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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Preface
Optimal management of water resources is the necessity of time in the wake of development and
growing need of population of India. The National Water Policy of India (2002) recognizes that
development and management of water resources need to be governed by national perspectives in
order to develop and conserve the scarce water resources in an integrated and environmentally
sound basis. The policy emphasizes the need for effective management of water resources by
intensifying research efforts in use of remote sensing technology and developing an information
system. In this reference a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed on December 3, 2008
between the Central Water Commission (CWC) and National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC), Indian
Space Research Organisation (ISRO) to execute the project Generation of Database and
Implementation of Web enabled Water resources Information System in the Country short named
as India-WRIS WebGIS.
India-WRIS WebGIS has been developed and is in public domain since December 2010 (www.indiawris.nrsc.gov.in). It provides a Single Window solution for all water resources data and information
in a standardized national GIS framework and allow users to search, access, visualize, understand
and analyze comprehensive and contextual water resources data and information for planning,
development and Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM).
Basin is recognized as the ideal and practical unit of water resources management because it allows
the holistic understanding of upstream-downstream hydrological interactions and solutions for
management for all competing sectors of water demand. The practice of basin planning has
developed due to the changing demands on river systems and the changing conditions of rivers by
human interventions. The multiple uses of water and varying demands on a river basin require an
integrated approach to managing river basin.
Basin wise report generation is one the important deliverables of India-WRIS project. Report of Area
of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan Basin describes systematically the present status of water resources:
major water resources projects, hydro-meteorological observations, surface and ground water
development scenario, topographic characteristics, climatic variability, land use / land cover pattern
& allied natural resources along with socio-economic profile of the basin. The report contains
valuable latest information of the basin on all aspects of water resources and allied sectors and will
be useful as baseline information for the irrigation officials, hydrologists, agriculturalists,
conservationists, research organizations and all those involved in the development of Area of Inland
Drainage in Rajasthan Basin.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Acknowledgment
The Inland Drainage in Rajasthan Basin report is an outcome of the project Generation of Database
and Implementation of Web enabled Water resources Information System in the Country short
named as India-WRIS WebGIS jointly executed by the Central Water Commission (CWC) and
National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC), Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). This
comprehensive publication gives the present status of water resources assets, topographic features,
climatic variability, land use / land cover pattern & allied natural resources along with socioeconomic information of the basin.
We, on behalf of the authors and India-WRIS project team acknowledge; Shri Alok Rawat, Secretary,
Ministry of Water Resources; Mrs. Sudha Midha, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Water
Resources; Er. A. B. Pandya, Chairman, Central Water Commission; Dr. K. Radhakrishnan, Chairman,
Indian Space Research Organization and Secretary, Department of Space; Shri Sudarsanam
Srinivasan, Secretary to GOI and Member- Finance, Department of Space; Shri A. Vijay Anand,
Additional Secretary, Department of Space; Dr. V. Koteswara Rao, Scientific Secretary, ISRO; Dr. V.
Jayaraman, Ex-Director, NRSC for constant encouragement and guidance, technical discussions and
for evincing keen interest in India-WRIS project and this report.
Our foremost acknowledgement is towards India-WRIS project team who created and
organized large number of data sets and information in GIS format as seamless layers and attribute
data for the entire country which served as base for this report. Thanks are also due to all CWC and
NRSC / ISRO officials who carried out the quality assurance and shown their enthusiastic
involvement. Finally, our sincere thanks are to all divisions and officials of NRSC and CWC for their
valuable support during the preparation of this report.
The basin report includes the results generated through interpretation of latest satellite imageries as
well as compilation of huge information from voluminous records. This would not have been
possible without the countrywide support. We would like to thank all the organizations, institutes
and individuals who contributed either directly or indirectly in bringing out this publication.

Dr. J R Sharma
Project Director, India-WRIS &
Chief General Manager, RCs/ NRSC/ ISRO, New Delhi
Er. Yogesh Paithankar
Project In-charge, India-WRIS &
Director, CWC, New Delhi

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Executive Summary
India is endowed with rich water resources. Rapidly increasing population, rising standards of living
and exponential growth of industrialization and urbanisation have exposed the water resources. In
order to utilise the water efficiently the common people should know about the availability of the
current water resources present in the country.
For effective utilisation and management of water resources this report has been generated for Area
of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin to provide an overview on the water statistics and its critical
parameters. Area of inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin shows variations in climate, land use,
cropping pattern and in availability of water resources. The basin extends over states of Haryana and
Rajasthan. It lies between 6913 to 7715 east longitudes and 2531 to 2944 north latitudes. The
basin spreads over 16 parliamentary constituencies (2009), comprising 7 of Haryana and 9 of
Rajasthan with the total population of 16929250.The terrain of the basin is flat. The climate of the
basin is characterized by extremely high temperature range and aridity. The major part of the basin
receives an average annual rainfall of over 288.94 mm. The average annual maximum temperature
of the basin is 40 C while the average annual minimum is 6 C. The rivers of basin include few rivers
namely, Ghugri, Sukhri, Kantu and Dohan river in western Rajasthan. Most of them are ephemeral in
nature. The basin consists mainly of grey brown, desert, alluvial and sandy soil. Due to less amount
of rainfall in the basin, 90 percent of the area experiences moderate soil erosion and has very low
soil productivity. The major part of the basin is covered with agriculture accounting to 64.15 percent
of the area. Out of the total basin area 30.63 percent is wasteland with majority part of Jaisalmer
area covered with sandy and scrub land. Lakes/Ponds are most predominant followed by tanks and
very less reservoirs. The basin has been divided into three agro-climatic zones namely Western Dry
region, Trans-Gangetic Plains region and Central Plateau and Hills region. The basin comprises of two
agro-ecological zones: Hot arid ecoregion with desert and saline Soil zone and Hot semi-arid
ecoregion with alluvium-derived soils zone.
Due to very flat terrain and non-existence of permanent drainage network, it is not possible to subdivide this basin into small hydrological units. There are a total of 11047 surface water bodies and it
has 13 irrigation projects. The basin has about 724 ground water observation wells. The basin has
shown a varied pattern in the water level fluctuation due to recharge by both rise and fall in the
level, in general there is a fall of ground water level due to draft. The major lithology found in the
basin is type of sand, clay, Kankar Gravel and silt. The basin consists of 105 exploratory wells
locations for aquifer and litho logical studies.
There are 49 water resource assets in Basin. The basin has 48 lifts and 1 dam. There is lack of
reservoirs and major medium irrigation projects. There are724 ground water observation wells lying
in the basin. IMD has established 48 meteorological stations in the basin which are providing basic
meteorological parameters with temporal data of some stations. Ground water quality of basin is
affected by chloride, nitrate, Salinity, Fluorine and iron. There are two important inter-basin transfer
links in the basin and the basin has 15 major water tourism sites.

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Table of Contents
Preface ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- i
Acknowledgment ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ii
Executive Summary -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- iii
1. Introduction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1
1.1.Overview of basin -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1
1.2.Topography ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5
1.3.Climate ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7
1.3.1.Rainfall ........................................................................................................................ 7
1.3.2.Temperature ................................................................................................................ 9

1.4.Major rivers --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10


1.5.Land use/land cover ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10
1.6.Soils ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 12
1.7.Agro-climatic zones ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 17
1.8.Agro-Ecological zones -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 19
1.9.Demography -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
2. Hydrological units ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 23
3. Surface water resources ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 24
3.1.Surface waterbodies ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 24
3.2.Water resource projects ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 25
3.2.1 Major and medium irrigation projects......................................................................... 25
3.2.2 Dams, Barrages/Weirs/Anicuts -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 25
3.2.3 Command area and canal network.............................................................................. 27
3.2.4 Multipurpose Projects ................................................................................................ 27
3.2.5 Interstate Projects-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------27

4. Ground water resources---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 29


4.1 Ground water observation wells ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 29
4.2 Ground water level fluctuation -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 31
4.3 Litholog well locations ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 34

5. Hydro-met observations --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 36


5.1 Meteorological stations------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 36
6. Water quality------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 37
6.1 Ground water quality observations--------------------------------------------------------------- 37
7. Inter-basin transfer links --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 39
8. Water Tourism Sites --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41
9. Conclusion --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 43
Annexure I: State, district and parliamentary constituency in the basin ----------------------- 44
Annexure II: Climate Temperature (1969-2004) profile in the basin --------------------------- 46
Annexure III: Inventory of surface water resources -------------------------------------------------- 46
Annexure IV: Inventory of litholog well locations ---------------------------------------------------- 50
Annexure V: Inventory of Water Tourism Sites-------------------------------------------------------- 55
Acronyms -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 56
References ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 59
Authors ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 60
India WRIS Project Team -------------------------------------------------Error! Bookmark not defined.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

List of Tables
Table 1. Salient Features of the Basin------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table 2. Elevation Zones-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Table 3. Land use/Land Cover statistics(2005-2006) -----------------------------------------------------------------------

10

Table 4. Number and size of Waterbodies. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

24

Table 5. Number of water resource projects--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Table 6. Water Resource Assets--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

25
25

Table 7. Meteorological Stations-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

36

Table 8. Water tourism sites------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

41

List of Maps
Map 1. Index Map-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Map 2a. Satellite Imagery of Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan Basin-------------------------------------------

Map 2b. Basin- Drainage-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Map 3. Elevation Zones------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Map 4. Annual Average Rainfall-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Map 5. Land use/cover statistics (2005-2006) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

11

Map 6. Soil Texture------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

13

Map 7. Soil Erosion------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

14

Map 8. Soil Slope---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

15

Map 9. Soil productivity------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16

