve,.. / l'm convinced that...

Structuring: Shall we move on to the next point? / Let's start

with.

/ Let's try and agree. / What was the next idea?

Clarification: So you mean. , . / Could you explain that,


please? / Areyou saying that,.. / lf lhave understood
correctly,...

Turn-taking: Sorry to interrupt you but... / l d just like to say


that... / Can l just add something here? / Um,.. um...um...

Asking for opinion: What do you think about...? / What's


your opinion o...? / Have you got any comments on...? /
Don't you agree that.

i.t.

Analysing a Discussion task

:i].i d

We can safely say that the performance of the two candidates is


more or less of the same quality.
{._

whole. You should,.. - C (look at it before reading, but do


it at the end.)

All the answers can be ticked for the whole conversation.

Look at the question and keep it in mind when reading the


text. lfyou have understood the text and answered the other
questions (mostly) successfully, it should be easy.

? " Reading and writing about blockbusters and

Reading Task 3: Multiple-Choice Reading


1 -D; 2-A; 3-D; 4- A; 5-A; 6-C; 7
-B
lmprove your guessing and dictionary skills
Your dictionaries will provide the answers, meanings.

busts

Alltitles, except slumdog Millionaire, refer to either a film which


later had one or more sequels, or to one of the sequels itself.
However, Slumdog Millionaire is not a sequel and is not likely to
have a sequel in the future.
li
i"} s

l
l

Not necessarily.

The calculations are based on factors such as whether key


film stars are kept, how long it has been since the last film,
and how well the last film did.

Answer key
Unt 4: Lfestyles
Lesson

1:

6-Colouring or"jazzng up" a story

Pursuing Adventures

ln the lists, the bolded words and phrases are the !inking
devices, and the italicised ones are used to add colour and
spice to the narration.

?,-Words related to adventures


ffi-,,ba.

The placement of words and expressions reflects one


possible solution, but plenty of other associations could
equally well be justified,
1.
fi

rockclimbing

ngertips, grip, 5ummit.

2. (extreme)

mountain biking

brake, tree roots, downhill,

collaboration, safety gear


3. scuba

diving

oxygen, coral ree ecotourism,

4.

snowboarding

downhill, summit, slide, brake

cruise
5.

inline skating

jumping

base, fear of heights

6.

of cou rse,

nfo rtu

atel y, but,

fi

nal

ly

Paragraph 2: no wonder, now that ! was remind ed, in full


mode
Paragraph 3: not entirely unexpectedly, incidentally, risky
certainly was (reversed word order for emphasis!)

it

Paragraph 4: all that remained, following a sleepless night, no


way back, take itfrom me, once we made it

"f.r,|e|ng

****

(italicised @)

whitewater rafting

8.

canopying

slide, ecotourism, fear of heights,

&,Vocabulary and grammar quiz


Every word in this list can be a noun and a verb without
changing their form. Note that the noun form of 'increase'is

&.ories of extreme activties


'l
-inline skating; 2-canopying; 3-extreme mountain
biking;4-scuba diving

stressed on the first syllalable, while the verb form is stressed


on the second syllable. This shift of stress is quite common
in many two-syllable words which have the same verb and
noun form.

Lesson 2: Bad Habits


the story of an extremely extreme

Although the words in each summary can differ, the overall


meaning can stay the same.

Paragraph 2: Plenty of stories heard in a pub in NewZealand convinced Jackie that she should finally try Bungee
Jumping and as soon as possible.
Paragraph 3: A day later, she decided to attempt a
previously not permitted act: to Bungee Jump from
helicopte1 after receiving the necessary permits.

nervousness, Jackie went to the airport and made all


the necessary arrangement for the flight on board the
helicopter.

When it came to jumping, with an incredible


adrenalin rush in her veins, she made all kinds of
unidentifiable noises, as she jumped out of the chopper with
only a 300-meter rubber cord tied around her ankle.
5:

&. Reading and guessing


meanings

key words

and their

ffin

chocolate, Coca Cola, coffee, etc.

b,
What makes the entry personal and funny is that the writer
of the blog post is addressing (speaking to) their own bad
habit that they would like to get rid of.

Paragraph 4: After a night of little sleep because of her

Paragraph

collaboration, rapid, ecotourism

grip, base

activity

ph

Paragraph 5: so far so good, then, these were the words,

safety gear, cruise, brake


7. bungee

Pa ra g ra

3"Defining meanng
1

-B; 2-; 3-A; 4-F; 5-C; 6-D

5. One-minute

speed

reading

possible titles could be:


'DOs and DON'Ts for the Paragraph Headings task'
'How best to handle the Paragraph Headings task'
'Good strategies for the Paragraph Headings task'

Answer key
!,a, ldentifying paragraph headings about
paragraph headings
A-5; B-Not needed!; C-4; D-l; E-3;F-2

'f

. Reading Task 1:

cl!
Criteria for effective essays

E
l!

.E

o
o

t
co

n
a

!
t

The essay should have a logical structure.

Paragraph Headings

A-Not needed!; B-l;C-4; D-6; E-Example; F-Not needed!;


G-5; H-2; 1-3

There shou|d be exactly 5 paragraphs,


Each paragraph should focus on just one point or topic.
Each paragraph should contain just one idea.
Each paragraph should have a topic sentence.
Pros and cons should appear in each paragraph.

'i, Gving advice


The expressions from the text:
You must be able to explain... orYou must be ready for... /
You needn't be strong and powerful,.. / Just do something
to protect yourself... / You will have to alter... / You may
haveto revise... /Whatyou need is a community.,. /You'll
need their encouragement.,. / ...they'll need to get tough
on you. . .Yet you have to find ways to motivate yourself

The opening and closing paragraphs should be very

dramatic and striking.


The writert position should be made clear in the first
paragraph.
The conclusion should confirm the write! position.
The conclusion should contain no new ideas that have
not been considered earlier in the essay.
There should be appropriate linking of ideas between

And some other possible forms for advice giving:

sentences and between para9raphs,

lf l were you, l would. . . / Have you thought about? / You

(really) ought to.., / Why don't you...? / ln your position,

would... /You should perhaps... /You could always...

There should be examples to support the main ideas.


The style should be quite formal, or at least neutra|,
There should be no contracted forms or informal
phrases.
There should be a line space between paragraphs.

collocations
e.9. chain -, passive give up -, quit -, take
up

e.9.

e.9. smoking

alcohol -, drug -, to
have an -, to cause an

(an)

addiction

conscious -,

constant -, an extra

-, to make an -, in an

ban,

hazards,

(an)

prone,

to,

problem,

infinitive (with'to')

- clinic

chronic -, potentially
fatal -, to display

-,
(a)

symptom

efort

(to;,

flu-like -, common

of a disease,

problem,

of a

- responds

well to treatment

Lesson 3: Ways of Living, Ways

.
,

of

Thinking
"

Comments:

--related diseases

-,

-, to lead to

- compartment,

, Checklstfor effectve essays

The table shows a widely-accepted view of essay writing,


although naturally opinions may differ when it comes to
evaluating a specific piece of writin9.

The number of

paragraphs depends on the number of main

issues the writer tackles. At B2 level, where the requirement


is to write approximately 150 words,4 paragraphs will

normally be enough,
A paragraph should focus on one issue, which would

normally bring together more than one idea related to that


issue.

Depending on the overall structure of the essayl it may not be


appropriate to put pros and cons in the same paragraph.
Not all paragraphs require a topic sentence. For example,
the introduction and conclusion may not need explicit topic
sentences.
The opening paragraph needs to grab the reader's attention
but does not need to be extremely dramatic.lt may be
enough to ask an interesting question to gain the readeft
interest.
Similarly, the opening paragraph does not have to make
the writer's position clear. The writer may prefer to consider
both sides of the argument before giving their opinion in the

conclusion,

paragraph ends and the next


one starts,This can be done by indentation or by leaving a
complete line space between paragraphs - just as long as it
lt needs to be clear where one

is clear,

Answer key
4. Analysi ng

discu rsive writi

C.

Checklist (with 8 criteria selected from the table in Activity 3):


criteria for

actually, consequently, by the way, definitely, anyway, in


comparison, to tell the truth, sure,
speaking of.,., for example, to some extent,
considering..., 9uess what,

Comments

effective essays
Logical structure

The main points are in a logical order.

Writer! position

The writer! position is well signalled, and

Those words not highlighted above would normally be used


in more informal contexts, for example a chatty email or in a
spoken discussion.

made clear at

the rest of the essay illustrates the overall

the beginning

VieWpoint.

Strong opening

Both the opening and closing contain thought-

and closing

provoking, strong ideas.

Coherent

Each paragraph is focused and shows internal

paragraphs

cohesion through the use of pronouns and

dealing with one

determiners

issue

and sentences are well linked to each other

(e.9. 'this'and 'the'), The clauses

Lesson 4: ln and out of Homes

2. Describng places to live


d.
Picture

with appropriately used linking words and

expressions.
The three central paragraphs (i.e, not the

in each

opening and closing paragraphs) contain

paragraph

topic sentence or clause.

Formal/Neutral

The style is consistently neutral. Howeve, the

style, no

contractions in the first and last paragraphs are

contracted forms

2,3,
1

Topic sentence

paragraphs

although only paragraphs 4 and 5 begin with


6).

of housing could have an enclosed, private communal (i.e.

position Without
repetition

1,2, 4,s;'twinned'is not a word that can be applied to housing


1,

4i

sh a

red facil ities' would be typical of student

accommodation, not public housin9

l,",

The final paragraph serves as a personal

conclusion, reinforcing the position which

probably 4

1, 2, 3,

used to create cohesion and coherence.

the pictured house is typical of suburban housing, not

inner-city housing

Altogether,

(conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions) are

confirm5 writert

1, 2, 3;

more than 10 linking words and expressions

conclusion

possibly 5;'a block of flats'is British English, while'on

shared) garden or leisure area at the back

it to the previous paragraph,

linking adverbs (see Activity

red faci l itles' refers to kitchen and/or bathroom faci lities

apartment block'is US English; it is quite likely that this kind

with the overall neutral style of the Writing.

which links

that a number of students would share access to


1, 2, 3,

not appropriate as their informality does not fit

linking between

,2,3,5;'a housing estate' is British English, While'a housing

3, 5;'sh

Each paragraph opens with a reference device

developmen( is US En9lish

Appropriate

Related words, expressions

i.,J)'- {,,,

is

made clear right from the opening paragraph.

1-C

student in the hosteltrying to prepare for an exam):


pass the retake; go home for the breaks; get down to any
revision; all turning twenty-one
(a

2-A

5. Linki ng words and expressions for

con

ideas across sentences and paragraphs

necting

?.

Comparing & Contrasting

the
At the same time, However, ln spite

of

this, On the other hand,

(an elderly person who has recently moved to a terrace


from a detached housewith a big garden):
l miss the big garden; all that space; one bedroom upstairs;
noise is coming from both sides; spare bedroom overlooking

Adding info

Additionally, Moreover, On top of that,

Concluding, summarizing

ln short, On the whole,To sum up,

smallbackyard

3-B (a young couple on a low budget, renting a flat in a


housing estate):
got lost... in this labyrinth of buildings;allthe buildings look like
carbon copies; help me find my way back; maintenance costs
are incredibly low;so many people sharing the expenses

Giving exampIes; focusing

For instance, ln particula1 SpecificalIy,

Reformulating, cla riying

ln other words, To put it in another Way,

Referring to, changing subject

As for.

Cause & effect; reason & result

Accordingly, As a consequence,

independence; no next door neighbours; stone floors; low

Giving Alternatives

Alternatively, lnstead,

ceilings;fireplace

.,

With regard to. .,,

4-F (probably

youngish person moving into a cottage which

needs renovating):

Answer key
7 . Writing Task 2: Discursive Writing -

Listening to radio programmes, answering


m u ltipl e- ch oi ce q u esti o n s
1 -/ ; 2-{ ; J-t ; !-r; -x; $-x; | -x; $-{ ; 9-r' ; fi-{ ;
11-x;'|2-/;13-r';14-x

3.

A Letter to

the Editor
A possib|e answer:
Dear Sir,

with interest Michael Jenner's recipe for making


cheese sauce in the November's edition of CookeryWorld.
l would like to take issue with a couple of points.
Jenner writes that, in makin9 the base mixture, flour
should be placed in a frying pan and then butter added;
yet as any amateur knows such a procedure runs the risk
of burning the flour. lnstead, the butter should be melted
without causing it to boil and the flour added gradually
l read

5. Listenng Task

3: Radio Programme

1 -B; 2-B; 3- A; 4-C; 5-A; 6-C;

Lesson
,?,,

"

1:

- A; 8-B; 9-C;

0-A

Food Blogs

Ta b o o g a m e a n

d v o ca

b u la

r y,f o cu se d g a pfi l

afterwards.

-website; 2-cook/prepare; 3-update; 4-recipes; 5-busy;


6-time; 7-visitors; 8-cookbooks; 9-in9redients
1

Scandalously, Jenner then tells us just to pour in milk


into the flour and butter mixture. Again, it is common
knowledge that a small quantity of water blended into the
flour before adding the milk can prevent the sauce from

lumping.

3. Choosing

the right vocabulary for your

texts

Here are four possible categories we have identified, but you

could come up with very different ones]

feedback, ingredient, instructions, recipe - these are

related to the presentation of dishes in recipes;


add, boil, stew, stir in - these represent various cookin9
activities, tecniq ues;
canned, deep frozen, expire, p]eserve - they all have
something to do with how we or shops store food;
diet, healthfood, nutrition, vegan - these words or
terms are connected to the quality and health level of

food.

ln my view, if Michael Jenner cannot 9uide us in making


a simple cheese sauce, l would have little confidence in

trusting him with a more elaborate recipe. l believe the


readers of Cookery World deserve better.

Yours faithfully,
E. N.

Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thing


AlI

Listenng to and completing quotes

Any guesses expressing somethin9 similar to the


descriptions below can be accepted.

1.

Topic 1:The original article was a review of a cookery book,


The Joys ofthe Cajun BBQ (barbecue).

renovation,

lf the bees

disappeared off the

years of life left. (Albert Einstein,

2. We stole a box of honey jars one

D. l don't think l touched honey

time and went out in the woods

again for 20 years. l never wanted


to see honey again. (Quincy Jones,

and took care ofthe whole box.

3. leat my peas with honey; |'ve

4.

it all my life,

lf you want to gather honey,

lntroduction: B, C; Body: A,

E;

Conclusion: D, F

B. They do taste kinda funny, but


it keeps'em on the knife. (Ogden

A. don't kick over the beehive.


(Jonathan sWift, 1 8th-century lrish
Writer)

we have rather chosen to fill our

E. With the two noblest of things,


which are sweetness and light.

hives With honey and wax; thus

(Abraham Lincoln, US president)

5. lnstead of dirt and poison

5. Basic guidelines for writing a Letter to the


Editor

C. then man would only have four

surface ofthe globe,

done

Topic 3:The original online article was a longer text with


multimedia support (e.9. videos) about a region's culinary
history and characteristics, i ncluding recipes.

the uses of honey

Except for statements no. 4 and no. 8, all the others are true.

