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HSE

Health & Safety


Executive

Use and operation of


daughter craft in the UKCS

Prepared by MaTSU Ltd


for the Health and Safety Executive 2005

RESEARCH REPORT 307

HSE

Health & Safety


Executive

Use and operation of


daughter craft in the UKCS

JK Robson, MNI
MaTSU
Harwell International Business Centre
Didcot
Oxfordshire
OX11 0QJ

Daughter craft (DC) operate from emergency response and rescue vessels (ERRV) on the UKCS.
Since their introduction in the 1990s the craft have seen progressive incremental development in terms
of their design and operation. In parallel with this, the regulatory framework under which they operate
has also been adapted. Using a datum point of October 2002, the technical specifications, similarities
and differences between DC are discussed in detail and inferences drawn from the analyses. The
development of DC based on their changing role is also discussed.
Recent changes in the provision of stand by cover as a result of the Jigsaw project has created a
quantum leap in both the DC philosophy and the regulatory regime. It is likely these changes will be
matched by future developments in the areas of crew training and certification.
This report and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its
contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the authors alone and do
not necessarily reflect HSE policy.

HSE BOOKS

Crown copyright 2005


First published 2005
ISBN 0 7176 2932 5
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be

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ii

CONTENTS
1 INTRODUCTION

2 METHODOLOGY

3 REVIEW FINDINGS

HISTORY OF THE DC
CONVENTIONAL ROLE OF DC
DEVELOPMENT OF ROLES FOR DC
WORK BY PROMARINE
ANALYSIS OF DC SPECIFICATIONS
ANALYSIS OF DC AND THEIR ERRV
ANALYSIS OF DC AND THEIR LOCATION
REGULATORY FRAMEWORK FOR DC
DC OPERATOR CONSIDERATIONS
FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

APPENDIX 1 TECHNICAL DATA FROM THE PROMARINE DC


STUDY (2001)
APPENDIX 2 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS OF COMMON

DAUGHTER CRAFT
APPENDIX 3 REQUIREMENTS FOR LOAD LINE EXEMPTION
APPENDIX 4 ALBUM OF DAUGHTER CRAFT IN ACTION

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27

33

45

46

iv

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Since the earliest days of offshore oil and gas exploration in the UKCS smaller rescue craft have been
operated from emergency response and rescue vessels (ERRVs). Such rescue craft are much faster and
more manoeuvrable than the mother vessel and can provide rapid response and intervention, especially
where in-water survivors need to be recovered.
The role was originally fulfilled by fast rescue craft (FRC) and in many cases they are still used today,
but since the early 1990s larger and most robust rescue vessels were introduced and have operated
semi-autonomously from the mother vessel. These craft, termed daughter craft (DC), enjoy many of the
benefits of FRC in terms of their rescue and recovery capability. Moreover, DC design, construction
and size enables the craft to stay at sea for longer and offers the crew/passengers a more protected and
stable environment.
In more recent years DC design and operation has continued to evolve. Although their primary activity
is and is likely to remain the rescue and recovery of persons in an emergency, DC are seen as having the
potential to undertake other roles such as providing close standby for helicopter operations or the
transportation of small items to or between installations.
DC currently operate under the Load Line Exemption regulatory framework and limits are placed on
their maximum range from the mother vessel, duration of time in the water and maximum significant
wave height for operation. These limits to operability are likely to be superseded in the near future when
they may be covered by the Maritime and Coastguard Agencys Small Commercial Vessel Code.
Bearing all these changing factors in mind, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) commissioned
MaTSU to review the development of the DC, provide an overview of current DC activities and assess
potential future developments.
Initially the study undertook a literature review and in large part used the outcome from a parallel HSE
study that gathered together detailed technical specifications of DC and their mother vessels currently in
operation on the UKCS. Other activities included face to face interviews with all ERRV operators that
use DC as part of their fleet, a site visit to a DC manufacturer and meetings with the MCA to discuss
the current and future regulatory regime in respect of DC.
Despite the extensive nature of the literature search the amount of detailed information was found to be
limited. However, when the results were overlaid with technical information from the complementary
study it was then possible to develop a good appreciation of how DC have evolved on the UKCS in
terms of their design, construction, propulsion and fitment.
In parallel with the evolution of the DC themselves, their role and the training of their crews has also
had to develop. DC crew are now specially trained to carry out their duties and this results in high levels
of skill, motivation and pride among those selected for DC crews. Coxswains require further training in
the wider range of communications facilities and navigational skills, particularly for the larger and
better equipped DC that in future may operate at greater distances from the mother vessel and yet retain
LLE certification.
With the possible move towards regulation under the Small Commercial Vessel Code further training
and certification will be required depending on the area category under which the craft will operate. At
the forefront of development will be the imminent introduction of autonomous rescue and recovery craft
(ARRC) as part of BPs Jigsaw project. Due for delivery in 2005, the ARRCs design specification
calls for craft of 18.8m in length, a range of 400 miles at 20 knots and maximum speed of 34 knots.

Coupled with this is a launch capability in up to 7m Hs and a capacity of 57 survivors. There are
precedents for vessels of a similar size to operate in equally arduous weather conditions; the Dutch
KNRM and RNLI Arun class lifeboats are similar in a number of respects. A major difference,
however, is that these vessels are not intended for launch and recovery via twin falls davits from another
vessel and this aspect remains to be proven through trials.
The introduction of the ARRCs could be seen as an extension of the DC concept, which itself may lead
to further development in the designs of smaller DC and an expansion of their operational capabilities.
As has been shown when used in offshore activities and by national rescue organisations around the
world, DC and those craft similar to them are fast, effective tools for marine rescue in all but the more
extreme weather conditions.

vi

1 INTRODUCTION

Daughter craft (DC) have seen increasing use as stand-by, rescue and recovery cover for offshore
oil and gas platforms on the UKCS. This has arisen from the requirement for larger and more
robust craft for the more remote and exposed platforms, as well as the industry driven move to
provide cover for closely deployed installations (e.g. in the Southern North Sea) by using craft
that were more independent of their mother vessel than the conventional fast rescue craft (FRC).
In many respects DC enjoy many of the benefits of FRC in terms of their rescue and recovery
capability. They can attain high speeds, are manoeuvrable and can be launched/recovered from
the mother vessel quickly. DC design, construction and size enables the craft to stay at sea for
longer and offers the crew/passengers a more protected and stable environment.
Even though the primary activity of DC is, and is likely to always remain, the rescue and
recovery of persons in an emergency1, DC are seen as having the potential to undertake other
roles such as providing close standby for helicopter operations or the transportation of small
items to or between installations. While doing so they can also act as rescue craft whilst the
personnel undertake their duties on these installations. This offers potentially large cost savings
compared to the usual combination of transfer by helicopter and provision of rescue cover by an
emergency response and rescue vessel (ERRV)2. To place this into context, as an example of how
the introduction and evolution of the DC concept has helped to rationalise in-field activities in the
southern North Sea (SNS), in one particular field before DC were available, up to 12 ERRV
were deployed to support a field of multiple installations whereas afterwards the same cover was
afforded by 2 ERRV with their DC.
Recognising the evolution of the DC, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) is also in the
process of adapting the regulatory framework under which the craft operate. In this respect the
current Load Line Exemption certification that specifies the operational parameters of a DC may
change so the craft are included within the MCAs Small Commercial Vessel Code.
In view of this changing role and regulation, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have
commissioned MaTSU to review the development of the DC, provide an overview of current DC
activities and assess potential future developments.

Guidelines for the Safe Management and Operation of Vessels Standing By Offshore Installation, Section 3.11.1,
Issue No. 2 August 2001
2
Prior to 2000, emergency response and rescue vessels (ERRVs) where known as stand by vessels (SBV). Their role
did not alter with the change of name.

2 METHODOLOGY

A search of the literature was undertaken to ascertain the current status of DC, their development
and future prospects. This was seen to be an essential first step before engaging in discussions
and correspondence with the operators and builders of such vessels.
The search took into account as many different sources of information as possible, including:
Reports issued by the HSE
Relevant organisations

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency

The Maritime Information Centre


Research reports
Guidelines for vessel operations
Builders specifications for DC
Internet searches
Despite the extensive nature of this search, the amount of detailed information was limited. This
has been reviewed and presented in Sections 3.1 to 3.3. This forms a suitable review point to
discuss with the HSE the finding to date and the proposed way forward.
Concurrently with this study a HSE research contract was let with Promarine, Aberdeen. The
objective of the contract was to produce a database of the ERRV in use on the UKCS; their
technical specification, types and location. An analysis of the results of the study is presented in
Section 3.4.

3 REVIEW FINDINGS
3.1 HISTORY OF THE DC
ERRV and the close support, fast rescue craft (FRC) have long performed the traditional roles
including:
Rescue of survivors of emergency evacuations from the sea or life rafts
Rescue in man overboard situations
Assist recovery of personnel from totally enclosed, motor propelled survival craft (TEMPSC)
to ERRV
Attend helicopter ditching
Assist in collision risk management activities
Most FRC are similar to the inshore rescue craft used by the RNLI, in that they often use rigid
inflatable design, with both self righting capability and a high level of stability. They are typically
~ 6 m in length with a beam of 2.5 m and are capable of speeds of around 30 knots. A typical
example of such a craft is shown below.
The fitting and use of DC on the UKCS was pioneered by Boston Putford Offshore Safety Ltd. in
1985. The Putford Tern, a converted ex-Zapata Offshore Marine supply boat, was the first
vessel to offer a DC and was fitted with a PR-30 DC on the West Sole field in the southern
North Sea during the 1986 summer maintenance season.
The FRC depicted is a DELTA 6.5, approved by
the Marine and Coastguard Agency as a 15-person
Fast Rescue Craft under the Standby Code. It
complies with SOLAS 1984 requirements and is
powered by twin 60 hp outboards to give a top
speed in excess of 30 knots. It is similar in design
and construction to those used by many rescue
organisations and standby vessel companies.
Example of a FRC3

The DC is an early model Delta boat of the type in


use in 1990 when the DC concept was in a state of
rapid evolution.