Map 10. Agro-climatic zones------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

18

Map 11. Agro-ecological zones---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

20

Map 12. Population Density------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

22

Map 13. Water resource assets of Basin---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

26

Map 14. Command Area and Canal Network--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

28

Map 15. Location of Ground water observation wells---------------------------------------------------------------------

30

Map 16. Ground water level fluctuation (Recharge) ----------------------------------------------------------------------

32

Map 17. Ground water level fluctuation (Draft) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

33

Map 18. Litholog well locations--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

35

Map 19. Inter-basin Transfer Links----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

40

Map 20. Water tourism sites-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

42

List of Figures
Figure 1. State wise drainage area of Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin--------------------------------

Figure 2. Monthly average temperature (1969-2004) ---------------------------------------------------------------------

Figure 3. Trend of monthly average rainfall----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

10

Figure 4 . Type and number of waterbodies---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

1. Introduction
1.1. Overview of basin
The basin extends over states of Haryana and Rajasthan and lies between 6913 to 7715 east
longitudes and 2531 to 2944 north latitudes. It is bounded by the Punjab plains on the north and
east, by Aravalli range on the south and by Thar Desert on the west. Total area of the basin is
approximately 1, 39,917.03 Sq.Km. Small rivers draining into the basin are the Kantu, the Kakni, the
Ghugri and the Sukri.The major part of the basin is covered with agricultural land accounting to
64.15 percent of the total area and 0.4 percent of the basin is covered by water bodies. The basin
spreads over 16 parliamentary constituencies (2009) comprising 7 of Haryana and 9 of Rajasthan.For
more details refer Annexure I A, B. The location of the basin is shown in Index map in Map 1. The
salient features of the basin are given in Table 1. The satellite imagery of IRS P6 AWiFS False Colour
Composite of the Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin is shown in Map 2a and the drainage
spread of the basin is shown in Map2b.
Table 1. Salient Features of the Basin

Salient Features of the Basin.


69 13' to 77 15' E
25 31' to 29 44' N
1,39,917.03 Sq. Km (GIS Calculated)
Rajasthan (87%), Haryana(13%)

Basin Extent

2
3

Area (Sq.km)
States in the basin

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Districts (Census 2011)


Parliamentary Constituencies (2009)
Average Annual Rainfall (mm)
Mean Maximum Temperature (o C)
Mean Minimum Temperature (o C)
Total Population
Number of villages
Highest Elevation (m)
Number of water resources structures

25
16
288.94
33.55
17.95
16315258
8492
965
Dams-1
Lifts-48

13

Number of Irrigation projects

Major-11
Medium-1
ERM-1

14

Number of Ground water observation wells

724

15
16

Number of Hydro-Observation Sites


Water tourism sites

48
15

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 1. Index Map


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 2a. Satellite Imagery of Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan Basin


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 2b. Basin- Drainage

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Rajasthan: 121425.6 Sq.km (87 %)


Haryana: 18491.44 Sq.km (13 %)

Figure 1. State wise drainage area of Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin

1.2. Topography
The Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan basin has flat terrain. The region slopes, generally from east
to west and north to south. The north-eastern part of the region has a general elevation of about
300 m, but towards the south it has about 150 m. The western half is covered with sand dunes and
small hillocks exposed in between. Some of the dunes are semi-stabilized. These are found in
isolation or in longitudinal down-ward continuation or occasionally side by side. The limestone and
sandstone rocks are exposed in tract of Jaisalmer-Barmer-Bikaner. Out of the total area, 45 percent
of the basin area falls in the elevation range of 200-300 m. The elevation variation of the basin is
given in Table 2 and Map 3.
Table 2. Elevation Zones

Sl. No. Elevation (m)

% of Total Area

10-50

0.06

50-100

4.85

100-200

30.52

200-300

45.49

300-400

16.16

400-500

2.43

500-750

0.45

750-1000

0.03

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 3. Elevation Zones


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

1.3. Climate
The climate of the basin is characterized by extremely high temperature range and aridity. It is one
of the hottest basins of India. The temperature begins to rise sharply everywhere from March,
reaches the maximum in May and June and remains quite high until October, then start falling. The
highest mean relative humidity is found in wet months of year from July to September. Dust storms
are common which suddenly brings down the temperature causing occasional showers. These
storms decrease in number and intensity eastwards. The rainfall is very low, highly erratic and
variable seasonally as well as yearly. Most of the rain occurs in the rainy months of July and August
in short and stormy showers with a relatively high intensity. In the basin four distinct seasons occur.
They are winter, summer, and monsoon and post monsoon. Winter seasons begin in November and
continuous till the end of February. January is generally the coldest month of the year. Clear bright
weather interspersed by brief spells of cloudy weather and accompanied by a little rain caused by
western disturbances traversing north India, is experienced during this part of the year. The winds
blow mainly from north to south. March onwards the hot weather sets in and continuous till June.
For more details refer Annexure II.

1.3.1. Rainfall
The major part of the basin receives an average annual rainfall of over 288.94 mm. The south-west
monsoon sets in by the middle of June and continuous to be active till September (92 percent of the
annual rainfall occurs during this period). Heavy rains occur in association with monsoon depressions
from the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea.
The southwest monsoon withdraws by about the middle of September and weather clears up.
Pleasant weather prevails till the end of December. Maximum rainfall is received in the districts like
Kaithal, Jind, Kurukshetra and Karnal. Spatial distribution of rainfall variation is shown in Map 4.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 4. Annual Average Rainfall


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

1.3.2. Temperature
The basin faces variability in temperature in different parts of the basin. Daily temperature
(maximum, minimum and mean) gridded data (1 x 1 ) for 35 years (1971-2004) collected from IMD
has been analyzed. Mean temperature is calculated as the average of maximum and minimum
temperature. The average annual maximum temperature of the basin is 40 C. while the average
annual minimum temperature is 6 C. The analysis of temperature is shown in Figure 2. Detailed
month wise temperature profile is given in Annexure II.

Figure 2. Monthly average temperature (1969-2004)

The highest rainfall of 778.92 mm was observed in 1975 and lowest rainfall of 150 mm was recorded
in 1987. The trend line shows that there is a considerable decrease in average annual rainfall. During
the monsoon months of June to September, the basin receives maximum of the annual
precipitation. The Figure 3 shows the trend of rainfall for the period 1971-2004.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Figure 3. Trend of monthly average rainfall

1.4.

Major rivers

The rivers of Inland Drainage Basin include few rivers namely; Ghugri, Sukhri, Kantu and Dohan river
in Western Rajasthan. These Rivers disappears in most part of the year due to scanty rainfall. Most
of them are ephemeral in nature.

1.5.

Land use/land cover

The basin holds a variety of land use/land cover classes. The major part of basin is covered with
agriculture accounting to 64.15 percent and wasteland constituting 30.63 percent of the total basin
area. The major part of Jaisalmer area is covered with sand and scrub land. The whole of this region
is largely sandy and at places bare are exposed. Vegetal cover is very thin and only a few small trees
can be observed here and there. Large area is covered with scrubs which are thorny and have
stunted growth. The distribution of land use / land cover in the basin during 2005-06 is given in Table
3 and Map 5.
Table 3. Land use/Land Cover statistics(2005-2006)

Sl.No.
1
2
3
4
5
6

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Category
Built Up Land
Agricultural
Forest
Grassland
Wasteland
Waterbodies

% of Total Area
1.25
64.15
1.17
2.40
30.63
0.40

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 5. Land use/cover statistics (2005-2006)

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

1.6.

Soils

Soil is composed of minerals, mixed with some organic matter, which differ from its parent
materials in terms of its texture, structure, consistency, color, chemical, biological and other
characteristics. Information on the soil profile is also required for simulating the hydrological
character of the basin.
The soils of Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin are generally characterized as sandy,
containing 90 to 95 percent sand and 5 to 7 percent clay. Desert soil extends considerable over the
districts of Ganganagar, Bikaner, Churu, Barmer, Jaisalmer, Jhunjhunu. This soil contains high
percentage of soluble salt and has high pH value. Alluvial soil is mainly concentrated in the southern
part of the Ganganagar; this soil is good for agriculture. Saline soils are found in the depression of
Barmer, Jaisalmer, and Bikaner. The basin consists mainly of grey brown, desert, alluvial and sandy
soil. Due to less amount of rainfall in the basin 90 percent of the area experiences moderate soil
erosion and has very low soil productivity.
Soil texture is determined by the relative proportion of clay, silt and sand particles. Coarse- textured
soils are sandy. Medium-textured soils contain mainly silt with smaller amounts of sand and clay.
Fine-textured soils have a high percentage of clay and less silt or sand. In Area of Inland Drainage
majority part of the soil has coarse texture. The type of soil texture in the basin is shown in Map 6.
Soil Erosion is the detachment and movement of soil from one place to another caused by water
and/or wind and it causes land degradation. The Area of Inland Drainage basin is facing moderate
soil erosion. Some parts of the basin are also prone to severe soil erosion due to dust storms. Soil
erosion and its affected area is shown in Map 7.
Soil slope is the number of feet of rise or fall in each 100 feet of land and it is one of the factors of
surface runoff. The basin has combination of very gentle and moderate slope. Type of soil slope and
its area is shown in Map 8.
Soil productivity is referred to the ability of the soil to yield crops. The chief factors in soil
productivity are soil organic matter (including microbial biomass), soil texture, structure, depth,
nutrient content, water-storage capacity, reaction and absence of toxic elements. Most of the soil
faces soil erosion and become less productive. Due to soil erosion and lack of water availability its
soil productivity is moderate and gives moderate crop production. Soil productivity variation in the
basin is shown in Map 9.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 6. Soil Texture