;,.What is a Letter to the Edtor?

Topic 2:The original article was a review of a local pub's


new menu, in other words, a new line of dishes, following

Rankin.

furnishing mankind

Answer key
6. lfyou gotthe money, honey,

got the time and

G. when you run out of money,

'l d

honey, l run out of time. (Willie

point when a bee

or presentation

Nelson, American country singer)

landed on my nose.'

disturbed,

An outdoor talk

. Could the person


continue the talk or
not?

. what

7. The only reason for being a bee

H. only reason l know for making

that l know of is making honey.

honey is so as l can eat it. (Winnie-

And the

the-pooh, book character created

8.

just got to the key

was the

reaction ofthe

audience?

byA. A. Milne)

'The jar of honey

small accident on

. What was damaged

lf you know somebody is


going to be awfully annoyed

F. satisfying, and if they howl

opened in my

the way home from

as a result

with rage or cry, that! honey.

rucksack. lt was

the market or from

accident?

by something you Write, that's

(A. N. Wilson, English writer and

terrible.'

obviously very

newspaper columnist)

relative!/friend!

ofthe

. Could the damaged

house in the country,

thing be cleaned or

for example.

repaired? How?

&. Reading, predcting and gap-fitling

Lesson 3: Eating Well or Not Eating WeIl

Title C

is

the most appropriate.

-Typesoffood

The dishes in the pictures are very

(although many other ideas con

1-B;2-A;3-C; 4-B; 5-C

probably the following

be

justified):

. Lstening Task 2: Makng Noes

A-a cinnamon bun (or any kind of bun with cream);


B-spaghetti; C-a steak D-cold cherry soup (or any
cold fruit soup); E-French fries; F-fried fish; G-paprika
chicken; H-stew

1-a stronger flavour; 2-1eft open or not closed; 3-9one or


become or turned hard(er) / dark(er);4-hot water;
5-boiling; 6-sme!Is like alcohol; 7-sweeter (than sugar);
8-fresh(er) (longer); 9-one (year old)

R, Readng for specific information and


vocabulary practCe
Text 1 -cold cherry soup; T2-stew; T3-French fries; T4-

fried fish; T5-cinnamon bun

&, Identifying spelling mistakes


&.
1 -bears > years; 2-beerkeeping
> beekeeping; 3-at last
at least; 4-day > way; S-fuzz> buzz;6-1eather > gather

>

4, Reading skills overview


fu.
Sample answers (but others are also possible):

h"

1-180 million; 2-7OOO;3-9000; 4-150 million; 5-11,4OO;


6-556 & 35,000

Skimming (SK)

Scanning (SC)

a newspaper story

TV Guide

an online

a train

lntensive Reading (lR)


a

timetable

job advertisement

a short story

advertIsement

7 , Stinging stores

a poster

Possible assumptions are expressed in the form of questions


in the table.
statement

What was happening

What happened

webpage

medicine instructions

C.

and where?

nxt?

An attack of bees very

HoW long did the

surrounded by

probably on a lakeside

person have to stay

lf

in the water?

...want to know what

so l threw myself into

Did anyone help?

dish exactly is,

the lakej

trip or at a campsite.

an economic report

news portal

The possib|e reasons for reading the same text type


differently:

'5uddenly l was
thousands of bees,

a memo

you...
certain

skim

scan

read intensively

How long did the

...Want to see what there is on

skim

scan

read intensively

bees stav?

offer in genera|,

skim

scan

read intensively

.,Want to eat fish,

Answer kev
5,, Reading Task 2: Scan Reading
succeed?
1

2.

3.

4.
5,

{;*.

- How to

Read the statements 1-7 , so you have an idea of what to


look for in the texts.
Next, skim read the text right through, and mark the
parts of the text that you think tell you about statements
] -7. Remember, there may be parts of the text which

you don't need to understand completely.


Then work through the statements, checking whether
you have marked the correct section of text by looking
at the text again. Fill in your answer in the space
provided, lf you don't know one yet, leave it and go on
to the next one. Come back to it at the end - it may be
easier then.
Never leave a statement unanswered. lf you don't know
the answer,9uess!
Make sure you read the texts and statements very
carefully one more time. Sometimes a few words can
make the difference between an answer being right or
Wron9.

Reading Task 2: Scan Readng

-C; 2-D; 3-B; 4-B; 5-D; 6-C;

-A

However,...; Although.,.;

5imilarly,...

interesting idea is..,; ld now like


to turn to...

clarification

Turn-taking

Could you explain that, please?; So

Sorry to (8.) interrupt you but...;

you mean,..; (6.) Are you saying

correctly...

just like to say that.

,.;

can l just

lf l may say something...; May

|'m not sure what you mean.; |'m

afraid

add (9.) something here?

that..,; lf l have (7.) understood

l...?; Sony but l would like to add

something to this..

didn't really understand

that.; Could you give an example

of.. .?

Disagreeing

Askino for an opinion

Well, that sounds quite convincing

What do you think about...7;

but..

,;

Yes, that's

partly true but

don't forget...; l see (10.) what


.That'<
\/^l l mA^n hr rt l <till thinlz

but.

(1 1.)

Way

, .;

That's interestin9, but don't

What's your opinion on /


about,..?; Have you got (12.) any

comments on /about.

. .

you agree that,,.?

?;

Don't

What are your feelings about...

?; l

am curious to hear what you think


of that.

you think,.,?; That's one Way of

1. l would go for a couple days without eating anything


2. lfelt dizzy and then lfainted
3. l have been worried about my weight and what l ate

7,

one?

while/whereas...

The next point is...; Another

see it...

;"

5.
6.

(5.) On the other hand,..; ..,but

agree.; What was the next idea?;

Shall we (4.) move on to the next

Well, you have a point there,

Iu,lo

4.

comparinq and contrastinq


Both... and...; Neither of them...;

quite possible. But the

].?,

stru(turing
Let! start With...; Let's try and

ever since l was a little girl


l would be out of breath just going upstairs
When l woke up l was in hospitalwith a drip feed
l would eat so much that l would make myself physically
sick
Being hungry gave me a rush of energy so l could carry
on reading allthrough the night

(1 .)

Agreeing

nitely think that...; ln my

opinion,...

Personally,

|'m sure that. ..; lt seems to me.

As l see it,...

l haven't

.;

Yes,

d go (2.)

that! true,

thought (3.) of that.; How


true.

couldn't agree more.; That'

exactly what l think.; Yes, you're


absolutely right.; l Was going to
say the same.;That's a good point.;
l

This categorisation is a suggestion and other categorisations


are equally possible.

British cuisine: fish, chips, curry, steak, boiled vegetables,


pies, rarelmedium/well done, black tea, cheese

agree.

Chinese cuisine: sweet and sour soup, noodles, rice, soy


sauce, a wok, chopsticks, 9reen tea, hot spices, hundred-

year-old egg

so, too.;

along With that.,.;

believe,..; l'm convinced that...; lf


you ask me,...

think / suppose

Different cuisines and eating habits

balsamic vinegar, salami, cheese, tea, tiramisu

k., Collectng useful expressons for a discusson


Giving your opinion

but.,.; Yes, but don't forget that...

ltaIian cuisine: pasta, pizza, rice, coffee, seafood, olive oil,

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines

l defi

looking at it, but...;You?e right,

Hungarian cuisine: goulash soup, pancakes, cauldron, lard,

bacon, sausages, hot spices, breadcrumbs, wine, poppy


seeds, coffee, salami, noodles, stew, cottage cheese

French cuisine: oysters, seafood, wine, cognac, aubergines,


croissant, chips, cheese, coffee, pancakes, fish

Answer key
!, Listening an_d discussng:
comparing
American and Hungarian ating'habit
1. lnterest in the foods, food history, and eating culture of

2.
3.

discussion groups
th

at

su

(A web

pport s i nteroct ive di

page

multi-user or multi-ptayer online

scu ssion s

9ame

by users. Users submit text content

other countries has 9rown.


To please the customers who may expect international
dishes there, too.
Asia, the Middle East, Central and Latin America

using a form, which is saved and

archived on the server and thus


made available to other visitors.)

wiki

(A

collaborative website which

can be directly edited by anyone with


access to it.)

carry on a verbal conversation over

",,

Readng, rygking notes and roleplay More


than justfeeding

the lnternet.)

online tests

The wording of the answers could be anything similar


to the
following points, Just make sure the content r the message is
the same,

1.

2,
3.

#;

Lesson

i"_"vmgp-

1:

Communication at any time

(asynchronous communication):

forum discussions

Real-time (synchronous

communication):
text Chat

(A

real-time lntemet

service that allows two or more users


to type messages and immediately
send them to each other.)

email

audio conferencing
(Communication between three or
more sites that are linked by a voiceon ly te leco m mu n

onIine newslettefs

(A document,

sent usually in emailform that


nforms,

an

nou n ces, rem i nds,

file sharing

ications medi u m.)

(The process of

making

files available to others to download

from the lnternet.)

advises, instruct5, advertises or


com m

un

Facebook [can be either] (The world's largest social networking website


intended to connect friends, family, and business associates.)

2. |eqding and vocabulary


main topic
,,_

ldentifying the

.,

blog, maintaining a blog or adding an aiticl" to an existing


is called "blogging'i lndividual articles on a
btog are
called "blog posts,"''posts''or''entries'i A person who posts

blog

these entries is called a ''blogger''. A blog comprises text,


hypertext, images, and links (to other *b p.ges and to
video, audio and other files). Btogs use a conversational
style of documentation, Blogs often focus on a particular
area of interest, such as the political goings-on in
Washington, D.C. Most blogs discuss personal experiences.
'',

l:]l,

Words and phrases in the text: weblog, authoring a blog,


maintaining a blog, adding an article to a blog, blogging,
blog posts, blog entries, blogger,
Other words and phrases: blog search, blog site, blog tv,
blog layout, blogspot, vblog or video blog

icotes, offe ri ng hypertext

links for further sources

of

nformatio n and webpages.)

blogs (Ablog -the shortened form


of "web log" - is a type of website,

usually maintained by an individuaI


with regulal entries of commentary,
descriptions of eventl, or other
material such as graphics or video.

l?o)

text-based posts of up to 140 characters displayed on the author's profile


page and delivered to the author's subscribers who are
known as followers,)

Online Communication

its

web chat

networking, micro-b!ogging service that


users to send and read messages known as tweets.Tweets
arc
(A sociat

A blog is a website in which items are posted on a regular


basis and displayed in reverse chronological order. The
term blog is a shortened form of webtog. Authoring a

ln the table only the less well-known terms are explained.

enabIes

*"lfe;r,t"g=,j

" . Getting online

tw|taet [can be either]

,..h.elp disadvantaged young people to find a profession


and employment.
...learning a range of skills needed in the restaurant
business.
... build a global social enterprise and to inspire
youngsters globally.

:,tj, ld,],

voice chat (An application that


enables two or more individuaIs to

,;;,, Co m

video conferencing (IJsing a


computel video camera, and
network such as the !nternet, to
conduct a live conference between
two or more people.)

p ute r- re l ated exp resson s

i:

These six multi-word verbs can fill the gaps in the sentences:
hack into=gain entry to a computer, website etc. without
permission
pop up=appear suddenly
scroll down=move (a Pa9e) down

Entries are commonly shown in

Set up=g5l6;l5h

r ev e r se

log in=enter a computer by providing username and password

c h ro n

o I o g i ca I o

rd e r.)

Answer key
plug in=insert a plug into an electric socket

::.,

1-hack into; 2-pops up; 3-scroll down;4-set up; 5-1og


in;6-pIug in

A-2 (a podcast=a programme [usually audio, sometimes


video] which is made available as a downloadable digital file

ia

More computer words

B-4 (cyberspace {web}celebrity=61,1 individual whose fame

The multi-word verbs that can also be used as multi-word


nouns or adjectives are the following:
Nouns: a print-out, a back-up, a plug-in, a set up, a pop-up

Adjectives: a back-up server, a plug-in device, a pop-up

window

is primarily derived from their lnternet presence)

C-l

(spoof user=a person sending an email or other form


of electronic communication using a false name or email
address to make it appear that the email comes from
somebody other than the true sender)

D-3 (news Twitter site=a Twitter profile for


i]:, Seven steps to

reading success

2-D ('the key


('more
words); Step 3-A
thoroughly); Step 4-G ('one by one'
&'systemati cally); Step 5-F (' mu lti ple- choice options'); Step
6-E ('which options are definitely incorrect)i Step 7-C ('review
your answers)
Step

:':i

"

-B

(key words: Qet a general idea); Step

its advantages and disadvantages. lnterestingly, the closing


paragraph is not a conclusion, but rather a summary as well as
a prediction, the latter illustrating a typicalfeature of tabloid

newspaper articles,

Reading Task 3: Multiple-Choce Readng


1 -B; 2-D; 3-A; 4-C; 5-C; 6-D; 7 -B

l#."

"

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace


,,'i..

Reading about livng in cyberspace

Possible headings:
Heading 1-'Types of virtualreality'; Heading 2-'Realand
virtual relationships'; Heading 3-'My computer and me'i
Heading 4-'lf forced to choose'

Speed reading for overall meaning

This formal and not very thorough, rather superficial text


could be an online or printed newspaper article. lts first three
paragraphs introduce the frrst couple of years of the history of
Twitter, while the following paragraphs provide examples of

',l*

a news agency)

Watching for dstractors

l- *;,
A good distractor is always logical or plausible and usually
works for one of the following reasons:
]. it refers to something in the text but not accurately
or it is not true within the context of the text and/or

question;
2. it is true but is not the answer to the question that has
been asked;
3. it might be true but the text does not say so or refer to it.
ln this question, distractors A and C represent the first type,
while distractor D represents the third type.
Key words in the text extract that give the right answer (B):
'The director of the company came up with the idea of people
sending text messages to a large number of people through the
net,'

i:.-Words and contexts


Words in the text related to the world of computers, to the
cyber world:
gaming, simulations, computer universe, live on [...]
computers, be connected to technology, screen, keyboard,
at the click of a button, l live off it [the computer]

words in the text connected to the real world:


boredom, physical sense, l eat at [the computer], l've spilled
soda, in a normal fashion,'face-to-face'situation, stick with
a more'primitive'medium of social contacts, going out with
my buddies

!i:.,Workng out meanng from context


1-F; 2-D; 3-H; 4-A;5-1; 6-8; 7 -C; 8-G; 9-E

word formaton and contextualisation


verb
e.g,

prefer

noun
preference

adjective
prc:erable,

prefetential
confuse
exeile

confusion

confusing, confused

eagerness

eaqer

excitement

exgiling, exgited,

exgitable
initiate

initiation

in_itial

intera!1

interaCtion

interac,!ive

Answer

interfere

intererence

interfering

socialise

soclety, sociali5ation

social, sociable

tend

tendency

Type of

language
learninq

Disadvanta9es
self-discipline needed
no or limited outside help
lack of personal touch

often cheaper than faceto-face learning


lots offree services,

options (e.9. chatting)


learn according to own

6. Answering the question

l.
The questions the teacher would not ask:
. How much does your father earn?
. Do you have a boyfriend?
. What religion are you?

