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Human
Productivity
Lab

This handbook is made possible


through the generous support of:

TM
BrightCom TM

IPeak NETWORKS

www.HumanProductivityLab.com | www.Brockmann.com
© 2009 Human Productivity Lab and Brockmann & Company. All rights reserved. No portion of this document may
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Executive Summary
Key Findings

• Economic, geopolitical and public health realities are driving the case for inter-company
telepresence and effective visual collaboration as air travel becomes more costly and
inefficient
• The higher quality end-user experience of telepresence coupled with capable tools for
data collaboration are providing an acceptable alternative for many face-to-face meetings
• Telepresence equipment and network interoperability remains a major stumbling block
towards widespread inter-company telepresence service adoption
• The need for quality video connections with partners, vendors and customers can
be enabled through dedicated video overlay networks and telepresence and video
conferencing exchanges which specialize in connecting disparate networks
• Security concerns will compel many companies to invest in premium services
• The cultural and operational issues around inter-company telepresence are as important
to understand and address as the technical issues

Video conferencing had been relegated to the


corners of the enterprise market for the past four About The Collaboration
decades, primarily as a communications service
Human Productivity Lab and Brockmann
suitable for enthusiasts but not really ready for prime
& Company bring decades of experience
time. In recent years, that practice has changed
in telepresence, visual collaboration,
dramatically. The introduction of HD cameras,
managed services and inter-networking.
codecs and low cost high speed networks defined
an expectation for performance.
Inter-company telepresence is the next
major requirement in the development of
It was the introduction of telepresence that showed
the industry
the power of quality and the need for a natural,
elegant and immersive experience. Now that airlines
Look for our follow-on report: The Inter-
are regularly failing - more than 25 in 2008 alone
Company Telepresence and Video
- and users have broken the ‘must travel to meet’
Conferencing Exchange Review to
expectation, the technical, operational and cultural
be released in January of 2010. The
hurdles of enabling inter-company telepresence
report is a comprehensive look at the
and video conferencing need to be understood
Telepresence Exchange and Managed
and overcome. This handbook, the first of its kind,
Service Providers that are enabling
is a comprehensive overview of these issues and
secure inter-company services. Use the
includes six industry best practices that will enable
form at the back of this handbook to
your organization to connect with customers,
reserve your copy when released.
partners and suppliers while reducing the hard, soft
and opportunity costs of doing business.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 1


Table of Contents

Drivers for Telepresence 5


High Growth Is a Confluence of Factors 5
SARS, Swine Flu, Terrorism, Economic Crisis and Natural Disasters 7
Our Goal 7

Fundamentals of Inter-Company Telepresence 8


It’s All About The Network 8
Inter-Company Telepresence Architectures 11
ISDN Networks and Video 12
ISDN Gateways 13
MPLS VPNs and Video 13
DiffServ Introduces Performance and Complexity 14
Telepresence and Video Conferencing Exchange Providers 16
Telepresence and Video Conferencing Communities of Interest (CoINs) 17
The Internet and Video 17
Internet Security 18
Trivial Firewall Settings for Single Station Inter-Company Video Communications 19
Session Border Controllers & Inter-Company Gateways for IP Video Networks 19
Video Automated Attendants 20
Virtual Waiting Rooms 20
Telepresence Interoperability 20
Collaboration Tools 28
Recordings 29

Best Practices in Inter-Company Telepresence Operations 30


1. Strategic Review of Video Communications 30
2. To Converge or Not To Converge 31
3. Establish an Inter-Company Telepresence Program Champion 32
4. Expand Your Network by Reaching Public Rooms 33
5. Leverage Your Travel Management Supplier 34
6. Integrate Telepresence Into Sales and Customer Support Processes 35

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 2


Conclusion 36
Inter-Company Telepresence and Video Conferencing is a Business Priority 36

Appendix A: Security Resources 37


Cisco 37
Polycom 37
RADVISION 37

Appendix B: Sample Letters 38

Appendix C: The Inter-Company Telepresence Glossary 42

Appendix D: Related Research 47


Telepresence 2009 47
Video Communications 2.0 47
Tips for Improving the Users’ Experience 47
Cost Saving Strategies: Why Video Managed Services? 47
Why Video Communications is a Business Best Practice 47
The Perfect Storm: Why Video Conferencing Will Dominate Business Communications 47

Appendix E: Our Sponsors 48

Human Productivity Lab: Howard S. Lichtman 62


About the Human Productivity Lab 62
HPL Consulting 62
HPL Publishing 63
HPL Sales Force Training 63

Brockmann & Company: Peter Brockmann 64


About Brockmann & Company 64
Customers Know Best 64

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 3


List of Tables and Figures

Table 1 – Comparing frequency of face-to-face meetings with customers page 10


and telepresence sessions with customers.

Figure 2 - Comparing centralized and decentralized inter-company page 11


telepresence and video communications architectures. The
intermediate network shown could be an ISDN service, an
MPLS VPN service or the Internet.

Figure 3 – The telepresence and video conferencing exchange. page 16

Figure 4 – Avatars ought to be used in video auto-attendant applications. page 20

Figure 5 – The angle between the line of the camera capturing the image page 21
of a participant and the eye position of the person they’re
speaking to on the monitor is the eye-line, which needs to be
as close to 0o as possible for the most natural experience.

Figure 6 – Interoperability of six commercially available systems. page 22

Table 7 – Telepresence interoperability offsets for a range of leading page 24-25


market participants.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 4



Drivers for Telepresence

The ability for organizations to instantaneously and effectively


connect with vendors, investors, joint-venture partners and
customers globally will revolutionize business in ways that can
only be speculated on at the dawn of this technology’s inception.
This level of interconnection will start slowly but accelerate
rapidly. Currently, fewer than 40 known companies have deployed
telepresence and effective visual collaboration group systems. These


companies have barely scratched the surface of the technology, but


already their benefits have been substantial, the ROI proven and
further adoption among their peers certain.
- Howard S. Lichtman, August 2006
[1]

2200 immersive [telepresence] rooms by 2008 to 5,700 in 2010 and


11,600 in 2012.
- Gartner Group, December 2009[2]

High Growth Is a Confluence of Factors


In three short years we have witnessed enormous growth in room deployments of telepresence
and high definition video conferencing. The rapid growth of enterprise telepresence and the
emergence of publicly available telepresence environments in hundreds, growing to thousands
of firms, is only the pre-amble for the coming revolution in business communications. We are
rapidly approaching a world where a business person can walk into a room and connect with
their customers, joint venture partners and suppliers anywhere on the globe, instantly in a highly
productive environment that closely replicates an in-person experience.

Somewhat ironically, one of the factors driving the growth in next generation communications is
the global recession. The worldwide collapse in demand for products and services in 2008 and
2009 has caused most if not all organizations to reduce the variable costs in their operations.
Most companies cut deeper and faster than at any other time in recent history. After the layoffs
and the budget slashing, CIOs and business managers looked to drive new efficiencies in the

[1] Telepresence, Effective Visual Collaboration and the Future of Global Business at the
Speed of Light, Human Productivity Lab, 2006
[2] The Future of Telepresence, webcast for TANDBERG, December 3, 2009
[3] The Crash of Commercial Aviation and Telepresence, September 8, 2008

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 5


way they do business in order to adjust to a lower and more sustainable cost structure. GM and
Chrysler (autos), Nortel (telecom), Japan Air Lines (air travel), Fleetwood Enterprises (recreational
vehicles), Idearc (phone books), Star-Tribune (newspapers), Charter (cableco), Eddie Bauer (retail),
BearingPoint (consulting) and many other bankruptcies exacerbated the financial crisis.

The airline industry suffered particularly poorly in 2008, foreshadowing the value destruction across a
larger swath of the economy later that year. A combination of rising fuel prices, demand destruction
and inflexible labor agreements in 2008 saw the bankruptcy of over 25 global carriers and four major
airline consolidations. Fortunately for the surviving firms, the industry’s resulting capacity reduction of
21% - which according to OAG is roughly the equivalent of a major airline ceasing operations in 2009
- also saw the average price of commercial flights rise especially in “captured cities” with few carrier
options. In addition, the airlines have added a plethora of surcharge fees including luggage, in-flight
meals, pillows and blankets, pushing the rising cost of travel even higher.

Driven by reduced demand, airlines scheduled fewer flights between city-pairs, enabled more multi-
hop flights and removed aircraft from service. As a result, airlines, in a bid to improve yields per flight,
also lowered the available capacity for re-routing passengers whenever bad weather, mechanical
difficulty or missed connections disrupt travel plans. This has generally meant less pleasant and more
expensive travel, not to mention downright dissatisfaction when disruptions cause delays. In short, the
cost of travel for business users continues to rise in hard costs, soft costs, and opportunity cost. CFOs
are looking for ways to cut travel costs and find alternatives.

As physical travel becomes more expensive and less convenient the awareness of successful
telepresence and effective visual collaboration investments is sky-rocketing. Modern telepresence
environments have managed to replicate across-the-table professional meetings with an amazing
degree of realism. Modern collaboration tools let
users easily share PC data, work in real-time in the
same application, view circuit-board-level detail
of physical objects, and white board interactively Accenture, the global management
between locations in meetings where the
consulting and technology services
participants are separated by thousands of miles.
firm operates 50 telepresence
Many organizations have leveraged these rooms around the world. In 2009
investments internally over the past few years, using they pursued an inter-company
telepresence and video conferencing resources
telepresence strategy which now
and services to connect their headquarters with
regional and satellite offices. But to use these connects them to 31 companies, 600
amazing capabilities to conduct business with telepresence rooms, and close to
customers, partners and suppliers has proven 2,000,000 of their partners and
too much of a hassle for too many. Coordinating
clients personnel.
equipment interoperability, security, quality of service
and network connectivity have proven to be major
impediments to widespread adoption of inter-
company telepresence. Until recently, hopping onto
a plane was the easiest thing to do.

Yet despite these barriers, smart business leaders are moving toward the puck and improving their
ability to connect with their partners, vendors, and customers. They are leveraging telepresence as an

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 6


integral part of the sales and customer engagement process to reduce costs, improve productivity and
aggressively accelerate their position in new markets.

SARS, Swine Flu, Terrorism, Economic Crisis and Natural Disasters


A modern business faces many risks to continued operations: labor strife, product recall, legal
troubles, fickle customers and industrial espionage to name a few. The disruption of business
travel can be just as disastrous to a company’s health.

The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks caused significant disruption in the travel industry
and the economy proper as all airports in the United States shut down for two days to design
and introduce new security procedures. In 2003, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
infected some 8,000 and killing 775 in 30 countries, disrupting travel, business and public health
operations around the world. And the massive path of destruction caused by the December 26,
2004 tsunami affected service on whole swaths of the Indian Ocean coast. No doubt the 2009
swine flu pandemic-in-the-making and viral pneumonia in the Ukraine is raising alarms for many
executives being asked to spend hours in the constantly re-circulated environment of aircraft
cabins with 200 other strangers of unknown health status.

Further complicating business planning are the ongoing uncertainties of the global economy.
The potential for rapid changes in the finances of nation-states and their leading firms was
underscored by the 2008-9 Icelandic financial crisis which saw the collapse of the country’s
financial institutions, a 90% drop in the Iceland stock market, double-digit interest rates and
a sudden decline in the value of the Icelandic krona of more than 35% against the euro from
January to September 2008. The more-recent solvency struggles of Dubai World, California, and
Greece echo these troubles and symptoms.

Leaders in major companies around the world understand the need for business travel and
face-to-face communications to keep key employees in contact with key customers, partners
and suppliers. Smart organizations are hedging their bets and cost-justifying a portion of their
investment in telepresence and visual collaboration technologies as part of their business
continuity and disaster recovery plans. It’s not a stretch for them to view telepresence as an
effective substitute and productive complement for business travel. After all, even in the face of
public health calamities, natural catastrophe, financial crisis or war, company and ecosphere-wide
global collaboration must go on.

Our Goal
This handbook is a guide for overcoming the obstacles to inter-company telepresence and
video conferencing. With these technologies, you will be able to connect your organization
with business associates old and new more frequently and intensely. You will learn how to use
telepresence and visual collaboration to reduce the cost of doing business and enter new markets
with a greater velocity than ever before. And you’ll learn to make these enhanced inter-company
telepresence capabilities become your “Business Continuity Plan” should a further deterioration
of economic conditions, currency crisis, pandemic, or a cataclysm arise.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 7


Fundamentals of Inter-Company

““
Telepresence

The value of a network increases proportionally with the square of


the number of nodes on the network.
- Metcalfe’s Law, Robert Metcalfe


Metcalfe’s Law understates the value created by Group Forming
Networks (GFN) as they grow. Let’s say you have a GFN with
n members. If you add up all the potential two-person groups,
three-person groups, and so on that those members could form,
the number of possible groups equals 2n. So the value of a Group
Forming Network increases exponentially, in proportion to 2n.
- Reed’s Law, David P. Reed [4]

It’s All About The Network


The link between connection possibilities and value to users is intuitively obvious, but Metcalfe’s
Law crystallized it. In the 1970s, Robert Metcalfe, the inventor of the most successful networking
technology ever created – Ethernet – spoke about the value of the network as a proxy for the
network’s utility to the users of the network. The difference between a network of 10 nodes and
a network of 1,000 nodes is a greatly expanded possibility of connecting to more nodes, more
people and therefore more potential value.

Extending Metcalfe’s observation, David P. Reed, the designer of UDP (and now an adjunct
professor in MIT’s Media Lab) observed in 2001 that some networks, especially Group Forming
Networks (GFNs), had the ability to grow faster than networks without social networking
characteristics. Inter-company telepresence meetings and networks exhibit many if not all of the
properties of GFNs. Many different independent organizations require robust communications
with any given firm: suppliers, customers, joint-venture partners, outside law firms, recruiters,
accountancies, advertising agencies, foreign distributors, industry analysts and investment bankers
to name but a few potential participants. Inter-company telepresence networks have the ability to
grow exponentially as the interoperability, security, performance, and cultural issues are addressed.

[4] David P. Reed’s, “The Law of the Pack”, Harvard Business Review, February 2001, pp 23-4

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 8


Telepresence has redefined the user expectations of what the video communications experience
can be. As a matter of principle, telepresence environmental designers carefully control lighting
and wall coverings, employ high density audio designs, and use modern and pleasing furniture
implementations - on top of large flat screen monitors, video walls and/or beam splitters that
show remote participants in realistic life-size and real-time settings. The telepresence equipment
industry has established a “de-facto” standard of three screens capable of displaying two life-
sized participants on each screen in a product category we are calling ‘Group Systems’. The
compression algorithms and codecs involved are carefully engineered to assure the highest
quality and most life-like experiences ever seen. Using what had previously been considered
‘obscene’ quantities of bandwidth, telepresence suites create a business class consistency of
quality between locations.

These complex and highly controlled environments are configured with user controls that
assure they work instantly, without serious participant intervention or technical experience.
Many vendors of these systems incorporate managed services as part of the offer assuring
concierge-level service that monitors and fixes all aspects of the telepresence environment and
its communications. With telepresence systems users finally have a high quality experience with
peace-of-mind operations.