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 7. Soil Erosion


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 8. Soil Slope

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 9. Soil productivity


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

1.7. Agro-climatic zones


An agro-climatic zone is a land unit uniform in respect of climate and length of growing period (LGP)
which is climatically suitable for a certain range of crops and cultivars(Source: FAO 1983). The
climatic conditions like rainfall, temperature, humidity, wind velocity and duration of sunshine etc.
of a region affect the agricultural cropping pattern. Annual rainfall and its distribution over the entire
year, and the regimes of diurnal and annual temperatures are the prominent factors affecting
agriculture and the life style of the people. Planning Commission of India (1989) made an attempt to
delineate the country into different agro climatic regions based on homogeneity in rainfall,
temperature, topography, cropping and farming systems and water resources. On the basis of
climatic conditions and agricultural produce, Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin has been
divided into three agro-climatic zones, each one having special characteristics of its own as shown in
Map 10. The main characteristics of the agro-climatic zones of the basin are describes below:
1. The Western Dry region: A major part (87 %) of the basin falls in this region, complete Rajasthan
part is falling in this region, and Fatehbad district of Haryana and is characterized by arid
conditions with hot climate, erratic rainfall, high evaporation, scanty vegetation and fragile ecosystem. The ground water is deep and often brackish. Famine and drought are common features
of the region. The region mainly has coarse cereals based cropping systems with poultry farming
and cattle, goat, sheep, camel are reared as primary means of livelihood.
2. The Trans-Gangetic Plains region: This region holds 12 percent of the total basin area and
consists of parts Hanumangarh district of Rajasthan and Kaithal, Jind, Hisar, Bhiwani, Karnal,
Rohtak parts of Haryana. The region is rich water & soil resources and has comparatively high
land productivity level with delicate water balance in the region as exploitation of groundwater
has already surpassed hundred per cent of utilizable balance. The region has both rice and
wheat based cropping system with Poultry farming and buffalo and cattle are reared.
3. Central Plateau and Hills region: The very little part (1 percent of total basin area) of the basin is
covered by this region. The basin comprises of only 3 districts of Haryana namely Mahendragarh,
Rewari, and part of Sikar district of Rajasthan. The topography is highly variable nearly 1/3rd of
the land is not available for cultivation and Irrigation and cropping intensity are comparatively
low where 75 percent of the area is rainfed grown with low value cereal crops. A Large volume
of land and water resources exists in this region with very low productivity with predominance
of subsistence agriculture and excessive runoff. The potential of horticulture and livestock are
under-utilized. The region mainly has coarse cereals based cropping systems with poultry
farming as primary means of livelihood.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 10. Agro-climatic zones

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

1.8. Agro-Ecological zones


Agriculture is highly dependent on soils and climate. The ever-increasing need for food to support
the growing population in the country demands a systematic appraisal of its soil and climate
resources in order to prepare effective land-use plans. India has a variety of landscapes and climate
conditions and this is reflected in the development of different soils and types of vegetation. Based
on climate data and an up-to-date soil database, the country has been divided into 20 agroecological zones. Each agro-ecological zone is uniform in terms of physiography, climate, length of
growing period and soil type for macro level land-use planning. Out of twenty agro-ecological zones,
the Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin comprises of 2 agro-ecological zones as depicted in
Map 11. The main contributing agro-ecological zones of the basin are described below:
Hot arid ecoregion with desert and saline Soil zone: This zone cover about 95 percent of the total
basin area of the basin. The western Plain, hot and arid agro-ecoregion, covers south western parts
western Rajasthan and Haryana. The region is characterized by typical hot summer and cool winter
(arid). The annual precipitation is less than 300 mm and the mean annual Potential
Evapotranspiration (PET) is ranges between 15002000 mm.The ecosystems represent aridic soil
moisture and hyperthermic soil temperature regimes with an annual LGP of less than 90 days. The
area is under rainfed Mono-cropping (traditional) agriculture. The natural vegetation comprises
sparse, sporadic tropical thorn forest. The resistant and short duration rainy season crops, such as
pearl millet, chari (fodder), and pulses are grown in non-saline areas. In areas favored by availability
of irrigation water, cotton, sugarcane, mustard, gram and wheat are grown.
Hot semi-arid ecoregion with alluvium-derived soils zone: Small part (5 percent of total basin area)
of the Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan basin is covered by this zone. It constitutes the parts of
Haryana. The climate of the region is characterized by hot and dry summer and cool winter. The
annual precipitation ranges from 500 to 1000 mm with an increasing trend from west to east and
the mean annual Potential Evapotranspiration (PET) ranges from 1400-1900 mm. The length of
growing period ranges between 90 and 150 days. The soil moisture regime is typic-ustic and the soil
temperature regime is hyperthermic. The natural vegetation comprises tropical dry deciduous and
thorn forests. The region is under irrigated agriculture as well as traditional rainfed agriculture. The
area is intensively cultivated for both kharif and rabi crops, such as rice, millets, maize, pulses,
berseem, wheat, mustard and sugarcane.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 11. Agro-ecological zones


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

1.9. Demography
The basin spreads over 16 parliamentary constituencies (2009) comprising 7 of Haryana and
9 of Rajasthan. The total number of villages falling in the basin is 8492 with 2698203households.
The total population in this basin is 16929250.Population density of the basin is low due to desertic
conditions. People used to live in highly scattered manner and clustered around water points. Map
12 reveals that the population of the basin is largely clustered in the eastern and northern parts. The
density of population shows a sharp decrease westwards. Pattern of population distribution reflects
the habitability conditions closely related to availability of water. Even rainfall affects the density of
population, because it spells out the prospects for cultivation of crops or herding of cattle, the
mainstay of livelihood in the basin. It is further illustrated by the comparatively high density of
population in the parts of Jodhpur, Nagaur, Ganganagar districts of Rajasthan and Karnal, Rohtak,
Kaithal district of Haryana in where irrigation water has mitigated the hardship caused by lower
amount of rainfall and had led to greater concentration of population. According to the Census Data
2001 northern part of the basin and Haryana part of the basin have more population density as
compared to the other part of basin.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 12. Population Density


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22

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

2. Hydrological units
Knowledge of terrain as well as DEM is essential for accurate demarcation of boundary.Semiautomated approach has been adopted for delineation of hydrological units. SRTM DEM, topo maps
on 1:50000 scale, IRS P6 LISS IV & CARTOSAT merged data, drainage network, surface water bodies,
rail/road network and other ancillary data has been used for this purpose. Drainage divides from
contour/ridge lines are used to demarcate the boundary of hydrological units. The divide has been
marked where flow is in opposite directions. Hydrological boundary has been validated with
reference to contours and drainage network. Hydrological unit boundary cuts perpendicular to the
contour lines but it does not cross the drainage line at any location except its outlet. This approach is
potentially more objective, repeatable, cost-effective, and consistent than previously adopted
manual delineation methods.
Due to very flat terrain and non-existence of permanent drainage network, it is not possible to subdivide this basin into small hydrological units.

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23

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

3. Surface water resources


Surface water is water in a river, lake or fresh water wetland. Surface water is naturally replenished
by precipitation and naturally lost through discharge to the oceans, evaporation, evapotranspiration
and sub-surface seepage. Although the only natural input to any surface water system is
precipitation within its watershed, the total quantity of water in that system at any given time is also
dependent factors like storage capacity in lakes, wetlands and artificial reservoirs, the permeability
of the soil beneath these storage bodies, the runoff characteristics of the land in the watershed, the
timing of the precipitation and local evaporation rates.

3.1 Surface waterbodies


Surface water bodies have traditionally played an important role in the lives of common people in
India by way of irrigation, drinking water supply; ecology, tourism and domestic uses. There are total
11047 surface water bodies. Lakes/Ponds are the most predominant with 8315 in number and forms
about 75.27 percent of the total surface water bodies in the basin. Other class of water bodies
includes tanks and reservoirs. Most of the water bodies have a size range of 0-25 ha. The size range
of the Waterbodies falling in the basin is given in Table 4.Type of waterbodies and their percentage
in the basin is shown through column chart in Figure 4.
Table 4. Number and size of Waterbodies.

Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6

Size Range (ha)


0 - 25
25 - 50
50 - 100
100 - 250
250 - 500
500 - 1000

9000

No. of Waterbodies
11015
19
5
4
2
2

8315

Number of Waterbodies

8000
7000
6000
5000
4000
2729

3000
2000
1000

3
0
Lakes/Pond

Tanks

Reservoirs

Type of Waterbodies
Figure 4 . Type and number of waterbodies

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

3.2. Water resource projects


Water resources projects are planned for various purposes like irrigation, hydro-power generation,
water supply for drinking and industrial purpose, flood control navigation etc. The basin has major
and medium irrigation projects, ERM projects and lift irrigation projects. Details of all type of
projects are given in Annexure III B, C, D.

3.2.1 Major and medium irrigation projects


The basin has 13 irrigation projects (Table 5). Some of the major irrigation projects are IGNP Stage II (Rajasthan Canal Stage - II) , IGNP Stage - I, Western Yamuna Canal, Bhakra Canal/ Bhakra Nangal,
Sidhmukh Major Irrigation Project, Rewari Stage - I, Nohar Major Irrigation Project, Jui Lift Irrigation
Project and Raipur Patan.
Table 5. Number of water resource projects

Sl. No.