Studying
online

huge choice and variety,

difficult to choose
possible lack of honesty
difficulty of tasks
and materials often
unpredictable

pace
huge choice and variety
chatting can be simila to
speaking in a face-to-face

situation
all skills can be practised
social media sites offer
wide range of practice

b.

opportunities

Barbara makes two exam-taking mistakes:


She answers as if she had memorised short "speeches"
beforehand about certain topics, such as'Your home'or

all sites can be accessed


with tablets and

.
.

Advantages

'o

n lin

u n i cati o

e co m m

She is not

smartphones

n!

listening carefully to what the examiner asks, and

does not answer that question.

Suggested answers:

2. Online language learning tools in support of


Euroexams
Exam tasks and possible resources:

The question which the teacher

The question which Barbara

asks

thinks she actually answers

Euro 82 exam task

Useful online language learning


]eou]ces

Are you comfortable?

ls your

Why do you want to study English

Are computers important

Paragraph Headings

Websites

online?

nowadays?

Writing 2

e,9, newspape and magazine websites

ls English an important language?

Discursive Writing

With reviews and articles; blogs; essay sites

How many hours a

week do you

home/room comfortable?

want to study English?

Reading

e.9, social websites; language Iearning

Listening 3

e.9. podcasts; language learning websites;

How many times a week would you

What is your favourite day of the

Radio Programme

online messaging, chatting; news websites

like to study?

week and why?

Gramvoc 2

e.9. language learning websites; free

Multiple-Choice Gapfi ll

webpages of news portals

Can you pay for the course

electronically?

ls shopp|ng

online cheaper than

(e,9. BBC

Learning English)

traditional shopping?
Speaking 2

e.9. social websites; online messaging;

Picture story

chatting

Amodel intervew
Both candidates perform well: they answer the questions
appropriately and provide quite a range of vocabulary and
structure when doing so.
Flix has a stronger Hungarian accent, but he uses
intonation appropriately: he changes his pitch well and
places the stress on the right syllables. Sra sounds a bit
more British. However, Sra's intonation is very flat; she
cannot convey meaning, emphasis effectively with such flat

intonation,

Lesson 3: Online Language Learning


''.

, Learning lqnguages: in the classroom or


onlne?

Since the text focuses on online learning forms mainly, the


key does too.

"1

*, Doesthisword exist in Hungarian?


English

Hungarian

Website

weboIdaI

distance learninq

tvoktats

online messaqinq

online zetenetv|ts

chat room

chat szoba (csetszoba)

chatting
podcast

csete| s

social networkinq site

kzssqi

blog post

blog bejegyzs, poszt

podcast
oldal

&" Mediation Part One:Translation


A possible answer:

False friends in EngIish


Word that

English
Word
E.g.

classical

Typical misuse

should be
used

ThiswasaM

False friend used

Clifton House Online English

correct!y

classic

llike classical music.

lt Was not an

on purpose,

The path leads

accident. 5he did

deliberately

directly to the lake.

can l have

meal

The waiter gave me

info@ cliftonhouse.co,uk
Dear Sir/Madam,

example.

directly

itfuly.

menu

24-hour

He ran for twelve

l am writing to ask you if l could have access to the


downloadable version of some of your free online
teachin9 material5.
l have been using your online services to improve my
English for a year now and l have enjoyed every minute
of it. l especially like the chat room, 9rammar practice
exercises, the vocabulary building games and puzzles.
l also found the link to the graded versions of famous

store

hours non-stop.

literary pieces for language learners very useful.

lettuce

lt Was nice having so

the menu,

chicken sandwich
meng?

non-stop

went shopping

at the

salad

fiHtop.

He understood

As l need further practice l would like to download a


part of the tasks before the web pa9e5 are updated, This
function is not allowed at the moment, so l would like to
know if there is a way of obtainin9 permission.

coke, which was

how she felt

Veryl?patMie

about her loss

of him.

and was generally

didn't have

many vegetables in

carrots. l just had

saH,
sympathetic

He gave me a

my salad.

nice

Yours faithfully,
Tams Garay - tamas.9826freemail.hu

5ympathetic.

table

wrote the answer

The student put her

board

Lesson 4: Shopping Online

pencil on the table.

on thetable.

1,

1.

. Setphroses n formal lefters and emails


These are likely English forms for the Hungarian phrases in
the table.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6,
7.
8.
9.

10.
'l

12.
13.
14.

5,
6.
7.

With regardstoyourenquiry,...
l wonder if you could give me further information on.
With reference to your |etter/email,...
Could you (possibly) ensure/make sure that

everyone...?
l would like to take this opportunity to..,
l look forward to your prompt reply.
l can be contacted at,.,
Yours faithfully (at the end of a letter starting 'Dear Sir/
th e en

How to shop online

2.
3.
4,

Dear Sir,
Dear Professor Hughes,
l am writing to complain about...
l would like to enquire about...
l am writing to thank you for...
l wish to apply for the job...

Mad a m,') / You rs si ncerely (at


'Dear Mrs Robinson,),

look forward to hearing from you soon.

..

d of a l ette r sta rti n g

search the catalogue or search for the specific product

categories
choose what you want to buy
put your selection in a virtual "Shopping Cart"
review the contents of the shopping cart; delete items
if necessary
register (if required)
log in using a username and password
enter the address to which you want the product to be

delivered

8. select your preferred method of payment


9. fill in your payment details
10. wait for the confirmation of your order
'l. modifo or cancel the order
1

12.

keep the printed copy of the purchase order and


confi rmations for records

Answer key
2.

Checking for and correcting grammar


mistakes
Welcome to our web shopl
We would like to tellyou why it i5 worthtffise using our
food delivery service of the 200-300 basic products in

almost every househ olds

(exa

mple).

ThisThese food and chemical products are always of


the same type and brand, the type of products that you
simply want to buy to restock your pantry when you will
run out of them.
Our web shop service is ready to relieve you of this timeconsuming task. On our site, you can find 3000-4000
products, a range we are constantly broadening and
developing in response to our
Gustomers'

wishes.

eusffi

The shopping list, favourite products, and detailed


search functions make shoppin9 ffiofe easier and more
comfortable. You will be awardinged bonus points for
remaining a loyal customer, Our helpful staff wi|l deliver
the requested items within 48 hours of registering your
order. You may place an order by phone on 06] 476 36 80
or online.
We hope you enjoy using our service and that we can
welcome you toas a regular customer in the future.

Function 2-Making complaints

.
.
.

am upset about the...


to say that you have not.,.
l am upset about the inconvenience caused.
I

l regret

There are no specific phrases for function 3: explaining the

problem in detail!

Function 4-Giving suggestions

.
.
.

would appreciate your looking into this matter.


suggest that in order to avoid..., you should...
l think something should be done about,,,
l

Function 5-Being positive

l have no wish to go elsewhere and hope that a solution


can be found.
l am generally satisfied with the good service.
Normally l am very happy with things...

.
.

Function 6-Future actions

shall have no choice but to seek legal advice in this


matter.
l regret that unless my request is granted, l shall be
l

forced / obliged to consider taking further action.

6" Evaluating a sample email of complaint


&3*b.
The samp|e email uses virtually no functional exponents.
Even the few phrases the writer includes in the email are

Complaining in writng
State the reason for writing the letter.
Make the complaint: state your dissatisfaction and how

1.

2.

you were inconvenienced.


Explain the problem in detail in the main body of the
letter. lnclude such details as dates, times, names of
people involved, etc.
State your suggested solution.
State some positive things about your normal
experience with the organization concerned. (This step
is optional but often worth including.)
Refer to what action you might have to take unless
your request is responded to appropriately.

3.

4.
5.
6.

quite impolite, thus inappropriate.

The scores and the detailed reasons for them:


6

o
o

Reasons
Although the writer includes the necessary information
(three problems and the required action by the

E.
@=
>.:
oo

=r
i!

recipient), there is a serious weakness because no


o
ll

l'
6
F

reference is made to the initial orde, making it difficult


for the reader to respond. Also, the problems are not

very clearly described. Nevertheless, the writer may


well eventually achieve the overall purpose of getting a

replacement order for free,


The email is highly inappropriate in style. Not only is

lx" Functional exponents for complaints


Function 0-Opening
am writing to complain about...
l really must complain about...
l wish to complain about...
l would like to draw your attention to the fact that...
l

it too aggressive, personal and

emotional, but it also

shows a lack of awareness of the appropriate level of


ci
d.E

>o
o;
o
ll

formality for this kind of writing. As well

r
o

as the

choice

ofvocabulary and overall style mentioned above, the


contractions (e.g."|'m'i"|'ll") and omissions (e.9."Looking
forward,.,") also contribute to an inappropriate
informality. The layout, however, is fine, except that the
use of 'ln conclusion'is not appropriate in a letter.

Answer key

EE
o,=
oCl

t"l

E
,6

7.

an opening paragraph setting out common information.

A possible answe]:

The typical section5 (see Activity 4) are sequenced

Dear SuperBooks,com,

approoriatelv.
The letter consists of two paragraphs with few linking
devices. New ideas (e,g. the packaging being broken)

oE ,i
,E

o.

o6
9_

t.
>:
E
vT
!E
6E

sF
E

are not introduced With new paragraphs. The writer uses

reference devices effectively and accurately ("the ...

delivery l received from you'i"but not this time'i "unless


you do'i use of"the" in general).
The grammar shows a good range and level ofaccuracy
for 82 level, although the choice ofstructures (e.g. the

c
o
q
tt

passive in "which has been caused by you") is sometimes


inappropriate. The minor errors (e.9'didnt contained")
are not very important and do not get in the way of

communication.

is
>.E

Et

The lexical range is sufficient for the task and is used

'6

l
EG

cE
o-a
od

t
o
c

rl

EB
E>

Writing Task t: Transactional Writing

The structure of the letter is logical, except that it lacks

accurately

if not always appropriately,

e.9. "stuff'i

"want'i

"awful'iThere are only occasional lexical errors (e.g.


"bottle jar of peanut butter"). Spelling is good,

Overall comment: Although the writer clearly

is at 82 level in terms

of

am Writing in connection with my recent order (5B 365724) for three


academic books advertised on your web5ite,
l

The service fell far short of the standards advertised. ln place of one
ordered title, lron and Silk, l received by mistake a book of humorous

anecdotes by Woody Allen.


ln addition, one of the other two titles, True Notebooks, had several torn
pages. You also promised next-day delivery, but l had to wait two Weeks.

am requesting you dispatch lron and Silk by Mark Salzmann


immediately and you refund half the purchase price of EUR I 5 for the
torn book.
l

am looking forward to receipt of the book and the compensation.

Yours sincerely,
Robert Berg

Unit 7: Yes, l can!


Lesson

1:

Handling Exam Sfress

Coping or not coping with exam stress?


1-E;2-A;3-D;4-B;5-C

general language knowledge, the candidate has not been able to score
as well as he or she might have done (just

9 points out of 30), because

of inappropriate use of language and the effect that this has on task

achievement and appropriacy.


Evaluation (iteria

short explanation5

TAsK

Would your writing achieve its communication purpose in

ACHlEVEMENT

real life? Would the reader fully understand your intentions,

1-5 points

point ofview? Have you followed all the instructions and


included all - and only - the re|evant information?

APPROPR|ACY

ls

1-5 points

type, your intention and the imagined readership? Have

the layout and style ofyour text appropriate for the text

you found the right level offormality (e.g. contracted vs.

non-contracted forms)? Have you referred to all relavant


points in the instruction?
the text made up of logically structured, Well-connected

COHERENCE

l5

']-5 points

ideas?

coHEsloN

Have you used purposefully chosen linking words and

1-5 points

phrases, reference words and phrases, in order to establish

the inner cohesion of both the paragraphs and the whole


text? HaVe you divided you text into well-connected

paragraphs?

GRAMMAT|CAL

Have you used the right grammatical stuctures with

RANGEAND

the necessary range to support your communicative

AccunAcY

purposes? Are there grammatical or accuracy mistakes

1-5 points

(e.g. word order, punctuation) left in the text which hinder

compehension?

LEXlCAL RANGE

Have you used the right range of vocabulary which is

ANDACCURACY

appropriate to support your communicative purposes? Are

1-5 points

there any vocabulary mistakes left in the text Which hinder

comprehension?

Misplaced words
SKIMMING is used to quickly identify (seareh) the main
ideas of a text by running (+o.oking) your eyes over it, noting
important information, often at a speed three to four times
faster than normal reading. You often skim when you have
a limited amount of time and want to see, for example, if
an article may be of interest (answer) for you, Remember,
it's not essentia! (spfifit) to understand each word when
skimming. Some people read the first and last paragraphs
using headin9s (e,9. subtitles, subheadings), summaries
(phfass) and other organisers as they move (gruide) down
the page or screen or focus on the illustrations.

SCANNlNG

is a technique you often apply when looking


(fiJfilifig) up a word in the telephone book or dictionary.
You basically search (identifr) for key words or ideas. ln most
cases, you know what you're looking for, so you concentrate
on finding a particular answer (interest). A good example

for this is the Scan Reading EXAM PRACT|CE task, where the
7 statements guide (move) your reading, Scanning involves

moving your eyes quickly down the page seeking specific


(essentia}) words and phrases (sirmnnaries). lf you see words
or phrases that you don't understand, try to ignore them as
much as possible.

ry

P*.

".'

Reading Task 2: Scan Reading


1 -B; 2-C; 3- A; 4-D; 5-C; 6-B; 7 - A

Writing Task 2: Discursive Writing

A possible answer:

Lesson 2: Facing the Exam

A new instant classic for exam candidates

,E- Features of effectve reviews


ln a 1S}-word review, which is the requirement at the Euro 82
exam, you probably cannot meet all these requirements fully,
but you can consider them and think about which ones may be
the most relevant for the particular task.

Those preparing for the 82 Euroexam - myself included can at last grab the Eurocity 82 2.0 course book. Having
looked at it briefly, l can assure you it is worth waiting for.
Firstly, the new book certainly looks pretty attractive,
as the shades of blue and yellow are gentle on the eye.

The colours and layout also provide support for the new

logical structure.

a meaningful, eye-catching title which carries the overall

message
both the beginning and the ending are strong and

attention-9rabbing

dynamic adjectives, often synonymous with each other


to reinforce meaning
sufficient data about authors, contributors, creators, etc.
an unambiguous opinion given
language of evaluation (e.9. one can hardly believe...,
you find it very..., it is difficult to.,.)
rhetorical questions
in the case of films, books, plays or operas, a brief outline
of the plot
pros and cons, if necessary
clear evidence for recommendations
a recommendation which could be further specified:
who it might be good for (or not) and why
a c|ear overall structure, with an opening, a middle and a

closing
clear linking of ideas, using a range of linking words

.i:l,,

Analysing a frlm review

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Strengths
The first sentence cetainly catches
the eye; it is interesting as it

weaknesses
There is no title at all.

contains slightly contradictory


ideas in the same sentence,
This use of opposites in words and

topics is maintained throughout:


h a pp| vs.'sad' ;' cheap' vs.
'

No information is given about the


director, actors or setting (Sheffield,
the infamous "City of Steel").