Telepresence systems are almost never purchased in quantities of one unit. The initial business
case for telepresence is almost always to replace business travel for internal meetings. Gartner
conservatively characterized the deployment pattern for telepresence in enterprise organizations:

Organizations deploy an initial batch of three to six telepresence


systems, and then come back between nine and 18 months later
for a second batch, which brings the total up to between 15 and 20
rooms. Thereafter, additional deployments are modest, and few
organizations ever surpass 30 systems. Given the overwhelming
focus on Fortune 5000 companies, this places the upper bound of the
core addressable market at something like 150,000 systems (5,000
organizations each with 30 systems). By 2013, we expect that less
than a third of this market will have been addressed. [5]

This assessment of the growth in the market seems to reflect static usage through 2013. It
doesn’t reflect growth due to the availability of inter-company telepresence and public availability.
Publicly available telepresence and inter-company telepresence increases utility, usage and the
need for overflow capacity and therefore the number of deployed rooms. Publicy available and
inter-company telepresence increases usage and deployments increases beyond the classic
Global 5000 firms.

[5] Scott Morrison, Gartner Group Video conferencing Products and Services Market Forecast,
Worldwide, 2007-2013

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 9


Table 1 – Comparing frequency of face-to-face meetings with customers and telepresence
sessions with customers. [6]
Meeting Class Average Frequency Per Month

Face-to-Face meetings 5.7

Telepresence sessions 0.8

Table 1 above shows that there are 7 x more meetings with customers that are face-to-face than
using telepresence services. Why? Partly because of the cultural expectation that nothing beats
a face-to-face encounter in securing or improving business relationships. However, there are also
technical, cultural, and operational hurdles also stand in the way of effective and efficient inter-
company telepresence and visual collaboration capabilities. These hurdles include:

• Performance – Connecting telepresence and visual collaboration systems often involves joining
disparate and competitive network providers with different policies and practices for Quality-of-
Service and IP addressing. It gets even more complex when multiple providers and their different
advanced services get into the mix.
• Security – It can be a sad truth that when integrating networks, the security policies of the least
secure participant can become the security policy for all. That’s why most security professionals
are skeptical of network integration. It’s essential to pay special attention to the interfacing
technologies, assuring these issues don’t risk network integrity or enterprise operations. There’s
also the increasing phenomenon of co-opetition to worry about. In co-opetition, companies that
may be partners in one market, can be fierce competitors in another. The risk of establishing live
video connections and potentially sharing meeting information with partners or competitors can
be enough to give anyone pause. Are the whiteboards in your executive telepresence and video
conferencing rooms cleaned off after each meeting? What can a competitor or investor deduce
from your room reservations if they can see that your executive telepresence suite is booked
every day this week at the exact same times as that of a publicly speculated acquisition target?
• Interoperability – A common practice in the early life of a communications product category
is that the initial generations of product are not optimized for inter-brand interoperability, which
is seen as a low priority feature (and the standards and testing mechanisms are not well defined
either). Besides, in the land rush that is the initiation of any new market, vendors hope to
convince customers to stick to one vendor: them. Furthermore, not every telepresence or video
conferencing vendor conforms to every standard the same way. In fact, not every product release
from every vendor conforms to the same standard the same way. Overcoming these variations in
suite-to-suite operations is never trivial.
• Operational – The procedure for reserving an inter-company session or for establishing an ad
hoc session can be complicated and onerous. It all depends on the blend of technologies that
your firm has implemented and the technical priorities of the firms you hope to connect your users
with. Ensuring a high quality experience with ease-of-use for end-users (push this button) is the
key to the conduct of successful sessions and unearthing the value expected from Reed’s Law.
• Cultural – Since it is the culture that defines what is acceptable, what is expected, and
what is allowed, the cultural hurdles have the greatest impact on the successful adoption of
telepresence or any other technology. Different organizations adopt new applications and new
technologies in different ways. Successful telepresence organizations have imbedded inter-

[6] Brockmann & Company unpublished study, www.brockmann.com, conducted Spring 2009.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 10


company telepresence directly into the way they do business, making it a natural extension of the
company’s communications-rich operations. People have to use the technology to help them do
their job. Addressing these hurdles will enable secure, convenient and high performance inter-
company telepresence and video conferencing services.

Inter-Company Telepresence Architectures


Transmitting video over IP networks involves complex processes for capture of audio and images,
compressing, packetizing, transmitting it over the network(s) and then decompressing the video
at the remote site(s) for presentation on the screen. Store-and-forward applications like email
and web browsing can tolerate lost, late or out-of-sequence IP packets, but not real-time video
or voice communications. These service defects cause video artifacts that ruin the immersive
experience and jolts the brain into a state of disbelief, while a one-way latency of over 100
milliseconds result in a perceptible and annoying delay when remote participants speak causing
audio collisions and stilted communications. Good network architecture is essential in minimizing
the negative effects of delay and packet delivery inconsistency.

Inter-company telepresence and video communications implementations typically follow one of


two architectures, centralized or decentralized designs. Figure 2 compares the centralized and
decentralized architectures.
Each of the appropriate
WAN services, ISDN,
Internet connectivity and
MPLS are discussed later,
but can be adapted in inter- Central control point
company configurations to
support either centralized or
decentralized architectures.
Enterprise A
Figure 2 – Comparing Enterprise B
centralized and
decentralized inter-
company telepresence
and video communications
architectures. The
intermediate network
shown could be an ISDN
service, an MPLS VPN
service or the Internet.

Enterprise A Enterprise B

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 11


In the centralized architecture, all inter-company session initiation messages and media flows are
concentrated through a central portal such as a session border controller (SBC) or a specially-
configured video bridge. Since all the traffic is centralized, the security administration is simplified
and more easily monitored. Similarly, the telepresence manager can poll the device for reports
on the history of every inter-company communication including destinations, service quality and
duration, which can be useful in chargeback-for-service environments.

In the decentralized design, every video communications device is empowered to communicate


with any other video communications device that its network connectivity can address. In a
decentralized design, security policies are more difficult to implement since it often means
modifying practices and technologies in a large number of independent endpoint devices.
The type of Wide Area Network (WAN) service employed to connect internal video endpoints are
important considerations for the inter-company implementation.

ISDN Networks and Video


For two decades, most video communications operations in companies relied on ISDN, the
Integrated Services Digital Network. While much of video traffic has or is migrating to IP, ISDN still
has a significant share of the market to warrant an overview and is occasionally the only option
available.

The world’s telephone companies came up with ISDN as the telecom industry migrated from
analog communications to digital. Today, ISDN is offered in two basic designs, a low speed
Basic Rate Interface offering two bearer channels of 64 kbps each and a 16 kbps data channel
for telecom signaling (2B+D) and a high speed Primary Rate Interface offering in North America
23 x 64 kbps channels with 1 x 64 kbps channels set aside for signaling. The European PRI
standard offered 30 x 64 kbps channels and 2 x 64 kbps channel for signaling, timing and alarm
information.

ISDN BRI did not gain much traction as a residential connectivity service in North America,
primarily because of the higher price with no perceived increase in user value. ISDN BRI did
gain much traction in western Europe where the service providers offered it as a lower priced
alternative to analog dialtone.

ISDN PRI circuits are popular as a method for corporate PBXs to be connected to the Public
Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), since they provided a separate channel for signaling data
that presents the caller ID information to the digital telephone and indicate to the PBX which DID
or office extension the incoming call on a particular circuit was destined for.

In concert with the development of video codecs and endpoint optics, the ISDN bridge performed
E.164 dialing and usually bound several ISDN point-to-point circuits together. These aggregated
circuits to create the connection speeds associated with a higher quality experience, at n times
the cost where n is the number of 64 kbps circuits involved. ISDN services are typically priced on
a monthly fee plus time and distance and so the total ISDN WAN costs vary month-to-month with
demand.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 12


ISDN services, because of their circuit-switched origins, are not responsive to service disruptions
in the network which is not usually an issue for three-minute phone calls, but can often result in
nasty service disruption in multi-hour video meetings. A circuit failure means the bridge has to
redial which often requires participant intervention. At the same time ISDN services are generally
viewed as secure because of the physical separation of traffic and the tight phone company
control of the physical access.

ISDN Gateways
The major feature of the ISDN-IP gateway is the interfacing between circuit switched and packet
switched networks such as enterprise IP networks or the Internet. This device converts media
traffic, addressing and signaling information from an ISDN network to an IP network and vice-
versa. The gateway supports both IP and E.164 address space. This allows an enterprise
migrating their internal video architecture from a legacy ISDN deployment to IP to continue to
reach both internal and external ISDN end-points.

From a performance perspective, ISDN networks can theoretically support the multi-Megabit
services that high quality telepresence systems demand, but since it takes the initiation and
binding of 125 channels of 64 kbps each (6 x ISDN PRI) to deliver one circuit of 8 Mbps between
two codecs in a typical telepresence suite-to-suite session and there are usually three codecs that
might need as much as 8 Mbps each, it is not a practical option.

ISDN services are however appropriate for inter-company video conferencing in a decentralized
inter-company architecture. That’s because any endpoint can dial out to any other endpoint over
a dedicated circuit with no firewall traversal issues. However, the low speeds attained always
present an inferior experience for users, not to mention the time and distance charges. ISDN
service can be configured as part of a centralized architecture where IP-attached users connect
into a video bridge or MCU, which then engages with the ISDN network to dial out to the ISDN-
attached sites or enable dial-in from the ISDN-attached users. Interestingly, many carriers are
‘hollowing out’ their ISDN networks by migrating ISDN traffic onto an IP transport WAN. ISDN-
dialed traffic is packetized by ISDN-IP gateways at the access central office and depacketized at
the egress central office.

MPLS VPNs and Video


Many large enterprises have deployed telepresence and video conferencing either in a standalone
or converged network using a carrier-provided Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) service.
In an MPLS network, transmission packets are assigned headers called labels including traffic
classification specifying eight classes of packet priority, which are processed by the networking
hardware to quickly route the packet without regard to the contents or protocols of the packet
being transported. This allows any communications to traverse any network regardless of the
underlying physical infrastructure, whether SONET/SDH, Ethernet, ATM or frame relay.

Carrier implementations of MPLS typically create logically-unique Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)
for their enterprise customers that aggregate many different customers’ traffic onto a shared
network. For internal applications such as intra-company telepresence, MPLS provides traffic
segmentation so video packets get the priority they deserve and very fast transmission.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 13


Peering MPLS VPNs through a carrier or by connecting to a telepresence and video exchange are
effective methods for reliable and secure inter-company telepresence networking. Each enterprise
member of an MPLS peering group enables connectivity and MPLS tunnels to the central peering
point or Network Access Point. Each enterprises’ VPN terminates on a Gbps Ethernet interface of
the peering service provider’s switch, isolating the enterprises’ internal address and security policies
from any other network participant, but enabling inter-connectivity with any other participant.

This mechanism assures both peering of SIP registry servers and very low transit delay in processing
media transport, regardless of the number of carriers involved in the communications path.

DiffServ Introduces Performance and Complexity


Much of the complexities in interconnecting independently operated MPLS networks - as was
the case with every predecessor virtual network technology (ATM, Frame Relay and X.25 before
that) - was the coordination of signaling specifying packet treatments for congestion across peer
networks and especially across carrier networks. This is an issue because there are preferences
and in many cases economic consequences associated with different classes of traffic, defined
by the Differentiated Services (DiffServ) architecture for IP networks.

MPLS and DiffServ however, do not work naturally well together since they operate at different
layers – MPLS operates between the network and data link layers while DiffServ operates at the
network layer – and are subject to differing proprietary treatment on traffic.

DiffServ is a class-based mechanism for traffic management, first proposed in 1998 by the IETF
as a mechanism for assigning each packet to one of 64 possible traffic classes so each router in
a DiffServ domain can uniformly differentiate each packet’s priority treatment on the basis of its
class. At the time, routers processed each IP packet on a first-come, first-routed basis. In the low
speed, high congestion designs of the 1990s, this resulted in many packet discards and a poor
user experience in real-time services such as voice or video. DiffServ was developed to enable
disparate traffic classes to traverse a common IP
network with appropriate priority available to real-
time applications.
Inter-company telepresence
DiffServ-configured routers implement Per-Hop often teaches you about
Behaviors (PHBs), which define the treatment
expected for each class. Some PHBs may be how good your IP network
defined for low-loss, low-latency traffic and operation really is.
others for best-effort delivery. DiffServ makes
recommendations to network operators about
router operations and does not mandate a specific
classification for voice or video traffic. In practice and despite the 64 possibilities, there are four
commonly-defined PHBs:

• Default is typically a best-efforts delivery.


• Expedited Forwarding is for low-loss low-latency traffic (like video).
• Assured Forwarding assures delivery below some subscription maximum.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 14


• Class Selector provides backward compatibility with earlier mechanisms.

But since MPLS was defined before DiffServ, the MPLS protocol designers agreed to use the
3-bits that had been set aside for experimental purposes in the MPLS label header, for Quality
of Service, enabling 8 possible PHBs in MPLS. Aligning one IP network implementation of
DiffServ with another IP network implementation of DiffServ is hard enough, yet the complexity
is compounded more severely when you have to similarly align the DiffServ implementations of
disparate MPLS service providers as well on opposite sides of a telepresence exchange.

It is not surprising then that DiffServ is a frequent source of inter-company telepresence problems.
It is at the edge of networks where DiffServ
classification happens and where it first
becomes apparent that two carriers and two Economics of Carrier
enterprises have different practices for traffic Inter-Company Telepresence
classification. Inter-company telepresence is all The telephone network of the past century
about expanding the edge of networks. originated with service providers operating
in distinct local footprints. As it became
Inter-company telepresence services push clear that users in one locality were willing
beyond the pre-determined boundaries of to pay to speak with users in another, the
carriers where sessions are viewed as either industry developed procedures for settling
on-net or off-net. Only the peer enterprise payments for traffic originating on one
telepresence manager has to worry about network and terminating on the other and
the end-to-end experience. Their contractual vice-versa. In wireless networks, roaming
limits extends to the edge of the telepresence service agreements between mobile operators
exchange, but not across their partner’s carrier. assures their users are granted mobile services
Users may never notice that a few email in territories and countries well-beyond the
packets are being discarded on the other footprint of their home service providers.
network since the application quickly
retransmits. But telepresence users can quickly There are no standard settlement processes
spot a degraded experience as a result of for carriers terminating or transporting one-
packet loss or greater instance of packet jitter. another’s telepresence traffic at this time. So
Given these sensitivities and complexities, the although carriers are interested in facilitating
burden of higher complexity is more than offset inter-company telepresence services, it will only
by the higher quality experience associated with be as a mechanism to grow the overall service
modern traffic management practices. utilization in the early days.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 15


Figure 3 – The telepresence and video conferencing exchange

Telepresence
Telepresence Exchange
Studio
Provider
Call Control /
Gatekeeper Video Conferencing

Call Control /
Gatekeeper

Your Organization’s Partner, Vendor,


Network or Customer’s
(Carrier or Private) Executive
Network
Telepresence or
Shared Video Conferencing
Wire-Speed
Switch

E.164 Dialing, Exchange


Provider’s Telepresence
Telepresence
Call Control Studio
Studio Policy Enforcement

End-to-End
Desktop / PC Your Organization’s Diagnostics & SLA Partner’s
or Mobile MCU reporting MCU

ISDN
Internet PSTN
Video Conferencing
Video Conferencing
Exchange
Provider’s MCU(s)
IP / ISDN Gateway

Telepresence and Video Conferencing Exchange Providers


A telepresence and video conferencing exchange is a service provider that sits between multiple
networks (carrier and private) that frequently use different DiffServ classes, different MPLS tagging
schemes and have independent network addressing policies and practices. An exchange
provider will typically provide some or all of the following services:

• Physical network connectivity between networks


• MPLS tag matching
• IP address conflict resolution between public, private or public-public or private-private
address conflicts
• E.164 calling support
• Directory services for inter-company video sessions and publicly-available telepresence suites
Telepresence exchange services can include access to shared video network infrastructure for
multi-site calls, and access to publicly available telepresence and video conferencing rooms.