Example of a DC4

3
4

Photograph courtesy of Delta Power Services


Photograph courtesy of Delta Power Services

The DC concept grew out of the FRC as can be seen by comparing the photographs above. The
evolution of the DC from the FRC was accompanied by:
An increase in size (to between 9 and 20 m in length)
Adoption of weather protection systems (e.g. cabins) for the crew
Retention of the ability to launch from a mother craft and self-righting capacity
This enables DC to attend for lengthy periods close to platforms (primarily periodically manned
platforms) on which routine maintenance operations are being carried out (in effect DC are
effectively standing-by) or on which over-side or hazardous activities are taking place. The
provision of a safe area for the crew (i.e. a watertight wheelhouse) and improved shape/size for
riding out rough seas enabled DC to obtain UK Department for Transport Load Line Exemption
Certificates (these exempt vessels from certain freeboard regulations that apply to merchant
shipping and permit the vessel to operate somewhat independently from the mother vessel).
The increased size of the DC (compared to FRC) brought about improvements in the speed and
ride quality of these vessels.
3.2 CONVENTIONAL ROLE OF DC
ERRV use FRC primarily in emergencies and in training exercises; they are not permitted to give
close stand-by cover on their own. In contrast, ERRV and associated DC can provide standby
cover during routine operations, helicopter flights and over-side working. These different types of
operation play a part in defining the strategy for both positioning of ERRV and attendant DC as
well as sharing these vessels between installations. For example, the allowable separation from an
installation is usually based on a maximum travelling time to the site of a routine operation:
Routine maintenance rescue craft launched within two minutes of alarm.
Helicopter operations rescue craft launched within two minutes of alarm and up to 20
personnel recovered within two hours.
Over-side maintenance rescue craft in position to recover survivors within four minutes of
alarm and up to four personnel recovered to a place of safety within twenty minutes.
These times are then converted into travelling distances which depend on the prevailing weather
condition and season.
In addition, Load Line exemptions allow the independent operation of DC provided certain MCA
specified parameters are complied with. These generally specify the maximum continuous period
the crew may be on duty, the maximum distance away from the mother vessel that the craft may
operate and the maximum wind/sea state for normal operations. In many cases the parameters are
that the crews duty period should not exceed 4 hours and the DC must remain within 10 nautical
miles of the mother craft, although in the Villages field a Halmatic P-38 DC was issued with a
LLE certificate allowing a range of 15 nautical miles from the mother vessel. Notwithstanding the
trend towards larger and better equipped DC, studies5 have shown that regular crew changes are
required, sometimes more frequently than every four hours because of demands made on the crew
by vessel motions (see Section 3.2.7). During crew changes, the above operating procedures are
suspended.

The Performance Capabilities of Crews of Daughter Craft Involved in Offshore Operations in the Oil and Gas
Industries, M. Tipton, C. Eglin & F. Golden, Research Report 108

When acting in their primary rescue and recovery role the concept of whether a DC can be
considered to be a place of safety is not explicit. Neither PFEER6 nor the UKOOA code7
specifically exclude a DC being considered a place of safety, but instead PFEER defines it as
being a safe location where medical treatment and other facilities for the care of survivors are
available. The UKOOA code expands upon this by stating that a place of safety must have
adequate facilities and competent personnel in sufficient numbers to be capable of providing:
Access for survivors
Reception for survivors
Initial medical diagnosis
Initial treatment and stabilisation
Facilities for subsequent transfer of survivors
Although the debate on whether a DC could be defined as a place of safety is continuing, on
balance the general assumption within HSE and the offshore industry is that the current fitment of
DC may be inadequate to fulfil the accepted definition. In the coming years this view may be
modified particularly with the trend for large and better equipped craft that are able to act in a
more autonomous role.
3.2.1 Design of DC
There is a wide variation in the design, size and capability of DC ranging from small vessels
similar to traditional FRC to large vessels that are similar to the Koninklijke Nederlandse
Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) class of vessel used by the Dutch Lifeboat Service and, more
recently chosen by the Caister Lifeboat as their new boat (a Valentijn 2000 typically 10.6m [l]
x 4.1m [w] x 0.75m [d], 2 x 430 hp inboard engines giving a speed of 34 knots, 4 crew and total
complement of 50 persons).
The design approach to DC has normally been based on knowledge gained from previous designs
of craft rather than an original concept design, mainly because of the cost implications. This
development carefully ensures that various aspects meet the requirements of Registries or other
national regulatory codes.
Typically, the hulls of DC are GRP or welded and stiffened plates of marine aluminium. Many
contain closed cell foam linings to render the craft unsinkable.
The size of the craft denotes the number of crew and passengers that can be carried safely on the
vessel (usually 15, albeit not all of them in the sheltered wheelhouse). The seakeeping
performance of DC is improved by:
Increased size
Greater length-to-width ratio
Adoption of a deep-V profile for the hull.
Several aspects of the design are driven by the rescue function of the DC.
The size of the deck space should give the crew sufficient room to operate and to
accommodate survivors; typically sufficient room is provided for a total complement
(survivors and crew) of about 15.

Offshore Installations (Prevention of Fire and Explosion, and Emergency Response) Regulations 1995.
Industry Guidelines for the Management of Emergency Response for Offshore Installations, Section 4.5, Issue No.
2 May 2002

The freeboard of the DC is a compromise between minimising the height through which the
crew have to lift survivors from the sea and minimising decks being awash.
The vessels collar should be small enough to allow the crew to lean over to pull survivors
from the sea
The location of the wheelhouse and survivor retrieval point should allow the coxswain clear
visibility of the rescue operation and minimise the chances of running over the survivor or
entangling him in the propulsion/steering gear.
Whilst the wheelhouse is primarily designed to protect the crew during non-rescue operations
(as well as providing toilet and galley facilities), it should also provide sufficient room for a
few injured survivors, including stretcher cases. In many designs, where there are large
number of survivors, the majority would have to remain on the open deck some of the
larger designs do allow sufficient room within the wheelhouse to provide accommodation for
all rescued survivors.
3.2.2 Propulsion of DC
Most FRC are powered by outboard motors, either petrol or diesel. However, the increased size
of DC also allows for inboard diesels. While they have similar overall reliabilities (for modern
units), they each have their pros and cons:
Outboard motors can be repaired more quickly than an inboard diesel by exchanging the
unit, thereby reducing downtime
Diesel fuel is less flammable than petrol, thereby reducing fire risk
In the event of capsize, the outboard is more prone to water ingress
In general, although some of the smaller DC use outboard motors, the larger the DC the more

likely it is to use inboard diesels.

These engines power one of two types of propulsion unit:

Normal propeller, together with a rudder this can present more danger to persons in the sea
Waterjet this reduces risk to persons in the sea but it is more prone to clogging (e.g. from
kelp) and takes more time to repair than a propeller.
3.2.3 Launch/recovery of DC
The earlier designs of DC tended to be launched/recovered via twin falls with lifting apparatus at
each end of the boat to limit rotation while the craft was suspended. Their davits were of fairly
basic design, were usually non-constant tension and without a pendulum damping system. They
operated with a power hoist and gravity lower controlled by a hand brake lever. Hoist speed was
generally in the range 30-48m/min and it could take up to 5 minutes to recover the boat to deck
level. High levels of training, experience and team working were required from both the crafts
crew, who had to simultaneously hook on each end of the boat during recovery, as well as the
winch operator who had to ensure the craft was properly attached and in synchronisation with the
sea before hoisting.
A clear indication of the davit configuration and stowage location of a DC (circa 1990) is shown
below.

Putford Apollo with PR-33 DC8

Advances in DC design coupled with innovative davit systems has meant that since 1997 all
newly constructed ERRV based DC have used constant tension davits with a hydraulic
accumulator dampening system via a single fall. Such system developments and hoist speeds
typically between 35-60m/min has reduced craft recovery times to less than 1 minute in almost all
cases and half this time on several vessels. Improved recovery times has more recently become
the norm despite the higher freeboards of the rescue zone favoured by more modern or purpose
built ERRV compared to the earlier designs or converted supply boat/trawler ERRV.
The current design philosophy of both ERRV, showing the rescue zone and FRC/DC fitment and
a single fall DC is ably demonstrated in the photographs overleaf.

Photograph courtesy of Boston Putford Offshore Safety Ltd.

Viking Provider9

Norsafe Munin 1000 DC from Viking Provider10

Photograph courtesy of Viking Standby Ltd.


Photograph courtesy of Viking Standby Ltd.

10

10

3.2.4 Rescue equipment


Although there is potentially a wide range of rescue equipment carried by DC, the precise
combination is specified by the operator. These could include the following:
Retrieval poles
Jasons cradle
Dacon Scoop
Hadrian rail and clip-on sliders
Man over board recovery davit
Nets
Lifelines
In addition to carrying such equipment, careful consideration has to be given to its arrangement,
e.g. lifelines attached to the crew should allow them mobility sufficient to carry out their duties
3.2.5 Communications and navigation equipment
All DC carry radar and VHF radio. A range of other equipment is carried at the operators
discretion:
Sirens, to warn survivors and other vessels of the DCs approach
Loudhailers, to communicate with survivors in the water
Intercom, to facilitate communication between the crew
Active and passive transponders, to improve radar contact between the DC and other craft
Satellite positioning equipment, to pinpoint location
3.2.6 Crewing of DC
The crew on conventional DC is similar to that on FRC: a coxswain and two boatmen. By
agreement, DC crews operating on the UKCS abide by the OPITO (Offshore Petroleum Industry
Training Organisation) training standards:
Boatmen. Basic personal survival course for ERRV crews, basic medical training course and
fast rescue boat course with VHF.
Coxswain. A boatman with at least three months experience, a valid FRC Coxswain
Certificate, a valid Medical Aid and Care ITP Certificate and evidence of participation in an
OPITO approved ongoing training programme at sea.
There are a number of OPITO approved training establishments in the UK offering appropriate
training in DC operation, though only the following currently offer the Daughter Craft Coxswain
course:
Maritime Rescue International Ltd, Stonehaven
North Sea Training Services, Lowestoft
Though the courses are not recognised nor required under the IMO Standards of Training,
Certification and Watchkeeping regulations, they are a prerequisite to being employed as a DC
Coxswain on the UKCS. The five day course comprises a series of explanations, demonstrations
and opportunities to practise preparing and releasing a DC for operations, deploying a DC and
rescuing and recovering a casualty. Candidates are continually assessed against the relevant
OPITO training standards by direct observation of practical work and by oral and written
questioning. Following satisfactory assessment a certificate is issued.