'profitabIe'.

The plot is presented very briefly,

There are dynamic words and


phrases which carry meaning in
themselves: e.g.' down-i n -thed u mps','society h os forgotten t hem'.
The writer's viewpoint and

recommendation are clear.

"1

Book Reew

Note that, in such a short review


the otherwise short plot still
amounts to more than half the
whole text.

Appearance is not everything though. The content, written


by experienced teachers of Euro 82 preparation classes
in Hungary, offers some of the'bld"topics completely
rewritten, while introducing some entirely new, up-to-date
themes (e.9. Lifestyles, Cyber World).
The focus, however, has not changed. Each ofthe 24

lessons is built around one'Exam practice'task, with


activities helping to develop the skills we need to perform
well in an exam situation.There are some fun and creative
activities too!
Having looked through it, l want to see Eurocity 82 2.0 in
action! l am going to ask my teacher to try it out and l am
sure she will like it as much as l do. @
(I82 words)

Audio scripts
Similarly to the lessons, for each recorded text, you will find
a headphone symbol with a file number in the middle to
help you find the recording in the downloadable audio files.
The recordings follow two different formats:
All recordings for the EXAM PRACT|CE tasks were
made exactly as if they were real 82 Euroexam tasks,
This means, the recording with the same track number
contains everything: the instructions; the audio material
you have to |isten to in order to answer the questions;
the necessary repetitions; the pauses for reading, writing,
checking and proof-reading. Such recordings do not
need to be stopped until the end of the whole task is
indicated.

Four of the EXAM PRACT|CE listening materials, called


"reprises", are repeated (Files 3,, 6., 9., and '|6.) W|THOUT
instructions, pauses, etc, for further listening practice,

All the other audio files contain non-exam materials for


further listening parctice.

Unt 1: Exam Setting


Lesson l: What's in the Exam?

3. Focusing on

key information

nt,

This task in the Euroexams is called Making Notes.


You see a table of notes before you hear the
recording. ln these notes there are a total of nine gaps.
On your answer sheet you can write a maximum of three
words for each gap. When it comes to marking, only the
meaning is marked. The examiners don't mark your spellin9,
punctuation or grammar. And you have one minute to read
the notes before the recording starts. You should bear in
mind that the words and sentences, which are used in the
recording, are different from those written in the notes.
Of course, all the information you need to complete the
gaps in the notes is given to you. lf you miss something the
first time, do not panic! Remember that you will hear the

recording twice.

Listening Task 2: Making Notes

o
{,

You will hear a short talk about the 82 Euroexam.


. Look at the notes,The notes contain nine gaps.
. you have one minute to read the notes.
[1-minute pause]
Now listen to the speaker and write a maximum of 3
words on each numbered line.
Do not write more than 3 words in one gap.
You will hear the recording twice.

.
.
.

P:

So what exactly are the Euroexams?

ot,

The Euroexams are designed to test whether you,


the candidate, can use English at the right level, and
in the real world. But unlike some traditional exams,
we believe that effective communication is more
important than complete accuracy.

So, assessment in the tests of the Euroexams depends


|ess on the accuracy of your language, but more on

successful communication, including the clarity of


your overall message, and its effect on your reader or
listener.

This B2-|evel course book, therefore, thoroughly


prepares you for using English in the real world as well
as for passing the exam. But the course book is not
the only thing offered by Euroexam. There is also a
practice set of Euro 82 exams on the website, as well
as a practice set of three whole exams which you can
purchase in printed book format.
The most useful tool for Generation Y howeve, seems
to be the online exam preparation course which offers
sample exam tasks, skills development activities and
plenty of learning and exam tips.Takin9 this e-learnin9
course requires users to check regularly what new
tasks and materials are available, and then to complete
as many of them as possible. All participants in the
course can receive online support from a teacher who
is responsible for all registered learners.

And

you are hooked on social media, use Facebook


for example, you can find a useful post in your feed
virtually every day shared by Euroexam.These posts
will mostly be links to videos, short texts, blog posts
or vocabulary building materials. Whatever they may
be, exam candidates can be sure that they can practise
and develop their language skill with them in an
enjoyable way.
if

Following the success of its Facebook page, Euroexam


has recently introduced a new innovative Facebook
application called "Nyelvi Fitnesz'i Every week,
thousands of language learners enjoy working
with three language practice tasks to develop their
listening, reading and vocabulary building skills. You
can join in any time you like, sooner or later even on
your smartphone, too,
Remember success in the Euroexams indicates that
you have developed your skill effectively, taken
advantage of the wide variety of exam preparation
options, and as a result, now can undertake a variety
of rea|-|ife tasks using English at the required level.

Audio scripts
Unt 2: Globetrotting

Lesson 2: Bridging the Communication

4.

Gap

3. From Hungarian into Engtish, from


English into Hungarian

1.

As for this evening,

ld rather 90 to see an opera

3.
4.
5,
6.

l.\,

MediationPartTwo:Dialogue
Help your friend who doesn,t speak English,
between the two people.

.
.
.
.
.
.

)
{,

performance than a ballet.


Egszen rszletes lerst nem tudok adni a fots
tskrl, vadonatj volt, az induls eltt vettem.
After the brakes started to go funny, the chain
suddenlyfelloff, and then ldid, Offthe bike lmean.
Ouch.
Sajnos ennek a nemzeti parknak ugyan van honlapja,
de az angol nyelv oldalai szinte teljesen resek,
semmi hasznos informcit nem tallok.
This car is smaller than the size l booked. lt won't be
large enough for the four of us with all our luggage.
l've checked the roaming tariffs of each mobile
company for trave| in the US, and they seem to be
virtually identical.

2.

Mediate

I s.
" l

i i

lf the person speaks in English, translate into Hungarian.


lf the person speaks in Hungarian, translate into English.

The first two have been done for you.


Do not translate every word. Concentrate on the basic

meaning.
Please remember the quality of your language is also
important.
you will hear each line twice.There will be a fifteen
second pause between each line for you to write
the
At the end of the conversation you will have two minutes
to check what you have written.
Remember, you will not have time to translate every
word.

translation.

down

Dialogue

Exl.

fm spending a couple of days in Budapest and l'm looking


for some cultural events.
Ex2, Termszetesen, Milyen programra gondolt7lgen nagy a

1.
2,

What about the spring? l'll be back again for a week


then. l d love to go to a concert or a dance theatre to
see some modern ballet performances.
Adok egy programfzetet, amit tnzhet. Benne
van minden szksges informci, idpontokrl,
helysznekrl s rakrl. Meg rvid ismertetsek is az
eladsokrl,
Sounds great. l see you have an email address so l can
easily contact you. And whatt your offer for now? Are
there tickets available for anything that's worth seeing?
Mit szlna egy kis jazzhez? ppmost zajlik egy
jazz f eszliv l, k n bz r nyza to kat k pvi se
egyttesekkel. Este is Van egy koncert. De nagyon
hossz, 6-kor kezddik, s krlbell jjel 2-ig tat,
Well, actually, l prefer something classical. l might
90 to the opera. By the way, is there a ticket booth
where you can get last minute bargain tickets for a
performance?
Sajnos nlunk nincs ilyesmi, de esetleg megprblhat
jegyet venni a sznhzban, az elads kezdete eltt
fl rval. Nha vannak eladatlan vagy visszahozott
je9yek.

vlasztk,
l've heard so much about Budapest being a festival
city. What does that mean in practical terms? Can you

recommend anythin9 along those lines?


Nos, hrom olyan jelents fesaivl van vente, amit mi
szerveznk, de egyik sem most zajlik. Ezekre am9y is
jval elbb kell megrendelni a jegyeket.

5.
6.

7.
8.

Lesson 3: Souvenirs
Listening Task 1: Short Conversations
You will hear two friends who have been on holiday

talking about different things.

.
.
.
.
.

t,

you will hear six short conversations.


Listen and decide which present they are talking about.
There are two items which you will NOT need.
Write the number of the conversation (1-6) next to the
item it refers to.
you will hear each conversation twice.

Conversation

1,

A:
B:

Wow

A:

What were you worried about? That you d drop them


from the top of the EifelTower?

B:

Veryfunny.

- thatt

a real tourist souvenir!

l know, isn't it silly? l swear l bought it tos l needed


somewhere to keep these things safe. Last year l lost
them in Rome and l had to pay 30 Euros before they
let me into my room.

conversation 2

B:
A:

There was just so much to see we felt we needed to


read up about it in the evenings - and plan where to
9o the next day.
Were the recommendations any good?

Audio scrpts
Well, yes, we found some good places - for example,
there was a Toy museum that l'd never heard of
before. But the maps were useless - too small. We kept
gettin9 lost.

conversation 3

A:

Why are you keeping that - you can't use it again, can
you?

B:

No, of course not, but l like to stick them in a scrap


book next to our photos. They have all the times and

dates on them, so we can remember the journeys,

A:

Oh, good idea, ld like to see that when you've made it!

on a website. She had to do something quickly, that's why


she called the hotel immediately and booked a room...
that... um... had a view. After that, she quickly jumped into
a taxi, and as she was sitting in the taxi, she imagined the
hotel; how it would look like, and... er.,. how good it would
be, and how different would it be from the other hotel. so
she got to... er... the hotel, and she... she was very happy
with it. She could sit in the...um... nextto the window and
she was looking outside , and she saw the very nice view...
the Danube and the Chain Bridge, and the Parliament. So
she was very happy at the end that she found a good hotel
to stay in Budapest. Before she...um..,flew... home, she
gave the hotel very high. . . mark. . . for the service and for its
view.

conversation 4

A:
B:

What about this, Did you climb up to the top of this?

i_ff

Oh, no. You can't go up that. But we were in the square


when it rang, lt was 'l 2 otlock too.

A:
B:

Lesson 1: Filmmakers

Was it loud?

A:

Yeah

B:

Sorry

but somehow ljust never got around to writin9 them,

- l was waiting by my letter box every day - and

- nothin9.

A:
B:

look, why don't you have one now? Which one

s#_{T

4i

:i#{,

t{j'

3: Radio Programme

o1)

on the test paper you have ten multiple-choice

.
.
.
.

questions about the pro9ramme,


Choose the best response (A, B or C) for the questions.
Circ|e the appropriate letter.
You will hear the recording twice.
You have two minutes to read the questions/prompts
before the recording starts.

lnterviewer Tonight on Making Movies

Oh, l nearly forgot, This is a present for you.

WowThanks,
lt's got a hole on the back so you can hang it on the
wall.

Oh, l thought ld have my lunch off it.


l

think it's for decoration rather than use. But it's up to

you.

Lesson 4: Travel Stories

4.

;,rfi

would you like?

conversation 6

B:
A:
B:

al

You will hear part of a radio interview with two


people who act in films.

conversation 5
lt's so embarrassing. l honestly meant to send these

4. ListeningTask

Not very. You know the funny thing is, it looks as if


each face is saying a different time.

B:

Listening to storytelling

ot,

ln the morning when she left the ...er... miserable


hotel, she suddenly, she found... um... herself in
front of.. . um . . . a caf with wifi lnternet. So what she did
was... um.., she went in and started to... um... browse the
net for hotels. And soon...l guess...she found a good hotel

David
lnterviewer

David

lnterviewer

(|)
we are
unsung t

9oin9 to talk to two of the


heroes of the film world. our two
guests have made over sixty films
between them, but l guarantee that
not even the greatest film buff will have
heard of them. So David Fletcher and
Helen Gatly, what exactly is your role in
making movies?

'

We're both extras.


David, what does that mean? What do you
do exactly?
Well, we are in the crowds, the people in the
street who are essential to makin9 sure that
the scenes are realistic. when the stars walk
into a pub for examp|e, people sittin9 at the
tables or chatting by the bar are extras,
Do you find the job exciting?

Audio scripts
Helen

That's probably not the word l'd use. lt's


interesting at times and when you see the
finished film it's great to think that you were
part of it, but most of the time you just sit
around for hours and then the same scene
is shot ten or twelve times and you just
drink your coffee in the caf or walk past the
stars as they have a conversation.

lnterviewer

lnteresting. And how did you become a film


extra?

David

The usual, you know, through a friend of a


friend. l think ld met the guy once at some
party. All l remembered of him was that
he was working on a film of some kind. lt
was weeks later when he phoned me up
because they needed extras. l got Helen
involved and we liked the work, so we
contacted an agency that finds extras and
work began to come in,

lnterviewer

What films have you been in?

Helen

Loads. The first was a British gangster film


called Face.Then lwas in the romantic
comedy Notting Hill, some films by Ken
Loach and lots of TV series, you know, soap
operas. l've been in Eastenders a few times.

David

Adverts are pretty good as well, there are


always jobs for extras in adverts.

lnterviewer

Have you ever spoken in a film or on TV?

David

No, never. lt's actually bad for extra work.


Directors think that once you have a

speaking role people might recognize you


and the audience will think"lsn't that the
guy from Snatch having a drink at the bar"
and then, when they notice you, you're not
in the background any more.

!nterviewer

What is the pay like?

Helen

That's a difficult one to answer. lt's quite


good for each film, usually about a hundred
or a hundred and fifty pounds a day, but
it's not a steady income, you might go for
weeks without any work at all.

David
Interviewer

Helen

David

You never really get to speak to the stars to


be honest. They are usually off somewhere
else and just come onto the set, do their
part and go home.The only time you
sometimes meet the star actors is at the
party when the film is done.They generally
seem fine, but we live in a different world
and our paths do not cross that much.
lt's like working for a very big company, you
don't get to meet the boss very often, do

you?

lnterviewer Would you

David

l am a real actor, thank you very much! But


to be a star, well, who wouldn't? But it's not
going to happen.

lnterviewer And

Helen

how about you, Helen?

don't think l would. l think it would be a


bit boring and it must be terrible if you've
worked incredibly hard on a film and then
you get awful reviews and you're blamed for
the disaster. No-one criticises the extras.
l

!nterviewer Unfortunately,

Helen
David
lnterviewer

that's all we've got time for.


Will l see either of you on screen in the near
future?
l'm in a new film by Antonia Bird, which is
due out in about a month. l am standing at
the bus stop when Robert Carlisle walks to
his car.

And l'm in an advert for a new soft drink


called Taboo. l'm on a rollercoaster at a
fairground.
Well, l look forward to seein9 you both,
thanks for coming in.

Lesson 4:The lnteractive Audience

5. Analysing a Discusson task


Examiner:

Basically, it's not a full time job, but we can


get by all right.
Do you know any film stars?

like to be a rea| actor?

nl)

For the final part ofthe test, you are going


to talk to each other about a topic l will
give you. l'm just going to listen. Your topic
is:

Teen films may be the key to success for the film

industry.Why?

teenagers are more likely to 90 to the cinema,

Discussion task: sample topic card

Audo scripts
First make a spoken list of four or five
things.Then, when you have done that,
discuss which one is the best or most
important. Remember to give reasons
for what you say. You have three minutes
altogether to try and agree. All right?'