Pricing-wise, exchange services can include one-time charges for on-boarding each endpoint and
for port activation. Clients can then expect to pay a monthly recurring charge which can include
either a flat-rate fee for a certain amount of bandwidth transfer between your network and your
partners, or a per-minute charge. Options often include access to video network infrastructure

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 16


and usage-based ISDN gateway services. Attractive value-added options include end-to-end call
diagnostics to pinpoint quality issues among multiple networks, carriers and service providers.

Leading providers include:

• Cisco has developed an inter-company architecture for


Cisco TelePresence. Tata Communications, BT Conferencing,
The Human Productivity Lab and Orange Business Services, Telmex, NTT, Telefonica, Telus and
Brockmann & Company are AT&T offer services based on Cisco’s architecture. Number of
publishing the followup report, The endpoints supported in practice is not available.
Inter-Company Telepresence and • IPV Gateways is a major wholesale exchange that matches
Video Conferencing Exchange DiffServ tags on 20 carriers with potential connectivity to 700
Review in January 2010. Get a other carriers through its partner, Telx. IPV supports tens of
discount for placing a pre-release thousands of downstream endpoint connections on some of
order now. Get more information on the largest telepresence, video conferencing managed service
the report and a discount for placing a providers including MASERGY, IVCi, Telemerge, InterCall, York
pre-released order now on page 60. Telecom and Providea.
• Independent Video Managed Service Providers running
their own exchanges with the option to connect to wholesale
exchanges include BCS Global, Glowpoint and Iformata.

Telepresence and Video Conferencing Communities of Interest Networks (CoINs)


A telepresence and video conferencing CoIN is a specialty network where the participants of the
CoIN can reach any other member of the CoIN and are united by the equipment vendor, the carrier
and/or managed service provider. Some telepresence and video conferencing CoIN providers
include MASERGY, HP Halo HVEN, Glowpoint, Iformata and Teliris. Some telepresence CoINs have
relationships with Telepresence Exchange Providers to route traffic to other networks.

The Internet and Video


The commercialization of the Internet in 1995
marks one of the most important milestones in the Desktop Video Configuration
history of the telecommunications industry since
it inaugurated an amazing period of innovation in Desktop video services such as
protocols, applications, access equipment, services Skype video and instant
and end user experiences. Today, 74% of US homes
messaging-based video
have broadband Internet access using cable, DSL,
WiMax or Fiber connectivity at an advertised average applications don’t need special
download speed of 9.4 Mbps. The widespread firewall configuration since they
availability of high speed Internet access for typically originate from within
residential applications at only $15-$140/month is a
the enterprise LAN and often
major influence in what business users expect to pay
for high speed connectivity to the Internet. rely on port 80 (http service)
to get around any firewall
Part of the great success of the Internet is due configuration issues.
to it being a giant shared network. It is a best-
efforts delivery service where packets in transit

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 17


are discarded in the event of network congestion
and all applications and all users have an equal
Tip for Better Internet Video probability of being correctly processed. Applications
Third party solutions such are assumed to correct for discarded packets by
requesting retransmission, which is not practical in
as IPeak Networks IPQ can
demanding real-time applications such as voice or
reduce packet loss on best video communications. For applications like email and
effort networks. The IPQ splits web browsing this is a huge shared-cost advantage.
packets into segments and
However, being a shared network is a giant liability
adds redundancy detail in
for real-time applications like voice and video
case packets are lost. communications. Since each of the packets in an
inter-company video communication has an equal
probability of being processed or queued as an email
dispatch or web browser communication, there is also
a high probability of jitter, which is variation in transit time across the network. Jitter and packet loss are
the two most frequent and significant quality-of-experience problems associated with the Internet.

Although the Internet offers inexpensive access, the trade off is that there’s no Quality of Service
in practice where some applications’ jitter and discard tolerances are respected. Instead every
application and every user is treated the same.

As an important shared network resource, the Internet has also been the major vector for information
crimes including viruses, spyware, eavesdropping, identity theft and denial of service. As a result of
these threats, the security of traffic traversing the Internet needs to be a major concern for enterprise
telepresence managers.

Internet address space is a finite resource so many companies and home users rely on Network
Address Translation (NAT) to expose only one IP address to the Internet and then use a different
dynamically-assigned addressing scheme in the company or the home network. Packets traversing
the NAT firewall have addresses substituted as appropriate so that the external site knows only of the
address of the NAT firewall and can’t reach the hidden computers, appliances and devices without the
firewall’s active cooperation. This way the many computers in the office are hidden from any probes
originating from the Internet.

Internet Security
A firewall is an inter-network security appliance that is designed to intercept and process all incoming
protocols, ports and service requests unless otherwise noted, in conformance with some enterprise
security policy. The simplest of these is the packet forwarding firewall that filters traffic on the basis of
direction, protocols and port numbers. Ports are used in the transport layer (as TCP or UDP) of the IP
protocol suite to name the ends of persistent logical connections with certain port numbers reserved
for specific protocols. For example, email servers pass messages on port 25, email clients retrieve
email on port 110 or 143. Web browsers generally communicate on port 80 while https occur on port
443. Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) messages are passed through port 5060 or as secure SIP using
port 5061. Similarly, H.323 signaling messages are passed through port 1719 and 1720.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 18


Trivial Firewall Settings for Single Station Inter-Company Video Communications
It is instructive to consider the trivial home office setting. In many small offices or home offices
(SOHO) there is only one video communications endpoint so it is not necessary to implement an
address manipulating solution that enable complex interactions or reporting services. To support
Internet-based inter-company or inter-office communications to and from this endpoint, it is
recommended to:

• Assign a dedicated IP address from within the internal address pool to the endpoint.
• Acquire a dedicated IP address for the SOHO router from the Internet service provider. Publish
that IP address to the video communications participants.
• Configure the firewall to forward all incoming H.323 and SIP messages to the endpoint.
• LifeSize users: define a minimum of 8 UDP ports and 2 TCP ports in the range port 60000 –
64999 for each of the maximum number of other endpoints in a multiway conference and point
the firewall to forward this traffic to the endpoint. A three-way conference from this endpoint
needs 16 UDP and 4 TCP ports.
• Polycom users: Ports 1718 with UDP, 1731 with TCP and then allow dynamic use of ports
1024-65535 with both UDP and TCP services.
• TANDBERG users: Ports 970-973 with UDP, Ports 2326-2373 with UDP, Port 2837 UDP and
Port 5587 if Multipoint Control Unit (MCU) is present and 5555-55xx TCP, forwarding to the
endpoint.

More sophisticated small offices might also have an installed IP PBX server requiring SIP
communications to and from the SIP trunking service provider. In these circumstances, it is not
appropriate to forward all the SIP and H.323 traffic to the video endpoint so a more sophisticated
solution, such as a session border controller, is in order.

As compared to the PC video implementation, the communications industry has to replace this
complicated security regime with simple, built-in works-anywhere functionality if there is any hope
at enabling broad market deployment. Under no circumstances should trivial implementations
require any firewall configuration, let alone the specifications defined here.

Session Border Controllers & Inter-Company Gateways for IP Video Networks


Session Border Controllers (SBC) provide a specialized real-time communications intermediary
service typically at the boundary of IP networks or the enterprise-service provider demarcation
point at the edge of a SIP trunking service provider network. They isolate addressing conflicts and
assure efficient real-time packet flows without compromising security.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 19


Video Automated Attendants
Figure 4 – Avatars ought to be used in video auto-
attendant applications.

Although typically deployed in support of SIP-based


telephony networking over IP, SBCs are increasingly
finding applicability in SIP and H.323 inter-company
video communications applications. These specialized
gateway applications provide services such as back-to-
back user agent service where signaling and media flow
traffic is terminated on each side of the SBC and passed
between the internal and external interfaces to overcome
addressing issues, H.323-to-SIP signaling gateway services and can provide encryption/
decryption service for packets traversing the Internet thereby freeing the endpoint from onerous
encryption/decryption processing.

Another gateway-class of network infrastructure, the video automated attendant functions like its
VoIP-equivalent. It enables video users from outside the company to access a corporate directory
of video users within a centralized architecture and initiate an ad hoc video communication.
Visitors see and sometimes hear a message, peruse the corporate directory and select the
person or room that they’d like to video with. The auto-attendant then hands off the session onto
the appropriate endpoint with corporate standards for bandwidth and messaging.

When used in conjunction with the SBC functionality, the automated attendant maintains
consistency with corporate standards for addressing since the SIP registry/H.323 gatekeeper are
aware of the online status and dynamic IP address of all internal users and that information is not
shared with incoming sessions.

Virtual Waiting Rooms


A similar approach for scheduled inter-company video meetings involves the deployment of a
MCU in the enterprise De-Militarized Zone (DMZ) where each video-authenticated employee in
the enterprise is assigned a virtual video meeting room, just as they might be assigned an audio
conference bridge ID and moderator password. The MCU supports two (or more) Ethernet
interfaces where one connects to the public Internet and the other conforms to the enterprise
network. Incoming participants are authenticated at the MCU and electronically ushered into a
virtual waiting room where they authenticate themselves and listen to music while perhaps viewing
the upcoming meeting agenda if the organizer had published it to the virtual waiting room. When
the organizer is ready to proceed, they authenticate themselves to the MCU and all the meeting
participants are bridged together.

Telepresence Interoperability
System-to-system interoperability is not as simple as implementing standard codecs for audio
and video presentation and transmission. In legacy video conferencing implementations,
single cameras and single screen presentations are quite common. Therefore, interoperability
involves only a few degrees of freedom for each critical dimension of the communications path.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 20


In telepresence systems however, many more degrees of freedom need to be factored into
the interoperability equation. Figure 6 on the next page shows the operating attributes of six
commercially available systems. As you can see, the basic assumptions about which camera
should be shown on which screen, and at what relative size and so on are important to delivering
on the user expectation in an inter-company telepresence session. Frequently, systems may be
‘inter-operable’, but they may only be able to connect a single screen while losing high definition,
spatial acoustics and the ability to collaborate on data.

Figure 5 – The angle between the line of the camera capturing the image of a participant
and the eye position of the person they’re speaking to on the monitor is the eye-line, which
needs to be as close to 0o as possible for the most natural experience.

Eye-Line

When the CFO decides she would like to conduct an inter-company telepresence session
and asks you to make it happen, the answer may hinge on the level of system-to-system
interoperability between disparate telepresence suites. Even when the network challenges are
overcome, the quality of experience might be considerably lower than end-users are accustomed
to when connected with like-systems. The endpoints from different telepresence vendors have
different assumptions around the number and placement of cameras, the geometries of monitors
and the availability, location and quality of speakers.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 21


Figure 6 – Interoperability of six commercially available systems.

BrightCom Lumina Telepresence L37 Cisco CTS 3000


Three 37” screens and a three camera Center Mounted 3 Camera Array, proprietary
array over the center screen. Proprietary codec,3 flat screen monitors, 3 position spatial
H.264 codec with support SIP. audio, interoperable with traditional video
conferencing via MCU.

Digital Video Enterprises LifeSize Conference 200


Tele-Immersion Room Three cameras each positioned below or above
Single camera, single codec located at eye-level each monitor, 3 flat screen monitors, H.264
behind beam splitter. Uses standards-based standards-based video conferencing compliant.
video conferencing endpoint as the engine.

Polycom RPX 400 Series Teliris VirtuaLive


Four pencil sized fixed cameras mounted Single moveable camera over each screen
behind the screen at eye-level, four 4’x4’ with 2-5+ flat panel monitors depending
rear projection video wall segments. H.264 on configuration. Proprietary H.264 SVC
standards based codecs. codec interoperable through gateway.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 22


That’s because telepresence interoperability goes beyond being able to connect codec to codec
and passing video streams. The magic of telepresence is creating an experience that as closely
as possible replicates being in the same physical space. This experience is the combination
of many tightly engineered factors including: eye-line and spatial acoustics where the speaker
closest to the speaker’s image plays her spoken audio stream so that the direction of the sounds
of the person speaking are consistent with the image of the person speaking.

Table 7 on the next page provides observations about the interoperability offsets associated with
each of two-vendor telepresence sessions.

Video conferencing interoperability is a simpler challenge since it is something that the endpoint
vendors have been working on for a decade or more, and since the number of screens and audio
inputs is greatly reduced, often to one each. Even two-monitor systems typically display the near
and far ends on each monitor as a default, with the far end and an H.239 data display available
as the next-to-default setting. In addition to the much simpler expectation, endpoint vendors have
also been quick to exploit new monitor technologies capable of 720p or 1080p HD presentation,
and deployed codec electronics and software that can really take advantage of the H.264
standard for a crisp visual experience.

In audio terms, the improvements in audio sampling and compression from the digital music
industry associated with Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) take audio treatments way beyond
the telecom assumptions in the old standby G.711 and G.729 techniques. These new
implementations have paved the way for significantly superior experiences over the classic
Standard Definition and telecom audio treatments, but negotiate with the legacy device to the
highest common denominator.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 23


Table 7 – Telepresence interoperability offsets for a range of leading market participants.

This chart features self-reported interoperability information from each vendor represented in the
1st column and each vendor’s answers are represented across their row. Each vendor along
the top row was invited to participate and some declined for a variety of reasons. This chart
is intended to help telepresence managers understand the issues in connecting to disparate
systems and is not intended to be an authoritative guide. It doesn’t contain information on a
variety of systems especially single screen systems and some vendors are not represented at all.