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3.2.7 Classification, standards and operational limits


Most classification societies (Lloyds, DnV, ABS) have rules dealing with the design of fast craft,
based primarily on hull pressures and vertical accelerations (i.e. design against slam impact
loads). These rules are effective in providing adequate structural strength and guarding against
injury to the crew but are ineffective in setting limits of operability, which are governed by crew
fatigue endurance and effectiveness as well as dynamic stability. In very general terms, larger
craft are more comfortable than smaller ones, primarily because the accelerations caused by a
crafts motion in a seaway are reduced.
Crew Endurance
There are a number of standards relating to the comfort of passengers and crew aboard ships, the
main determinant of which is the motion of the vessel, both acceleration and vibration (e.g. BSI
6841:1987). These standards and analysis of vessel motion in various seas can be used to
calculate a permitted exposure time, which sets the frequency for crew changes.
However, the operational limitation can arise from the effect of vessel motion on crew operability
and effectiveness, such as shown in the following table.
11

Table 1 Effect of activity on allowable vessel motion (rms)


Activity

Roll ()

Heave acceleration (ms-1)

Lateral acceleration (ms)


1.0
0.7
0.5
1

Heavy Manual
Light Manual
Intellectual

6.0
4.0
3.0

2.0
1.5
1.0

Operations
Assuming that the DC can be launched then the main operational envelope is formed by the
ability to recover and transfer survivors. There is considerable uncertainty in the operational
limits for these activities, with few being set as shown in Table 2.
12

Table 2 Operational limits for DC


Activity
Transfer from TEMPSC to DC
Transfer from DC to Standby Vessel

Operational limit
Wind speed (Beaufort)
Wave height (Hs in m)
5
8-9
6-7

Application of the standards to the types of activity typically carried out on DC, together with an
analysis of its motions, indicate the following limits of operability in terms of frequency of shift
change.

11
12

Abrahamsen and Brubakk, Human Comfort Onboard Fast Passenger Ferries, Cruise and Ferry, 1991.
Gallagher and Goodwin, Operating Envelopes of Offshore Rescue Methods, report to HSE, 1995.

12

13

Table 3 Suggested operational limits for smaller DC


Type of shift
1 x 1 Hour
1 x 2 Hour
1 x 4 Hour
2 x 2 Hour

Operational limit
Wind speed (Beaufort)
Wave height (Hs in m)
7
5.8
6
3.8
5
2.3
5
2.3

3.3 DEVELOPMENT OF ROLES FOR DC


The developing role for DC is that of providing longer stand-by capability at a greater distance
from the mother craft, as well as acting more independently during search and rescue (e.g.
provision of on-the-spot command and communications).
3.3.1 Design of newer DC
Clearly, such a role demands a large craft, in particular:
Large (i.e. heavier) craft undergo smaller accelerations due to wave impact than smaller
vessels, thereby reducing the risk to the crew and facilitating rescue operations during rough
weather. Typically such craft weight at least 10 tons
The wheelhouse should be fully enclosed and of sufficient size that it (together with any
below deck space) can accommodate all crew and survivors (this includes provision of toilet,
galley and medical facilities)
There should be sufficient space around the wheelhouse to allow for all recovery/rescue
activities as well as for helicopter winching operations
The larger hulls can permit significant space below decks to allow for accommodation of
additional survivors (e.g. the Putford Progress can take up to 30 survivors 12 plus two
stretcher cases below deck)
The role also requires better on-board facilities:
The galley should allow for the preparation of hot food and drinks for survivors and crew
The medical facilities should allow survivors to change clothes and provide for emergency
treatment (e.g. stabilising casualties) before evacuation to helicopter or mother vessel
A greater range of rescue equipment is normal: recovery scoop, scrambling nets, rigid
ladders, fitting for towing, etc.
Communications equipment similar to that on a mother vessel (for remote command and
control)
Improved navigational equipment, possibly fitting out with equipment to enable its use in an
integrated REWS type system and including the use of transponders to enable the craft to
range outside the line of sight from the mother vessel
3.3.2 Crewing of newer DC
The longer duration of stand alone activity of newer DC may require a watch-keeping system to
be adopted, possibly two hours on two hours off. This would require ideally a crew of four: two
Coxswains and two Boatmen but many DC have only one Coxswain. In addition to the training
described earlier (Section 3.2.6), Coxswains require further training in the wider range of
communications facilities and navigational skills, particularly for the larger and better equipped
13

Gallagher et al, Research into the Operation of SBV FRD Craft used as Daughter Craft, report to the Marine
Safety Agency, 1995.

13

DC that in future may operate at greater distances from the mother vessel and yet retain LLE
certification.
An option for the future is for DC to operate under the Small Commercial Vessel Code which,
depending on the intended area of operation, a vessel may be issued with a Small Commercial
Vessel Certificate. The areas most likely to be applicable to DC will be:

Area Category 3 - Up to 20 miles from a safe haven;


Area Category 2 - Up to 60 miles from a safe haven;
Area Category 1 - Up to 150 miles from a safe haven;
Area Category 0 Unrestricted service.

Vessel crewing requirements differ depending on operating area certification such that the
following minimum deck manning certification requirements will apply:
Table 4 Minimum deck certification for Small Commercial Vessel Code
Area Category 3
(Skippers
Qualification)

Certificate of Competency issued by a Competent Authority, OR,


RYA Advanced Powerboat Certificate (with 2 years experience), OR,
RYA Certificate of Competency or Service Coastal Skipper, OR,
MCA Boatmasters License Grade 1, 2 and 3 (modified), OR,
RYA Certificate of Competency or Service Yachtmaster Offshore, OR,
RYA Certificate of Competency Yachtmaster Ocean

(Additional
Requirements)

A second person capable of assisting the Skipper in an emergency

Area Category 2
(Skippers
Qualification)

MCA Boatmasters License Grade 1, 2 and 3 (modified), OR,


RYA Certificate of Competency or Service Yachtmaster Offshore, OR,
RYA Certificate of Competency Yachtmaster Ocean

(Additional
Requirements)

A person deemed by the Skipper to be experienced

Area Category 1
(Skippers
Qualification)

RYA Certificate of Competency or Service Yachtmaster Offshore, OR,


RYA Certificate of Competency Yachtmaster Ocean

(Additional
Requirements)

A second person holding at least a RYA Certificate of Competency or Service


Coastal Skipper

Area Category 0
(Skippers
Qualification)

RYA Certificate of Competency or Service Yachtmaster Ocean

(Additional
Requirements)

A second person holding at least a RYA Certificate of Competency as either


Yachtmaster Ocean or Yachtmaster Offshore

Other training and certification requirements for DC crews under the Small Commercial Vessel
Code include:
The crew should undergo training in the carriage of the dangerous goods and the IMDG Code
and records kept of the training undertaken.
Skippers should hold an approved Basic Sea Survival Course Certificate.

14

At least one person should hold a Radio Operators Certificate suitable for the radio
equipment on board.
The Skipper or a member of the crew of vessels which operate in Area Category 2 or 3
should hold an MCA approved Elementary First Aid Certificate or a RYA First Aid
Certificate. Skippers of vessels operating in Area Category 0 or 1 should hold a Proficiency
in Medical Care Certificate.
Skippers and any member of the crew who is liable to use the radar are strongly
recommended to undertake appropriate training in its use.
An Approved Engine Course is a course of at least thirty hours duration which is approved or
recognised by the MCA.
Skippers should be familiar with the vessels Stability Guidance Booklet.

Additionally, the Small Commercial Vessel Code requires minimum levels of training and
certification for those responsible for the engine, depending upon the power:
Table 5 Minimum engine certification for Small Commercial Vessel Code
Area Category 2
>750kW <=1500kW
>1500kW <3000kW

Attended an Approved Engine Course or satisfied the MCA


Marine Engine Operators License

Area Category 1
<=750kW
>750kW <1500kW
>=1500kW <3000kW

Attended an Approved Engine Course or satisfied the MCA


Marine Engine Operators License
Senior Marine Engine Operators License

Area Category 0
<1500kW
>=1500kW <3000kW

Marine Engine Operators License


Senior Marine Engine Operators License

3.3.3 Operational
The MCA issue LLE certification to DC on a case by case basis and impose limits on their
operation in terms of the maximum sea conditions, duration and range from the mother vessel. In
the past these have generally limited DC operations to less than 3.5m Hs (significant wave
height), for not more than 4 hours and not more than 10 miles distant from the mother vessel.
These parameters were recently increased during the recent extended trial of the 38 Putford
Progress.
Two important trends have been noted:
Requirements for DC to operate further from the mother craft and for longer.
Operators (either singly or in co-operation with each other) drawing up risk analysis based
strategies for deployment of ERRV and DC to cover multiple installations, reducing the
number of ERRV (e.g. www.riskassessor.com).
The implications for safety of the combination of these two trends is an area of concern, which
clearly needs more study.
Application of the approach outlined in Section 3.2.6 indicates the operational limits outlined in
the following table. These are similar to those for smaller DC, with the addition of new
operational limits for longer shifts.