Candidate A:

Yes, l think more teenagers go to cinemas,

Candidate

especially girls, And they always


watch the new films of their favourite stars.

B:

l agree,

CandidateA: And these films are not very expensive to


make.

Candidate B:

Yes, that's true, There are no

expensive

visual effects or famous directors. Also,


these films often continue the stories in
new films.

Candidate A: These films

are funny and entertaining,


and they are about us.

Candidate B: Yeah, they are really funny. Anything else?

Candidate A: You are right. These films are really

entertaining and teens like them. They find


it important to 90 out With their friends.
One popular activity is going to shopping
centres, where there are good quality
cinemas with lots of shows. What do you
think?
also like going there with my friends. We
often watch films, too. Have we discussed

Candidate B:

everythin9?

Candidate A: The posters ...


Candidate B:

Yes, the posters and magazines.Teenagers


want to dress and look like these
characters.

Candidate A:

l agree. So can

Candidate B:

They are entertainin9 and cheap

Candidate A: Yeah, And teenagers like going to

shopping centres with friends and going


to the cinema is part of their weekend
pro9ramme.

Candidate A: Teenage magazines also write about these


films.

Candidate

B:

Sure, they are full of posters ofthe stars of

these films,

Candidate B: Exactly. l think we can a9ree on that.


Candidate A:

Yes, we can agree. Going to cinemas is

one of the favourite weekend activities for


teena9ers.

Candidate A: And teenagers like to identify themselves


with these characters.

Candidate B: Now let's start with the

first. Teenagers 90

Thankyou.That is the end ofthe test.

Examiner:

Goodbye. Have a nice weekend.

to the cinema more often.

Candidate A:

Candidate B:

Yes. They like going to plazas with friends


and a part of an evening out is watching
films, isn't it?
l also like going to the cinema. But the
tickets are expensive for teenagers,

CandidateA: Maybe, but parents normally give money


for the tickets. what else did we mention?
These films are not expensive to make ...

Candidate B: Not

really. They take place at schools, on

beaches, youn9 9irls and boys play in


them, expensive stars or investments are
not important.

Candidate A: Certainly.The stories are quite simple.


Candidate

B:

Yes and they continue these stories in


follow-up films which is probably cheaper,
too. They don't have to spend a lot of

money on costumes, scenery or special


visual effects.

we come to a conclusion?

Unt 4: Lfestyles
Lesson

4.

1:

Pursuing Adventures

stories of extreme activities

Audio script

1:

(e
t,

Last week, l put them to the test at East Coast. The only
lesson ld had was a manufacturer's website virtual clip.
E-learning at its best! l followed the video's instructions
to the letter and l managed without even falling once. As
you can see in the photo, l am adequately protected and
look like some kind of robot on wheels, but it was cool
to be able to even travel a short distance shakily on my
first attempt. 5ubsequently, l did some online research

and realised a qualified coach would get me going and


learning faster too.

Audio scrpts

Do your knees tremble at the thought of swinging across


the jungle forest tops suspended from a steel thread? lf
so, zip-lining may not be for you, But if you are into a fun
adventure, then be sure to book a zip-lining ride in Belize.
|'m not afrad of heights, and the moment l stepped out
into space from the safe haven ofthe tree-top box, l felt
this mighty pull of gravity on my body, and then l was free

Welcome to the programme,


Leaving Home. My name is
Samantha Benjamin. On today's
programme we have two first-year
students who have both left home
to study, Danny Noble and Sarah
Jenkins, Welcome to you both.

Sarah

Hello

as a bird.

Danny

Yes, hello everybody.

Interviewer

Sarah, can l start with you? Why did you


decide to travel to another town to study?

Sarah

Well it's a long story actually. My father is


a management consultant and he really
wanted me to do a business course at
university, l tried to take an interest in
mone, marketing and economics, but it
just bored me stiff.

lnterviewer

So were you able to convince your father

2:

Audio scrlpt 3:
First we actually had to pedal uphill a bit, but then it was
time for the real thing. We had waterfalls over the road,
muddy sections, lots of rocks thrown onto the road from
the frequent earthquakes, two pretty deep creek crossin9s,
and plenty of downhill speed - making for a very fast and
bumpy ride! By this stage we were down to about 3600m
above sea level, riding the 1 km of tight corners known as
the Death Trail hardly able to breathe.

Sarah
At the catalinas the surface was flat as a lake. yet, the
first site was a big scare, you know why, At a depth of 12
metres, we had about 5 or 6 of them just circling around
us. Adrenaline rushing through your body and screams
left and right of buddies trying to point out more to
each other. An awesome sight and feeling!To make the
experience complete, on our way up to make a safety stop,
we encountered a giant manta, and 3 more bulls came
again to check us out!

Lesson 4: ln and out of Homes

5. Listening

Task 3: Radio

Programme

G)
1,

No l never believed he would change his

myself.

Interviewer

And

Sarah

More or less. l had a little money of my


own, and l enrolled in a course in the north
where prices and accommodation are
cheaper. l lived in a small attic room. lwas
able to earn some money by singing in a
band,

!nterviewer

Were you happy?

Sarah

Oh yes. For the first time in my life l was


enjoying the feeling of independence. l
could come in and go out when l liked,

is

that what happened, Sarah?

After a few months l started going out


with Tom, the drummer in the band. He
had a small flat which he had inherited
from his grandmother and we moved in
there.

You will hear part of a radio programme about two

youn9 people who have left home.

On the test paper, you have ten multiple-choice

questions about the programme.


Choose the best response (A, B or C) for the questions,
Write the letter of the appropriate answer into the
Answer box below,
You will hear the recording twice.
You have two minutes to read the questions before the
recording starts.

that you wanted to study something else?


mind. l told him l wanted to study drama,
but his response was to throw me out of
the house and tell me that l had to support

Audio script 4:

n{l

lnterviewer

Audio script

lnterviewer

Did your parents come to accept your


decision?

Sarah

Not at all. Father felt l was wasting my life


and decided never to speak to me again.
When my grandmother died l received a
letter from his secretary. Mother was even
worse. Every time l tried to speak to her
on the phone she just told me about all
the money that had been spent on my
education.

Audio scripts
lnterviewer

Danny

OK, thank you, Sarah. Clearly a difficult


time for you. Now can l turn to you,
Danny? How did you decide whether or
not to 90 to college?
Well, ldidn't go to college right after
school, l was unemployed for five years,

and then l got onto this programme that


helps unemployed young people to gain
skills and develop their knowledge in
certain areas.

lnterviewer

l see, Danny.

Danny

Oh, lots of things. We do some maths,


though l'm not too fond of that, but we
also do writing. l love writing poems.

tnterviewer

Where do you go to college, Danny?

Danny

That's a real problem for me. lwanted to


go to college in my home town. After all,
my friends are all there, but there weren't
any places, So l had to go the nearest big
city about 100 km from here.

And what do you study?

!nterviewer

But surely you have made new friends?

Danny

Well, yes l have, but they are not like the


friends from back home. when l'm at home
l go out with my old friends from school to
the Golden Eagle Pub, and we talk about
everything. But it's not like that with the
guys in London,

lnterviewer
Danny

How often do you get to 90 home, Danny?


Well, when l started at the college l went
home every day. lt wasn't the time spent
on the train that was the problem, but it
was the train fare that was killing me, So l
found a place in a hostel.

lnterviewer

Are you happy there?

Danny

lt's OK, l suppose. There's a problem with


the food, though. l don't like it as much
as the food my Mum makes. So she gives
me masses on Sundays to bring back to
the hostel. The problem is that l keep
forgetting to put it into the fridge and it
goes off.

lnterviewer

And how about your family? Do you miss


them, Danny?

Danny

Yes, l do. Mum and l used to watch TV

every evening before l went to the pub.


really miss that.

lnterviewer

Well, it seems it hasn't been very easy

foryou either ofyou.Thankyou both for


sharing your experiences with all of us.

Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thing

(e

Listening, note-takng and text


reconstruction

{,

Suspicious Honey Closes California Airport

California's Bakersfield airport was evacuated and shut


down for several hours yesterday after security staff became
suspicious of honey in a man's luggage. The passenger,
a gardener who had been carrying the honey in several
energy drink bottles, was released after being thoroughly
questioned by airport security officials, Reuters reports,
Authorities, who are trying to figure out why the honey
made the man's luggage test positive for bomb-making
materials,5uspect that gardening chemicals may be to
blame,

Listening Task 2: Making Nofes


You will hear part of a radio programme in which a

(e

honey expert, Laurence Woodruff, speaks about ways


of keeping honey at home.
. Look at the notes.The notes contain nine gaps.
. you have one minute to read the notes.
[1-minute pause]
Now listen to the speaker and write a maximum of 3
words on each numbered line,
Do not write more than 3 words in one gap.
You will hear the recording twice.

{l

.
.
.

R:

F:

Our next guest, Laurence Woodruff, is a honey


specialist, Mr. Woodruff, what do you think our
listeners should know about honey?

(e
{,

Well, first of allthey should know that honey is a


sweetener in liquid form. Honey can have many
colours and shades, from almost colourless to a very

darkbrown. lf you wanta strongerflavour,you should


look for darker honey,

lt's best to keep liquid honey in carefully closed


containers in a dry place at room temperature, say
about 20 degrees Celsius. lt! extremely important
for the container to be closed. lf you don't, the honey
loses its aroma and its flavour.

On the whole, there are three problems connected


with keeping honey.
Firstly, honey kept for many months may naturally
turn darker. This doesn't affect the lavour. we can
continue using it.

Audio scrpts
Secondly, as l'm sure your listeners know, or at least
some of them, honey can become very hard as it gets
older,This again is a natural process and nothing
to worry about. lf you want to return your honey to
liquid form, put the open container of honey in a
pot of hot water, Make sure the water is not boiling,
otherwise your container would break,

Q:

'Cross-cultural perspectives have a 9reat influence


on our eatin9 behaviours. To what extent do you
think it is true for American people?'

A:

ln increasing numbers, Americans are eating food


that is not traditionally found in the USA. Many
Americans now have their favourite international
food when eating out, regardless of whether they
may be dining at formal, sit-down restaurants, at
fast-food eateries or at cafes, or if they purchase food
from street vendors. Ethnic ingredients, produce and
products have also become easier to find in shops
for cooking at home. As a result of this, interest has
grown in the food, the food history and the eating
cultures of Asia, the Middle East, Central America and
Latin America.

The last thing that can happen if we keep honey for a


very long time is that it can start to smell like alcoho|.
This is more serious. ln this case your honey is spoiled
- throw it away!
Now, for people who like cookin9, there is more good
news. Honey can actually replace all sugar in cakes,
salad dressin9, sauces - basically everywhere. An
advantage of using honey instead ofsugar in cooking
is that honey is actually sweeter than suga1 so you
need less. Also you all know that cakes with sugar stay
fresh for only 2 or 3 days usually. Well, with honey it's
longer. Cakes with honey are often still fresh enough
to eat after 5 or 6 days.

Reacting to this change of habits, even most US fast


food chains today offer a variety of international
menus, which is part of an international trend toward
diversity in all aspects of life, Although all humans
need food to survive, people's eating habits (that is
how they obtain, prepare, and consume food) are
a result of learned behaviour. This learned eating
behaviour, as well a5 the values and attitudes it
embodies, has come to represent a key aspect of a
group's popular culture.'

One final thing, honey is extremely good not only for


adults, but for children too, although itl best not to
give it to babies less than one year old.

Lesson 3: Eating Well or Not Eating Well


.l , Listenn1 a?! discussion:the medaand
our eating

habits

.,)
t )

A recent study by a Harvard psychiatrist has shown


that watchin9 stick-thin actresses on US sitcoms distorts
girls' body images and encourages them to develop eating
disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. Most models
have 10 to 15o/o body fat compared with 22 to 26o/ofor a
normal healthy woman, and are therefore much thinner
than the average person. The study looked at the impact
of the introduction of satelliteTV in Fiji. Dieting was almost
unheard of prior to 1995, and the Fijian culture encouraged
healthy appetites and larger body shapes, But within 3 years
of watching US shows, girls became obsessed with their
weight.Two-thirds of those questioned reported dieting to
lose weight, whilst three-quarters felt that they were too fat.
1 in 8 of the girls asked was bulimic, So this proves what we
have suspected all along - that the shape of a normalfemale
body is wrongly portrayed by the media.

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines


Lstening and discussing: comparing
American and Hungarian eating habits
,',.,

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace


Answering the question - Answerng
the queston?

'*.,

Teacher: Hello,

t,

t,

Barbara. Nice to meet you. Can you see


and hear me ok?

Barbara:
Teacher:

Yes. l can see and hear you clearly.

Barbara:

Yes, l have a very comfortable house. We have

Great. So can l. Now, l would like to start with a


few general questions about yourself and your
studies. This will take about ten minutes. Are
you comfortable?

lived here for three years. l live with my father,


mother and younger brother, Bruno.

Teacher: OK.Thanks. Now l want to move on to talk


about your English studies. Why do you want to
study English online?

Barbara: l think computers

(e

are very important


nowadays. Everybody needs to use them, and
in the future they will replace books.

Audo scripts
Teacher: OK.That's very interesting.

Now, thinking about

this online English course that you are just


starting now, how many hours a week do you
want to study English?

Barbara:

Teacher: Uh-huh.

lf we can go back to talking about


this online course; let's just look at some of
the details.The online lessons are available on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, How many
times a week would you like to study?

Barbara:

Friday is my favourite day of the week because


l can go out with my friends, and l don't have to

get up early in the morning,


OK, we'll come back to that one later. Well, if
we move on to talk about the financial side
of things, the price is 10 Euros per lesson and
we would like you to make the transfer to our
account electronically, ls that possible?

Barbara: The price

of everything is going up nowadays


and more people are shopping online, which
can be solution because it is cheaper.

Teacher:

OK. Great. Well thanks for that. NoW if we could


just 90 over some of those areas once again
and clear up a few details,...

? . A model
Examiner:

Sara:

interview

Sra, are you a student or do you

n
work?

t )

l'm a student. l'm in my fourth year at the

Kovcs lmre Secondary School in Budapest.


enjoy my studies.

Examiner: And how about you Flix?

Flix:

work. l am uhm... a advisor to a


mana9ement executive in a pharmaceutical
company.
l

Examiner: Thank you. Now l'd like to ask about

Sra:

different topic. How often do you use a


computer, Sra?

Almost every day. l write my homework on


the computer, and of course emails to my
friends.

Examiner: Thank you. Flix, what do you use a computer


for?
F!ix:

Thank you. Flix, do you think computers


have a negative influence on family life?

Flix:

Well they can, if they are not used sensibly.

Examiner:

Thank you. Sra, do you think computers will


replace books at some point in the future?

Sra:

Well they might for some people, but not


for me, l enjoy reading novels, and l couldn't
imagine reading them on a computer screen.