Telepresence Group HP Halo Studio and Meeting Magor High Definition


BrightCom Lumina 37 Cisco CTS 3000 & 3200 DVE TeleImmersion Room LifeSize Conference 200 Polycom RPX 200 Series
System Screens, Capabilities Room Meeting Room
Lumina Telepresence Series - Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes -
Group Systems: L37 (modular), see caveat
L65 (fixed room), L85 Max Resolution/FR: CIF / 30 Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
(customized fixed room)- 3 Flat through gateway No
Panel Monitors, 3 Camera Fixed Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
BrightCom Lumina Array, Over Center Screen, Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes through gateway 30 Can It Call / Answer: No / No Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30
37 H.264. Supports HD 1080p Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30 Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: G-722 Max Resolution/FR: / or 720p / 60 Can It Call / Answer: / Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
30fps. Support for SIP. Series Audio Fidelity: G-722 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: Audio Fidelity: G-722 Max Resolution/FR: / Max Resolution/FR: 1080p
range from 2 to 24 telepresence Spatial Audio: Yes Each codec receves one stream TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: Audio Fidelity: G-722
participants. Data and video TP Multipoint/#of Streams: Yes / from MCU which can include up N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio: No
displayed and automatically 3 to 16 CP images Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
adjusted on any of three Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: No Caveats: When using a SIP Caveats: Proprietary Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Yes
screens. Caveats: Caveats: Proprietary Connection compliant codec as engine Connection Caveats: Caveats: Caveats:

Can It Call / Answer: Yes /


Yes
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Max Resolution/FR: / Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes
(SIP) Can It Call / Answer: No / No 1080p30 or 720p60 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080
LifeSize Conference
Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: N/A Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Can It Call / Answer: No / No or 720-60 Can It Call / Answer: / 720p60
200
Audio Fidelity: G.722 Audio Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio: No Max Resolution/FR: N/A Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: G.722.1c /
1080p 30 fps, 720p 60 fps, 4 Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: Audio Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: 14
cameras + H.239 data, LifeSize TP Multipoint/#of Streams: No / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: N/A N/A Spatial Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio: No
phone. 4 monitors and No Data Collaboration: N/A Data Collaboration: Yes TP Multipoint/#of Streams: N/A N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
placement is dealer Data Collaboration: N/A Caveats: Proprietary - Requires Caveats: When using Data Collaboration: N/A Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Yes
responsibility, H.264, AAC-LC Caveats: Is SIP standards based? TP Gateway LifeSize codec as engine Caveats: Proprietary Caveats: N/A Caveats: Caveats: N/A

Can It Call / Answer: No / No (


Not directly, only through Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
gateway) Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1
Polycom RPX 200 through gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Series Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (2
2 Rear Projection Video Wall through gateway Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes
Segments (8 feet), EyeConnect Spatial Audio: No Can It Call / Answer: No / No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
technology, 2 in-screen Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Can It Call / Answer: / Max Resolution/FR: / No Each codec receves one stream Can It Call / Answer: / Each codec receves one str
'EyeConnect' cameras, H.264, Max Resolution/FR: / Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No from MCU which can include up Max Resolution/FR: / from MCU which can inclu
content monitors built into Audio Fidelity: from MCU which can include up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No to 16 CP images Audio Fidelity: to 16 CP images
tables. Supports HD 1080p Spatial Audio: to 16 CP images Spatial Audio: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: Yes, using Spatial Audio: Data Collaboration: Yes, us
30fps and HD 720p 60fps, TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No H.239 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / H.239
supports 22kHz wideband Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: No Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint req
audio. Caveats: MCU Caveats: Caveats: N/A MCU, we tested with RMX 2000 Caveats: MCU

Can It Call / Answer: No / No Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes


directly, only through gateway Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1
Polycom RPX 400 through gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Series Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (2
4 rear projection video wall through gateway Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes
segments (16 feet), EyeConnect Spatial Audio: No Can It Call / Answer: / No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
technology, 4 in-screen Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Can It Call / Answer: / Max Resolution/FR: / No Each codec receves one stream Can It Call / Answer: / Each codec receves one str
'EyeConnect' cameras, H.264, Max Resolution/FR: / Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No from MCU which can include up Max Resolution/FR: / from MCU which can inclu
content monitors built into Audio Fidelity: from MCU which can include up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No to 16 CP images Audio Fidelity: to 16 CP images
tables. Supports HD 1080p Spatial Audio: to 16 CP images Spatial Audio: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: Yes, using Spatial Audio: Data Collaboration: Yes, us
30fps and HD 720p 60fps, TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No H.239 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / H.239
supports 22kHz wideband Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: No Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint req
audio. Caveats: MCU Caveats: Caveats: N/A MCU, we tested with RMX 2000 Caveats: MCU

Can It Call / Answer: No / Not Can It Call / Answer: / Yes


directly, only through gateway Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: / YE
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD
Polycom TPX & through gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
ATX 300 Series Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22
through gateway Can It Call / Answer: Yes, if Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: YES
The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook
DVE uses a standard-based Spatial Audio: No Can It Call / Answer: / No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / 24
TP Multipoint/#of Streams
3 x 60-inch flat panel monitors, 3 Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / codec Max Resolution/FR: / No Each codec receves one stream Each codec receves one str
fixed array cameras, over center Max Resolution/FR: / Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No from MCU which can include up from MCU which can inclu
screen, H.264, content monitors Audio Fidelity: from MCU which can include up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No to 16 CP images to 16 CP images
Telepresence
Magor High Definition Group HP Halo Studio and Meeting Magor High Definition
Polycom RPX 200 Series Polycom RPX
BrightCom 400 37
Lumina Series Polycom
Cisco CTS 3000TPX 300 Series DVE TeleImmersion
& 3200 TANDBERG
Room T3 Telanetix
LifeSize
Digital
Conference
Presence 200 Teliris VirtuaLive and Express Telepresence
Polycom RPX
Tech
200
TPT
Series
4000 Polyco
System
Meeting Room Screens, Capabilities Room Meeting Room
Lumina Telepresence Series - Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes -
Group Systems: L37 (modular), see caveat
L65 (fixed room), L85 Max Resolution/FR: CIF / 30 Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
(customized fixed room)- 3 Flat through gateway No
es Panel Monitors, 3 Camera Fixed Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
30 BrightCom Lumina Array, Over Center Screen, Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes through gateway 30 Can It Call / Answer: No / No Max Resolution/FR: 1080p /Can 30 It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30
Can It Call37
/ Answer: / H.264.
Can Supports
It Call HD 1080p
/ Answer: Yes / Yes MaxCanResolution/FR: 1080p
It Call / Answer: Yes SpatialCan
Yes //30 Audio: No/ Answer: Yes / Yes
It Call Audio Fidelity: G-722 Max Resolution/FR:
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes / Can It or
Call720p / 60 No / No
/ Answer: Max Resolution/FR: 1080p // 30
Can It Call / Answer: Audio
CanFidelity: G-722 Yes / Yes
It Call / Answer: Can It
Max Resolution/FR: / 30fps.
Max Support for SIP.
Resolution/FR: Series
1080p / 30 Audio Fidelity: G-722 1080p / 30 TP Multipoint/#of
Max Resolution/FR: Streams: 1080p
Max Resolution/FR: / Spatial
/ 30 Audio: No Audio1080p
Max Resolution/FR: Fidelity:
/ 30 Audio Fidelity:/ G-722
Max Resolution/FR: AudioMaxFidelity: G-722
Resolution/FR: / Spatial
MaxAudio: No
Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30 Max R
Audio Fidelity: range from
Audio 2 to 24
Fidelity: telepresence Spatial
G-722 AudioAudio: YesG-722
Fidelity: Each codec
Audio receves oneG-722
Fidelity: stream TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
Audio / Spatial
Fidelity: G-722Audio: Audio Spatial Audio: No
Fidelity: Spatial Audio:
Audio No
Fidelity: TP Audio
Multipoint/#of
Fidelity: Streams:
G-722 N/A / Audio
Spatial Audio: participants.
Spatial Audio:Data
No and video TPSpatial Audio: NoStreams: Yes / from MCU
Multipoint/#of which
Spatial canNo
Audio: include up N/A Spatial Audio: NoTP Multipoint/#of Streams:Spatial
/ TP Multipoint/#of Streams: /TP Multipoint/#of
Audio: Spatial Audio:Streams: / N/ASpatial Audio: No Spatia
displayed
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP and automatically
Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/A3 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/Ato 16 CP Multipoint/#of Streams: Data
TPimages / N/ACollaboration: Yes
TP Multipoint/#ofDataStreams:
Collaboration:
/ N/A N/A
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: /Data
TPCollaboration:
Multipoint/#of Yes
Streams: / N/A TP Mu
Data Collaboration: adjusted
Data on any of three
Collaboration: Yes Data
Data Collaboration:
Collaboration: Yes
Yes Data Collaboration: No
Data Collaboration: Yes Caveats: When Data
usingCollaboration:
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Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration:
Data Collaboration: Yes Caveats: When using aYes
Data Collaboration: SIP Data C
Caveats: screens.
Caveats: Caveats:
Caveats: Caveats: Proprietary Connection compliant codecCaveats:
Caveats: as engine Connection Caveats:
Caveats: Proprietary solution. Caveats:
Caveats: compliant
Caveats:codec as engine Cavea

Can It Call / Answer: Yes /


Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
es Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Max Resolution/FR: / Can It Can
Call /ItAnswer:
Call / Answer: Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
No / NoYes / Yes MaxCan It Call / Answer:
Resolution/FR: Yes / Yes
/ 1080p30 or
30 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 or(SIP) Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Can It Call / Answer: No / No 1080p30 or 720p60 Max Resolution/FR:
Max Resolution/FR:
N/A / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 or
720p60 Can It
LifeSize Conference
Can It Call / Answer: / 720p60 Max
Max Resolution/FR:/ 1080p30
Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 orMax Resolution/FR: N/A
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Audio Can It Call / Answer:
Yes Fidelity: AAC-LC Can It Call
Yes/ /Answer:
Yes No or
No / Audio 720-60N/A
Fidelity: or 720p60
Can It Call / Answer: / 720p60
Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Max R
200
Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: G.722.1c / Siren Audio
720p60Fidelity: G.722 Audio Max
Fidelity: N/A
Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 or 720p60
Spatial Max Resolution/FR:
Audio: No Max Resolution/FR:
/ 1080p30 N/A SpatialAudio
Audio:Fidelity:
N/A AAC-LC AudioMax
Fidelity: AAC-LC /
Resolution/FR: Audio
Spatial Fidelity:
Audio: No G.722.1c / Siren 720p6
Audio Fidelity: 1080p 30 fps, 720p 60 fps, 4
14 AudioAudio:
Spatial Fidelity:
NoG.722.1c / Siren Spatial
14 Audio:Fidelity:
Audio N/A G.722.1c / Siren14 Audio
TP Multipoint/#of Fidelity:Audio
Streams: G-722Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
No N/A Spatial Audio:
Audio Fidelity:
No TP 14
Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/A Audio
Spatial Audio: Spatial
camerasAudio:
+ H.239Nodata, LifeSize TPSpatial Audio: NoStreams: No / TP Multipoint/#of
Multipoint/#of Spatial Audio:Streams:
No N/A N/A Spatial Audio: Spatial
No Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of
Data Collaboration: N/A Streams: /TP Multipoint/#of
Spatial Audio:Streams: / Spatial
Data Audio: No
Collaboration: Yes Spatia
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of
phone. 4 monitors Streams:
and / N/ANoTP Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/AData Collaboration: N/A Streams: Data
TP Multipoint/#of / N/ACollaboration:
TP Multipoint/#of
Yes TP Multipoint/#of N/A N/AProprietary solution.
Streams: / N/AStreams:Caveats: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: TP Multipoint/#of
/Caveats: Dependent on Streams:
codec / N/A TP Mu
Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration:
placement is dealer Yes Data
Data Collaboration:
Collaboration: Yes
N/A Caveats:
DataProprietary - Requires
Collaboration: Yes Caveats: When Data
usingCollaboration:
Data Yes Data Collaboration:
Collaboration: N/A Can provide Polycom/Tandberg
Yes Data Collaboration: Yes
Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration:
technology (i.e. LifeSizeYes
or other Data C
Caveats: responsibility,
Caveats: N/A H.264, AAC-LC Caveats: Caveats:Is N/A
SIP standards based? TP Gateway
Caveats: N/A Caveats:
LifeSize codec as engineN/A Caveats: Proprietary codec alternative.
Caveats: N/A Caveats:
Caveats: N/A Caveats: N/Aproduct)
standards-based Cavea

Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes


Max Resolution/FR: / HD 720p 30fps
Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 (14kHz)
Spatial Audio: No
Can It Call / Answer: No / No ( TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Each
es Not directly, only through codec receves one stream from MCU Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes gateway) which can include up to 16 CP images Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p Max Resolution/FR: / CIF Data Collaboration: Yes, using H.239 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p
Polycom RPX 200 30fps or HD 720p 60fps through gateway Caveats: TM Multipoint requires MCU. Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Series Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Audio Can It Call
Fidelity: / Answer:
G.711 Yes / Yes
(3.4kHz) We tested with RMX 2000 and (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It
Spatial Audio: YesVideo Wall
2 Rear Projection Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p 30fps throughMax Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p 30fps or Tandberg Telepresence Server. Direct
gateway Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes Max R
TP Multipoint/#of
Segments Streams: /
(8 feet), EyeConnect or HD 720p 60fps SpatialHD 720pNo
Audio: 60fps connection to T3Can It Callin
results / Answer: No / No
all 3 images TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / or HD
m Can It Call / Answer: / Each codec receves
technology, one stream Can
2 in-screen Audio Fidelity:
It Call Siren22
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Audio Fidelity: Siren22
Streams: / (22kHz)
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'EyeConnect' can include
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H.264, up Max Audio: Yes /
Resolution/FR: Each codec receves
Spatial Audio:oneYesstream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio
one ('filmstrip'). Fidelity:through
Connecting No Max Resolution/FR:
from MCU which / can includeMaxup Resolution/FR:
Max Resolution/FR: / / Maxfrom MCU which /can include up
Resolution/FR: Spatia
Audio Fidelity: to 16 CPmonitors
content images built into Audio Fidelity:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Eachfrom MCU which can include
TP Multipoint/#of up Audio
Streams: / Each Fidelity:
codec TTPS allows receiving
Spatial Audio: No
the 3 full Audio toFidelity:
16 CP images AudioAudio
Fidelity:
Fidelity: Audio
to 16Fidelity:
CP images TP Mu
g Spatial Audio: Data Collaboration:
tables. Supports HDYes, using Spatial
1080p codecAudio:
receves one stream from MCU to 16 CP images
receves one stream from MCU Spatial
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Details are here:Streams:Spatial
/ Audio:
Data Spatial
Collaboration: Yes, using Spatial
Audio: Audio: Spatial
DataAudio:
Collaboration: Yes, using codec
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / H.239
30fps and HD 720p 60fps, TPwhich
Multipoint/#of
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up to 16/ CP images
Data Collaboration:
include up to No16 CP images TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No
http://videonetworker.blogspot.com/200 TP Multipoint/#of
H.239 Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of
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Streams:
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Multipoint/#of Streams: / which
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wideband DataCollaboration: Caveats:
Collaboration: Yes, using H.239 TPCollaboration:
Data Multipoint requires Data
Yes, using Collaboration:
H.239 Data Collaboration: No
9/10/part-4-telepresence- Data Collaboration:
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00 Caveats: MCU
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MCU Caveats: N/A
interoperability.html Caveats:
MCU, we tested with RMX 2000 Caveats:
Caveats: MCU
Caveats: Cavea

Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes


Max Resolution/FR: / HD 720p 30fps
Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 (14kHz)
Spatial Audio: No
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Each
es Can It Call / Answer: No / No codec receves one stream from MCU Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes directly, only through gateway which can include up to 16 CP images Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p Max Resolution/FR: / CIF Data Collaboration: Yes, using H.239 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p
Polycom RPX 400 30fps or HD 720p 60fps through gateway Caveats: TM Multipoint requires MCU. Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Series Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Audio Can It Call
Fidelity: / Answer:
G.711 Yes / Yes
(3.4kHz) We tested with RMX 2000 and (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It
4 rear projection
Spatial Audio: Yes video wall Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p 30fps throughMax Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p 30fps or Tandberg Telepresence Server. Direct
gateway Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes Max R
segments
TP (16 feet),Streams:
Multipoint/#of EyeConnect
/ or HD 720p 60fps SpatialHD 720pNo
Audio: 60fps connection to T3Can It Callin
results / Answer: / No
all 3 images TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / or HD
m Can It Call / Answer: / Each codec receves
technology, one stream Can
4 in-screen It Call
Audio / Answer:
Fidelity: / (22kHz) TP Multipoint/#of
Siren22 Audio Fidelity: Siren22
Streams: / (22kHz) from the
Can It Call / Answer: / three Max
T3 codecs combined /into
Resolution/FR: No Can It Each
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Answer: / one stream
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Answer: / / CanEach codec
It Call receves/ one stream
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Spatial Audio: Yes / Each codec receves
Spatial Audio:oneYesstream Max Resolution/FR: /
one ('filmstrip'). Connecting
Audio Fidelity:through
No Max Resolution/FR:
from MCU which / can includeMaxup Resolution/FR:
Max Resolution/FR: / / Max Resolution/FR:
from MCU which /can include up Spatia
Audio Fidelity: to 16 CPmonitors
content images built into Audio Fidelity:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Eachfrom MCU which can include
TP Multipoint/#of up Audio
Streams: codec TTPS allows receiving
/ Each Fidelity: the 3 full
Spatial Audio: No Audio toFidelity:
16 CP images AudioAudio Fidelity:
Fidelity: to 16
Audio CP images
Fidelity: TP Mu
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tables. Supports HDYes, using Spatial
1080p codecAudio:
receves one stream from MCU to 16 CP images
receves one stream from MCU Spatial
which can images separately.
Audio: Details are here:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams:Spatial
/ Audio:
Data Collaboration: Yes, using Spatial
Spatial Audio: Audio: DataAudio:
Spatial Collaboration: Yes, using codec
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / H.239
30fps and HD 720p 60fps, TPwhich
Multipoint/#of
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up to 16/ CP images
Data Collaboration:
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TP Multipoint/#of /
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MCU interoperability.html
Caveats: N/A Caveats:
MCU, we tested with RMX 2000 Caveats:
Caveats: MCU
Caveats: Cavea

Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes


Max Resolution/FR: / HD 720p 30fps
Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 (14kHz)
Spatial Audio: No
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Each
Can It Call / Answer: No / Not codec receves one stream from MCU Can It Call / Answer: / Yes
Can It Call / Answer: / YES directly, only through gateway which can include up to 16 CP images Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: / YES
Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p Max Resolution/FR: / CIF Data Collaboration: Yes, using H.239 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p
Polycom TPX & 30fps or HD 720p 60fps through gateway Caveats: TM Multipoint requires MCU. Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
ATX 300 Series Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Audio Can It Call
Fidelity: / Answer:
G.711 Yes / Yes
(3.4kHz) We tested with RMX 2000 and (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It
Spatial Audio: YES Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p 30fps throughMaxgateway
Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p Can It30fps
Call /or
Answer: Yes,Telepresence
Tandberg if Server. Direct Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: YES Max R

m
The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: /
3 x 60-inch
Each codec flat panelone
receves monitors,
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stream3 Can It Call
Audio / Answer:
Fidelity:
SpatialHD 720pNo
Audio:
/ (22kHz) TP Multipoint/#of
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60fps
Audio Fidelity:Streams:
DVE uses a standard-based
/ (22kHz)
Siren22 codec
connection to T3Can
from the three Max
It Callin
results / Answer:
Resolution/FR:
T3 codecs
/ No
all 3 images
combined /into
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: /
No Can It Each
Call / codec
Answer: / one stream
receves Can It Call / Answer: / CanEach
It Call / Answer:
codec 25
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: /
receves/ one stream
or HD
Audio
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fixed MCU which canover
array cameras, include up Max
center Resolution/FR:
Spatial Audio: YES/ Each codec receves
Spatial Audio:oneYesstream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio
one ('filmstrip'). Fidelity:through
Connecting No Max Resolution/FR:
from MCU which / can includeMaxup Resolution/FR: / Maxfrom MCU which /can include up
Resolution/FR: Spatia
to 16 CPH.264,
screen, images content monitors Audio Fidelity:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Eachfrom MCU which can include
TP Multipoint/#of up Audio
Streams: / Each Fidelity: Spatial Audio:
codec TTPS allows receiving No
the 3 full Audio toFidelity:
16 CP images Audio Fidelity: to 16
Audio CP images
Fidelity: TP Mu
g Data
can beCollaboration: YES, using Spatial
built into tables. codecAudio:
receves one stream from MCU to 16 CP images
receves one stream from MCU Spatial
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Details are here:Streams:Spatial
/ Audio:
Data Spatial Audio:
Collaboration: Yes, using DataAudio:
Spatial Collaboration: YES, using codec
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Max Resolution/FR: / Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
(SIP) Can It Call / Answer: No / No 1080p30 or 720p60 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080
LifeSize Conference
Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: N/A Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Can It Call / Answer: No / No or 720-60 Can It Call / Answer: / 720p60
200
Audio Fidelity: G.722 Audio Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio: No Max Resolution/FR: N/A Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: G.722.1c /
1080p 30 fps, 720p 60 fps, 4 Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: Audio Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: 14
cameras + H.239 data, LifeSize TP Multipoint/#of Streams: No / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: N/A N/A Spatial Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio: No
phone. 4 monitors and No Data Collaboration: N/A Data Collaboration: Yes TP Multipoint/#of Streams: N/A N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
placement is dealer Data Collaboration: N/A Caveats: Proprietary - Requires Caveats: When using Data Collaboration: N/A Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Yes
responsibility, H.264, AAC-LC Caveats: Is SIP standards based? TP Gateway LifeSize codec as engine Caveats: Proprietary Caveats: N/A Caveats: Caveats: N/A

Can It Call / Answer: No / No (


Not directly, only through Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
gateway) Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1
Polycom RPX 200 through gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Series Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22
2 Rear Projection Video Wall through gateway Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes
Segments (8 feet), EyeConnect Spatial Audio: No Can It Call / Answer: No / No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
technology, 2 in-screen Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Can It Call / Answer: / Max Resolution/FR: / No Each codec receves one stream Can It Call / Answer: / Each codec receves one stre
'EyeConnect' cameras, H.264, Max Resolution/FR: / Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No from MCU which can include up Max Resolution/FR: / from MCU which can includ
content monitors built into Audio Fidelity: from MCU which can include up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No to 16 CP images Audio Fidelity: to 16 CP images
tables. Supports HD 1080p Spatial Audio: to 16 CP images Spatial Audio: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: Yes, using Spatial Audio: Data Collaboration: Yes, us
30fps and HD 720p 60fps, TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No H.239 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / H.239
Telepresence Group supports 22kHz wideband Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: DataHalo
HP Collaboration:
Studio andNo
Meeting Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration:
Magor High Definition Caveats: TP Multipoint req
audio. Capabilities BrightCom
Caveats: Lumina 37 Cisco
MCU CTS 3000 & 3200 DVE TeleImmersion Room Caveats: N/A
Caveats: LifeSize
MCU, we Conference 200 2000
tested with RMX Caveats: Room Polycom
MCU RPX 200 Series
System Screens, Room Meeting
Lumina Telepresence Series - Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes -
Group Systems: L37 (modular), see caveat
L65 (fixed room), L85 Max Resolution/FR: CIF / 30 Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
(customized fixed room)- 3 Flat through gateway No
Panel Monitors, 3 Camera Fixed Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
BrightCom Lumina Array, Over Center Screen, Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes through gateway
Can It Call / Answer: No / No
30 Can It Call / Answer: No / No Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
37 H.264. Supports HD 1080p Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30 Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: G-722 Max Resolution/FR: / or 720p / 60 Can It Call / Answer: / Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
directly, only through gateway Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
30fps. Support for SIP. Series Audio Fidelity: G-722 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: Audio Fidelity: G-722 Max Resolution/FR: / Max Resolution/FR: 1080p
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1
range from 2 to 24 telepresence Spatial Audio: Yes Each codec receves one stream TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: Audio Fidelity: G-722
Polycom RPX 400 through gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
participants. Data and video TP Multipoint/#of Streams: Yes / from MCU which can include up N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio: No
Series Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22
displayed and automatically 3 to 16 CP images Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
4 rear projection video wall through gateway Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes
adjusted on any of three Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: No Caveats: When using a SIP Caveats: Proprietary Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Yes
segments (16 feet), EyeConnect Spatial Audio: No Can It Call / Answer: / No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
screens. Caveats: Caveats: Proprietary Connection compliant codec as engine Connection Caveats: Caveats: Caveats:
technology, 4 in-screen Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Can It Call / Answer: / Max Resolution/FR: / No Each codec receves one stream Can It Call / Answer: / Each codec receves one stre
'EyeConnect' cameras, H.264, Max Resolution/FR: / Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No from MCU which can include up Max Resolution/FR: / from MCU which can includ
content monitors built into Audio Fidelity: from MCU which can include up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No to 16 CP images Audio Fidelity: to 16 CP images
tables. Supports HD 1080p Spatial Audio: to 16 CP images Can It Call
Spatial / Answer: Yes /
Audio: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: Yes, using Spatial Audio: Data Collaboration: Yes, us
30fps and HD 720p 60fps, TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: No Yes
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No H.239 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / H.239
supports 22kHz wideband Can
DataItCollaboration:
Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Max
Data Collaboration: /
Resolution/FR: Data Collaboration: No Can It Call
Caveats: TP / Answer:
MultipointYes / Yes
requires Data Collaboration: Can It CallTP
Caveats: / Answer:
MultipointYes
req/
(SIP) Can
MCUIt Call / Answer: No / No 1080p30
Caveats: or 720p60 Max
MCU,Resolution/FR:
we tested with /RMX
1080p30 Max
MCUResolution/FR: / 1080
LifeSize Conference audio. Caveats: Caveats: N/A 2000 Caveats:
Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: N/A Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Can It Call / Answer: No / No or 720-60 Can It Call / Answer: / 720p60
200
Audio Fidelity: G.722 Audio Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio: No Max Resolution/FR: N/A Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: G.722.1c /
1080p 30 fps, 720p 60 fps, 4 Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: Audio Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio: No Audio Fidelity: 14
cameras + H.239 data, LifeSize TP Multipoint/#of Streams: No / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: N/A N/A Spatial Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio: No
phone. 4 monitors and No Data Collaboration: N/A Data Collaboration: Yes TP Multipoint/#of Streams: N/A N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
placement is dealer Data Collaboration: N/A Caveats: Proprietary - Requires Caveats: When using Data Collaboration: N/A Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Yes
responsibility, H.264, AAC-LC TP Gateway
Caveats: Is SIP standards based? Can It Call / Answer: No / Not LifeSize codec as engine Caveats: Proprietary Caveats:
Can N/A
It Call / Answer: / Yes Caveats: Caveats: N/A
directly, only through gateway Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: / YE
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1
Polycom TPX & through gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
ATX 300 Series Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22
through gateway Can It Call / Answer: Yes, if Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: YES
Can It Call
Spatial / Answer:
Audio: No No / No ( DVE uses a standard-based Can It Call / Answer: / No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams
3 x 60-inch flat panel monitors, 3 Can It Call / Answer: / Not directly, only through
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / codec Max Resolution/FR: / No Can
EachItcodec
Call / receves
Answer:oneYes / Yes
stream Each codec receves one stre
fixed array cameras, over center Max Resolution/FR: / gateway)
Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No Max
fromResolution/FR:
MCU which can/ include
720p up Can ItMCU
from Call /which
Answer: Yes /
can includ
screen, H.264, content monitors Audio Fidelity: Max
fromResolution/FR:
MCU which can/ include
CIF up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No 30fps
to 16 CP images Max
to 16Resolution/FR:
CP images / HD 1
Polycom RPX 200 can be built into tables. Spatial Audio: through
to 16 CPgateway
images Spatial Audio: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Audio Fidelity: Siren
Data Collaboration: 14 using
Yes, 30fpsCollaboration:
Data or HD 720p 60fpsYES, us
Series Supports HD 1080p 30fps and TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Audio Fidelity: G.711
Data Collaboration: No (3.4kHz) TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No (14kHz)
H.239 Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22
H.239
2HDRear Projection
720p Video Wall
60fps, supports Data Collaboration: through
Caveats: gateway
TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: No Spatial
Caveats:Audio: No
TP Multipoint requires Spatial Audio:
Caveats: Yes
TP Multipoint req
Segments (8 feet),audio.
22kHz wideband EyeConnect Caveats: Spatial
MCU Audio: No Caveats: Can It Call
Caveats: / Answer: No / No
N/A TP
MCU,Multipoint/#of
we tested withStreams:
RMX 2000/ TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
MCU
technology, 2 in-screen Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Can It Call / Answer: / Max Resolution/FR: / No Each codec receves one stream Can It Call / Answer: / Each codec receves one stre
'EyeConnect' cameras, H.264, Max Resolution/FR: / Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No from MCU which can include up Max Resolution/FR: / from MCU which can includ
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes,
content monitors built into Audio Fidelity: from MCU which can include up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No to 16 CP images Audio Fidelity: to 16 CP images
through gateway
tables. Supports HD 1080p Spatial Audio: to 16 CP images Spatial Audio: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: Yes, using Spatial Audio: Data Collaboration: Yes, us
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF, Can It Call / Answer: Yes/ Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes
30fps and HD 720p 60fps, TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No H.239 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / H.239
through gateway Max Resolution/FR: 720p30 Max Resolution/FR: 720p30
supports 22kHz wideband Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: No Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint req
Audio Fidelity: G.711 Audio Fidelity: AAC-LD Audio Fidelity: Can It Call / Answer: Yes/
audio. Caveats: MCU Caveats: Caveats: N/A MCU, we tested with RMX 2000 Caveats: MCU
Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Max Resolution/FR: 720p3
TANDBERG T3 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: Audio Fidelity: G.722
3 x 65-inch flat panel monitors, 3 Can It Call / Answer: / Brought into TP Can It Call / Answer: / Brought into TP Brought into TP Can It Call / Answer: / Spatial Audio: No
fixed array cameras over each Max Resolution/FR: / conference/layout as any other Max Resolution/FR: / conference/layout as any other conference/layout as any other Max Resolution/FR: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams
monitor, H.264, 3x integrated Audio Fidelity: standard based video endpoint Audio Fidelity: standard based video endpoint standard based video endpoint Audio Fidelity: Capable of doing Tandberg
22'' presentation / User Spatial Audio: directly or through the Spatial Audio: directly or through the directly or through the Spatial Audio: layout through the Telepres
interface displays on the table, TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Telepresence Server TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Telepresence Server Telepresence Server TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Server
Can It Call / Answer: No / No Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Support 1080p30 and 720p60, Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: Yes
directly, only through gateway Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
AAC-LD Directional audio Caveats: Caveats: Caveats: Caveats: Caveats: Caveats: Caveats:
MaxItResolution/FR:
Can Call / Answer: / Yes
CIF/ via a 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1
Polycom RPX 400 through
gateway gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Series Audio Fidelity: G.711720p
Max Resolution/FR: (3.4kHz)
/ (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22
4 rear
1,2, projection
3 or video
4 x 65-inch flat wall
panel through
30fps gateway Can It Call / Answer: / No Spatial Audio:
Can It Call No
/ Answer: Yes / Yes Spatial
Can Audio:
It Call Yes
/ Answer: Yes /
segmentswith
monitors (16 feet), EyeConnect
cameras mounted Can It Call / Answer: / Spatial Audio: No
Audio Fidelity: G.722 Can It Call / Answer: / Can
MaxItResolution/FR:
Call / Answer: / /N/A
No TP Multipoint/#of
Max Resolution/FR: Streams:
720p / / Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of
via a gateway Streams:
Teliris Express &
technology,
atop 4 in-screen
each, H.264 NOTE: Teliris Can
MaxItResolution/FR:
Call / Answer: / / TP Multipoint/#of
Spatial Audio: No Streams: / Can
MaxItResolution/FR:
Call / Answer: / / Max
AudioResolution/FR:
Fidelity: N./A / No Each codec receves one stream
60fps Can
Max It Call / Answer:/ /
Resolution/FR: EachResolution/FR:
Max codec receves one720pstre
/
VirtuLive
'EyeConnect'
Express comescameras, H.264,
with a maximum Max
AudioResolution/FR:
Fidelity: / Each
TP codec recevesStreams:
Multipoint/#of one stream
/1 Max
AudioResolution/FR:
Fidelity: / Audio
Spatial Fidelity:
Audio: N/ANo from MCU
Audio which
Fidelity: can include up
G.722 Max
AudioResolution/FR:
Fidelity: / from MCU
Audio which
Fidelity: can includ
G.722
Telepresence
content
of three monitors built into is
screens. VirtuaLive Audio
SpatialFidelity:
Audio: from MCU which can
Data Collaboration: Noinclude up Audio
SpatialFidelity:
Audio: Spatial
TP Audio: No Streams:
Multipoint/#of to 16 CP
Spatial images
Audio: No Audio
SpatialFidelity:
Audio: to 16 CP
Spatial images
Audio: No
tables. Supports HD
the flagship product that1080p Spatial Audio:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / to 16 CP images
Caveats: Resolution of any Spatial Audio: TP
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/A Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: Yes, using
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Spatial Audio:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration:Streams:
TP Multipoint/#of Yes, us
30fps andan
provides HD 720pfor
option 60fps,
up to 6 TP Multipoint/#of
Data Collaboration:Streams: / Data
vendorCollaboration:
connecting No TP Multipoint/#of
Data Collaboration:Streams: / Data
No Collaboration: N/A H.239
Data Collaboration: No TP Collaboration:Streams: / H.239
DataMultipoint/#of Data Collaboration: No
supports
screens. 22kHz wideband Data Collaboration:
Caveats: Caveats: TP Multipoint
throughCisco's CUVC is requires Data Collaboration:
Caveats: Data Collaboration:
Caveats: N/A No Caveats:
Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration:
Caveats: Caveats:
Caveats: TP Multipoint req
audio. Caveats: MCU Caveats: Caveats: N/A MCU, we tested with RMX 2000 Caveats: MCU