Type of Projects

Number of Projects

Major Irrigation Projects

11

Medium Irrigation Projects

ERM Projects

The basin has total 48 lift irrigation projects. Some major lift irrigation projects are Jawarhar Lal
Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme, Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - I, Rewari Lift Irrigation Scheme Stage
I, Sewani Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph I, Jui Lift Irrigation Scheme etc. There is one ongoing ERM
project in the basin, IGNP Stage-I used for irrigation in the districts named Ganganagar, Bikaner,
Hanumangarh. There are no Power house and HE Projects present in the basin. Location of lift
irrigation schemes are shown in Map 13.

3.2.2 Dams, Barrages/Weirs/Anicuts


Water resources structures are manmade structures to store the water for hydropower, irrigation,
drinking water supply etc. There are 49 water resource assets in the Basin. The basin is rich in
number of Lifts. Basin has only Raipur Patan dam which is an earthen dam (used for irrigation
purpose).Its live storage capacity is 8.32 MCM. The list of water resource assets of the basin is given
in Table 6.For more details refer Annexure III A.
Table 6. Water Resource Assets

Sl. No.

Water Resource Assets

Numbers of Water Resource Assets

No. of Dams

No. of Lifts

48

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 13. Water resource assets of Basin


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

3.2.3 Command area and canal network


Canals are man-made channels for conveyance of water. When the water is to be transported across
landscape to deliver the water to the respective command areas by canal network, construction of
various irrigation structures are necessary to negotiate terrain including drains, road, rail lines.
Important Irrigation structures are Regulators, Bridge, Aqueduct / Syphon Aqueduct, Super passage /
Syphon, Level crossing / Inlets and Outlets, and other Cross drainage Structures. Distributary head
regulator: this controls the supply to an off taking channel from the parent channel.
The Area of Inland drainage constituteshas few canal network systems. Some of the main canals are
B.N.ChakravartiCanal, Indira Gandhi Nahar, JuiCanal, LoharuCanal, MahendergarhCanal, Rajasthan
Canal, SatlujYamuna Link Canal and Western Yamuna Main Canal. Spatial distribution of command
area is shown in Map 14.
A study was carried out jointly by CWC & ISRO to assess the existing status of the irrigation
commands. IRS P4 LISS III data of two different seasons namely, pre monsoon (2005) and post
monsoon (2004) were used for delineation of waterlogged and salt affected areas of major and
medium irrigation commands of Area of Inland Drainage basin. Total waterlogged area within
these occupies 2,746.02 ha whereas salt affected area has been extended to 6,935.21 ha.

3.2.4 Multipurpose Projects


There are two multipurpose projects in the Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan Basin. Yamuna
Canal multipurpose project has an associated project Western Yamuna Canal Major Irrigation
Project. Another is Bhakra multipurpose project serving the purpose of irrigation and its associated
projects are Bhakra Canal/ Bhakra Nangal Major Irrigation Project_Rajasthan , Nohar Major Irrigation
Project, Sidhmukh Major Irrigation Project, Loharu Lift Irrigation Project.

3.2.5 Interstate Projects


Bhakra Nangal Interstate Project is one interstate project the Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan
Basin. The project is shared between Haryana and Rajasthan. They shares the cost and benefits of
the project.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 14. Command Area and Canal Network


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

4. Ground water resources


Ground water is an essential and vital component of our life support system.Sub-surface water, or
groundwater, fresh water located in the pore space of soil and rocks. It is also water that is flowing
within aquifers below the water table. Behaviour of ground water in the Indian sub-continent is
highly complicated due to the occurrence of diversified geological formations with considerable
lithological and chronological variations, complex tectonic framework, climatological dissimilarities
and various hydro chemical conditions. The ground water resources are being utilized for drinking,
irrigation and industrial purposes. The important attributes of ground water regime monitoring are
ground water level and its fluctuation due to draft and recharge and wells lithology. The ground
water monitoring network stations records the response of ground water regime to the natural and
anthropogenic stresses of recharge and discharge parameters with reference to geology, climate,
physiography, land use pattern and hydrologic characteristics. The natural conditions affecting the
regime involve climatic parameters like rainfall, evapotranspiration etc., whereas anthropogenic
influences include pumpage from the aquifer, recharge due to irrigation systems and other practices
like waste disposal etc.

4.1 Ground water observation wells


The basin has about 724 ground water observation wells. Mostly the upper portion has majority of
ground water observation wells. Four seasonal water level data viz., pre-monsoon, monsoon, postmonsoon and post-monsoon (rabi) are observed. Districts like Jaisalmer, parts of Jodhpur and
Barmer have saline tracts and are generally not suitable for irrigation by ground water except in few
localities. The spatial distribution of the ground water observation wells in basin is shown in Map 15.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 12. Location of Ground water observation wells


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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

4.2 Ground water level fluctuation


The occurrence of ground water generally depends upon the rainfall, drainage, topography and the
geological conditions of the area. Groundwater recharge is estimated bythe difference between pre
and post monsoon seasons. Similarly, groundwater draft is estimated by the difference between
post-monsoon and post-monsoon (rabi) seasons data. There are 231 CGWB sites in the basin that
has pre and post monsoon data. The pre monsoon data indicates that in major depth of water level
generally ranges from 10-40 m bgl. Based on pre and post monsoon data two interpolated maps, the
ground water level fluctuation maps (recharge)-2011 and ground water level fluctuation maps
(draft)-2011 are generated using inverse distance weighted interpolation technique.
The ground water level fluctuation maps (Due to recharge)-2011 shown in Map 16.The basin has
shown a varied pattern in the water level fluctuation due to recharge by both rise and fall in the
level. In general there is a rise of ground water recharge in the basin.In 2011, analysis of Water level
fluctuation due to recharge shows that in general there is rise in water level in entire basin. Parts of
the Jaisalmer, Jodhpur, Nagaur are showing rise in ground water level more than 4 m. Less than 2 m
fall was observed in Barmer and Bikaner districts. The severe fall greater than 4m was observed in
Churu and Bikaner district. In Chandigarh there is fall less than 2m in ground water level is observed.
The ground water level fluctuation maps (Due to draft)-2011 shown in Map 17, in general there is a
fall of ground water level due to draft in the basin other than few parts of Barmer and Churu
district. Parts of Nagaur and Jaisalmer district have shown severe fall of greater than 4m in ground
water level. In the Barmer and Churu district there is a rise of greater than 4m in ground water level
has been observed.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 13. Ground water level fluctuation (Recharge)

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32

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 14. Ground water level fluctuation (Draft)


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33

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

4.3 Litholog well locations


An aquifer is an underground layer of water-bearing permeable rock or unconsolidated materials
(gravel, sand, or silt) from which groundwater can be extracted using a water well. Related terms
include aquitard, which is a bed of low permeability along an aquifer and aquiclude (or aquifuge),
which is a solid, impermeable area underlying or overlying an aquifer. If the impermeable area
overlies the aquifer pressure could cause it to become a confined aquifer. Aquifers may occur at
various depths. Those closer to the surface are not only more likely to be used for water supply and
irrigation, but are also more likely to be topped up by the local rainfall. Many desert areas have
limestone hills or mountains within them or close to them that can be exploited as groundwater
resources.
The major lithology found in the basin is type of sand, clay, Kankar Gravel and silt. The basin consists
of 105 exploratory wells locations for aquifer and litho logical studies. Haryana has maximum
number of litholog observatory wells. Static water level varies form 1.49-47m. The drilling depth
ranges between 7-573 m in the basin. Spatial distribution of wells is shown in Map 18. The details of
observation location and the lithogy in the Basin is described in Annexure IV.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 18.Litholog well locations

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35

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

5. Hydro-met observations
This section describes the Hydrological and meteorological characteristics of the Area of Inland
Drainage basin. The hydrological and meteorological parameters of three main organizations,
Central Water Commission (CWC), India Meteorological Department (IMD) and ISRO (Automatic
Weather Stations) are incorporated in India-WRIS database. CWC has contributed substantially in
the collection of hydrological data all over the country. India Meteorological Department (IMD)
divides the country into various meteorological sub divisions and has 1025 stations all over India
having data of monthly average precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, average annual
rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for last 10 years. In India-WRIS distribution of Automatic
Weather Stations (AWS) maintained by ISRO are also included. So far there is no Hydro Observation
site in the basin.

5.1 Meteorological stations


There are 3 main organizations in our country which records meteorological parameters viz., India
Meteorological Department (IMD), Central Water Commission (CWC) and ISRO (Automatic Weather
Stations). There are 48 IMD stations in the basin having data of monthly average precipitation and
potential evapotranspiration, average annual rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for last 10
years. Some of their stations are also providing information about weekly data of rainfall, maximum
and minimum temperature, wind speed, evaporation and sunshine hours. List of organisation and
their station in the basin are given in Table 7.
Table 5. Meteorological Stations

Sl. No.
1
2
3

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Organisation
CWC Observation Stations
IMD Stations
ISRO AWS Stations

Number of Stations
0
48
0

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

6. Water quality
The observation of water quality is categorized in two sections, the surface water quality and ground
water quality. Surface water quality is measured by Central Water Commission, Central Pollution
Control Board whereas the ground water quality is measured by Central Ground Water Board,
Central Pollution Control Board and other state departments. There is no surface water quality
observation sites present in the basin. The details of ground water quality of the basin are given
below.