Examiner:

Thank you. NoW in this part of the test you

Yes, English is a very important language.

Everybody needs to know it nowadays.

Teacher:

Examiner:

Just about everythin9. l need to keep in


contact with representatives of my firm
around the world, and l use the computer for
that.

One particular problem is children spendin9


hours with computer 9ames.

are going to....

Materials for parwork and groupwork activities

Materials for pairwork and groupwork activities


The materials in this section are not arranged in the order of unit and lesson sequence, lnstead, they have been placed as
sPace allows, One basic PrinciPle has been considered: materials for activities involving information gap have been placed
on seParate paes to ensure that each student in a pair or group can only see their own version.

Unt 5: Food for Thought


Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thng

Listening to and completing quotes


Student A:
! . Vou begin the activity! Read any one of the first quote halves (1 -4) to your partner and let them choose the appropriate ending
for that quote, You may read that first half twice, but DO NOT SHOW the text to each other, When your partner has se,tected the
right ending, together read out the full quote once more, focusing on stress, pauses and intonation.

2.

Now your partner reads one of their first halves and you find the endings (E-H) in your table,

lst half of
lf

quote

2nd half of

the bees disappeared offthe surface of the globe,

We stole a box of honey jars one time and went out in


the woods and took care of the whole box.
3.

l eat

lf

my peas with honey; l've done it all my life.

you want to gather honey,


E.

with the two noblest of things, which are sweetness and


li9ht.

F.

satisfying, and if they howl with rage or cry, that's honey.


when you run out of money, honey, l run out of time.

only reason l know for making honey is so as l can eat it,

3.Taking in turns, continue untilyou have


Activity 2/b on p.

101,

got

all8 quotes complete and

have read them aloud foryourselves.Then

go backto

Materals for parwork and groupwork actvities

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace


Speaking Task

1:

Interview (Open dialogue format: SCRIPT l)

1 . one of you, who has been chosen to be the "examiner" first, asks the following questions to the tandidates': using this scriPt.

Examiner:
andidate

[Name of Candidate

1],

are you a student or do you work?

1:

Examiner:

And how aboutyou [Name of Candidate 2]?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:

Candidate

Now l'd tike to ask about a different topic. How often do you use a computer, [Name of Candidate 1]?

1:

Examiner:

Thankyou. [Name of Candidate 2], what do you use a computer for?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:

Thankyou. [Name of Candidate 2], do you think computers have a negative influence on family life?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:
Candidate

1:

Examiner:

2.
r

Thank you. [Name of Candidate 1], do you think computers will replace books at some point in the future?
Thank you. NoW in this part of the test you are going to.,

Discuss briefly the fottowing two questions

Did the "candidates" answer the "examiner's" questions?

o Was their pronunciation (individual sounds, word stress, intonation) accurate and clear enough, and did it support What
they said? (You may use the assessment criteria for Pronunciation in Activity 7 on p.127.)

3.

Now hand over the role of the "examiner" to one of your partners, who should turn to SCRiPT 2 on p, 1 96.

Materals for parwork and groupwork activities

Unit 2:

Lesson l: Survvng as a Tourist


Speaking Task 3: Transactional Dialogues

RoIe cards and "examiner's" script ISET

l]

1 . Your teacher will give you 3 separate, numbered role cards. Give them one by one to the "candidate" before you start the
instruction for each situation.

[Hand out card 1/A]


Examiner speaks:'(Nam

e),

read this card. When you are ready, please start a conversation with me. l am your friend.'

Card 1/A:

Your friend is trying to decide where to go on holiday. Suggest Greece.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out reply:.'Why doyou thinkthat's a good idea?'

Candidate speaks:
Examiner speaks:' Thank you.'

[Hand out card 1/B]


Examiner speaks: '(Name), read this card. When you are ready, please start

conversotion with me. l am the waiter,'

Card 1/B:
You go to a very nice but rather busy restaurant. Ask the waiter if there is a free table.

Candidate speaks:

Examinerreadsoutreply: Notforanotherhalf anhour. Icangetyouadrinkwhileyouarewaiting,ifyoulike.'


Candidate speaks:
Examiner speaks:' Thank you.'

[Hand out card 1/C]


Examiner speaks:

"(Na me), read this card. When you are ready, please start a

conversation with me. l am the fellow passengel

Card 1/C:
A fellow pasenger accuses you of having taken his suitcase. Deny it.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out reply:'Oh,
Candidate speaks:

I'm sorry, mine looks exactly like that.'

Examiner speaks:' Thank you.'

2. Afte, you have completed conversation /C, invite the observer to give feedback to the "candidate" using the checklist. Then
change roles according to the instruction for SET 2 in Activity 7/a on p. 29.
1

"1

Materials for pairwork and

Unit 3:

Movies

Lesson 4: The lnteractive Audence


Speaking Task 4: Discussion ITOPIC 2]

Act as an

'examiner" and conduct the Discussion task with the two "candidates" according to the script below.

Examiner's script:

For the final part of the test, you are going to talk to each other about a topic l will give you. l'm just 9oin9 to listen. Your

topic

is:

[Read out question and example on the card]


person,
you want to make a new fictional film based around the life of a famous
film?
Who could be some possibte subjects for the
* e.9. J. K Rowling

s
*

e
Discussion task: sample topic card

is the best or most


important. Remember to give reasons for what you say. You have three minutes altogether to try and a9ree. All ri9ht?

i* First make a spoken list of four or five things. Then, when you have done that, discuss which one

[Hand out card, "candidates" begin discussion]


2.

with the hetp of this stightly modifred checklist from Activity 5, the "examiner" is expected to evaluate how effectively, or
not, the "candidates" have performed, Tick only the questions that accurately describe the way in which the discussion has been
conducted, As the 'bxaminer", give quick feedback to the "candidates" about their performance.

Candidate

Candidate B

Did the'tandidates" contribute equally?


Did they name a number of possible answers?

Did they discuss which was the best answer?


Did they give sufficient reasons for their ideas?

Did they give their ideas and opinions?


Did they listen to each other carefully?
Did they avoid talking over each other?

3. When you have finished evaluating the performance of the two "candidates'i the third person in your group will conduct the
last Discussion as the "examiner" with TOPIC 3 on p. 19j,

Materials for pairwork and groupwork activites

Unit 2:
Lesson

1:

Surviving as a Tourist

Speaking Task 3: Transactional DiaIogues


RoIe cards and "examiner's"

script

|SET 3]

1 . Your teacher will give you 3 separate, numbered role cards. Give them one by one to the "candidate" before you start the
instruction for each situation.

[Hand out card 3/A]


Examiner speaks: '(Name), read this card. When you are ready, please start a conversation with me. l am the receptionist.'
Card 3/A:

You don't know what to do this evening. Ask the hotel receptionist if they have any suggestions.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out reply:'There are
Candidate speaks:

lots of possibilities. For example, the opera house is very

good.'

Examiner speaks:'Thank you.'

[Hand out card 3/B]


Examiner speaks: '(Name), read this card. When you are ready, please start a conversation with me. l am

the passer-by.'

Card 3lB:

A helpful local passer-by has just told you how to find a post office, but you didn't understand. Ask the person to

repeat what they said.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out reply:'Yes Candidate speaks:

it's the

second street on the right. Shall l show you7'

Examiner speaks: 'Thank you.'

[Hand out card 3/C]


Examiner speaks: '(Name), read this card. When you are ready, please start a conversation with me. l am the tourist.'
Card 3/C:
Someone seems to have taken your reserved seat on the bus. Ask the passenger to check his / her ticket.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out replyz
Candidate speaks:

'l'm afraid, this is my seat, look at the number. Could you check yours once again, please?'

Examiner speaks:' Thank you.'

2,

Afte, you have completed conversation 3/C, invite the observer to give feedback to the "candidate" using the checklist. When
Activity 7/b on p. 29.

the feedback is finished, go back to

Materals for pairwork and groupwork activtes

Unit 3: Making Movies

Lesson 4: The lnteractive Audience


Speaking Task 4: Discussion ITOPIC 1]

Act as

an "examiner" and conduct the Discussion task with the two "candidates" according to the script below.

Examiner's script:

For the final part of the test, you are going to talk to each other about a topic l will give you. l'm just 9oin9 to listen. Your

topic

is:

[Read out question and example on the card]


are they?
Being a famous film star has some disadvantages,What
* e.9. they have no privacy
*

s
s
8
Discussion task: sample topic card

ffi First make a spoken list of four or five things.Then, when you have done that, discuss which one is the best or most
important. Remember to give reasons for what you say. You have three minutes altogether to try and a9ree. All right?

[Hand out cardl "candidates" begin discussionl


2.

with the help of this stightly modified checklist from Activity 5, the "examinef' is expected to evaluate how effectively, or
not, the "candidates" have performed. Tick onty the questions that accurately describe the way in which the discussion has been
conducted. As the "examiner'i give quick feedback to the "candidates" about their performance.

Candidate

Candidate B

Did the'tandidates" contribute equally?


Did they name a number of possible answers?
Did they discuss which was the best answer?
Did they give sufficient reasons for their ideas?

Did they give their ideas and opinions?


Did they listen to each other carefully?
Did they avoid talking over each other?

3.

When you have finished evaluating the performance of the two "candidates'i another one of you in the grouP will conduct the
second Discussion as the "examiner" with TOP|C 2 on p. l89.

Materals

Unit 2:
Lesson

1:

activties

Survivng as a Tourist

Speaking Task 3: Transactional Dialogues


Role cards and "examiner's" script ISET 2]
1 . Your teacher will give you 3 separate, numbered role cards. Give them one by one to the "candidate" before you stort the
instruction for each situation.

[Hand out card 2/A]


Examiner speaks: '(Name), read this card. When you are ready, please start a conversation with me. l am the other tourist.'
Card 2/A:
You meet another tourist, who asks for advice about a place to stay. Recommend the 4-star Sunset Hotel.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out reply:'lsn't
Candidate speaks:

it a bit too expensive?'

Examiner speaks:'Thank you.'

[Hand out card 2/BI


Examiner speaks: '(Name), read this card. When you are ready, please start a conversation with me. l am the waiter.'
Card 2/B:

You are in a restaurant. The waiter has brought the wrong dish (you wanted fish). Complain.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out reply:'l'm
Candidate speaks:

so sorry. What would

you

like me to do

about it?'

Examiner speaks:' Thank you.'

[Hand out card 2/C]


Examiner speaks: '(Name), read

this card. When you are ready, please start a

conversation with me, l am the tourist.'

CardZlCz

A tourist asks you how to get to the British Embassy. You don't know but offer to find out.

Candidate speaks:
Examiner reads out replyz
Candidate speaks:

'Do you have a map maybe where we could check?'

Examiner speaks: 'Thank you.'

2.

Afte, you have completed conversation 2/C, invite the observer to give feedback to the "candidate" using the checklist. Then
change roles according to the instruction for SET 3 in Activity 7/a on p. 29.

for pairwork and groupwork activites

Unit 3:

Movies

Lesson 4: The lnteractve Audience


Speaking Task 4: Discussion ITOPIC 3]
1

Art o' an "examiner" and conduct the Discussion task with the two "candidates'! according

to

the script below.

Examiner's script:

For the final Part of the test, you are going to talk to each other about a topic l will give you. l,m just going to listen. your

topic

is:

[Read out question and example on the card]


What do you think the recipe for a good film could be?
* e.9. an interestin9 5tory
*
*
*

*
Discussion task: sample topic card

First make a sPoken list of four or five things. Then, when you have done that, discuss which one is the best or most
important. Remember to give reasonS for what you say. You have three minutes altogether to try and agree. All right?

[Hand out card, "candidates" begin discussion]


2. Wnn the hell of this stighttY modifred checklist from Activity 5, the "examiner" is expected to evaluate how effectively, or
not, the "candidates" have performed.Tick only the questions that accurately describe the way in which the discussion htas been
conducted. As the "examiner'i give quick feedback to the "candidates" about their performance.
Candidate

Candidate B

Did the'tandidates"contribute equally?


Did they name a number of possible answers?
Did they discuss which was the best answer?
Did they give sufficient reasons for their ideas?
Did they give their ideas and opinions?
Did they listen to each other carefuIly?
Did they avoid talking over each other?

3.

After You have completed the third discussion and given feedback

to

both 'tandidates", go back

to Activity 6/b

on

p.

69.

Materals for parwork and groupwork activites

Unt 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisnes


Speaking Task 4: Discussion ITOPIC 1]

1 . Act as an "examiner" and conduct the Discussion task according to the script below.Tetl the "candidates" once again which
criteria you are going to focus on (Range and Accuracy, Fluency and Coherence or Communication Suategies). Now begin the
'bxamining".

Examiner's script:

For the final part of the test, you are 9oin9 to talk to each other about a topic l will give you. l'm just going to listen. Your

topic

is:

[Read out question and example on the cardl


Why are fast food restaurants so popular all over the world?
quality everywhere
+, e.g.you get the same dishes and
*
,

*
Discussion task:5ample topic card

First make a spoken list of four or five things.Then. when you have done that, discuss which one is the best or most
important. Remember to give reasons for what you say. You have three minutes altogether to try and agree. All right?

[Hand out card, "candidates" begin discussion]


2. Give feedback to the two 'tandidates" using the scores and descriptions of the set of criteria you have been focusing on (Range
and Accuracy, Fluency and Coherence or Communication Strategies). When you have evaluated the performance of the two
"candidates'i another one of you conducts the next Discussion as the "examine( with TOPtc 2 on p. l97,
Range and Accuracy

Fluency and Coherence

Communication strategies

Wide range of grammar, lexis and cohesive


devices used to complete the tasks,
circumlocution only occasionally necessary.
Comfortable with more complex structures
and lexis although errors still occur.

Maintains a smooth flow of language with


hesitation mainly to formulate ideas, not
language.
Links ideas into clear coherent discourse
With little or no jumpiness even in extended
contributions.

lnitiates, maintains and ends turns,


Uses repair strategies (clarifi cation,
circumlocution) where necessary.
Uses appropriate register and intonation.

Sufficient range of grammar, lexis and


cohesive devices to adequately complete
the tasks although circumlocution may be

Some hesitation while formulating language,


but can effectively maintain flow of speech.
can link ideas into clear, coherent discourse

lnitiates, maintains and ends turns


satisfactorily although not always smoothly,
Evidence of ability to use repair strategies
(clarifi cation, circumlocution) although not
always applied.
Uses appropriate register,

Frequent hesitation and inability to link ideas


coherently causes 9reat strain on the listener,

Generally, fails to initiate, maintain and end


turns satisfactorily.
Does not use repair strategies (clarification,
circumlocution). Uses inappropriate register.

necessary,
Few errors in simple sentences.
Errors when attempting more complex
structures and lexis do not generally hinder

although with noticeable jumpiness especially


in extended contributions,

communication.
2

,|

Range of grammar, lexis and cohesive devices


insuf cient to adequately complete the tasks.
Repeated erro15 even in simple sentences.