15

14

Table 6 Suggested operational limits for larger DC


Type of shift
1 x 1 Hour
1 x 2 Hour
1 x 4 Hour
2 x 2 Hour
1 x 8 Hour
1 x 12 Hour

Operational limit
Wind speed (Beaufort)
Wave height (Hs in m)
7
5.8
6
3.8
5
2.3
5
2.3
4
1.5
4
1.5

A more recent HSE research project15 thoroughly investigated the demands and expectations
placed on DC crew involved in offshore operations. The work provided a detailed examination of
the performance of DC crew undertaking a range of generic tasks, in varying sea states, in an
attempt to identify any degradation in performance capability with time.
Rather than giving benchmark figures for the expected endurance of DC crew in different sea
states, the study provided a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the extent to which their
performance may be impaired by a number of factors that impinge upon it, such as:
DC design compared to the tasks required of it and the crew.
Effect of different environmental conditions, temperature, sea state, wave steepness.
Knowledge of and ability to perform skilled first aid treatment
The conclusions from the study are wide ranging and profound and in some cases challenge the
accepted understanding of DC operations that has developed over the last decade.
DC operating under the Small Commercial Vessel Code will probably not be limited by
weather conditions, range or duration, but instead will have to comply with the constraints of the
area category they are certified to operate in. Notwithstanding this, the requirements of the
Maritime Working Time Directive will apply to crews operating vessels under the Code. Briefly,
this will ensure that vessels are sufficiently manned to avoid the need to work excessive hours.
The Skipper is responsible for ensuring that he and all crew members are properly rested when
they begin work and obtain adequate rest when not on duty. The Directive provides that the
minimum hours of rest for anyone employed on board should be not less than:
10 hours in any 24-hour period; and

77 hours in any seven day period.

Although the limits should be observed they can be modified provided there is agreement between
the Skipper and crew, that health and safety and the safety of the vessel are not compromised and
that different leave periods are used as compensation.
If DC operating under the Code adopt a watchkeeping arrangement then a schedule of duties
should be drawn up setting out the hours of work and rest periods.

14

Gallagher et al, Research into the Operation of SBV FRD Craft used as Daughter Craft, report to the Marine
Safety Agency, 1995.
15
The Performance Capabilities of Crews of Daughter Craft Involved in Offshore Operations in the Oil and Gas
Industries, M. Tipton, C. Eglin, F. Golden & G. David, Research Report 108

16

3.4 WORK BY PROMARINE


The objective of the HSE contract with Promarine, Aberdeen was to produce a database of the
ERRV in use on the UKCS; their technical specification, types and location. The final report
from the initial contract was produced in January 2002 and yielded a database of 151 ERRV of
which 34 vessels carried a total of 42 DC, either singly (26 vessels) or in pairs (8 vessels). In
respect of DC the database contained a limited amount of technical information about each
vessel. An abridged version of the data gathered by Promarine is contained in Appendix 1.
At the conclusion of the first phase of work it was decided to extend the contract to encompass
more detail of the DC and their ancillary equipment. When the extended database was delivered
in November 2002 it contained a listing of 43 ERRV carrying a total of 56 DC, with 30 vessels
being fitted with one DC and 13 vessels having two. On almost all vessels where two DC are
carried they are identical in terms of the make, model and ancillary equipment.
On all DC the manning requirement is for 3 crew whereas the total complement on vessels where
DC are fitted ranges from 9 (1 x DC on the Putford Trader) to 18 (2 x DC on the Havila
Tigris). In general, however, where a vessel is fitted with DC the total complement is between 12
and 15, although there appears to be little correlation between the complement and number of
DC, i.e., some vessels have 15 crew and 1 DC and others have 2 DC with only 12 crew. In
emergency situations, where it may be necessary to launch both DC (where these are fitted), the
number of crew left on board the vessel to handle recovered casualties could be much reduced.
3.5 ANALYSIS OF DC SPECIFICATIONS
At the time of the November 2002 ProMarine study there were 10 different types of DC in use
from 4 manufacturers, from the smallest PR-30 (8.3m overall length and 2350kg dry weight) to
the largest Pacific-36 (14.4m overall length and 7490kg dry weight):
Table 7 Types of DC in use on the UKCS
DC no./type
6 x PR-30
5 x MP-911
16 x PR-33
2 x Delta Phantom
8 x Delta 95
1 x MP-990
2 x Norsafe Munin
2 x Delta 115
12 x MP-1111
2 x Pacific-36

Overall length (m)


8.3
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.9
10
11.5
11.75
14.4

Dry weight (kg)


2350
4200
2450
4584
2850
5240
5600
4600
5800
7490

Although the scantlings for each model are defined by the manufacturer and therefore owners can
not modify them, there is some latitude for the type of propulsion (inboard diesel or outboard
petrol) and power output that owners choose to fit to their craft. However, this tends to be the
case only with the smaller craft as larger ones begin to be constrained by their size and therefore
power requirements. With the exception of the Norsafe Munin which is driven by a waterjet, all
DC are fitted with conventional propellers:

17

27 x Inboard diesel engines with power outputs between 230bhp and 460bhp
Delta 115
2
(2 x 440bhp)
Delta 95
1
(1 x 230bhp)
Delta Phantom
2
(2 x 440bhp)
MP-1111
12
(12 x 430bhp)
MP-911
5
(5 x 300bhp)
MP-990
1
(1 x 432bhp)
Norsafe Munin
2
(2 x 460bhp)
Pacific-36
2
(2 x 430bhp)
29 x Outboard diesel engines with power outputs between 180bhp and 230bhp
Delta 95
7
(2 x 180bhp, 1 x 190bhp and 4 x 230bhp)
PR-30
6
(6 x 180bhp)
PR-33
16
(16 x 180bhp)
3.6 ANALYSIS OF DC AND THEIR ERRV
Based on the information contained in the ProMarine data it has been possible to make an
assessment of the profile of the ERRV fleet fitted with DC. Perhaps surprisingly, there is very
little correlation between size of vessels, their ages, former usage, specification and how they are
operated during the DC launch/recovery phase.
Where a vessel is equipped with 1 x DC it is more usual for this to be placed on the port side
although the ProMarine data also indicates that some vessels have davits on both sides even
though they only have one DC.
On the majority of vessels the DC fitment appears to come as a complete package to include the
craft itself and all its associated launch/recovery tackle although owners may have the option to
choose from different davit systems. Obviously, the time taken to launch or recover the DC under
ideal conditions will depend on a number of factors not simply the davit type or its mechanical
specification. The vessels design will also play a part, for example the davits location in relation
to the water line, the outreach required to launch/recover, the number of falls and the type of
lifting hook.
Table 8 DC davit types in use on the UKCS
DC type
Delta 115
Delta 95
Delta 95
Delta 95
Delta 95
Delta 95
Delta Phantom
MP-1111
MP-1111
MP-911
MP-911
MP-990
Norsafe Munin
Pacific-36
PR-30
PR-33

Davit type
2 x Caley Ocean Systems
1 x Grampian Hydraulics
1 x Hydralift
1 x Hydramaskin
3 x Caley Ocean Systems
2 x Vestdavit PAP 8000
2 x Caley Ocean Systems
8 x Hydramarine
4 x Caley Ocean Systems
4 x Caley Ocean Systems
1 x Hydramaskin
1 x Britannia C-Master 8000
2 x Hydramarine
2 x Caley Ocean Systems
6 x Schat Miranda
16 x Schat Miranda

Hook type
2 x Cranston
1 x Cranston
1 x Cranston
1 x Cranston
3 x Cranston
2 x Cranston
2 x Cranston
8 x Cranston
4 x Cranston
4 x Cranston
1 x Cranston
1 x Cranston
2 x Cranston
2 x Caley
6 x Mills Titan
16 x Mills Titan

18

Falls
2 x single
1 x single
1 x single
1 x single
3 x single
2 x single
2 x single
8 x single
4 x single
4 x single
1 x single
1 x single
2 x single
2 x single
6 x treble
4 x double and 12 x treble

Constant tension is used on approximately 60% (33 of 56 craft) of DC davits, the only davits not
fitted are those manufactured by Schat Miranda. Similarly, 34 craft are launched/recovered via a
single fall whereas 4 craft use twin falls and 18 use treble falls.
Perhaps of greatest significance to rescue and recovery performance is the time taken for launch
and recovery of DC and in this respect very significant differences are reported in the ProMarine
data. Clearly, the more sophisticated equipment ought to be able to launch and recover quicker
and this is borne out by the data. It appears that factors to be considered when determining craft
recovery time are less to do with simple winch speed and height of recovery and more to do with
the davit make, number of falls, boat size and whether constant tension is fitted.
At best, recovery of the DC is reportedly possible in 15 seconds (raising a 2850 kg boat through
6m on a single fall with an A frame using a non-constant tension davit) whereas at worst
recovery can take up to 5 minutes (raising a 7490 kg boat through 8m on a single fall using a
constant tension davit). Of the 23 DC where this information is available the median value for
recovery time is 63 seconds although they are predominantly in the range 20 - 60 seconds.
DC launch times, though likely to be possible in more adverse weather conditions than for the
recovery, are similarly widespread, ranging from 15 seconds to 3 minutes. For this parameter the
type of davit appears to be the main determining factor rather than the boat size. Of the 22 DC
where this information is available the median value for launch time is 46 seconds although they
are predominantly in the range 20 - 40 seconds.
Of some interest in the ProMarine data is the information concerning operational detail on how
the ERRV/DC are manoeuvred during recovery. This was provided for 36 ERRV with the
predominant manoeuvre being at very low speed with weather on opposite quarter which was
said to be the favoured method on 24 ERRV. Other manoeuvres included recovery at 2-3 knots (4
ERRV), recovery at 3 knots (2 ERRV) and recovery at 3-4 knots (6 ERRV). It is interesting to
note that of the ERRV that adopt minimal headway when recovering DC, all are fitted with either
Watercraft PR-30 or Watercraft PR-33 craft. It is suggested that the manoeuvre required when
recovering DC is more a factor of the type of DC or its davits rather than the seakeeping or
handling characteristics of the ERRV. This hypothesis is borne out on the Viking Endeavour
where different DC are fitted (Watercraft PR-30 on starboard side and Delta 95 on port side),
each requiring a different manoeuvre to recover.
DC are fitted to widely different ERRV in terms of their age, former use and current role. It
appears that whether or not an operator chooses to fit DC is possibly more to do with commercial
factors agreed between themselves and the Duty Holders than a particular type of hull being
better suited to their fitment.