6.1 Ground water quality observations


Ground water quality is influenced by contribution from the atmosphere and surface water bodies.
The natural chemical composition of ground water is influenced predominantly by type & depth of
soils and subsurface geological formations through which ground water passes. Due to rapid growth
of population, urbanization, industrialization and agriculture activities, ground water resources are
under stress. There is growing concern on the deterioration of ground water quality due to geogenic
and anthropogenic activities. Overexploitation of ground water increases the salinity of ground
water and excessive use of fertilizers and pesticides in agriculture and improper disposal of
urban/industrial waste can cause contamination of ground water resources.
The groundwater quality is monitored by the Central Ground Water Board once a year (April/May)
through a network of observation wells located all over the country. The hot spots for groundwater
in districts coming under basin states are identified on the basis of six main parameters: salinity
(EC>3000 micro simen/cm), chloride, fluoride (>1.5 mg/l), iron (>1.0 mg/l), arsenic (>0.05 mg/l) and
nitrate (>45 mg/l).There are 173 ground water quality observation wells which provide the water
quality data.
Salinity/Electrical conductance (EC) is the saltiness or dissolved salt contents of a water body. Salt
content is an important factor in water use. Salinity always exists in ground water but in variable
amounts. It is mostly influenced by aquifer material, solubility of minerals, duration of contact and
factors such as the permeability of soil, drainage facilities, quantity of rainfall and above all, the
climate of the area. In the basin relatively high values of EC exceeding the permissible limit of 3000
S/cm are observed in many parts. These areas are water quality hot spots from salinity point of
view, some of the districts are Barmer, Bikaner, Churu, Ganganagar, Hanumangarh, Jaisalmer,
Jodhpur, Nagaur and Neemuch, Bhiwani, Hissar, Kaithal, Mahendragarh, Panipat and Rohtak.
Chloride is present in all natural waters, mostly at low concentrations. It is highly soluble in water
and moves freely with water through soil and rock. Recommended desirable limit of chloride in
drinking water is 250 mg /l; this concentration limit can be extended to 1000 mg/l of chloride.
However ground water having concentration of chloride more than 1000 mg /l are not suitable for
drinking purposes. Relatively high values of Chloride (>1000 mg/litre) are observed in few parts of
the basin. Barmer, Bikaner, Churu, Ganganagar, Hanumangarh, Jhunjhununn, Jaisalmer, Nagaur,
Bhiwani, Jhajjar, Mahendragarh are the districts affected by high chloride water (>1000 mg/litre) and
these areas are water quality hot spots from point of view of chloride.
Fluorine is a fairly common element but it does not occur in the elemental state in nature because of
its high reactivity. Fluorine is the most electronegative and reactive of all elements that occur
naturally within many type of rock. The desirable limit fluoride in drinking water ranges from 1.01.5mg/l and more than 1.5 mg/l are not suitable for drinking purposes. Some of the districts like

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37

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Hissar, Jhajjar, Jind, Kaithal, Barmer, Bikaner, Churu, Jaisalmer, Jhunjhunun, Nagaur, Ganganagar,
Hanumangarh have Occurrence of Fluoride (>1.5mg/litre) in Ground Water.
Nitrate is a naturally occurring compound that is formed in the soil when nitrogen and oxygen
combine. The primary source of all nitrates is atmospheric nitrogen gas. Dissolved Nitrogen in the
form of Nitrate is the most common contaminant of ground water. The maximum desirable limit of
Nitrate concentration in ground water is 45 mg/l with no relaxation. Some of the districts of the
basin like Barmer, Bikaner, Churu, Jaisalmer, Jhunjhunun, Jodhpur, Nagaur, Ganganagar,
Hanumangarh, Hissar, Jhajjar, Jind, Kaithal, Karnal, Mahendragarh have Occurrence of Nitrate ( >45
mg/litre) in Ground Water.
Iron is a common constituent in soil and ground water. It is present in water either as soluble
ferrousiron or the insoluble ferric iron. The permissible Iron concentration in ground water is less
than 1.0 mg/litre. It is observed that high concentration of Iron (>1.0 mg/l) in ground waterhas been
found in the districts of Bikaner, Churu, Jaisalmer, Nagaur, Ganganagar, Hanumangarh, Bhiwani,
Hissar, Jhajjar, Jind, Kaithal, Karnal.

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38

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

7. Inter-basin transfer links


India has substantial water resources potential but its availability in various parts of the country is
highly uneven. Inter-basin transfer link proposes river water transfer from the region of surplus to
deficit areas. This may provide an effective way to enhance irrigation potential, to mitigate floods
and droughts and reduce regional imbalance by way of additional irrigation, domestic and industrial
water supply, hydropower generation, navigational facilities etc.
There are two important inter-basin transfer links in the basin. The inter-basin transfer links of the
basin are shown in Map 19.These falls under Himalayan component and most of its data is classified.
The name of the links is as follows:
1. Yamuna-Rajasthan Link: It will join Yamuna River to Sukri River in Rajasthan.
2.Rajasthan-Sabarmati Link: Itwill join SukriRiver in Rajasthan to Sabarmati River.

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Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 19. Inter-basin Transfer Links


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40

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

8. Water Tourism Sites


The basin has 15major water tourism sites. This includes diverse variety of tourist stations such as
wild life sanctuaries, national parks, fort and other major tourist locations. The spatial distribution of
tourist site is shown in Map 20.The list is given in Table 8. Details of the tourism sites of the basin are
given in Annexure V.
Table 6. Water tourism sites

Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Tourist Site Category


Lake
Step Well
Fort
Tourist Spot
Museums / Monument
Pilgrimage (Temple)
National Park
Wildlife Sanctuary

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No. of Places
3
1
2
2
1
1
2
3

41

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

Map 20. Water tourism sites


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42

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan

9. Conclusion
This report provides valuable information related to the topographic, demographic, climatic, surface and ground
water resources, hydro-meteorological and water quality scenario of the basin. Major issue of the basin is scarcity
of the natural resources and economic backwardness. Presently there are limited numbers of water resource
assets exist. However scope is there to increase the number of assets to store more volume of runoff water. The
area under agriculture is very low.
Systematic and scientific exploratory work is needed for quantitative and qualitative assessment of the ground
water resources available in the basin. These resources can be exploited in a rational way either independently or
in conjunction with surface water. It will also reflect the effect of the soil conservation work carried out in the
basin.

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Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

Annexure I: State, district and parliamentary constituency in the basin


A. District Details
Sl.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

State Name

District (2011)

Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan

Jind
Sonipat
Rohtak
Rewari
Panipat
Mahendragarh
Kurukshetra
Karnal
Kaithal
Jhajjar
Hisar
Fatehabad
Bhiwani
Nagaur
Jaisalmer
Jaipur
Hanumangarh
Alwar
Jodhpur
Churu
Bikaner
Sikar
Barmer
Jhunjhunun
Ganganagar

Population
Total Area (Sq.
District Area in Basin (Sq.
% of District Area in the
(2011)
Km)
Km)
Basin
1,334,152
2628.12
2486.94
94.63
1,450,001
2091.23
41.22
1.97
1,061,204
1655.74
763.76
46.13
900,332
1442.66
365.93
25.36
1,205,437
1189.68
23.68
1.99
922,088
1865.28
1820.81
97.62
964,655
1639.64
309.80
18.89
1,505,324
2474.19
1391.68
56.25
1,074,304
2210.26
1716.53
77.66
958,405
1882.99
758.11
40.26
1,743,931
4002.48
3941.03
98.46
942,011
2404.23
376.26
15.65
1,634,445
4479.54
4479.54
100
3,307,743
17026.59
9497.05
55.78
669,919
37070.06
35048.68
94.55
6,626,178
10860.83
30.43
0.28
1,774,692
9630.09
4682.94
48.63
3,674,179
8018.80
366.97
4.58
3,687,165
22037.60
8713.58
39.54
2,039,547
13438.70
13438.70
100
2,363,937
29217.34
29217.34
100
2,677,333
7428.38
5553.43
74.76
2,603,751
27351.28
6577.40
24.05
2,137,045
5724.04
5724.04
100
1,969,168
10365.27
2575.05
24.84

Source: Survey of India and Census Data 2011 Note: Population is mentioned for complete district.

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Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

B. Parliamentary Constituency Details


Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

State Name
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Haryana
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan

Parliamentary Constituencies (2009)


Sirsa
Bhiwani - Mahendragarh
Rohtak
Krukshetra
Sonipat
Hisar
Karnal
Ganganagar
Rajsamand
Barmer
Nagaur
Sikar
Jodhpur
Alwar
Bikaner
Churu
Jhunjhunun

Total Area (Sq. Km)


6953.70
5536.13
4142.45
4331.65
3439.22
5733.64
3614.03
12855.74
11057.91
55061.83
13330.88
6801.56
24516.16
2651.88
31839.23
17929.74
6830.54

Area Falling in Basin (Sq. Km)


761.57
5491.66
1865.30
2042.54
1281.82
5629.97
1365.64
1890.07
330.50
34220.51
9193.24
4446.93
15948.91
366.97
30971.78
17025.48
6830.54

% Area in the Basin


10.95
99.20
45.03
47.15
37.27
98.19
37.79
14.70
2.99
62.15
68.96
65.38
65.05
13.84
97.28
94.96
100

Source: Election Commission of India

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Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

Annexure II: Climate Temperature (1969-2004) profile in the basin


Temperature profile in the basin (36 Years Average for the period 1969-2004)
Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Month
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Maximum Temperature (C)


22.61
27.34
31.24
37.18
40.19
39.47
35.36
34.1
34.69
34.43
29.8
24.81

Minimum Temperature (C)


6.86
11.82
14.9
20.73
24.83
26.62
26.53
26.08
24.18
19.36
12.43
7.87

Mean Temperature (C)


14.73
19.58
23.07
28.95
32.51
33.04
31.26
30.5
29.81
27.2
21.12
16.34

Annexure III: Inventory of surface water resources


A. List of Dams with surrogate information

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

46

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan


Sl.
No.