Insuffi cient language for assessment

Materals for pdirwork and groupwork actvities

Unit 5: Food for Thought


Lesson 2: The Sweetest Thing

Listening to and completing quotes


Student B:
1 . Your partner begins the activity!They will read out the first half of a quote. Listen and choose the appropriate ending from the
right-hand column (extracts A-D). Read out the ending you have chosen to check if it fits. DO NOT look at your partner's text and
DO NOT show them yours. When you are both confident that you have selected the right ending, together read out the full quote
once moret focusing on stress, pauses and intonation.

2.

Now

yo,

choose one of the frrst halves of your quotes (5-8) and your partner witt find the appropriate ending,

lst half of

quote

2nd half of quote

A. don't kick over the beehive.


B,

They do taste kinda funny, but it keeps'em on the knife,

C, then man would only

have four years of life left.

D. l don't think l touched honey again for 20 years. l never


wanted to see honey again.
lnstead of dirt and poison we have rather chosen to fill
our hives with honey and wax; thus furnishing mankind
6.

lf you got the money, honey, l got the time and

only reason for being a bee that l know of is making


honey. And the

7. The

8. lf you know somebody is going to be awfully annoyed

by something you write, that's obviously very

turns, continue until you have got all 8 quotes complete and have read them aloud for yourselves,Then go backto
Activity 2/b on p. 101 .

3.Taking in

Materals for

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 2: Living in Cyberspace


Speaking Task l: lnterview (open dialogue format: scRlPT 2)

1 , One of You, who has been chosen to be the "examiner" first, asks the following questions to the kandidates,, using this script.

Examiner:
Candidate

[Name of Candidate

1], are

you a student or do you work?

1:

Examiner:

And how about you [Name of Candidate 2]?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:

Candidate

Now l'd like to ask about a different topic. How did you first learn to use a computer, fName of Candidate 1]?

1:

Examiner:

Thank you. [Name of Candidate 2], what do you frnd most enjoyable about using a computer?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:

Thank You, [Name of Candidate 2], what effect do you think computers have had on people,s social lives?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:

Thank you, [Name of Candidate

communication?

Candidate

], what do

you think are the possible drawbacks of using computers for

1:

Examiner:

2.

Thankyou. Now in this part of thetestyou are going to...

Discuss brieflythefollowing two questions

o Did the'candidates" answer the "examiner's" questions?


o Was their Pronunciation (individual sounds, word stress, intonation) accurate and clear enough, and did it support what
theY said? (You may use the assessment criteria for Pronunciation in Activity 7 on p.127)

3.

Now hand over the role of the "examiner" to one of

your

partners, who should turn

to scRtpT 3

on p. 1 99,

Materals for parwork and groupwork activites

llnit 5: Food for Thought

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines

Speaking Task 4: Discussion ITOPIC 2]


task according to the script below.Telt the "candidates" once again which
the
(Range
and Accuracy, Ftuency an Coherence or Communication Strategies). Now begin
criteria you are going tofocus on
"examining",

Act as an,,examiner,,

and conduct the Discussion

Examiner's script:

give You. l'm just 9oin9 to listen, Your


For the final part of the test, you are going to talk to each other about a topic l will

topic

is:

[Read out question and example on the card]


vegetarian?
Why do some people choose to become
* e.g.because of their religious beliefs
*
0

card
Discussion task: sample topic

which one is the best or most


First make a spoken list of four or five things. Then, when you have done that, discuss
to trY and agree, All right?
altogether
important. Remember to give reasons for what you say. You have three minutes

[Hand out card, "candidates" begin discussionl


,,candidates" using the scores and descriptions of the set of criteria You have been focusing on (Range
the Performance of the two
and Accuracy, Fluency and Coherence or Communication Strategies). When you have evaluated
,,candidates;i the third one in your group conducts the last Discussion as the "examiner" with TOP|C 3 on P. 198.

2.

Give feedback to

the

two

Range and Accuracy

Fluency and Coherence

Wide range of grammar, lexis and cohesive


devices used to complete the tasks,
circumlocution only occasionally necessary.
Comfortable with more complex 5tructures
and lexis although errors still occur.

Maintains a smooth flow of language with


hesitation mainly to formulate ideas, not
language,
Links ideas into clear coherent discourse
With little or no jumpiness even in extended
contribution5.

lnitiates, maintains and ends turns.


U5es repair strategies (clarifi cation,
circumlocution) where necessary.
Uses appropriate register and intonation

Sufhcient range of grammar, lexis and


cohesive devices to adequately complete
the tasks although circumlocution may be

Some hesitation while formulating langua9e,


but can effectively maintain flow of speech.
can tink ideas into clear, coherent discourse
although With noticeable jumpiness especially

lnitiates, maintains and ends turns


satisfactorily although not always smoothly,
Evidence of ability to use repair strate9ies

Frequent hesitation and inability to link ideas


coherently causes great strain on the listener.

Generally, fails to initiate, maintain and end


turns satisfactorily.
Does not use repair strategies (clarification,
circumlocution). Uses inappropriate register.

Communication Stategies

necessary.
Few errors in simple sentences.
Errors when attempting more complex
structures and lexis do not generally hinder

in extended contibutions.

(clarifi cation, circumlocution) although not


always applied.
Uses appropriate register.

communication.
2

Range of grammar, lexis and cohesive devices


insufficient to adequately complete the tasks.
Repeated errors even in simple sentences.

lnsuffi cient language for assessment

Materals for pairwork and groupwork actvities

Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines


Speaking Task 4: Discussion ITOPIC 3]
1 . Act as an "exominer" and conduct the Discussion task according to the script below,Tett the "candidates" once again which
criteria you are going to focus on (Range and Accuracy, Fluency and Coherence or Communication Strategies), Now begin the
"examining",

Examiner's script:

For the final part of the test, you are going to talk to each other about a topic l will give you. l'm just going to listen. Your

topic

is:

[Read out question and example on the card]


popular these days?
Why are cookin9 TV po9rammes and channels so
* e.g.people want to learn new recipes

Discussion task: sample topic card

;e First make a spoken list of four or five things, Then, when you have done that, discuss which one is the best or most
important. Remember to give reasons for what you say. You have three minutes altogether to try and agree. All right?

[Hand out carL "candidates" begin discussion]


2. Give feedback to the two "candidates" using the scores and descriptions of the set of criteria you have been focusing on (Range
and Accuracy, Fluency and Coherence or Communication Strategies), When you have evaluated the performance of the two
"candidates", go backto Activity 6/b on p. 1 14.
Range and Accuracy

Fluency and Coherence

Communication Stategies

Wide range of grammar, lexis and cohesive


devices used to complete the tasks,
circumlocution only occasionally necessary.
Comfortable with more complex structures
and lexis although errors still occur.

Maintains a smooth flow of language with


hesitation mainly to formulate ideas, not
language,
Links ideas into clear coherent discourse
With little or no jumpiness even in extended
contribution5.

lnitiates, maintains and ends turns.


U5e5 repair strategies (cIarifi cation,
circumlocution) where necessary.
Uses appropiate register and intonation.

Suff cient range of grammar, lexis and


cohesive devices to adequately compIete
the tasks although circumlocution may be
necessary.
Few errors in simple sentences.
Errors when attempting more complex
structures and lexis do not generally hinder

Some hesitation while formulating language,


but can effectively maintain flow of speech.
can link ideas into clear, coherent discourse
although with noticeable jumpiness especially
in extended contibutions.

lnitiates, maintain5 and ends turns


5atisfactorily although not always smoothly.
Evidence of ability to use repair 5trategie5
(clarifi cation, circumlocution) although not
aIways applied.
Uses appropriate register.

Frequent hesitation and inability to link ideas


coherently causes great strain on the listener.

Generally, fails to initiate, maintain and end


turns satisfactorily.
Does not use repair strategies (cIarification,
circumIocution). Uses inappropriate register.

communication.
2

Range of grammar, lexis and cohesive devices


in5Ufficient to adequateIy complete the tasks.
Repeated errors even in simpIe sentences.

lnsuffi cient language for assessment

Materals for pairwork and groupwork activities

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 2: Lving n Cyberspace


Speaking Task l: lnterview (Open dialogue format: SCRIPT 3)

1 . One of you, who has been chosen to be the "exominer" first, asks the following questions to the kandidates'| using this script.

Examiner:
Candidate

[Name of candidate

1],

are you a student or do you work?

1:

Examiner:

And how about you [Name of Candidate 2]?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:

Candidate

Now l'd like to ask about a different topic. What do you frnd least enjoyable about using a computer, [Name

of

candidate l]?

1:

Examiner:

Thankyou. [Name of candidate 2], who in your family uses computers most ?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:

Thankyou. [Name of candidate 2], what effect do you think computers have had on the way people spend their
leisure time?

Candidate 2:

Examiner:
Candidate

1],

what do you think are the dangers of becoming addicted to compters?

1:

Examiner:
2.

Thankyou, [Name of candidate

Thankyou. Now, in this part of the

test

you are going to ,..,

Discuss briefly the following two questions

o Did the'tandidates" answer the "examiner's" questions?


o Was their pronunciation (individual sounds, word stress, intonation) accurate and clear enough, and did it support what
they said? (You may use the assessment criteria for Pronunciation in Activity 7 on p.127.)

3.

Now go back to Activity 8/b on p. 1 27.

Photocopables

Photocopiables
Unit l: Exam Setting

Lesson l: Whatt in the Exam?


5. Reading about and discussing the Euro 82 exam
grouP. The 'l 4
These are the 14 pieces of information on cards which students receive in their 9roups. Make one set for each
cards are to be cut up, shuffled and given to each group.

Candidates listen to a dia|ogue in an


everyday situation and write translations
from English to Hungarian or vice versa

candidates translate a letter


from Hungarian into English

Candidates match paragraphs


to headings

candidates decide in which of the four


short texts certain pieces of information
can be found

There are 7 multiple-choice questions


about the content and details of a longer
text

This task is a discussion between


the two candidates about a topic

The task is a formaI letter or email of 100120 words, which is written to achieve a

particular outcome

candidates choose 1 from a choice of 3


text types and write an essay, a story, a
report, a review etc. of approximately
150 words in length

candidates match short recorded


conversations to titles, texts or pictures

Candidates fil! in gaps in notes based on


the information from the recordin9

Candidates answer 1 0 multiple-choice


questions about a radio programme
they hear

Candidates respond promptly to


some introductory questions from the
examiner

Each candidate tells a picture-based

story
they have prepared

Candidates make responses in


short everyday dialogues

Photocopables

Unit 2: Globetrotting

Lesson l: Surviving as a Tourist


Quick responses - practising functional language

One photocopy ofthese cards needs to be made for each pair ofstudents. Before handing them out, the cards need to be
cut up, so every pairwill get'l4 separate cards.

to Barcelona.

Complain that your


train is 2 hours Iate.

Find a hotel with a spare


double room.

Report a pickpocketing at
the po!ice station.

Ask someone about the location


of a bank or a money changing
office.

Offer to help an apparently


lost tourist with a map.

Ask at a railway information desk


about the departure times of
morning trains to Paris.

Find out about available tickets


for a musical/opera at the box
office.

Apologise for spilling coffee/red


wine aIl over a caf floor.

Ask someone what you should


see in the city.

Refuse an invitation for


dinner in a restaurant.

Recommend some sights to an


enquiring tourist in your city.

You meet your (English-speaking)


neig hbou r unexpected ly
while visiting London.

lnquire at your ho(s)tel about


nearby good restaurants.

Buy a return bus ticket

PhotocopiabIes

Unt 2:
Lesson

1:

Survvngas a Tourst

Speaking Task 3: TransactionaI Dialogues


One copy of each set of cards needs to be made and cut up for each group of 3. A different set will be given to the "examiner"
in each trio of examiner-candidate-observer (see distribution of roles for the three rounds of dialogues on p. 29).

Set

1:

1/A: Your friend is trying to decide where to go on holiday. Suggest Greece.


Transactional DIalogues task: sample roIe card

1/B: You 90 to a very nice but rather busy restaurant. Ask the waiter if there is a
free table.
Transactiona! Dialogues task: sample role card

1lCz A fellow passenger accuses you of having taken his suitcase. Deny it.
TransactionaI Dialogues task; sample role card

Set 2:

2/A: You meet another tourist, who asks for advice about a place to stay.
Recommend the 4-star Sunset Hotel.

Transactlonal Dialogues task sample role card

2/B: You are in a restaurant. The waiter has brought the wrong dish (you wanted
fish). Complain.

Transactional Dialogues task: sample role card

2lCz Atourist asks you how to get to the British Embassy. You don't know but offer
to find out.

Tranrectlonel Dielogucs tlsk: sample rolc card

Sef3;
3/A: You don't know what to do this evening. Ask the hotel receptionist if they
have any suggestions'

TransactionalDialoguestask:sampterolecard

3/B: A helpful local passer-by has just told you how to find a post ofice, but you
didn't understand' Ask the person to repeat what they:aidonatDlaloguestasksamplerolecard
3/C: Someone seems to have taken your reserved seat on the bus. Ask the
passenger to check hls / her ticket.

Transactional Dialogues task: sample role card

Unit 2:

Lesson 2: Bridging the Communication Gap


Whattourists say (in English or in Hungarian)

Only one copy of this set of cards needs to be made and cut up. The first member of each group gets one slip of paper. For
second round of the activity give a different slip to the first member of the rearanged lines (see instruction on p. 31 ).

Sajnos a fvrosi mzeumok


l need to find out what time
tbbsgben nem
the Zoo closes on Saturdays.
fogadjk el a nemzetkzi
d i kiga zolvnyt.

The ATM rejected my bank


card. Could you check it for
ffl, please?

A Lonely Planet tiknyv


szerint ennek az
kszerki tsna k m i nden
nap nyitva kne lennie.

Last night l booked 2 tickets


online for the Baroque
Masters exhibition for today.

Pontosan milyen
tevkenysgeket ta rta ! maz
a "Titokzatos Nyolcadik
kerlet" pro9ram?

You can 90 diving from any


beach to see the incredible
variety of fish
and other creatures.

I!

Hol jnnek ssze a vros

tindzserei amikor egy


zens szombat
estre vgynak?

Unit 2:
Lesson 2: Brdging the Communcaton Gap
RoIe

playing dialogues with mediation

One coPY of these 9 situation cards needs to be made and cut up for each group of 3 students.

Situation: A tourlst

!s

station.

reporting the loss or theft of

her.ur"r. .t th" poli."

Roles: Po!ice officer, tourist, mediator

Situation: A visitor wants to buy several CDs of authentic rorr rrrt,sic


Roles: Shop assistant, visitor, mediator
Situation: A visitor is inquiring about options for activities at a fitness and

wel!ness centre.
Roles: Visitor, receptionist, mediator

.Z*il

Situation: A visitor in a rented car is stopped by a poli." oFfi."[n


road for some small offences (slight speeding, seatbelts, lights of etc.).
Roles: Visitor, police officer, mediator
Situation: A tourist is trylng to find out about a day pass and/or a City Card
(price, vaIidity, discounts, etc.).