19

Table 9 Age profile and former role of ERRV carrying DC on the UKCS
Year of construction
2 x 1967
2 x 1968
1 x 1969
1 x 1970
1 x 1972
2 x 1973
1 x 1974
6 x 1975
8 x 1976
2 x 1977
1 x 1979
3 x 1982
3 x 1983
4 x 1985
1 x 1995
1 x 1997
1 x 1998
2 x 2000
1 x 2001

Former role
13 x Anchor handler/supply
19 x Platform supply vessel
7 x Purpose built
1 x Salvage Vessel
1 x Supply/diving vessel
2 x Trawlers

Current role
17 x Multi-role vessels
26 x ERRV

The diversity of the mother vessel profile is indicative that the fitment of DC is not dependent on,
for example, its year of construction or former use. However, a factor that operators of ERRV
perhaps consider when deciding whether their vessels could be fitted with DC is whether there is
a need for retro-fitting of manoeuvring thrusters to assist in the DCs launch/recovery. All but 8
ERRV were fitted with at least one tunnel bow thrusters (and 3 had two thrusters) although only
8 ERRV had at least one tunnel stern thrusters. Of the ERRV that were not fitted with tunnel
thrusters most had highly manoeuvrable azimuthing thrusters.
3.7 ANALYSIS OF DC AND THEIR LOCATION
As previously mentioned in Section 3.6 there is little that that can be inferred, apart from perhaps
commercial considerations and other duties that the DC may be expected to fulfil, from where
DC are located on the UKCS. The ProMarine database contains location information for 33
ERRV (correct as of 1 November 2002):
9 x ERRV with DC in Central North Sea
4 x ERRV with DC in Northern North Sea
14 x ERRV with DC in Southern North Sea
3 x ERRV with DC in Liverpool Bay
3 x ERRV with DC in West of Shetlands
However, the Southern North Sea (SNS) with its multi-platform fields, large number of normally
unattended installations (NUI) and relatively close proximity to shore, lends itself to the use of
DC more readily than other areas. The DC concept was first used successfully in the SNS and it
is where the boundaries of their use have been extended.
Current MCA control of DC activities limits their operation to a maximum of 3.5m Hs, at a
range of not more than 10 miles from the mother vessel and for periods of duty of not more than 4
hours.

20

3.8 REGULATORY FRAMEWORK FOR DC


In the UK the regulatory framework under which DC currently operate is contained within the
Merchant Shipping Act. In brief, the Act, which is applied through the Merchant Shipping (Load
Line) Regulations 1998 (S.I. 2241/98) requires DC to either be inspected against and be covered
by the requirements of the Load Line Regulations or to have a Load Line Exemption Certificate
(LLE). Part 1 (Section 5) of the Regulations refers to the circumstances under which a LLE can
issued (see Appendix 3).
To minimise the burden of obtaining certification for their DC all operators have sought to have a
LLE issued for their craft. These certificates apply any restrictions and/or conditions on the
operation of DC such as the distance it may operate from the ERRV, limitations on the weather
conditions it may operate in and specify any minimum equipment and/or manning requirements.
While LLE are issued by MCA on a case by case basis the normal limitations are that DC
should not be more than 10 nautical miles for its ERRV, that it should not operate in sea states of
more than 3.5m Hs and that it should not operate away from the ERRV for more than 4
continuous hours.
To discuss the operation of the LLE certificate to DC as well as develop an understanding of
potential developments in this area a meeting was held with Robin Raphael and Duncan
MacDonald of MCA on 12 March 2003. MCA advised that a number of recent events within the
offshore oil and gas sector, and in particular the growing and evolving role of DC, had required
them to review their legislative and certification framework:
Placing the matter into context, it was reported that half the ERRV in use on the UKCS are
foreign flagged and therefore outside the control of the MCA. To ensure that proper
standards are maintained it is essential that well considered and robust codes and guidelines
are in place.
It is felt that the Workboat Code could be used to regulate the operation of DC, albeit with
limitations on their use prior to the issue of a certificate, although it is recognised that this
would extend the Workboat Code beyond what was originally envisaged when it was drafted.
The Halmatic P-38 DC and one other craft in use in Liverpool Bay are currently covered by
the Workboat Code rather than LLE.
MCA have been made aware by BP that the DC proposed under the Jigsaw project could be
better suited to the Workboat Code rather than LLE.
Any changes to the Workboat Code would be achieved through an annex and would only
apply to DC.
ERRVA can not see the benefit to their members of replacing the current LLE with the
Workboat Code believing that it may lead to DC being considered as mini-ERRV.
Duty Holders believe the Workboat Code may enable DC to operate more flexibly and at
lower cost.
Any change to the current system is likely to require an amendment to the ERRV code to
reflect this new regime.
It is the MCAs intention that all their Codes of Practice (Yellow for Small Commercial
Motor Vessels, Blue for Small Commercial Sailing Vessels, Red for Small Vessels in
Commercial Use for Sport or Pleasure, White for Large Commercial Sailing and Motor
Boats and Brown for Small Workboats and Pilot Boats) are to be harmonised into one
document. This will be achieved through the Harmonisation Working Group (representatives
including designers, builders, regulators and operators).

21

MCA intend to contract a consultant to review the LLE infrastructure and the Workboat
Code and highlight what the issues to transition may be. However, MCA are already aware
that some vessels that have been issued with a Workboat Certificate may not be suited to act
as a DC or that if a DC was issued with a certificate it may be called upon to perform duties
to which it was not suited.
When the issues have been defined MCA will advise Duty Holders and ERRV operators of
their findings and invite them to decide whether they want MCA to continue with exploring a
move to the Workboat Code or whether the LLE system should remain.
Ultimately, MCA consider that a move from LLE to the Workboat Code would be beneficial,
however, they will not adopt this approach until all the previously identified issues have been
discussed by all interested parties and clarified.

To explore more recent developments with the DC regulatory framework, particularly the Small
Commercial Vessel Code of Practice, a further meeting was held with Duncan MacDonald of
MCA on 12 November 2003.
The MCAs yellow, blue, red and brown codes are to be amalgamated into one
document. A draft of the Small Commercial Vessel Code of Practice has been produced
and is undergoing a consultation process with a broad group of interested parties.
DC are not currently included in the Small Commercial Vessel Code of Practice and for
this to occur the annexes to the SBV Code will need to be amended. This is due to occur in
June 2004.
A scope of work for the amendments to the SBV Code is being produced and will be
agreed by all stakeholders. It is expected this may also cover the future introduction of
Autonomous Rescue and Recovery Craft (ARRC) and go some way in addressing the place
of safety issue.
With amendments to the SBV Code and subsequent coverage of DC within the Small
Commercial Vessel Code of Practice, the need for LLE to be issued for individual DC
would be removed.
To be included within the Small Commercial Vessel Code of Practice each DC would need
to be surveyed against requirement laid down in the SBV Code. These will detail the type
of craft, its equipment and how it can be operated. A certificate will be issued for each DC
after successful survey.
LLE will not be removed entirely but may not be used when the Small Commercial Vessel
Code of Practice is introduced.
3.9 DC OPERATOR CONSIDERATIONS
During November 2001 a series of meetings were held with DC operators to elicit their views on
the craft, their operational performance and how they may develop in the future. Below are the
points that were made during the meetings:
Steve Ferguson of Viking Standby Ltd., Montrose. 26 November 2001
DC Fleet:
2 x Norsafe Munin 1000 with twin Hamilton waterjets
1 x Maritime Partners 911 with twin inboard diesels
2 x Watercraft PR-30 with twin 90hp petrol outboards
Although Viking Standby Ltd. had been involved to a limited extent at the design stage of the
Norsafe DC, the company generally purchased their craft off the shelf. However, the company

22

believes that DC manufacturers do respond to operator experience as well as their own innovation
when modifying existing or designing new craft.
It is the companys policy to exercise their DC crews in up to 3.5 m Hs though at times this
guidance may be exceeded at the ERRV Masters discretion. In general, crews prefer to use a DC
rather than a FRC because of the additional comfort afforded. This is particularly important
when engaged in personnel transfer, light stores handling and close standby.
DC coxswains are specially selected and trained from among their pool of crew and become
interchangeable between different ERRV, DC and FRC.
The rated personnel capacity of their craft is thought to be optimistic, especially when dealing
with injured survivors needing horizontal transfer to the ERRV.
The companys DC have never been used in an emergency situation.

Gerry Harcombe of Havila Supply (UK) Ltd., Aberdeen. 26 November 2001

DC Fleet:
7 x Maritime Partners 1111 with inboard diesels
4 x Maritime Partners 911 with inboard diesels

The company has not had any input to DC design and development with all their current fleet
being of standard design. Some DC are fitted with a further VHF radio over and above standard.
It is the companys policy to exercise their DC crews in up to 3.5 m Hs although in an emergency
this limit would be increased depending on circumstances. For instance, although their craft have
not been used in an oil industry related emergency, they did successfully rescue the crew of a
fishing vessel in 5 7 m Hs and 55 knots wind.
Crews prefer to use the DC rather than the FRC because of the additional comfort they provide
as well as the more interesting tasks they undertake.

Brian Lamb of North Star Shipping (Aberdeen) Ltd., Aberdeen. 29 November 2001
DC Fleet:
3 x Delta 95 with petrol outboards
2 x Delta 115 with inboard diesels
2 x Delta Phantom with inboard diesels
The company has fed back crew suggestions for DC improvements to the manufacturers but has
always purchased their craft off the shelf.
It is the companys policy to exercise their DC crews in up to 3.5 m Hs though the ERRV
Masters can exceed this if required.
Crews prefer to use DC rather than FRC because of the comfort afforded and more interesting
work carried out. This is particularly important when engaged in personnel transfer, light stores
handling and close standby.