Can It Call / Answer: No / Not Can It Call / Answer: / Yes


directly, only through gateway Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: / YE
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1
Polycom TPX & through gateway Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
ATX 300 Series Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22
through gateway Can It Call / Answer: Yes, if Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: YES
Spatial Audio: No DVE uses a standard-based Can It Call / Answer: / No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams
3 x 60-inch flat panel monitors, 3 Can It Call / Answer: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / codec Max Resolution/FR: / No Each codec receves one stream Each codec receves one stre
fixed array cameras, over center Max Resolution/FR: / Each codec receves one stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: No from MCU which can include up from MCU which can includ
screen, H.264, content monitors Audio Fidelity: from MCU which can include up Audio Fidelity: Spatial Audio: No to 16 CP images to 16 CP images
can be built into tables. Spatial Audio: to 16 CP images Spatial Audio: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: Yes, using Data Collaboration: YES, us
Supports HD 1080p 30fps and TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data Collaboration: No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No H.239 H.239
HD 720p 60fps, supports Data Collaboration: Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration: No Caveats: TP Multipoint requires Caveats: TP Multipoint req
22kHz wideband audio. Caveats: MCU Caveats: Caveats: N/A MCU, we tested with RMX 2000 MCU

Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes,


through gateway
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF, Can It Call / Answer: Yes/ Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes
through gateway Max Resolution/FR: 720p30 Max Resolution/FR: 720p30
The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook Audio Fidelity: G.711 Audio Fidelity: AAC-LD Audio Fidelity:
26
Can It Call / Answer: Yes/
Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Max Resolution/FR: 720p3
TANDBERG T3 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: TP Multipoint/#of Streams: Audio Fidelity: G.722
3 x 65-inch flat panel monitors, 3 Can It Call / Answer: / Brought into TP Can It Call / Answer: / Brought into TP Brought into TP Can It Call / Answer: / Spatial Audio: No
Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 or Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Can It Call / Answer: No / No
(SIP) 1080p30 or 720p60 Max Resolution/FR:
Max Resolution/FR: N/A / 1080p30Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR: / 1080p30 or
720p60 Can It Cal
LifeSize Conference
Can It Call / Answer: / 720p60 Max Resolution/FR:
Max Resolution/FR:/ 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR:
/ 1080p30 or N/A
Can It Call / Answer: Yes /Audio
Yes Fidelity: AAC-LC Can It Call
Can It Call / Answer: Yes/ Answer:
/ Yes AudioorFidelity:
No / No 720-60N/A Can It Call / Answer: /
or 720p60 720p60
Audio Fidelity: AAC-LC Max Reso
200
Max Resolution/FR: / Audio Fidelity: G.722.1c / SirenAudio Fidelity: G.722
720p60 Audio Fidelity: N/A
Max Resolution/FR: Spatial
/ 1080p30 Max Resolution/FR:
720p60NoMax Resolution/FR:
or Audio: / 1080p30 N/A SpatialAudio
Audio:Fidelity:
N/A AAC-LC Max
Audio Resolution/FR:
Fidelity: AAC-LC / Audio
Spatial Fidelity:
Audio: No G.722.1c / Siren 720p60
Audio Fidelity: 1080p
14 30 fps, 720p 60 fps, 4 Spatial
AudioAudio: No G.722.1c / SirenSpatial
Fidelity: 14 Audio: N/A
Audio Fidelity: G.722.1c / TP Multipoint/#of
Siren14 Audio Fidelity:Audio
Streams: G-722Fidelity: N/A Spatial Audio:
TP Multipoint/#of No
Streams: N/A SpatialAudio Fidelity:
Audio: No TP14Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/A Audio Fid
Spatial Audio: cameras + H.239No
Spatial Audio: data, LifeSize TPSpatial
Multipoint/#of
Audio: No Streams: No / TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
Spatial Audio: No N/A N/A Spatial Audio:Spatial
No Audio: N/A TP Multipoint/#of
Data Collaboration: N/A Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of
Spatial Audio:Streams: / Spatial
Data Audio: NoYes
Collaboration: Spatial Au
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / phone. 4 monitors and
TP Multipoint/#of NoTP Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/AData Collaboration:
Streams: / N/A N/A Streams:Data
TP Multipoint/#of Collaboration:
/ N/A TP Yes TP Multipoint/#of
Multipoint/#of N/A N/AProprietary solution.
Streams: / N/AStreams:Caveats: N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: TP Multipoint/#of
/ Caveats: Dependent on Streams:
codec / N/A TP Multip
Data Collaboration: placement is dealer Yes
Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration:
Data N/A
Collaboration: Yes Caveats: Proprietary
Data - Requires
Collaboration: Yes Caveats: When using Data Collaboration:
Data Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration:
N/A Can provide Yes
Polycom/Tandberg DataData Collaboration:
Collaboration: Yes Data Collaboration:
technology Yesor other
(i.e. LifeSize Data Colla
Caveats: responsibility,
Caveats: N/A H.264, AAC-LC Caveats:Caveats: N/Astandards based? TP Gateway
Is SIP Caveats: N/A engine N/A Caveats: Proprietary
LifeSize codec asCaveats: codec Caveats: N/A
alternative. Caveats:
Caveats: N/A Caveats: N/A product)
standards-based Caveats:

Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes


Max Resolution/FR: / HD 720p 30fps
Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 (14kHz)
Spatial Audio: No
Can It Call / Answer: No / No ( TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Each
Not directly, only through codec receves one stream from MCU Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes gateway) which can include up to 16 CP images Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p Max Resolution/FR: / CIF Data Collaboration: Yes, using H.239 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p
Polycom RPX 200 30fps or HD 720p 60fps through gateway Caveats: TM Multipoint requires MCU. Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Series Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Audio Fidelity: G.711
Can It Call (3.4kHz)
/ Answer: Yes / Yes We tested with RMX 2000 and (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Cal
2Spatial
Rear Projection
Audio: Yes Video Wall Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080pthrough gateway
30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p 30fps or Tandberg Telepresence Server. Direct Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes Max Reso
Segments (8 feet), EyeConnect
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / or HD 720p 60fps Spatial Audio:
HD 720p No60fps Canresults
connection to T3 It Call /inAnswer: No / No
all 3 images TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / or HD 72
Can It Call / Answer: / technology,
Each codec receves one stream CanAudio
2 in-screen It CallFidelity:
/ Answer: /
Siren22 (22kHz)TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
Audio Fidelity: Siren22 Can It Call / Answer:
/ (22kHz) / threeMax
from the Resolution/FR:
T3 codecs combined/ into
No Can ItEach
Call /codec receves
Answer: / one stream Can
Can It It /Call
Call / Answer:
Answer: / / Each
Can codec
It Call receves /one stream
/ Answer: Audio Fid
p Max Resolution/FR: / 'EyeConnect'
from MCU which cameras, H.264, upMax
can include Resolution/FR:
Spatial Audio: Yes/ Each codec receves
Spatial Audio:oneYes
stream Max Resolution/FR: / Audio
one ('filmstrip'). Fidelity: through
Connecting No from MCU which
Max Resolution/FR: up Max
/ can includeMax Resolution/FR:
Resolution/FR: / / from
Max MCU which can
Resolution/FR: / include up Spatial Au
Audio Fidelity: content
to 16 CPmonitors
images built into Audio Fidelity:
TP Multipoint/#of from MCU
Streams: / Each which can include
TP Multipoint/#of up Audio
Streams: / EachFidelity: Spatial Audio:
codec TTPS allows receiving the 3 No
full AudiotoFidelity:
16 CP images Audio
Audio Fidelity:
Fidelity: to 16Fidelity:
Audio CP images TP Multip
Spatial Audio: tables. Supports HD Yes,
Data Collaboration: 1080pusing Spatial
codecAudio:
receves one stream from MCU to 16 CP imagesone stream from MCU
receves Spatial Audio:
which TP Multipoint/#of
can images separately. Details are here:Streams:Spatial
/ Data Collaboration: Yes, usingSpatial
Audio: Spatial
Audio:Audio: Data Audio:
Spatial Collaboration: Yes, using codec rec
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / 30fps
H.239and HD 720p 60fps, TPwhich
Multipoint/#of
can include Streams:
up to 16/ CP images
Data Collaboration:
include up toNo16 CP imagesTP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No
http://videonetworker.blogspot.com/200 H.239
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of
TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
Streams: / / TPH.239
Multipoint/#of Streams: / which can
Data Collaboration:
s Magor Telepresence
High Definition Group supports
Caveats: 22kHz
TP wideband
Multipoint requiresData Collaboration:
Data Collaboration: Yes, using Caveats:
H.239 TP
Data Multipoint requires
Collaboration: Yes, Data
using Collaboration:
H.239 Data Collaboration:
9/10/part-4-telepresence- No
HP Halo Studio and Meeting Data Caveats: TP
Collaboration: Multipoint requires
DataData Collaboration:
Collaboration:
Magor High Definition Caveats:
Data TP Multipoint requires
Collaboration: Data Colla
Caveats: Room Polycom
audio. RPX 200 Series
MCU Capabilities Polycom
Caveats: RPX
BrightCom
Caveats: TP 40037
Lumina Series
Multipoint requiresCisco
MCU CTS
MCU Polycom
3000TPX
Caveats: TP 300 Series
& 3200
Multipoint DVE
Caveats:
requires MCU TANDBERG
TeleImmersion Room T3 Caveats: N/A
interoperability.html Telanetix
MCU,
Caveats: Digital
LifeSize Presence
we Conference
tested 200 2000
with RMX Teliris VirtuaLive and Express
Caveats:
Caveats: Telepresence
Polycom
MCU
Caveats: RPXTech
200TPT 4000
Series Polycom
Caveats: R
T
Meeting System Screens, Room Meeting Room
Lumina Telepresence Series - Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes -
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Group Systems: L37 (modular), see caveat
Max Resolution/FR: / HD 720p 30fps
L65 (fixed room), L85 Max Resolution/FR: CIF / 30 Can It Call / Answer: Yes /
Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 (14kHz)
(customized fixed room)- 3 Flat through gateway No
Spatial Audio: No
Panel Monitors, 3 Camera Fixed Audio Fidelity: G.711 (3.4kHz) Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Each
BrightCom Lumina Array, Over Center Screen, Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes through gateway 30 Can It Call / Answer: No / No Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30 Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Max Resolution/FR: 1080p / 30
Can It Call / Answer: No / No codec receves one stream from MCU Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Can It Call37/ Answer: / Can It Supports
H.264. Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Max
HD 1080p Can It Call / Answer:
Resolution/FR: 1080pYes/ 30
/ Yes Spatial Audio:
Can It Call
No / Answer: Yes / Audio
Yes Fidelity: G-722Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes
Max Resolution/FR: / Can Itor
Call / Answer:
720p / 60 No / No MaxCan
Resolution/FR: 1080p/ / 30 Audio
It Call / Answer: Can Fidelity: G-722
Can It Call / Answer: Yes
It Call / Answer: / Yes Can It Cal
Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes directly, only through gateway which can include up to 16 CP images Max Resolution/FR: / 720p Yes / Yes
Max Resolution/FR: / Max Resolution/FR:
30fps. Support for SIP.1080pSeries/ 30 Audio
MaxFidelity:
Resolution/FR:
G-722 1080p / 30 Max Max Resolution/FR:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: /1080pSpatial
/ 30 Audio: NoMax Resolution/FR: Audio 1080p
Fidelity:/ 30 Max Resolution/FR:
Audio Fidelity: /G-722 Audio
Max Fidelity: G-722 /
Resolution/FR: Spatial
Max Audio: No
Max Resolution/FR: 1080p
Resolution/FR: / 30 Max Reso
Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p Resolution/FR: / CIF Data Collaboration: Yes, using H.239 30fps / HD 1080p
Audio Fidelity: Audiofrom
range Fidelity:
2 to 24G-722
telepresence SpatialAudio Fidelity:
Audio: Yes G-722 Audio
Each codec receves one G-722
Fidelity: stream TP Multipoint/#of Audio Fidelity:
Streams: G-722Audio:
/ Spatial AudioSpatial
Fidelity:
Audio: No Spatial Audio:
Audio No
Fidelity: TPAudio
Multipoint/#of Streams: N/A /
Fidelity: G-722 Audio Fid
Polycom RPX 400 30fps or HD 720p 60fps through gateway Caveats: TM Multipoint requires MCU. Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
Spatial Audio: Spatial Audio:
participants. Noand video
Data TPSpatial Audio: No
Multipoint/#of Streams: Yes / from MCU Spatial Audio:
which No
can include up N/A Spatial Audio:TP NoMultipoint/#of Streams:Spatial / TPAudio:
Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of
Spatial Audio:Streams: / N/A
Audio Fidelity:No
Spatial Audio: Spatial Au
Series Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Audio Fidelity: G.711
Can It Call (3.4kHz)
/ Answer: Yes / Yes We tested with RMX 2000 and (14kHz) Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Cal
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of
displayed Streams: / N/A
and automatically 3 TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / N/Ato 16 CP TPimages
Multipoint/#of Streams:Data / N/A TP Yes
Collaboration: Multipoint/#of
DataStreams: / N/A
Collaboration: TP Multipoint/#of
N/A Streams: / N/A TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Data TPCollaboration:
Multipoint/#ofYes Streams: / N/A TP Multip
4Spatial
rear projection
Audio: Yes video wall Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080pthrough 30fps Maxgateway
Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p 30fps or Tandberg Telepresence Server. Direct Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: Yes Max Reso
Data Collaboration: Data Collaboration:
adjusted Yes
on any of three Data
Data Collaboration:
Collaboration: YesYes Data Collaboration:
Data Collaboration: No Yes Caveats: When using Data Collaboration:
a SIP Can Yes Proprietary
Caveats: Data Collaboration:
Data Collaboration: Yes DataData
Collaboration: Yes
Collaboration: Caveats: When using Yes
Data Collaboration: a SIP Data Colla
segments (16 feet), Streams:
TP Multipoint/#of EyeConnect / or HD 720p 60fps Spatial Audio:
HD 720p No60fps connection to T3 It Call /inAnswer:
results all 3 images/ No TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / or HD 72
Caveats: Caveats:
screens. Caveats:
Caveats: Caveats:
Caveats: Proprietary Connection compliant codec as engine Caveats: Connection Caveats: Proprietary
Caveats: solution. Caveats:
Caveats: compliant
Caveats:codec as engine Caveats:
Can It Call / Answer: / technology,
Each codec receves one stream CanAudio
4 in-screen It CallFidelity:
/ Answer: /
Siren22 (22kHz)TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
Audio Fidelity: Siren22 Can It Call / Answer:
/ (22kHz) / threeMax
from the Resolution/FR:
T3 codecs combined/ into No Can ItEach
Call /codec receves
Answer: / one stream Can
Can It CallIt/Call / Answer:
Answer: / / CanEach codec
It Call receves /one stream
/ Answer: Audio Fid
p Max Resolution/FR: / 'EyeConnect'
from MCU which cameras, H.264, upMax
can include Resolution/FR:
Spatial Audio: Yes/ Each codec receves
Spatial Audio: stream Max Resolution/FR:
oneYes / Audio
one ('filmstrip'). Fidelity: through
Connecting No from MCU which
Max Resolution/FR: / can includeMax up Max Resolution/FR:
Resolution/FR: / / Maxfrom MCU which can
Resolution/FR: / include up Spatial Au
Audio Fidelity: content
to 16 CP monitors
images built into Audio Fidelity:
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / Each from MCU which can include
TP Multipoint/#of up Audio
Streams: / EachFidelity: Spatial Audio:
codec TTPS allows receiving the 3 No full AudiotoFidelity:
16 CP images Audio
Audio Fidelity:
Fidelity: to 16Fidelity:
Audio CP images TP Multip
Spatial Audio: tables. Supports HD Yes,
Data Collaboration: 1080p using Spatial
codecAudio:
receves one stream from MCU to 16 CP imagesone stream from MCU
receves Can It Call
Spatial
which / Answer:
Audio:
can images Yes / TP Multipoint/#of
separately. Details are here: Streams:Spatial
/ Data Collaboration: Yes, usingSpatial
Audio: Spatial
Audio: Audio: Data Audio:
Spatial Collaboration: Yes, using codec rec
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / 30fps
H.239and HD 720p 60fps, TPwhich
Multipoint/#of
can includeStreams: Data Collaboration:
up to 16/ CP images include up toNo 16 CP imagesYes TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / No
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TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / TP Multipoint/#of
TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
Streams: / Can It Call / Answer:
/ H.239
TP Multipoint/#of Yes / Yes
Streams: / which can
s Data Collaboration: Can It Call
supports
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Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes


Max Resolution/FR: / HD 720p 30fps
Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 (14kHz)
Spatial Audio: No
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Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p Max Resolution/FR: / CIF Data Collaboration: Yes, using H.239 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p
Polycom TPX & 30fps or HD 720p 60fps through gateway Caveats: TM Multipoint requires MCU. Audio Fidelity: Siren 14 30fps or HD 720p 60fps
ATX 300 Series Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes Audio Fidelity: Can It Call / Answer:
G.711 (3.4kHz)Yes / Yes We tested with RMX 2000 and (14kHz) Audio Fidelity: Siren22 (22kHz) Can It Cal
Spatial Audio: YES Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080pthrough 30fps Max Resolution/FR: / HD 1080p
gateway Can It 30fps or Tandberg
Call / Answer: Telepresence Server. Direct
Yes, if Spatial Audio: No Spatial Audio: YES Max Reso
TP Multipoint/#of Streams: / or HD 720p 60fps HD 720p
Spatial Audio: No60fps connection to T3
DVE uses a standard-based Canresults
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Each / Answer:
codec receves /one stream Audio Fid
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receves oneYes
stream Max Resolution/FR: one ('filmstrip').
/ Connecting
Audio Fidelity: through
No Max Resolution/FR:
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from MCU which can / include up Spatial Au
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16 CP images Audio Fidelity: Audio
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Can It Call / Answer: Yes / Yes,


through gateway
Max Resolution/FR: / CIF, Can It Call / Answer: Yes/ Yes Can It Call / Answer: Yes
through gateway Max Resolution/FR: 720p30 Max Resolution/FR: 720p30
Can It Call / Answer: Yes/ Yes Audio Fidelity: G.711 Audio Fidelity: AAC-LD Audio Fidelity: Can It Call / Answer: Yes/ Yes
The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook
TANDBERG T3
Max Resolution/FR: 720p30
Audio Fidelity: G.722
Can It Call / Answer: Yes/ Yes Spatial Audio:
Max Resolution/FR: 720p30
Can It Call
No / Answer: Yes/Yes
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TP Multipoint/#of Streams: /720p30
Spatial Audio: No
TP Multipoint/#of Streams:
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Max Resolution/FR: 720p30
Audio Fidelity: G.722
27 Can It Cal
Max Reso
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over each MaxSpatial Audio: No /
Resolution/FR: Spatial Audio:
conference/layout No other Max Resolution/FR:
as any Max/Resolution/FR: /
conference/layout Max Resolution/FR:
as any other / as any other
conference/layout MaxMax
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TPResolution/FR:
Multipoint/#of /Streams: Spatial Au
Collaboration Tools
For most video conferences or telepresence Activision, a leading video
sessions, its not enough to see and hear the remote
game producer (Call of Duty,
participants. It’s increasingly important to be able
to share PowerPoints, documents, high resolution Guitar Hero, Tony Hawk series)
graphics and movies. Collaboration tools and services uses HD video conferencing
such as data sharing, interactive white boards, high to accelerate video game
resolution image sharing and document cameras,
development enabling faster
are increasingly an important part of any effective
telepresence system operation. Users need the QA cycles. Remote QA
telepresence technology to support the artifacts and engineers are able to share
collaboration processes that they would normally their experience with the game
need to participate in during face-to-face meetings.
developers without either
Most of these collaboration tools use the ITU’s 2003 party leaving their offices, or
standard, H.239, which specifies the method for the software load leaving the
multi-vendor data-sharing as an integral part of the development studio.
communications media flow between participating
endpoints. In practice, video conferencing
sessions with less than 384 kbps of bandwidth
available experience a severely degraded video, audio and or data-sharing presentation. Some
telepresence vendors integrate a web conferencing server with the telepresence system enabling
not only high definition document or screen sharing, but also the control of the telepresence
session from within the web conference screen.

Interactive Whiteboards
For collaborations with partners, vendors and customers where a higher degree of interactivity or
shared experience is appropriate technologies such as interactive white boards where you draw
on the white board in the telepresence room in Berlin and the results appear on the interactive
white board in San Jose are appropriate. The San Jose user can then use their interactive white
board to make edits to the drawings and share the results with Berlin. However, it is usually a
requirement that both telepresence rooms need to be equipped with the same interactive system,
a dedicated collaborative computer and be accessible over the IP network.

A popular default approach is the simultaneous execution of a web collaboration session. Of


course, this introduces further complexity to the meeting participants who must bring their PCs to
the telepresence session, exchange meeting invitations and then independently authenticate in to
the session.

Visualizers and Document Cameras


The ceiling visualizer (an optional HD camera mounted on the ceiling to present documents and
physical objects), is one in a series of video input devices that often times needs to be factored
into interoperability plans for inter-company sessions. Support for document camera input
streams is not entirely the same approach from one vendor to another, let alone one organization
to another. So, telepresence managers need to be sensitive to the capture and presentation

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 28


requirements of both their company telepresence and video conferencing systems and those
of customers, partners and suppliers that they may be expected to conduct inter-company
telepresence sessions with.

Recordings
The ability to record conferences is a handy feature. Depending on your industry, it may even be a
regulatory requirement. In some industries such as financial services sector and in some countries
such as the United Kingdom, all electronic communications - including video communications
- are required to be recorded and later made available in regulatory investigations. Regardless
of the legal requirement, there are merits in recording sessions even if its not legally required
in your industry or state. That’s because the communication can then be edited, replayed and
otherwise improved to satisfy training, safety or quality needs. Recording sessions can be played
back for colleagues that couldn’t make the meeting but need to hear and see the meeting, as
part of training courses, litigation defense, remote casting calls, deposition and to simplify the
communications required with rolling software development initiatives across multiple time zones
where the recorded video conference at the start and stop of each day leaves a recorded status
report for the next team.

Recordings of inter-company meetings involve privacy and legal sensitivities. Some jurisdictions
require the permission of only some participants, while in other jurisdictions it is required to gain
the permission of all participants.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 29


Best Practices in Inter-Company
Telepresence Operations
No report or presentation can credibly claim to deliver all of the industry best practices in a field as
diverse and dynamic as telepresence and video communications, and this handbook is no exception.
For your consideration and professional review we present several best practices for an inter-company
communications framework.

1. Strategic Review of Video Communications


Thinking of video communications as a strategic service within the company puts a greater emphasis
on the strategic planning of the service. It also puts emphasis on the investment profile and the
staffing of the video communications management function. An independent audit of the video
communications resource in the enterprise is the best place to begin the strategy development
process. This audit procedure should articulate the location, condition and standards for the
company’s video infrastructure, endpoints, administrators and key users. Randomly checking
processes and resources through onsite inspection and interviews can determine the confidence in
the data gathered as the baseline for the operation.

Higher quality, greater numbers of endpoints, sessions and length of sessions, and significant
growth in inter-company video communications are
major industry trend lines. Sharing the audit results
and mapping them onto these industry trend lines Recommendation:
in video communications have implications for
the many assumptions in the original design and • Conduct an independent audit
deployment of infrastructure. This process will highlight of your video communications
those assumptions that no longer fit with the overall capabilities, infrastructure,
implementation expectations and goals within the practices and operations.
company.
• Map the audit results
For example, a common practice has been in the past onto the trend lines for the
to install MCUs at the corporate HQ. After all, most industry and reconsider the
communication flows are from the HQ to the regional basic assumptions inherent
sites and the regional sites to the HQ. However, in an
inter-company telepresence setting, this may no longer in endpoints, network,
be valid. Instead, a lower cost, and ultimately higher operations, infrastructure and
performance operational practice would indicate that administration.
housing the bridge and other infrastructure ‘in the cloud’ • Develop and present strategic
is more effective. This would involve relocating your
video and VoIP servers and infrastructure into a carrier- plan. Reset assumptions about
neutral collocation facility preferably at a telco-hotel. You operations and investments.
can connect to various video, voice, data network and

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 30


exchange service providers using cross-connects versus pulling multiple dedicated T1-E1/T3-E3/
Ethernet circuits to your HQ, which may or not be available but most certainly will be expensive.

Managing those resources remotely with aid of the Video Managed Service Provider (VMSP)
connected to a telepresence and video conferencing exchange provider will drive efficiencies, reduce
bandwidth bottlenecks and increase service availability than if the infrastructure was centralized at HQ.

While most telepresence rooms establish a business class consistency of quality in capture, distance
to camera and screen, lighting, and acoustic wall treatments, classic video conferencing rooms do not.
Sometimes the camera and monitor are placed at the end of a boardroom table, sometimes in the
corner, sometimes across the table. Standardizing or minimizing the variations in a room configuration
is a boost to user confidence and user satisfaction.

For example, in one client, all camera presets are standardized so that 1 is the wide shot of the
room, 2 is the head of the table, 3 is left speaker position and 4 is right speaker position. All rooms
are configured with speaker phones in the center of the table, speed dial 1 is the help desk and VGA
cable for H.239 data presentation on the right side of the table. This simplifies the user experience in
much the same way that standard invocation of telephone features (‘76’ is delete message command
in a popular voicemail application) improves personal productivity.

And, in another circumstance, the company’s implementation of the video auto attendant server
forwards all problem sessions and or misdialed calls to the on-duty video engineer’s endpoint
for immediate attention. This best practice impresses video visitors with its responsiveness and
accelerates repeat use for inter-company visual collaboration.

2. To Converge or Not To Converge


Enterprises have historically implemented video communications within the constraints of their ongoing
budget for connectivity services – they’ve typically implemented the highest speed and most efficient
network services that their budgets can tolerate in some futile attempt to balance cost with quality. The
power of the immersive experience however, turns this old practice on its ear.

Converging real-time voice traffic with best efforts data traffic has been an initiative within enterprise
networking for the better part of the past decade. It’s driven carriers, bandwidth budgets and
equipment vendors in a race for the fastest, cheapest and highest performance capabilities for
processing, managing and troubleshooting these dynamic, mission-critical environments. The recent
changes in communications habits and technologies promises to reset this strategy and drive video
onto a new, particularly high performance WAN, independent of the converged voice and data
environment.

Off-enterprise-network mobile communications is increasing as is video communications


use. Telepresence 2009 report by Brockmann & Company shows that the frequency of video
communication has doubled since 2007. This greater frequency and longer duration of video sessions
is coupled with the reduction in enterprise-terminated voice sessions. It is entirely likely that the
corporate share of bandwidth allocated for transport of video services exceeds the corporate volume
of voice traffic in many organizations.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 31


Some organizations dampen the insatiable appetite for
video bandwidth with a corporate-wide constraint on the Recommendation:
video service, limiting any one session to a maximum
of 384 kbps, even though the lowest cost personal HD
• Move video communications
video system can easily consume as much as 1,000 kbps onto the telepresence MPLS WAN.
in a point-to-point session. In this way, the firm can more • Engage a Video Managed
easily converge the voice, video and data traffic onto a Service Provider to assure the
single enterprise WAN. Yet, there are consequences in
terms of the user experience and overall satisfaction with
highest quality user experience
the service. and performance.
• Insist on DiffServ commonalities
And, because any one telepresence session uses more •Periodically, and formally review
bandwidth than most organizations have for all other
applications, telepresence facilities often don’t fit in the
reports on service levels and
converged WAN at all. In the short to medium term, the outages with VMSP.
traffic engineering and bandwidth management practices
suitable for converging voice and data may not be
appropriate for the very high per-session requirements of video traffic.

Instead, leading organizations have implemented specialized video overlay networks for their
telepresence and video traffic. Instead of hiring a video-specific WAN management team, they have
engaged with video managed service providers to enable the firm to manage video as a strategic
service for the enterprise. This way the investment in equipment and infrastructure can best deliver
higher productivity and higher business performance and the VMSP can best be held accountable
for operational excellence. As part of this initiative, the firm should insist on DiffServ in all network
equipment and conduct periodic formal reviews with the VMSP to discuss outages, performance gaps
and corrective actions taken or to be taken.