Roles: Ticket seller, tourist, mediator

Situation: A visitor is inquiring about conditions at an intern.t..te

download ing, limitations, etc.).


Roles: Visitor, attendant, mediator

Situation: A visitor
local use.

is

tpri*r

trying to buy a SlM-card and/or a mobile phone for

Roles: Shop assistant, vlsitor, mediator

Situation: A guest at a cheap youth hostel is complaining to the night clerk


about some inconvenience (noise, smel|, malfunction, etc.).
Roles: Clerk, guest, mediator
Situation: A foreign visitor is inquiring about the terms and conditions for
transferring money abroad (cost, time, identity, etc.).
Roles: Clerk, visitor, mediator

Unit 2:
Lesson 4: Travel Stories
5. Speaking Task 2: A Pcture Story
Student A's Picture story
'On a Tuesday afternoon Lucy found a letter in the post from her boyfriend. . .'

:--

=-_-.

%
rc

j \2
l

n
fr

l, /,

|,1

Photocopiables

Unit 2:

Lesson 4: Travel Stories

S.Speaking Task

2:

A Pcture Story

Student B's Picture story


'One day Tim and Daniel spotted a sad chameleon in a cage. . .'

"W
n

Fffi,
iT{fi

;.ffiL

ffi

Unit 3: Making Movies

Lesson 4: The lnteractive Audience


Speaking Task 4: Discussion

One copy of each set of these sample topic cards needs to be made and cut up for each group of 3. ln each round, the
"examiner"will pick up and use the numbered card (Topics 1-3) according to their script.

TOPiC

l:

Being a famous film star has some disadvantages, too.What are they?
they have no privacy

".g.

o
a

oiscur$on

*!,tmple

topic card

TOPiC 2:
You want to make a new fictional film based around the life of a famus person.
Who could be some possible subjects for the film?

".g.

J. K Rowling

a
a

Discussion task sampletopic card

TOP|C 3:

What do you think the recipe for a good film could be?

9 an interesting story

a
a

Discussion task sample topic card

l,,

PhotocopiabIes

Unit 4: Lifestyles
Lesson

1:

Pursung Advantures

7.Speaking Task

2:

A Picture Story

Student A's Picture story


"lt all started brightly, when Sarah and her 3 friends began

)\.\r

zo)!

r\(,\$
-.&

,J,
try."

packing their 2 canoes for the trip..

PhotocopabIes

Unt 4: Lifestyles

Lesson l: Pursuing Advantures

7.

Speaking Task

Student

Bt

2:

A Picture Story

Picture story

"Greg and his friends frnally managed to pack alltheir climbing equipment into the car...

{l:Ju,

ffi

2-L-/a
J:ynrTn

tTJ z",u,'',.z

\.r

c4 j

Le
L^\
ir

ffi
r--rS-,6
\^

a)

r.,,,v:\,\

Wffiry

Unt 5: Food for Thought


Lesson l: Food Blogs

Taboo game and vocabulary focused gapfiIl


One copy ofthe set offour cards for theTaboo game needs to be made and cut up for each group offour students, Each
student gets one card.

WEBslTE

RECIPE

ingredient
food
cookbook

F.a

read
in

structio

BUsY
relaxed
active
fulI

time
hectic

.,.,
'

. update
internet
,Prowse
t

visitor
Goog!e

cooK "'
prepare
food
Australia

chef
kitchen

Photocopiables

Unt 5: Food for Thought


Lesson

1:

Food Blogs

Mme race

One copy of the set of word cards needs to be made, cut up and shuffled for each group of students.

reIaxed

multiple

fetsback

float

,*
,D)'

update

su

rface

cookbook

sha re

stu m ble

flavour

yummy

anecdote

clippin9

dessert

desire

Weight

Unt 5: Food for Thought


Lesson 4: Cultures and Cuisines
Speaking Task 4: Discussion
one coPY of each set of these sample topic cards needs to be made and cut up for each group
of
"examiner"will Pick uP and use the numbered card (Topics

TOP|C

1-3)

according to t'heir script.

3. ln

each round, the

1:

why are fast food restaurants so popuIar all over the wortd?

'.

e.9.you get the same dishes and quality everywhere

._'f

''
"'t
i. .

-l
Disssion task sampte topic Gard

TOP|C 2:

Why do some peopIe choose to become vegetarian?


e.9.because of their religious beliefs

o
a

Discussion task sample topic card

TOP|C 3:

why are cooking Tv programmes and channels so popular these days?


. e.9.people want to learn new recipes
a
a
o
a

Discussion task sample topic <ard

212|

Photocopiables

Unit 6: Cyber World

Lesson 3: Online Language Learnng

&"

A living letter

One or two copies (depending on the number of students) of this set of cards needs to be made, cut up and shuffled. Each
student receives one card. lt does not matter if two students receive duplicate cards.

With regards to your enquiry...

ShouId you need further

lnformation...

F
l

would like to enquire about...

would Iike to apply for the job..


t

.t

Could you (possibly) ensure/make


sure that everyone...

am writing to complain about..

Dear Sir / Dear Professr Hughes,

wonder if you could give me


further information on...
l

expect a prompt delivery


of the items.
!

would like to take thls


opportunity to...

With reference to your


letter/email...

am writing to thank you for..

can be contacted at..

look forward to your prompt repIy.

ln view of the points above,

expect/demand.

Yours

fa

..

ithfu l ly,/You rs sincerely,

Marking schemes

Marking schemes
Unit 2:

Lesson 2: Bridging the Communication Gap


Mediation Part Two: Dialogue

o Only mark the sixteen numbered pieces of information; they are highlighted in bold below,

lf

the meaning is clear, the mark is awarded. The use of both the first and third person is acceptable.

o The meanin9 may be conveyed using different words from those in the Answer Key and in this Marking Scheme

Errors in grammar and spelling are not penalised

irtn"#uning
n

l
ll

Ex
1

l Ex

Write in

Hungarian
Write in

English

Write in
Hungarian
Write in
English
Write in
Hungarian
Write in
English
Write in
Hungarian
Write in
English
Write in
Hungarian
Write in
English

Y49
kuxek.

?rt Bunp+stutt{tk.

1.

- aalal,ui

,.

@l,yatn yyra*u.dt

Scorre

Certal,ill4. Wha ntrt

l
n"

#,.ir.l"urj

.|lr_

dJ

eueua

dl /you

h"ape

huahl

Tfu clwk?

k
maX

Annyit hallottam mr, hogy Budapest fesztivlvros - Mit jelent ez

gyakorlatban?

Tudna ajnlani..

.?

- valamit ezzel kapcsolatban

(There are) three major annual festivals - organised by us - none of


those are happening at the moment. - 2. have to order tickets well in

advance

Tavasszal megint itt leszek egy htig, - 4. Szvesen elmennk egy


koncertre - vagy egy tncsznhzba - hogy megnzzek valami modern
3.

balett eladst

5. Let me give you a program guide (to browse through) - 6. gives


you the necessary information about dates, venues, prices. - And

summaries of the shows/performances,


7. Ltom van

email cmk / knnyen kapcsolatba lphetek nkkel - Kaphat valamire jegy - amit rdemes

8. smi az ajnlata mostanra?

megnzni?

9. What would you say to some jazz?

10. There's a

jazzfestival on

now - with groups representing different trends. - 11. (There's a concert


in the eyenins. ) tl|s very long, starting at 6 till about 2 in the morning.

12. inkbb valami klasszikusat szeretnk - 13. etmennk az operba.


- (jut eszembe,) van jegyiroda, - 14. ahol az aznapi eladsra lehet

that - 16. try getting a


ticket at the theatre half an hour before the performance - Sometimes

olcsn jegy,eket kapn i?

15. (l'm afraid) we don"t have anything like

there are unsold tickets or - tickets that haven been brought back

Total:

16

Markng schemes
Assessng and marking writng and speaking
Writing and sPeaking are the two tests which are marked according to performance criteria. ln both cases
two markers
assess the candidate's Performance and follow the criteria in the tables on the next two pages. Having
two markers and
detailed criteria ensure that the final mark awarded in the speaking and writing tests is objctive and reliable.
The descriPtors in the tables Provide sufficient information and guidance for markers/assessors to make
the appropriate
decisions about the scores which are described in detail, as well as about the ones in between them.

Marking the Writing Test


Each task is scored separately by two

examine
lrs. For each tas*f/ore,ceive.3O'marks.

Task Achievement (5 marks) - Would your writlfg


eghisF itstoriimunication purpose in real life (e.g. would the hotel be
booked, would Your comPlaint be understoodll Wrtfu tfie reader fully underst.nj you, intentions, point
of view? Have you
followed all the instructions and included all - and only - the relevaniinformation?

APProPriacY

(5 marks) - ls the layout and style of your text ppipriate for


the text.type, your intention and the imagined
readershiP? Have You found the right level of formality (e.9. coriiracted vs. non-contracte forms)?
Have you referred to all
relevant points in the

instruction?

(,

,i

Coherence (5 marks) - ls the the text made up of logically structured, well-connected ideas? boes your writing
make sense
(you will lose marks for writing nonsense)?

Cohesion (5 marks) - Have You used purposefully chosen linking words and phrases, reference words and phrases, in
order
to establish the inner cohesion of both the paragraphs and the whole text? Have you divided your text into
well-connected
paragraphs?
Grammatica! Range & AccuracY (5 marks) - Have you used the right grammatical structures with the necessary
ran9e to
5uPPort Your communicative Purposes? Are there grammatical or accuracy mistakes (e.9. word orde1 punctuation)
left in
the text which hinder comprehension?
Lexical Range & AccuracY (5 marks) - Have you used the right range of vocabulary which is appropri3te
to support your
communicative PurPoses? Are there any vocabulary mistakes left in the text which hinder comprehnsion?

Marking schemes
-o

l!

o!

|9

l!

o6

.. >o9

-g

o _ 9.E;
,i ,i
.9
+.E
ooo
xy'
E:=
!4-:.
E b g
P;
Pg Pl } 5
Eoo6 F33o
Fg5 i 9{;
.9=939i_9E,

_4!o

Xy
6
-

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Marking schemes
Scoring in the Speaking Test

Overall impression

All four tasks (interview picture story, transactional dialogues and


discussion) are marked together,

r The interlocutor/examiner awards

Good ability to maintain accurate, fluent and natural conversation.


Suitable range of grammar, lexis and cohesive devices to complete tasks.
Some ability with complex language,
Pronunciation is natural With appropriate intonation, thou9h
occasionally problematic.

5 points for overall impression

(see the table on the right).

r The assessor (the person who is NOT asking the questions) gives
a maximum of 20 points in total (4x5 points, focusing on the four
sets of criteria below),

Range and Accuracy (5 points) - is the candidate using grammal


vocabulary and other language appropriate for the level? And to
What extent is the candidate getting it right?
Ftuency and Coherence (5 points) - is the candidate
without stopping and starting? ls s/he making sense?

Smooth use of language. Occasional small difficulties or gaps that do not


severely impede understanding.
A number of errors, including slips in simple sentences.
Pronunciation may place some small strain on the listener.
Conversation is maintained in a generally natural and appropriate

speaking i

Pronunciation (5 point) - can we understand the words? Does it,


sound like English?
Communication Strategies (5 points) - is the candidate really
talking to the examiner and (in task 4) other candidate? E.9.
answering, asking, listening,

manner.

*F

Very hard to understand. Clearly siQnificantly below level criteria,

Rang and AcCuracy

Wide range of grammar,


lexis and cohesive devices
used to complete the task5,
circumlocution only occasionally
neces5ary.

Comfortable with more complex


structures and lexis although

Noticeable hesitation. Jumpiness. lnsufficient 9rammar, lexis and


cohesive devices to do the.tasks.
Frequent errors in simple sentences.
Avoidance of comolex structures or lexis.
'
Signifi cant pronunciation d'rffi culties.

F!uency and Coherence

pronunciation

Maintains a smooth flow of


language with hesitation mainly
to formulate ideas, not language.
Links ideas into c|ear coherent
discourse with little or no
jumpiness even in extended
contributions.

Although there may still be


an evident forei9n accent,
pronunciation is natural and
places little strain on the listener,
The candidate often utilises
features of connected speech
and English intonation patterns.

some hesitation while


formulating lan9uage, but can
effectively maintain floW of
speech.
can link ideas into clear, coherent
discourse although with
noticeable jumpiness especially
in extended contributions.

Pronunciation lstlearly
intelligible in spite of evident
foreign accent and occasional
mispronunciations putting 5ome

Frequent hesitation and inability

Mispronunciations and
inability to produce certain
sounds frequently impedes
communication of the message.

Communication Strategies
lnitiates maintains and ends
tu rns.

Uses repair strategies


(clarifi cation, circumlocution)
where necessary.
Uses appropriate register and

intonation.

errors still occur.

4
Sufficient range of gramma1
lexis and cohdsive devices to
adequately complete the tasks
although circumlocution may be
3

necessary,
Few errors in simple sentences.
Errors when attemptin9
more complex structures and
lexis do not generally hinder

strain on the listener.

lnitiates maintains and ends turns


satisfactorily although not always
smoothly,
Evidence of ability to use
repair strategies (clarifi cation,
circumlocution) although not
always applied.
Uses appropriate register.

communication.
2

Range of grammar, lexis and


cohesive devices insufficient to
adequately complete the tasks.
Repeated errors even in simple
sentences.

_9

Generally, fails to initiate maintain


and end turns satisfactorily.
Does not use repair strategies
(clarifi cation, circumlocution).
Uses inappropriate register.

lnsuffr cient language for asses5ment

to link ideas coherently causes


great strain on the listener.

circumlocution

You don't know a word so you talk around it, e.g. bird that thing that flies

coherent discourse

What you are saying is logical and makes sense

cohesive devices

Words like and, but however, also, first of all which tie your sentences together and make it easy to understand

connected speech

When words are said together in 5entences they change, E,g. Fish and Chips sounds like fi-shan-chips

intonation patterns

This is 'music' of the language. Yes/no questions for example go up at the end, e.9. Are you ill?

reg

ister

turns

Different groups of people use different types of language. The register of lawyers is different from pop group singers.

When people talk together they take turns

(e.9.

taking your turn or 9ivin9

a turn to

other people),

Level 82

,E

l2,a

*_ - Student'S,Book

'#*
- t5.

=4&'?l*,l

*-,Eurocity 2.0
.

tells you all about the five tests in the 82 Euroexam


has 24lessons, sufficient for 50 teaching hours
o includes 24 exam tasks
o takes you step by step through what you need to do in the Writing Test
o offers plenty of language practice
o gives you tips and strategies for success in the exam
o is ideal for the classroom, small groups and self-study

Free online access to the audio material for Euroc


Free online audio and video practice activities

iIy

2.0

Get better at commnication in real everyday English and take the 82 exam fully
prepared.

www.euroexam.org

c2

Mastery

C1

Operational Proficiency

Euro C1

82

Vantage

Euro 82

B1

Threshold

Euro 81

A2

Waystage

Euro A2

A1

Breakthrough

@ Euro Examination Centre


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