Name of
Dam

River

Raipur
Patan Dam

Type of
Dam

Year of
completion

Catchment
Area (Sq.
Km.)

Length of
dam (m)

Max height
above
foundation
(m)

Gross
storage
capacity
(MCM)

Live
storage
capacity
(MCM)
8.32

Earthen

Type of
spillway

Submerge
nce Area
(Th Ha)

Purpose

Irrigatio
n

B. Major/Medium irrigation projects with surrogate information


Sl.
No.
1

Name of Project

Type

River

Tributary

Status

GCA
(Th
ha)
1860

CCA
(Th
ha)
1410

Ultimate
Irrigation
Potential
964

District/s Benefitted

IGNP Stage - II (Rajasthan


Canal Stage - II) Major
Irrigation Project
IGNP Stage - I Major Irrigation
Project
Western Yamuna Canal Major
Irrigation Project

Major

RaviBeas

Ravi-Beas

Ongoing

Major

RaviBeas
Yamuna

Ravi-Beas

Completed

525

525

Yamuna

Completed

436

436

Major

Satluj

Completed

372.47

289

Hanumangarh, Sriganganagar

Major

Yamuna

Ongoing

249

154.64

Rohtak, Bhiwani, Mahendargarh

Ongoing
Completed 91.55

130.41
80

82
31.21

Yamuna
Yamuna

Completed
Completed

73.56
32.87

43
20

Bhiwani, Ambala
Hanuman garh/ Ganganagar
&Churu
Bhiwani, Hissar
Jhajjar, Bhiwani, Gurgaon

10

Bhakra Canal/ BhakraNangal


Major Irrigation
Project_Rajasthan
JawaharLal Nehru Lift
Irrigation Project
Loharu Lift Irrigation Project
Sidhmukh Major Irrigation
Project
Sewani Lift Irrigation Project
Rewari Stage - I Major
Irrigation Project
Nohar Major Irrigation Project

Ravi-Beas

Completed 39.68

31.95

13.42

Sriganganagar/ Hanumangarh

11

Jui Lift Irrigation Project

Major

Completed

30.16

18.70

Ambala, Bhiwani

2
3
4

5
6
7
8
9

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Major

Major
Major
Major
Major
Major

RaviBeas
Yamuna

RaviBeas
Yamuna

Sriganganagar, Barmer, Bikaner,


Churu, Jaisalmer, & Jodhpur
Sri Ganganagar, Bikaner,
Hanumangarh
Bhiwani, Jind, Karnal, Rohtak,
Hissar, Ambala, Sonepat

47

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan


12

Raipur Patan Medium


Irrigation Project

Medium

Shekhawati Completed

2.21

Sikar

C. Lift Irrigation projects with surrogate information


Sl.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

Name of Project
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme JLN Feeder - I
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - I
Rewari Lift Irrigation Scheme Stage - I
Sewani Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - I
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - VI
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - VIII
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - IX
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme BadhwanaDistyPh - I
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme BadhwanaDistyPh - II
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Satnali Feeder - III
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Satnali Feeder - IV
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Satnali Feeder - V
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Satnali Feeder - VI
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Madhogarh Branch - I
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Madhogarh Branch - II
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Madhogarh Branch - III
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Madhogarh Branch - IV
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - II
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - III
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - IV
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - VII
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme KitlanaDisty: Ph - I
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph V
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Narnaul Branch - III
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Narnaul Branch - IV
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Narnaul Branch - V

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Off take
point
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal

Type of
pump

No. of
pumps

Horse power
of pumps

Lift in
(m)
3.88

8.544
8.91
9.837
11.132
7
7
7
8.516

Discharge
(Cumec)

4.45

8.564
7
7

48

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan


27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48

Sl.
No.
1

JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Narnaul Branch - VI


JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Satnali Feeder - I
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Satnali Feeder - II
Jui Lift Irrigation Scheme
Shewani Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - V
Shewani Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - VI
Shewani Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - II
Shewani Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - III
Shewani Lift Irrigation Scheme Ph - IV
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme - BadhwanaDistyPh - III
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme - BadhwanaDistyPh - IV
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme - Gothra Mr Ph - I
Loharu Lift Irrigation Scheme - Gothra Mr Ph - II
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme JLN Feeder - II
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Mohindergarh Canal - I
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Mohindergarh Canal - II
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Mohindergarh Canal - III
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Mohindergarh Canal - IV
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Mohindergarh Canal - V
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Narnaul Branch - I
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme Narnaul Branch - II
JawarharLal Nehru Lift Irrigation Scheme JLN Canal - I

Name of Project
IGNP Stage-I ERM

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

River
Ravi- Beas

Canal
Canal
Canal

5.555
7.261
8.147

Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal
Canal

7
7
7
7
7
7.04
7
5.89

D. ERM projects with surrogate information


Status
Year of completion
Districts Benefitted
Ongoing

Sriganga Nagar, Bikaner, Hanumangarh

8.277

75.9
47.86

26.05
25.75

Purpose
Irrigation

49

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

Annexure IV: Inventory of litholog well locations

1
2
3

Adampur
Agroha
Akoda

246.30
277.67
119.79

Antri

51.12

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

AteliKatkai
Badaula
Badrai
Bahu
Bahuna
Barkoda
Barwala
Bawana
Bayal

96.29
212.54
183.80
155.14
308.46
61.80
306.63
163.06
101.15

14
15

Behl
Bhagote

124.50
173.63

16
17
18
19
20
21

Bhandwa
Bhiwani
Bhojawawas
Birohar
Budhera
Chappar

172.82
256.15
37.49
224.73
136.25
192.95

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Sand Kankar Clay mixed


Clay mixed with Kankar
Clay Sand mix with
Kankar&weathered
Quartzite
Quartzites
Sand Clay & Sand
Clay mixed with Sand
Silt Sand kanker &Clay
Clay Kankar
Sand &Clay
Clay Sand mixed
Claymixed with Kankar
Sand Clay weathered
pegmatite
Clay Kankar & weathered
Quartzite
Sand Clay Kankar &Gravel
Clay mixed with Kankar
Clay mixed with Kankar
Sand Kankar Clay
Sand Clay Quartzite

Draw down
(m)
No. of zones
encountered
/trapped
Total
thickness of
zones (m)

Discharge
(lps)

Static water
level (m)

Location

Major
Lithology

Sl.
No.

Depth
Drilled (m)

Lithology in the Basin

Major rock group

NA
11
6

NA
192
41

NA
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

16.82 27

22

12

5.82
17

1200

11

10.50 1796

17

15.03 225

23

4
8
NA
5
12
6
10
3
1

59
141
NA
88.4
186
37
254
145.7
88

Consolidated Sediments (Pre-Cambrian -Devonian


and other ages)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
NA
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

12
10

108
136.5

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

6
15
NA
NA
2
3

115
235
NA
NA
16.5
157.58

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
NA
NA
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

4.95

25

47
15.07 220

37.98 946

50

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan


22
23
24
25
26

Dadri
Dallanwas
Danauda
Daraulai
DehinaZaina
bad-II
Deosar
Dhancholi

180.75
164.41
308.15
170.03
139.50

Clay mixed with Gravel


Sand Clay Kankar and Gravel
Sand Clay Kankar and Silt
Clay Sand Kankar &Gravel
Clay Sand Kankar &Gravel

193.24
60.25
98.20

30
31
32

DhanikiBhat
ota
Dharsun
Dhiranwas
Dholera

Sand Clay Kankar & Gravel


Sand Kankar weathered
Quartzite
Clay Kankar limestone

33

Dostpur

51.30

34
35

Galaula
Goad

42.10
95.11

36
37

Gokulpur
Hajampur

137.55
294.74

38

Hamidpur

55.20

39
40
41
42
43
44

Hasanpur
Hassanpur
Hissar
Imlota
Islampur
Jadonpur
(Dochana)
Jalmana
Jant

305.40
115.60
275.84
160.93
63.29
107.35

Clay mixed with Kankar


Quartzite
Clay mixed with Kankar
Sand mixed with Clay
&Kankar
Clay Sand weathered
Quartzite
Sand Gravel & Kankar
Sand Clay Kankar and Gravel
Clay with little Sand
Sand mixed with Clay
Micashist slates
Siliceous limestone

306.14
143.70

Gravel Sand & Kankar


Sand and Clay

27
28
29

45
46

75.80
220.80
102.29

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Clay Kankar limestone


Clay mixed with Kankar
Clay Kankar weathered
Quartzite
Quatzites limestone

12.61 2911
14.20 2264

12
4

8
5
7
4
4

25.28 873

4
2

176.18
35.25

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

6.52

15

53.2

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

36.8
136
77.29

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

238

143.87
35.5
223
147.01
92.35

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

8.44

668

10

1
8
1

7.35

1326

11

50

6
NA

19.5
NA

Consolidated Sediments (Pre-Cambrian -Devonian


and other ages)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
NA

3
6

56.47
134

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

19.90 871

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

14.30 2210

25
15.75 120

12

12
1
NA
6
2
1

228
30
NA
84.12
19
104.75

5.32 3240
18.20 548

17
10

8
13

234
124.5

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
NA
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Crystalline Rocks (Archaean -Pre-Cambrian)
Consolidated Sediments (Pre-Cambrian -Devonian
and other ages)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