23

DC coxswains are selected and trained from among their pool of crew and in general there is no
intermixing between DC and FRC crews.
The companys DC have never been used in an emergency situation involving the oil industry but
have taken part in the rescue of personnel from a fishing vessel in Liverpool Bay.

Colin Waddell of B.U.E. Marine Ltd., Aberdeen. 29 November 2001


DC Fleet:
2 x Halmatic P-36 with inboard diesels
2 x Maritime Partners 1111 with inboard diesels
The companys DC were bought as is along with their mother vessels. Subsequently, the
company fitted an additional VHF radio to each craft as well as an external public address system
and cooking facilities. For some contracts a Safemarine REWS system has been installed on
some DC and the painter release mechanism was modified to make it safer to operate.
The company believes that most innovation in DC is manufacturer rather than operator led and in
the future there will be a trend towards bigger ERRV with DC being fitted on more vessels.
It is the companys policy to exercise their DC crews in up to 3.5 m Hs though at times this
guidance may be exceeded at the ERRV Masters discretion.
Although working in DC for extended periods was generally not well liked by the companys
crews, doing so was better than being a FRC coxswain or boatman. DC crew are selected from
among their FRC and, after a period of training, it is seen as career progression.

Ian Palmer and Robert Catchpole of Boston Putford Offshore Safety Ltd., Lowestoft. 30
November 2001
DC Fleet:
9 x Watercraft PR-30 with twin 90hp petrol outboards
9 x Watercraft PR-33 with twin 90hp petrol outboards
1 x Delta Marine Access Craft
1 x Halmatic P-38 with inboard diesels
Over the years since the inception of the DC Boston Putford Offshore Safety Ltd. have been
involved with Delta Power Services to take the concept forward and were also part of the
consultation exercise when the limit of their range from the mother vessel was increased from 5
miles to 10 miles. More recently the company played a part in trials of the Halmatic P-38, named
the Putford Progress and its associated davit system.
DC are used for helicopter operations, close standby and warning off of errant vessels. It is the
companys policy to exercise their DC crews in up to 3.5 m Hs though at times this guidance may
be exceeded at the ERRV Masters discretion.
DC coxswains are selected from among their pool of crew and trained appropriately.
The companys DC have been involved in one installation man overboard rescue and the rescue
of a fishing vessel crew.

24

3.10 FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS


As has been the case in the past, future developments on the DC concept will be largely driven by
what the industry needs. These may come about either as a series of incremental refinements, i.e.,
slightly larger craft, more facilities, better navigational or operational equipment or more
crew/passenger comfort, or as a step change in design and/or operation to meet new offshore
industry initiatives.
Over an 18 months period ending in the summer of 2002 the operation of a Halmatic P-38 DC
(named the Putford Progress) on board the ERRV Putford Worker was the subject of MCA
supervised trial in the Villages field of the southern North Sea.
The DC had a dry weight of 11 tonnes and over the course of the trial there were over 1000
launch/recovery cycles using a single point lift Hydramarine davit. The MCA report on the trial
indicated some initial technical problems were experienced but these were overcome. On occasion
the DC had gone back to the shore; this being permissible because the crew were work boat
certified. The DCs engine and telecommunications gear were reported to have all worked well.
The ERRV crane driver was found to be a critical responsibility and one that requires a high
degree of skill. Although those carrying out this task were properly trained initially, they were not
experienced in lifting such large craft.
What may be seen as a quantum leap in the DC concept is the work carried out to define the
requirements of BPs Jigsaw project. In particular, the boundaries of design may be radically
extended by the intention to deploy Autonomous Rescue and Recovery Craft (ARRC) from
Regional Support Vessels (RSVs).
Construction of eight ARRCs and four RSVs is underway with delivery of the first RSV expected
in the first quarter of 2005 and the first ARRC by the middle of 2005. Each 93m long RSV will
accommodate two davit launched ARRCs and two 7.5m FRC. Although the ARRCs have yet to
be delivered, the design anticipates the following particulars:

18.8m length
Launch capability in seas of up to 7m Hs

400 nautical miles range at 20 knots


Internal capacity of 57 survivors and an
overload capacity of up to 84

6 full-time crew members including a


paramedic

Self-righting
Survivor reception area and

comprehensive medical facilities

34 knots maximum speed


Capable of independent operation from
the RSV including transfer of survivors
to shore
Deck area to enable helicopter transfer of
survivors

In preparatory work, a number of trials were undertaken using models and simulators. It was
reported that the trials were generally successful and demonstrated that certain tasks could be
completed by the crew and medical aid administered while craft was undergoing accelerations due
to movement in a seaway of up to 7m Hs.

25

Overall, the issue of whether the ARRC can be considered a place of safety will not be decided
until after the craft have been delivered and assessed by the HSE.

26

APPENDIX 1 TECHNICAL DATA FROM THE

PROMARINE DC STUDY (2001)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

ERRV owner/manager
BUE Marine
BUE Marine
BUE Marine
BUE Marine
Tufton Oceanic Investment Ltd
Gulf Offshore
North Star Shipping
North Star Shipping
North Star Shipping
North Star Shipping
North Star Shipping
Havila Supply ASA
Havila Supply ASA
Havila Supply ASA
Havila Supply ASA
Havila Supply ASA
Havila Supply ASA
Havila Supply ASA
Gulf Offshore
Gulf Offshore
Maersk
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Boston Putford
Viking Standby
Viking Standby
Viking Standby

ERRV name
BUE Foula
BUE Iona
BUE Raasay
BUE Skye
Caledonia Master
Clywd Supporter
Grampian Crusader
Grampian Frontier
Grampian Osprey
Grampian Prince
Grampian Supporter
Havila Chieftain
Havila Clever
Havila Sea
Havila Searcher
Havila Star
Havila Sun
Havila Tigris
Highland Spirit
Highland Sprite
Maersk Don
Nova
Putford Acasta
Putford Achates
Putford Achilles
Putford Ajax
Putford Apollo
Putford Aries
Putford Artemis
Putford Athena
Putford Enterprise
Putford Guardian
Putford Protector
Putford Puffin
Putford Rover
Putford Sea Mussel
Putford Shore
Putford Trader
Putford Viking
Putford Voyager
Putford Worker
Viking Endeavour (P)
Viking Endeavour (S)
Viking Provider

27

Built
1968
1977
1983
1968
1995
1985
1976
1997
1979
1983
1976
1982
1975
1975
1975
2000
1972
2001
1998
1985
2000
1969
1973
1976
1973
1976
1975
1977
1975
1975
1985
1967
1983
1970
1982
1974
1967
1976
1976
1985
1976
1976
1976
1982

Type
SBV
SBV
Multi-role
SBV
Multi-role
SBV
SBV
Multi-role
SBV
Multi-role
SBV
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
Multi-role
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
SBV
Multi-role
Multi-role
Multi-role

Previous type
Trawler
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Trawler
Anchor Handler/Supply
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Purpose built
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Anchor Handler/Supply
Anchor Handler/Supply
Anchor Handler/Supply
Purpose built
Purpose built
Purpose built
Purpose built
Platform Supply Vessel
Purpose built
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Salvage Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Supply/diving vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Platform Supply Vessel
Anchor Handler/Supply
Anchor Handler/Supply
Purpose built

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

No. of
crew
12
13
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
15
12
15
15
15
12
18
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
15

Working area Installation ERRV


type
BHP
1700
SNS
Steel Jacket 4200
SNS
Steel Jacket 4240
1700
CNS
FPSO
7260
Liverpool Bay Oil Storage 7200
CNS
Steel Jacket 4200
WoS
FPSO
8300
NNS
Concrete
3200
CNS
Steel Jacket 6000
Liverpool Bay Steel Jacket 3200
NNS
Concrete
12728
7040
CNS
Steel Jacket 4200
CNS
Steel Jacket 8000
NNS
Concrete
4010
2850
NNS
Steel Jacket 4010
WoS
FPSO
6000
Liverpool Bay Steel Jacket 3600
CNS
Steel Jacket 4800
SNS
HDJU
2401
SNS
Steel Jacket 2800
SNS
Steel Jacket 2400
SNS
Steel Jacket 4200
2400
SNS
Steel Jacket 2310
4800
SNS
Steel Jacket 6001
CNS
Steel Jacket 6161

12

ERRV propeller
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Fixed Pitch
Fixed Pitch
Fixed Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Fixed Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch

ERRV
rudder
Spade
Becker
Becker
Spade
Kort Nozzle
Kort Nozzle
Spade
Becker
Spade
Spade
Spade
Becker
Becker
Becker
Becker
Azimuth
Becker
Azimuth
Becker
Becker
Becker
Spade
Spade
Spade
Kort Nozzle
Spade
Kort Nozzle
Becker
Spade
Spade

ERRV
thrusters
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
3
1
4
1
4
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Directional
Aquamaster
Aquamaster
Aquamaster
Aquamaster
Veth
Azimuth
Not Fitted
Azimuth
Gilljet
Aquamaster
Not Fitted
Aquamaster
Aquamaster
Azimuth
Aquamaster
Aquamaster
Schottle
Azimuth
Aquamaster
Not Fitted
Azimuth
Azimuth
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Azimuth
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Azimuth

2000

Fixed Pitch

Spade

Gilljet

12
12
12
12
9
12

SNS
SNS
SNS
CNS
SNS
SNS

Steel Jacket
Steel Jacket
Steel Jacket
Steel Jacket
Steel Jacket
Steel Jacket

1440
7656
2500
1600
4200
4800

Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Fixed Pitch
Fixed Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch

Spade
Spade
Spade
Spade
Spade
Becker

1
4
1
1
2
1

Not Fitted
Aquamaster
Azimuth
Azimuth
Not Fitted
Not Fitted

15
15
15
15

SNS
WoS
WoS
CNS

Steel Jacket
Semi
Semi
Steel Jacket

3200
6160
6160
4800

Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch
Controllable Pitch

Becker
Spade
Spade
High Lift

1
1
1
2

Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Azimuth

28

Thrust
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

8.4 tonnes
6.7 tonnes
8.1 tonnes
8.4 tonnes
638kw
2000bhp
N/A
600bhp
550bhp
600bhp
N/A
800bhp
4000bhp
610bhp
560bhp
735kw
400bhp
735kw
1400bhp
N/A
736kw
246bhp
N/A
N/A
575bhp
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
900bhp

Tunnel
(F)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Not
2
1
2
1
Not
1
1
1
1
Not
1
1
Not
1
1
Not
1
1
1
1
1

168bhp
N/A
600bhp
600bhp

Thrust (F) Tunnel (A)


350bhp
590bhp
8.1 tonnes
1095bhp
619kw
560bhp
450bhp
600bhp
N/A
600bhp
300bhp
1600bhp
N/A
1500bhp
515kw
400bhp
515kw
N/A
700bhp
440bhp
N/A
3.5 tonnes
5.4 tonnes
N/A
5.4 tonnes
5.7 tonnes
6.3 tonnes
6.5 tonnes
5.0 tonnes

Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
1
Not Fitted
1
Not Fitted
1
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
1
2
1
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted

Not

N/A

Not Fitted

N/A
N/A

1
2
Not
Not
1
1

160bhp
600bhp
N/A
N/A
500bhp
6.3 tonnes

Not Fitted
1
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
1
Not Fitted

N/A
N/A
N/A
10 tonnes

1
1
1
1

800bhp
5.0 tonnes
5.0 tonnes
7.0 tonnes

Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted
Not Fitted

Thrust
(A)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
600bhp
N/A
300bhp
N/A
800bhp
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
800bhp
450bhp
440kw
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A

No. of
DC
Pacific 36
1
MP11-11
2
MP11-11
2
Pacific 36
1
Delta 95
1
Delta 95
1
Delta Phantom 2
Delta 95
1
Delta 115
2
Delta 95
1
Delta 95
1
MP11-11
2
MP9-11
1
MP9-11
1
MP9-11
1
MP11-11
2
MP9-11
2
MP11-11
2
MP9-90
1
Delta 95
2
MP11-11
2
PR30
1
PR30
1
PR33
1
PR33
1
PR33
1
PR33
1
PR33
2
PR33
1
PR33
1
PR30
1
N/A
PR33
1
PR33
1
N/A
PR30
1
313bhp PR33
1
N/A
PR33
1
N/A
PR30
1
500bhp PR33
1
N/A
PR33
1
PR33
1
N/A
PR33
1
N/A
Delta 95
1
N/A
PR30
1
N/A
Norsafe Munin 2

29

DC type

Length
(m)
14.4
11.75
11.75
14.4
9.5
9.5
9.4
9.5
11.5
9.5
9.5
11.75
9.2
9.2
9.2
11.75
9.2
11.75
9.9
9.5
11.75
8.3
8.3
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.3
8.3
9.3
9.3
8.3
9.3
9.3
8.3
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.5
8.3
10

Weight
(kg)
7490
5800
5800
7490
2850
2850
4584
2850
4600
2850
2850
5800
4200
4200
4200
5800
4200
5800
5240
2850
5800
2350
2350
2450
2450
2450
2450
2450
2450
2450
2350
2450
2450
2350
2450
2450
2350
2450
2450
2450
2450
2850
2350

No. of
crew
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Total DC
capacity
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
16
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15

Engine

HP

Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Outboard petrol
Inboard diesel
Outboard petrol
Inboard diesel
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Inboard diesel
Outboard petrol
Inboard diesel
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Outboard petrol
Inboard diesel

430
430
430
430
230
230
440
230
440
230
190
430
300
300
300
430
300
430
432
480
430
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
230
180
460

Propulsion
type
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Propellors
Waterjet

30

Speed
(knots)
25
32
32
25
30
30
34
30
40
30
30
32
33
33
33
32
33
32
30
30
32
30
30
32
32
32
32
30
32
32
30
32
32
30
32
32
30
32
32
32
32
30
30
30

Range
(miles)
120
250
250
120
100
100
100
100
350
100
100
250
100
100
100
250
100
250
100
100
250
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
130

Davit manufacturer

No. of
davits
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Caley Ocean Systems
2
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Hydralift
1
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Caley Ocean Systems
2
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Grampian Hydraulics
1
Hydramarine
2
Hydramaskin HMD G60 1
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Caley Ocean Systems
1
Hydramarine
2
Caley Ocean Systems
2
Hydramarine
2
Brittannia C-Master
1
Vestdavit PAP 8000
2
Hydramarine G-Davit
1
Schat Miranda
2
Schat Miranda
2
Schat Miranda
2
Schat Miranda
2
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
2
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
2
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
2
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Schat Miranda
1
Hydramaskin
1
Schat Miranda
1
Hydramarine
2

Side fitted
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port
Starboard
Port
Port
Port and Starboard
Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port
Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port
Port
Port
Port and Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port
Port and Starboard
Port
Port and Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port and Starboard
Port
Port and Starboard
Port
Port
Port and Starboard
Port
Port and Starboard
Starboard
Port
Starboard
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Starboard
Port
Port and Starboard

No. of
falls
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
2
3
3
1
3
1

Davit hook type

Hoist height
(m)
Caley
8
Cranston
7
Cranston
8
Caley
8
Cranston
7
Cranston
7
Cranston
5
Cranston
7
Cranston
6.5
Cranston
8
Cranston
6
Cranston/Henrickson 7
Cranston
7
Cranston
7
Crabston
7
Cranston
7
Cranston
7
Cranston
7
Cranston
8
Cranston
8
Cranston
6
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Mills Titan
approx 3
Cranston
7
Mills Titan
approx 3
Cranston
6

31

Total time to
Recover (s)
300
80
70
300
35
17
25
30
42
30
15
20
55
35
35
35
35
35
60
120
30
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
Not
20
Not
30

Total time to
lower (s)
180
40
64
180
30
17
40
30
22
30
30
20
60
20
20
15
20
15
>60
120
20
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
>5
20
>5
25

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Recovery time
approx 5 mins
60 sec
70 sec
approx 5 mins
45 secs
24 secs
55 sec
80 sec
45 sec
45 sec
N/A
45 sec
60 sec
60 sec
60 sec
45 sec
45 sec
45 sec
60 sec to deck
<2 mins
45 sec
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
Approx 5 mins to deck
4 min
Approx 5 mins to deck
45 sec

Davit type
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Non Compensated
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Constant Tension
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Non Compensated
Constant Tension
Non Compensated
Constant Tension

Heave compensation type


Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Not fitted
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumilator dampaening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumulator dampening system
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Not fitted
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system
Not fitted
Hydraulic Accumilator dampening system

32

APPENDIX 2 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION OF COMMON DC

Maritime Partners MP-1000 FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft)16


Maritime Partners MP-1211 FPC (Fast Patrol Craft)17
Maritime Partners MP-1111 FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft)18
Maritime Partners MP-911 FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft)19
Maritime Partners MP-990 WJ FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft)20
Delta Power Services 95 BFT Seafire21

Delta Power Services 95 Comet22

Delta Power Services 11523

Delta Power Services 1000 Marine Access Craft24

Norsafe Munin 1000 and 1200 DC25


Halmatic P-3826

16

Information courtesy of Maritime Partners A/S


Information courtesy of Maritime Partners A/S
18
Information courtesy of Maritime Partners A/S
19
Information courtesy of Maritime Partners A/S
20
Information courtesy of Maritime Partners A/S
21
Information courtesy of Delta Power Services
22
Information courtesy of Delta Power Services
23
Information courtesy of Delta Power Services
24
Information courtesy of Delta Power Services
25
Information courtesy of Norsafe A/S
26
Information courtesy of VT Group plc
17

33

MP-1000 FRDC
MP-1000 FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft) is designed,
built and equipped to comply with MCAs regulations for
such vessel as well as The Norwegian Maritime Directorates
requirements for Fast Rescue Craft for Offshore units.
The hull is built of marine aluminium and is of a fully
planning type with a deep V-bottom construction, suitable for
high speeds. The superstructure is made either by marine
aluminium or GRP sandwich construction. The
superstructure provides shelter and seating for six persons
and one stretcher.
MP-1000 FRDC is built to give maximum safety for the
crew and is self righting. It is installed with twin inboard
diesel engines and duoprop stern drive for the best
manoeuvring features. The craft is equipped with a lifting
arrangement with an approved release hook for safe launch
and recovery from the mother vessel/oil rig. The hull is filled
with special foam with closed cells, and this makes the boat
unsinkable. The strength of the hull and superstructure is
sufficient to withstand all normal forces encountered under
normal use offshore at maximum boat speed. The
superstructure can be customised to carry up 26 persons.MP1000 can also be delivered with water jet propulsion in model
MP-1000WJ FRDC.
Technical data:
Overall length:
10.00 metres
Length hull:
8.96 metres
Breadth extreme:
3.50 metres
Breadth hull:
2.92 metres
Draught:
0.70 metres
Weight empty:
5250 kgs
Davit load with 18 persons:
6900 kgs
Max speed with 3 crew:
31-32 knots
Engine:
Std: Twin VOLVO KAD 32 P - 170 hp
Alt: Up to 340 hp
Propulsion: Std: Duoprop Stern Drives
Alt: Other approved water jets

34

Materials:
Hull made of marine aluminium.

The hull is filled with expanded polyurethane

foam.

Superstructure made of GRP, aluminium option.

The fender is made of special foam, and

protected with tailor-made PVC cover.

Lifting arrangement is made of high quality

steel, fitted with approved off-load release hook.