51

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan


47
48
49
50
51
52

Jasawas
Jhanewal
Jhojunkalan
Jind
Kairu
Kalanaur

100
306.63
152
305.54
166.25
305.10

53
54

Kalayat
Kamania

306.01
72.45

55
56

Kaninakhas
Kantikhas

57
58

308.40
104.30

61

Kaul
KhatotiKala
n
Kheri
(Mathanhel)
Kodanya
(Kojinda)
Kultajpur

62
63

Loh-khera-i
Ludesar

214.11
22.44

64
65

Madha
Mandola

310.59
144.47

66
67

Mayar
Meghot
(Hala)
Meham
Motipura

295.10
101.23

59
60

68
69

Alluvium
Clay Kankar Sand Gravel
Sand Gravel &kanker

17.20 695
5.72 4656
40
632
1600

6
15
7

10
20
8
17
2
3

81
284
134
294
10
265.8

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

19

23
1

262
45.15

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

12

NA
5

NA
74.5

NA
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

12
4

14
1

285
79.3

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

127

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

164.86

Clay and Sand (Bedrock


Granite)
Sand Clay Kankar & Gravel
Sand Kankar weathered
Quartzite
Quartzites
Clay Sand mix with
Kankar&weathred Quartzite
Sand Silt Clay &Kankar
Sand Clay Kankare lime
stone weathered Quartzite
Clay mixed with Sand

75

Sand &Clay

12.35 466

13

61

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

88

Clay Kankar weathered


Quartzite
Sand Kankar & Gravel
Clay Kankar mixed with Sand
(bad rock granite)
Sand Clay Kankar
Sand Kankar Clay, Sand
stone of Ajabgarh series
Sand Kankar Clay mixed
Weathered Quartzite
limestone

33.10 66

10

30

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

4.26

220

11
3

150
75.5

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

1.49

1905

2
5

23.25
96.93

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

7
1

256
71.23

4
3

199.3
32.61

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Consolidated Sediments (Pre-Cambrian -Devonian
and other ages)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

109.35

274.32
129.54

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Sand Clay mixed with Kankar


Gravel

16.65 150

7.20

871

5.74 4500
19.04 270

9.44

98

13

52

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan


70
71

Mundri
NagalKalia-I

308.15
107.36

72
73

Nahar
Nangal
(Durga)
NangalChou
dhary
NangalKaliaII
Nangal Mala

123.74
104.30

NangalPath
ani
Nidana
Nisang
Nizampur
Pachnota

185.93

Padla
Palri
Paoli
Pattikayasth
aseth
PipkaNangal

279.78
159.11
309.37
610.21

70.75

88

Raghunathp
ura
Raipuir

89
90

Rajaund
Rodha

335.28
140.07

91

Said Alipur

101.20

74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87

95.15
98.20
70.40

477.31
308.45
60.17
101.13

106.35

268

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Clay Kankar weathered


Quartzite
Kankar mixed with caly
Pegmatites
Sand Clay weathered
Quartzite
Clay Kankar weathered
Quartzite
Sand weathered Quartzites
& Clay
Clay Sand Kankarand Gravel
Clay mixed with Kankar
Gravel Sand & Kankar
Slates
Sand Clay weathered
pegmetite

2.82
9.30

4656
495

9
14

19
5

253
68

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

102.7
92.3

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Intrusive Rocks (Archaean -Pre-Cambrian)

9.64

170

16

5
2

9.14

210

10.18

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

9.83

1200

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

NA

NA

NA

45.13

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

10
12
3
2

393
281
21.5
84

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Crystalline Rocks (Archaean -Pre-Cambrian)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

6.48 3250
19.32 22
6.02 17

7
9

2.10

1500

15
4
17
1

207
81.38
286
7

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

7.97

230

19.5

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

25.17 130

45.44

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

21.4

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

6
5

238.5
84

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

84.1

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

Clay mixed with Sand


Clay and Kankar
Clay mixed with Kankar
Sand caly & weathered
Quartzite
Sand Kankar weathered
Quartzite
Sand Silt Clay &Kankar
Sand mixed with Kankar
Sand Kankar Silt Clay
(Bedrock Granite)
Sand limestone weathered

8.40

4541. 12
67

150

18

53

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

92
93
94
95
96
97

Salhawas
Samain
Sangri
Satnali
Segra
Seonthpura

161.60
305.40
310.90
166.19
115.51
62.25

98

Sesote

127.10

99

Siwani

143.56

100

SurpurKalan

117.78

101

Tehla

75.45

102

ThakarankiD
hani
Thana
(Begpur)
Uchana
Ujhana

101.26

103
104
105

Quartzite
Clay mixed with Kankar
Clay Kankar
Sand Clay & Kankar
Sand Clay Kankar and Gravel
Claymixed with Sand
Quartzites

32.6
227
263
47
17.99
38

106.43

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)
Consolidated Sediments (Pre-Cambrian -Devonian
and other ages)
Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

102.42

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

43

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

10

50.15

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

27

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

11

263.4

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

11
12

251
573

Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)


Un-consolidated Sediments (Quaternary -Recent)

40.50 352

10.91 563

14

306.62

Clay mixed with Gravel


&Kankar
Sand Clay mixed with Kankar
Clay
Sand Kankar Clay (Bedrock
Granite)
Sand Kankar weathered
21.50 130
Quartzite
Clay Kankar weathered
7.22 702
Quartzite
Clay Kankar
2.97 3070

307.23
610.20

Sand Clay Kankar & Gravel


Clay kanker and Gravel

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

2
10
9
4
1
2

54

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

Annexure V: Inventory of Water Tourism Sites


A. Water Tourism Sites in the Basin
Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5

Name
Bhindwas Lake
Gadsisar Lake
Jaisalmer Fort
Kolyat Lake
Krishna Museum

6
7
8
9

Loharlgal
Malsisar
Patwon Ki Haveli
SanihitSarovar

10

Singhana Step Well

Type
Lake
Lake
Fort
Lake
Museums /
Monument
Tourist Spot
Tourist Spot
Fort
Pilgrimage
(Temple)
Step Well

Waterbody
Bhindwas Lake
Gadsisar Lake
Amar Sagar Lake
Kolyat Lake
SanihitSarovar

WB Relation
On
On
Near by
On
Near by

District
Jhajjar
Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer
Bikaner
Kurukshetra

State
Haryana
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Haryana

Loharlgal
Banka's Talav
Amar Sagar Lake
SanihitSarovar

On
On
Near by
On

Sikar
Jhunjhunun
Jaisalmer
Kurukshetra

Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Haryana

Singhana Step Well

On

Jhunjhunun

Rajasthan

B. Wildlife Sanctuaries / National Parks in the Basin


Sl.
No.
1
2

Name

Type

Akal Wood Fossil National Park


Desert National Park

National Park
National Park

Gajner Wildlife Sanctuary

Kheechan Bird Sanctuary

Tal Chhapar Sanctuary

Wildlife
Sanctuary
Wildlife
Sanctuary
Wildlife
Sanctuary

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Nearest City

Jaisalmer

District

State

Jaisalmer
Jaisalmer

Rajasthan
Rajasthan

Year of
Establishment
0
1992

Bikaner

Rajasthan

Jodhpur

Rajasthan

Sikar

Rajasthan

Mammals

Chinkara,
Blackbuck

Birds

Great Indian
Bustard

55

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

Acronyms
AEZ
AIA
AIBP

AWS
BCM
BIS
BOD
BR
CAZRI
CBIP
CCA
CEA
CGWB
Ch
CIWTC
CO
CPCB
CSMRS
cumec
cusec
CWC
CWPRS
D
DEM
DOS
E
EC
ERM
FAO
FC
FF
FMP
FRL
G
GCA
GD
GDQ
GDS
GDSQ
GIS
GOI
GPI
GSC

Agro-Ecological Zones
Annual Irrigated Area
Accelerated Irrigation Benefits Programme
Automatic Weather Stations
Billion Cubic Meters
Bureau of Indian Standards
Biological Oxygen Demand
Balancing Reservoir
Central Arid Zone Research Institute
Central Board of Irrigation & Power
Culturable Command Area
Central Electricity Authority
Central Ground Water Board
Chainage
Central Inland Water Transport Corporation
Central Organization
Central Pollution Control Board
Central Soil & Materials Research Station
cubic meter per sec
cubic foot per sec
Central Water Commission
Central Water and Power Research Station
Discharge
Digital Elevation Model
Department of Space
East
Electrical Conductivity
Extension, Renovation and Modernization
Food and Agriculture Organization
Flood Control
Flood Forecasting
Flood Management Programme
Full Reservoir Level
Gauge
Gross Command Area
Gauge and Discharge
Gauge, Discharge and Water Quality
Gauge, Discharge and Sediment
Gauge, Discharge, Sediment and Water Quality
Geographical Information System
Government of India
Grossly Polluting Industries
Gross Storage Capacity

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

56

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

HE
HFL
HO
hrs
I&CAD

IBTL
IBWT
ICAR
ICPO
IM
IMD
India-WRIS
IR
IRS
ISRO
IWAI
IWT
km
LBC
LGP
LISS
lps
LSC
LULC
m
MCM
Mcum
MDDL
mg/l
MLD
mm
MMIR
MOSDAC
MoU
MoWR
MPN
MSL
MU
MW
N
NBSS&LUP
NRSC
NW
NWDA

Hydro-electric
Highest Flood Level
Hydrological Observation
Hours
Irrigation and Command Area Development
Inter-Basin Transfer Link
Inter-Basin Water Transfer
Indian Council of Agricultural Research
Irrigation-Cum-Power Outlet
Moisture Index
Indian Meteorological Department
India-Water Resources Information System
Irrigation
Indian Remote Sensing
Indian Space Research Organization
Inland Waterways Authority of India
Inland Water Transport
Kilometer
Left Bank Canal
Length of Growing Period
Linear Imaging Self-scanning Sensor
Litres Per Second
Live Storage Capacity
Land Use Land Cover
meter
Million Cubic Meter
Million Cubic Meter
Minimum Draw Down Level
Milligram per Litre
Million Liters per Day
Millimeters
Major and Medium Irrigation
Meteorological & Oceanographic Satellite Data Archival Centre
Memorandum of Understanding
Ministry of Water Resources
Most Probable Number
Mean Sea Level
Million Units
Mega Watt
North
National Bureau of Soil Survey & Land Use Planning
National Remote Sensing Centre
National Waterway
National Water Development Authority

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

57

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

NWDT
NWMP
NWP
OW
P
PET
PH
pH
ppm
PS
PW
Q
R&R
RBC
RF
RRR
RRSC
RSC
S
SAC
SAR
SD
SMCS
SOI
Sq. Km
SRTM
TAC
TC
TDS
Th ha
TW
UIP
UT
WB
WMO
WS

Narmada Water Disputes Tribunal


Northern Water Monitoring Programme
National Water Policy
Observatory Well
Precipitation
Potential Evapotranspiration
Power House
puissance de Hydrogen
Parts per million
Pisciculture
Peizometer Well
Water Quality
Rehabilitation and Resettlement
Right Bank Canal
Rainfall
Repair, Renovation and Restoration
Regional Remote Sensing Centre
Residual Sodium Carbonate
Sediment
Standing Advisory Committee
Sodium Absorption Ratio
Sub Division
Soil Moisture Control Section
Survey of India
Square Kilometers
Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission
Technical Advisory Committee
Total Coliform
Total Dissolved Solids
Thousand Hectare
Tube well
Ultimate Irrigation Potential
Union Territory
Water Body
World Meteorological Organization
Water Supply

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

58

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

References
1. India-Water Resources Information System: www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in
2. River Basin Atlas of India, India-WRIS, 2012. RRSC-West, NRSC, ISRO, Jodhpur, India.
3. Sharad K. Jain, Pushpendra K. Agarwal and Vijay P. Singh (2007). Hydrology and Water
Resources of India, Springer, The Netherlands, pp. 473-497.
4. R. L. Singh et al. (1971). India - A Regional Geography. National Geography Society, Varansi,
5. Wadia, D.N (1949). Geology of India, London, 279.
6. Ground Water Quality in shallow aquifers of India, Central Ground Water Board, Ministry of
Water Resources, Government of India (2010).
7. Aquifer Systems of India, Central Ground Water Board, Ministry of Water Resources,
Government of India (2012).
8. Report of the Irrigation Commission, Ministry of Irrigation and Power, New Delhi (1972).
9. Agro-Ecological Regions of India (Technical Bulletin, NBSS Publ.24; National Bureau of Soil
Survey & Land Use Planning)

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

59

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

Authors
ISRO Officials

CWC Officials

Dr. V.K. Dadhwal

Er. A.Mahendran

Director
National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC)
ISRO, Department of Space, Govt. of India
Balanagar, Hyderabad

Member (WP & P)


Central Water Commission
New Delhi

Dr. J.R. Sharma

Er. W.M. Tembhurney

Project Director, India-WRIS Project &


Chief General Manager
Regional Remote Sensing Centres - NRSC/ ISRO
DOS Branch Secretariat, Loknayak Bhawan
New Delhi

Chief Engineer (EMO)


Central Water Commission
New Delhi

Dr. A.K. Bera


Scientist/Engineer SF
Regional Remote Sensing Centre-West
NRSC, ISRO, Jodhpur

Er R.K.Jain
Chief Engineer (BPMO)
Central Water Commission
New Delhi

Ms. Suman Gurjar

Er. Yogesh Paithankar

Research Scientist
Regional Remote Sensing Centre-West
NRSC, ISRO, Jodhpur

Ms. Jyotsana Chuchra


Research Scientist
Regional Remote Sensing Centre-West
NRSC, ISRO, Jodhpur

www.india-wris.nrsc.gov.in

Director
Remote Sensing Directorate
Central Water Commission, New Delhi

Er. Alok Paul Kalsi


Deputy Director
Remote Sensing Directorate
Central Water Commission, New Delhi

60

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

India-WRIS Project Team


ISRO Officials

CWC Officials

Project Director

Dr. J R Sharma

Project In-charge
Er. Yogesh Paithankar, Director

Convener (S/W)

Sh. P G Diwakar

Quality Assurance Team

Sh. V M Bothale, Sh. M V Ravikumar, Dr. S S Rao,


Dr. S N Das, Sh. D S P Rao, Ms. A Vijaya Banu,
Sh. Chandrasekaran, Sh. D J Chutia

Convener (Database)

Dr. A Jeyaram

Quality Assurance Team

Dr. S Sudhakar, Sh. Uday Raj, Dr. M Kudrat,


Ms. Rajashree V Bothale, Dr. D Dutta,
Dr. G Ravishankar, Sh. S Pathak, Dr. K K Sarma

Project Coordinators

Sh. Shantanu B., Sh.Uday Raj, Dr. A T Jeyaseelan

Project Managers

Dr. A K Bera, Dr. B K Bhadra, Sh. S Pathak,


Dr. Rakesh Paliwal

Dy. Project In-charge


Er. Alok Paul Kalsi, Dy. Director
Er. Prashant Kumar Gupta, Dy.
Director
Technical Guidance
Er. C K Agarwal, Chief Engineer (B
& BBO)
Er. W M Tembhurney, Chief
Engineer EMO Er R.K. Jain, Chief
Engineer (BPMO)

Groups and Work


Components

Project Leads & Project


Scientists at Lead
Centre

Research Scientists at
Lead Centre

DPDs & Project


Scientists

Team

S/W Design,
Architecture,
Integration, Data
Security, Web
Hosting & Website

Sh. Gaurav Kumar


Sh. K S Srinivasan

Ms. Suman Gurjar


Ms. Pragya Chaturvedi
Ms. Shilpa Taneja
Ms. S V Pravalika
Ms. Divya Mishra
Ms. Jyotsana Chuchra
Mr. Samuel Lourdraj C
Mr. Rahul Sharma
Mr. Piyush Dubey
Mr. V Srinivasa Reddy
Ms. Chitra S Pai
Ms. Manasa Devi B
Mr. Mohamed Ali S
Ms. Hemlata Gehlot
Mr. Amit Kumar
Mr. Devdatta Tengshe
Mr. Jai Prakash Jyani
Mr. Munish Gorsi
Ms. Deepika Acharaya
Ms. Pratima Tak
Mr. Niteen K Bankar
Ms. Himani Singh
Ms. Sneha
Ms. Kamini Yadav
Mr. Goutam Bhati
Mr. Debhasish Bhakta
Mr. Nitin Chauhan
Ms. Ila Agnihotri
Mr. Vishal Singh
Ms. Vineeta Sharma
Dr. N Vyjayanthi
Dr. Shirsath Paresh B
Mr. Sanjay Kumar
Ms. Rashmi Rekha Dutta
Mr. Brij Kishor Jashal

Sh. Vinod M Bothale


Sh. Shantanu B
Sh. K Nagajyothi
Sh. S S Rajashekhar
Sh. Harish Karnatak
Sh. D Giribabu
Dr. A V Suresh Babu
Sh. E Sivasankar

Er. Navin Kumar, Director

Database
Organization & Geodatabase Standards
Legacy Data ISRO
Projects

Watershed Atlas &


Water Resources
Projects
Administrative
& Thematic Layers

Sh. Hansraj Meena

Dr. A K Bera
Dr. Rakesh Paliwal

Dr. Rakesh Paliwal


Sh. Ashish Kumar Jain

Dr. A K Bera
Dr. Rakesh Paliwal
Er. Sagar S Salunkhe

Dr. B K Bhadra
Dr. Rakesh Paliwal
Sh. S Pathak
Sh. Sushilkumar B Rehpade
Sh. Amanpreet Singh

Environmental Data

Dr. S Rama Subramoniam


Dr. Manoj Joseph

Capacity Building,
Modelling, Value
Addition & Report

Sh. S Pathak

Lead Centre: Regional Remote Sensing Centre - West, NRSC/ISRO, Jodhpur

Er. S N Abraham, Director


Er. R Azhagesan, Director
Er. Ashish Banerjee, Director
Er. Rajiv Kumar, Director
Er. Piyush Ranjan, Executive Engineer

Dr. M C Gupta
Dr. S N Das
Dr. S S Rao
Sh. K Abdul Hakeem
Dr. V V Rao
Dr. G Ravishankar
Dr. A V Suresh Babu
Sh. B Simhadhari Rao
Ms. Rajashree V B
Dr. G Sreenivasan
Dr. S Ravindranath
Dr. K H V Durga Rao
Dr. D Dutta
Dr. V M Choudhary
Sh. P V Raju
Sh. P Satyanarayana

Er. Pankaj Sharma, Dy. Director


Er. Amarjit Singh, Dy. Director
Er. S K Chaturvedi, Dy. Director
Er. Y S Varshney, Executive Engineer
Er. Manoj Paunikar, Executive Engineer
Er. Amitabh Prabhakar, Executive
Engineer
Er. Vishal Garg, Assistant Director
Er. M Sahabdeen, Assistant Director
Er. Ashish Awasthi Assistant Director
Er. R. Bhaskaran, Assistant Director

Dr. S N Das
Sh. John Mathew
Sh. M Shanker
Sh. B Simhadhari Rao
Dr. P Manavalan
Sh. Pramod Kumar
Sh. P V Raju
Dr. K H V Durga Rao

61

Area of Inland drainage in Rajasthan

62