MP-1211 FPC
MP-1211 Fast Patrol Craft (FPC) is designed, built and
equipped to comply with MCAs regulations for work boats or
similar national regulations.
MP-1211 is built of marine aluminium and is of a fully planning
type with a deep V-bottom construction, suitable for high
speeds. The hull is equipped with a special foam with closed
cells, and this makes the boat unsinkable. The strength of the
hull and superstructure is sufficient to withstand all normal
forces encountered under normal use offshore at maximum boat
speed. It is installed with twin inboard diesel engines and
waterjets for the best manoeuvring features.
MP-1211 is built to set a new standard for this type of craft, and
is self righting. The superstructure is made in GRP sandwich
construction, and provides in standard version seating for 4
persons in the wheelhouse, with capacity for more people in the
front cabin. The superstructure can be customised to carry up 26
persons and with adaptable interior layout and equipment:
Refrigerator, cooker, microwave oven, sink, lockers, toilet and
sleeping facilities.
MP-1211 can also be delivered as Fast Rescue Daughter Craft
(FRDC).
Technical data:
Overall length:
12.35 metres
Length hull:
11.25 metres
Breadth extreme:
3.50 metres
Draught:
0.70 metres
Weight empty:
7700 kgs
Max speed service weight:
34-35 knots
Engine:
Std: 2 x Yanmar 6LYA-STE - 340 hp
Alt: Other approved engines
Propulsion: Std: Waterjet Hamilton HJ274
Alt: Other approved water jets

35

Materials:
Hull made of marine aluminium.

The hull is filled with expanded

polyurethane foam.

Superstructure made of GRP, aluminium

option.

The fender is made of special foam

and protected with tailor-made PVC cover.

MP-1111 FRDC
MP-1111 FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft) is designed,
built and equipped to comply with MCAs regulations for
such vessel as well as The Norwegian Maritime Directorates
requirements for Fast Rescue Craft for Offshore units.
The hull is built of marine aluminium and is of a fully
planning type with a deep V-bottom construction, suitable for
high speeds. The superstructure is made either by marine
aluminium or GRP sandwich construction. The
superstructure provides shelter and seating for six persons
and one stretcher.
MP-1111 FRDC is built to give maximum safety for the
crew and is self righting. It is installed with twin inboard
diesel engines and duoprop stern drive for the best
manoeuvring features. The craft is equipped with a lifting
arrangement with an approved release hook for safe launch
and recovery from the mother vessel/oil rig. The hull is filled
with special foam with closed cells, and this makes the boat
unsinkable. The strength of the hull and superstructure is
sufficient to withstand all normal forces encountered under
normal use offshore at maximum boat speed. The
superstructure can be customised to carry up 26 persons.
MP-1111 can also be delivered with water jet propulsion in
model MP-1111WJ FRDC.
Technical data:
Overall length:
11.40 metres
Length hull:
10.46 metres
Breadth extreme:
3.50 metres
Breadth hull:
2.92 metres
Draught:
0.70 metres
Weight empty:
6450 kgs
Davit load with 20 persons:
7950 kgs
Max speed with 3 persons:
38-40 knots
Engine:
Std: 2 x VOLVO KAD 44 - 243 hp
Alt: Other approved engines of 170-340 hp
Propulsion: Std: Duoprop Stern Drives
Alt: Other approved water jet units

36

Materials:
Hull made of marine aluminium.

The hull is filled with expanded polyurethane

foam.

Superstructure made of GRP, aluminium option.

The fender is made of special foam, and

protected with tailor-made PVC cover.

Lifting arrangement is made of high quality

steel, fitted with approved off-load release hook.

MP-911 FRDC
MP-911 FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft) is designed,
built and equipped to comply with MCAs regulations for
such vessel as well as The Norwegian Maritime Directorates
requirements for Fast Rescue Craft for Offshore units.
The hull is built of marine aluminium and is of a fully
planning type with a deep V-bottom construction, suitable for
high speeds. The superstructure is made either by marine
aluminium or GRP sandwich construction. The
superstructure provides shelter and seating for six persons
and one stretcher.
MP-911 FRDC is built to give maximum safety for the crew
and is self righting. It is installed with twin inboard diesel
engines and duoprop stern drive for the best manoeuvring
features. The craft is equipped with a lifting arrangement
with an approved release hook for safe launch and recovery
from the mother vessel/oil rig. The hull is filled with special
foam with closed cells, and this makes the boat unsinkable.
The strength of the hull and superstructure is sufficient to
withstand all normal forces encountered under normal use
offshore at maximum boat speed.
Technical data:
Overall length:
9.20 metres
Length hull:
8.60 metres
Breadth extreme:
3.50 metres
Breadth hull:
2.92 metres
Draught:
0.70 metres
Weight empty:
4300 kgs
Davit load with 15 persons:
5700 kgs
Max speed with 3 persons:
31-33 knots
Engine:
Std: Twin VOLVO AD31P/DP
Alt: Other approved engines
Propulsion: Std: VOLVO PENTA Duoprop

Materials:
Hull made of marine aluminium.

The hull is filled with expanded polyurethane

foam.

Superstructure made of GRP, aluminium option.

The fender is made of special foam, and

protected with tailor-made PVC cover.

Lifting arrangement is made of high quality

steel, fitted with approved off-load release hook.

37

MP-990 WJ FRDC
MP-990 WJ FRDC (Fast Rescue Daughter Craft) is designed, built
and equipped to comply with MCAs regulations for such vessel as
well as The Norwegian Maritime Directorates requirements for
Fast Rescue Craft for Offshore units.
The hull is built of marine aluminium and is of a fully planning type
with a deep V-bottom construction, suitable for high speeds. The
superstructure is made either by marine aluminium or GRP
sandwich construction. The superstructure provides shelter and
seating for six persons and one stretcher.
MP-990 WJ FRDC is built to give maximum safety for the crew
and is self righting. It is installed with twin inboard diesel engines
and waterjets for the best manoeuvring features. The craft is
equipped with a lifting arrangement with an approved release hook
for safe launch and recovery from the mother vessel/oil rig. The hull
is filled with special foam with closed cells, and this makes the boat
unsinkable. The strength of the hull and superstructure is sufficient
to withstand all normal forces encountered under normal use
offshore at maximum boat speed.
Technical data:
Overall length:
9.90 metres
Length hull:
8.96 metres
Breadth extreme:
3.50 metres
Breadth hull:
2.92 metres
Draught:
0.70 metres
Weight empty:
4800 kgs
Davit load with 15 persons:
6500 kgs
Max speed with 3 persons:
31-33 knots
Engine:
Std: Twin Yanmar 4LHA-STP - 222 hp
Alt: Other approved engines
Propulsion: Std: Hamilton HJ241
Alt: Other approved waterjets.

38

Materials:
Hull made of marine aluminium.

The hull is filled with expanded

polyurethane foam.

Superstructure made of GRP,

aluminium option.

The fender is made of special foam

and protected with tailor-made PVC cover.

Lifting arrangement is made of high

quality steel, fitted with approved

off-load release hook.

39

DELTA POWER SERVICES 95 COMET

40

41

DELTA POWER SERVICES 1000 MARINE ACCESS CRAFT

42

43

HALMATIC P-38

Typical applications include standby vessel daughter craft, sea fisheries patrol boats, search and
rescue craft, super-yacht tenders and lighthouse and buoy tenders.
Principal Particulars
LOA (m)
11.50
Beam (m)
3.60
0.60
Draft (m)
Speed (knots)
25 - 40
300
Range (Nm)

44

APPENDIX 3 REQUIREMENTS FOR LOAD LINE EXEMPTION


Statutory Instrument 1998 No. 2241
The Merchant Shipping (Load Line) Regulations 1998
In general, these Regulations apply to United Kingdom ships wherever they may be and to other
ships while they are within United Kingdom waters, except - (a) ships of war; (b) ships solely
engaged in fishing; (c) pleasure vessels; (d) ships which do not go to sea; and (e) ships under 80
tons register engaged solely in the coasting trade and not carrying cargo. However, the
Regulations also make provision for certain exemptions as detailed below.

Exemptions
5. (1) Subject to paragraph (4) below the Secretary of State may exempt from these
Regulations
(a) any ship which embodies features of a novel kind if the development of those features
and their incorporation in ships engaged on international voyages might be seriously
impeded if the ship had to comply with all the requirements of these Regulations.
(b) any ship plying on international voyages between near neighbouring ports if
(ii) in his opinion the sheltered nature and condition of the voyages makes it
unreasonable or impracticable to apply these Regulations; and
(ii) he is satisfied the Government of the other country (or, as the case may be, of each
of the other countries) concurs in that opinion.
(2) Subject to paragraph (4) below the Secretary of State may exempt from these
Regulations:
(a) a ship which is not a Convention-size ship;
(b) any other ship which does not ply on international voyages.
(3)

Subject to paragraph (4) below, where a United Kingdom ship does not normally ply on
international voyages but is, in exceptional circumstances, required to undertake a single
international voyage, the Secretary of State may exempt the ship while engaged on that
voyage.

(4)

Any exemption conferred under this regulation may be conferred subject to such conditions
as the Secretary of State thinks fit; and, where any such exemption is conferred subject to
conditions, the exemption shall not have effect unless those conditions are complied with.

45

APPENDIX 4 ALBUM OF DAUGHTER CRAFT IN ACTION

Maersk Don with MP-1111 DC27


Havila Tigris with MP-1111 DC28
Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 200029
Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 200030
Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 200031
Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 200032

27

Photograph courtesy of Ken Robson


Photograph courtesy of Ken Robson
29
Photograph courtesy of Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM)
30
Photograph courtesy of Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM)
31
Photograph courtesy of Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM)
32
Photograph courtesy of Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM)
28

46

Maersk Don with MP-1111 DC

Havila Tigris with MP-1111 DC

47

Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 2000

Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 2000

48

Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 2000

Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij (KNRM) Valentijn 2000

49

Printed and published by the Health and Safety Executive


C30 1/98
Printed and published by the Health and Safety Executive
C0.06 06/05

ISBN 0-7176-2932-5

RR 307

20.00

9 78071 7 629329