3. Establish an Inter-Company Telepresence Program Champion


As discussed in this report, inter-company telepresence is not easy nor simple. But the benefits are
extensive and real, particularly in large organizations
where business travel to visit, train or support customers
in other large organizations is a major hard cost, soft cost, Recommendation:
and opportunity cost reduction target for both firms.
Systematic prioritization and focus
Hiring or developing a Virtual [Inter-Company] Meeting on the benefits of inter-company
Specialist is a best practice because it aligns responsibility
for an initiative with a professional resource that can be
telepresence assures that:
held accountable, or that hold others accountable as • Efforts are rewarded with benefits
appropriate. A Virtual Inter-company Meeting Specialist • The changes stick
is a dedicated employee whose responsibility would • Success momentum continues to
be to coordinate, monitor, measure, and promote inter-
company virtual meetings between the organization and
drive the initiative forward
vendors, joint venture partners, and customers. They are • Lessons learned are applied
the focal point and project manager for implementing

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 32


On April 22nd, 2010, the Human Productivity
Lab will be hosting a conference to help
organizations develop an inter-company
telepresence business strategy and develop
effective virtual meeting specialists. See our ad
in this handbook for more. Contact us if you’re
interested in developing a custom program for
your organization.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 33


possibilities to mix enterprise and public rooms. That’s Recommendation:
why developing interoperability procedures with these
leading public room service providers is such a strong Standardizing relationships with
recommendation. It greatly expands the footprint of your selected public room service
video network, expanding the opportunities to avoid
travel and thereby accelerate the business, without the providers:
cost of owning one more telepresence suite or one • Expands network, increases
more video conferencing room or unit. Users can do utility of video services
inter-company video conferencing or telepresence with • Accelerates the business
customers or suppliers who’s employers don’t have or
don’t allow inter-company telepresence but are willing to • Are billed on a per-hour basis
travel locally to an executive suite, hotel or conference • Provide insight on new potential
facility to participate in telepresence sessions. sites for video services
Costs of service are closely associated with consumption,
so there’s no fixed cost. Of course public rooms could
be used for internal sessions too. In this case, reviewing reports from the public service provider could
provide insight on where the company ought to expand its own video service network.

Overall, inter-networking with one or more public room service provider is a great way to expand the
potential endpoints that your users can reach, increasing the appeal and utility of the service just as
Reed and Metcalfe predicted it would.

5. Leverage Your Travel Management Supplier


Substituting business travel with telepresence sessions can also conveniently be done at the point
of sale for travel services. Leading travel management companies are beginning to offer clients the
ability to intercept travel reservations and present telepresence or video conferencing alternatives that
are lower cost, greener and faster transactions than the typical business trip. In its initial release, these
services facilitate intra-company telepresence where
the travel management can flag the routes most likely
reflecting intra-company trips and access the company’s Recommendation:
internal telepresence and video conferencing scheduling
resources.
Incentivize your travel
management agent and travel
The on-boarding of these services typically involves portal to substitute telepresence
having the telepresence manager share their room and video conferencing for travel:
inventory, including their preferred public room service
providers. Often the telepresence manager makes
•Work with your travel
available an interface into the company room scheduling management company to
capabilities, so that agents and or the web travel portal develop a program or find a
can book appropriate transactions directly and in real- virtual meeting provider
time. Eliminating any transactional friction is the goal of
this initiative, making the substitution of video services for
• Make your room scheduling
business travel easier. application available to your
travel management company
• Internally market the service

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 34


As telepresence and video conferencing exchanges and managed service providers become more
sophisticated around inter-company telepresence services, you should expect the travel management
companies to expand their offerings to book ever-more sophisticated sessions including inter-
company sessions and company-public sessions.

6. Integrate Telepresence Into Sales and Customer Support Processes


Begin to integrate telepresence into your company sales processes. Advertise your organization’s
telepresence capability in the contact options for your sales organization and include the video auto
attendant URI or IP address on company business cards. We recommend that organizations set
management goals for appropriate sales representative to conduct some minimum number of sales
calls via telepresence or video conferencing each month. Implement methods to measure results and
over time raise the goals as achievement becomes a regular practice in the sales organization.

One leading organization, as part of an internal ‘culture adjustment’ program, sent sales professionals
travel soaps, bar coasters and little bags of peanuts together with a wallet card highlighting the
practices and benefits of video conferencing and the scheduling portal’s URL. The accompanying note
expressed sympathy by providing all the goodies they’ll likely miss getting with less travel, but then
highlighted the benefits of video conferencing: fewer x-rays and security inspections, less time wasted
waiting, less time spent completing travel expense forms, and more time on profitable business and
with family.

Product or service failures are inevitable, but they can be great opportunities for creating loyalty
and superb customer experiences. Equipping the customer support professionals with personal
video conferencing devices and publicizing the capability can go a long way towards implementing
a consistently high quality, premium support service for customers that have also invested in video
conferencing equipment and inter-company infrastructure.

At least one retailer is equipping stores with eye-level


personal telepresence systems that allow product Recommendation:
specialists to be concentrated in a national video call
center. Expensive and highly knowledgeable product Sales and customer service
specialists are therefore always available to potential professionals are always looking
customers to answer questions and win more business.
for ways to do more, faster:
In larger, more complex product organizations the • Educate the sales leaders on
deployment of video conferencing or telepresence suites how intercompany telepresence
for the exclusive use of customer service can give the can make their teams more
business customer a more sincere and personal service.
productive
And service recovery supported by video conferencing
leads to a more loyal customer. Video conferencing is a • Educate external-facing
powerful aid to the support team because the team can be coworkers on video - make them
more sensitive in the sharing of the status of the problem program ambassadors
resolution process with the affected customer(s), who,
• Have fun with showing the sales
likewise, can communicate more information through a
video conference than they can in email or over the phone. team what’s in it for me (them)

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 35


Conclusion
Inter-Company Telepresence and Video Conferencing is a Business Priority
No doubt telepresence and video conferencing services have and will help many thousands of
firms reduce cost and improve personal and organizational productivity. Accenture’s connectivity
with 31 firms, 600 rooms, and almost 2,000,000 partner employees is a glimpse of the future
here today. There aren’t many practices adopted with vigor in the current recession that have
environmental benefits, reduce wear and tear on employees, and preserve a firm’s stockpile
of cold, hard cash. That makes telepresence and effective visual collaboration a growing
phenomenon for business communications in good times and in bad.

For any organization experiencing the effects of higher utilization of video communications
services, the enabling of standardized connectivity with public rooms assures an increase in
capacity without the usual capital expense. In these circumstances, the public room service
provider becomes the ‘overflow’ infrastructure that fiscally tight organizations prefer, where there’s
only a bill when utilized. Other best practices recommended include conducting a telepresence
and video communications strategic review, developing an inter-company telepresence and video
conferencing champion, leverage the company’s travel management supplier to capture video
sessions as travel substitutions, integrate video conferencing and telepresence into sales and
customer support organizations.

Inter-company telepresence and video conferencing services promise to accelerate the pace at
which visual collaboration is changing business practices. Telepresence managers must make
sure their organizations are correctly poised to exploit these trends. It’s a matter of capturing the
productivity improvements necessary to lead the global economy out of this long and
nasty recession.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 36


Appendix A: Security Resources
Cisco
Download. Configuring Security and Troubleshooting Security Configurations for Cisco
TelePresence Multipoint Switch, TelePresence Manager, and the Cisco TelePresence System.

Polycom
Download. Delivering on the Promise of Easy to Use, Secure and Inexpensive Video conferencing
in an IP Environment - Solving the Challenges Created by Firewalls and Network Address
Translations in a Video conferencing Environment.

RADVISION
Download. Port Security Scopia Solution 7.0, publication 19, June 2009. This document details
RADVISION use of TCP, IP, UDP ports throughout the company’s NBU product range.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 37


Appendix B: Sample Letters
Dear [NAME OF XYZ EXECUTIVE],

As you may know, the IT department


This letter is a memo to business leaders in
is evaluating telepresence and visual
XYZ company contemplating establishing
collaboration solutions that will allow us to
an inter-company telepresence and video
deliver training globally. We are also evaluating
conferencing initiative. It solicits business
solutions that will not only connect the
leader recommendations on target customers,
corporate headquarters to key XYZ locations
partners and suppliers.
around the world but that could also provide
vital connections to key vendors, joint venture
partners, customers and trading partners.

No doubt that as the airline industry restructures itself (2008 saw the bankruptcy of 25+ airlines
globally and the International Air Transport Association announced recently that airlines are
projected to lose $12 billion dollars this year) there will be higher ticket prices, fewer non-stop
flights, fuller flights and significantly reduced ability for the airlines to efficiently reroute passengers
when delays or mechanical problems occur. Business travel will likely get a lot less convenient for
doing business, greatly affecting your team’s productivity.

Our telepresence service can help. We are surveying the leaders of the business units within the
company to determine what external organizations it would be important and/or critical to have
effective telepresence and/or video conferencing connections with to reduce our cost of doing
business, improve our productivity and collaborative efforts, particularly as the convenience of air
travel is predicted to continue to deteriorate.

If you could please complete this short survey by Friday, it will help us in evaluating the equipment
and network options that would best connect us with our key stakeholders, and most likely
improve our business faster.

Sincerely,

YOUR NAME, TITLE


EMAIL
TELEPHONE

Dear [HIGHEST RANKING APPROPRIATE EXECUTIVE AT CUSTOMER/SUPPLIER/PARTNER],


Organization & Key Location(s) Customer/ Estimated No. Importance to
Contact Supplier/Partner of Face-to-face Business
Meetings/month

Example: Sugar Land TX Supplier 25 Very important


Schlumberger,
Al Smith, Buffalo NY
408-555-1212

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 38


This letter is to business leaders in customers,
suppliers, and partners proposing participation
in an inter-company telepresence and video
conferencing initiative.

Your company is a key [CUSTOMER/SUPPLIER/PARTNER] in our business and we’d like to


take steps to deepen our corporate relationship, reduce both our costs of doing business and
limit our environmental impact. Over the past three years XYZ company has invested significantly
in our internal network, telepresence and video conferencing implementation. We have reaped
substantial benefits to our company, the environment and our employees and now we’d like to
expand our network footprint to include the ability to conduct inter-company telepresence and
video conferencing with your company.

No doubt face-to-face meetings are a regular part of working with your fine organization and are
likely to continue for important joint initiatives. However, our experience has been that we can
substitute telepresence and video conferencing services for most of the routine, but important
team collaborations. We’d be happy to discuss our success and detailed technical proposal with
the appropriate responsible member of your organization.

I would like to introduce our Virtual Meeting Specialist, Ms Francine Venky whose contact
details are below. She is best positioned to answer any questions your staff may have and is
responsible for facilitating this important initiative here at XYZ. I am also attaching a directory of
our telepresence and visual collaboration assets and contact information to share with your IT
staff and appropriate administration professionals.

Sincerely,

[HIGHEST RANKING APPROPRIATE EXECUTIVE FOR CUSTOMER/SUPPLIER/PARTNER]

XYZ Corporation

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 39


Telepresence and Visual Collaboration Directory
dated January 2010 This is a sample telepresence and video
conferencing directory that you can customize
Dear Partners, and share with customers, suppliers and
The XYZ Corporation uses telepresence and partners to encourage inter-company
visual collaboration internally to save time, telepresence and video conferencing.
money, and reduce the wear and tear of
travel on our valuable employees. We invite
our partners, vendors, and customers to connect with us to improve our ability to collaborate
and reduce the shared costs of our relationship. We have these capabilities in all of our major
facilities and business units including: Executive Management, Sales, Research and Development,
Manufacturing, and even offer training and certification on our entire line of oil field redevelopment
products and services.

Virtual Meeting Coordinator: Ms. Francine Venky


123 Oil Patch Way (888) 555-1234, fvenky@xyzservices.com
Sugar Land, Texas 77478 http://www.xyzservices.com/telepresence

Capabilities Include:
Telepresence Group System – Brand A – 18 Seats,
- Interactive Whiteboard, Visualizer, Brand A Data Collaboration, Webconferencing
Telepresence Group System – Brand B – 6 Seats,
- Brand B Data Collaboration, Webconferencing
HD Videoconferencing System – Brand C – 24 Seat Classroom
- Interactive Whiteboard, Visualizer, Brand C Data Collaboration, Webconferencing
HD Videoconferencing System – Brand C – 4-8 Seat Meeting Room
- Interactive Whiteboard, Visualizer, Brand C Data Collaboration, Webconferencing

Please Note: We also have the ability to offer real-time support and troubleshooting via video
on any piece of equipment that we sell or service. We can connect with your employees on rig
or platform and use handheld video units to both examine issues in the field and/or troubleshoot/
illustrate fixes and work-arounds from our testing & development lab in Sugar Land or our
manufacturing facility in Victoria, Texas.

Technical: Our telepresence and video assets are managed by VMSP Corp. and you can reach
their Network Operation Center at (888) 555-4321. VMSP will coordinate connectivity and inter-
operability issues and do a test call to your telepresence system prior to our first scheduled virtual
meeting to ensure a quality connection.
Network: We operate a dedicated IP video overlay network with VNSP Corp and are “on-net”
with everyone else on the VNSP Corp network. We also subscribe to a telepresence exchange
service with TESP Corp and can establish QoS connections with hundreds of different networks
through their exchange. We can also reach ISDN video endpoints as well.
Multi-point Capabilities: We can host multi-site telepresence and videoconferencing calls with
dozens of sites.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 40


Telepresence and Video By Business Unit
Sales – Every Sales Rep has a personal video number and can set up telepresence meetings in
any of our dedicated rooms. If you have general sales questions or to reach an engineer 24 x 5
Monday-Friday via video:
-videosales@xyzservices.com Video Sales IP: 116.12.45.126 or E.164: 281-555-1234

Customer Support – You can reach our global customer support desk at our testing &
development lab in Sugar Land via video 24 x 7 x 365
-Videosupport@xyzservices.com IP: 116.12.45.125 or E.164: 281-555-1235

Training and Certification – We offer regularly scheduled training and certification classes
via telepresence and video. You can find the 2010 schedule here: www.xyzservices.com/
training. You can also call Jane Smith @ (888) 555-1236 to schedule a private training session or
certification class.
-videotraining@xyzservices.com IP: 116.12.45.127 or E-164: 281-555-1236

Telepresence and Video at Regional Offices


Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia
Telepresence Group System - Brand A, 18 Seat Classroom
-Interactive Whiteboard, Visualizer, Brand A Data Collaboration, Webconferencing
• Site Contact & Scheduling: ALKVideoScheduling@xyzservices.com or +966 3 555 1234

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 41


Appendix C: The Inter-Company
Telepresence Glossary
AAC – advanced Audio Coding is standardized by the ISO as the lossy compression technique
for digital audio. It is designed to supercede MP3.

Audio Compression - the encoding of audio information so that it uses less bandwidth or
storage space on digital media or in transmission while retaining audio quality. Popular examples
of audio compression techniques include G.729 and AAC.

Bandwidth – the amount of data a communications link can transmit in a given period of time.
Measured in bits per second.

Beam splitter - an optical device that splits a light source into two beams. This device is
frequently used in telepresence deployments to better replicate direct eye contact between
remote participants.

Camera Platform - a device for mounting a camera on, usually movable, but can also describe
a platform that uses an exacting placement. Camera platforms can use simple pan and tilt
mechanisms, or have an additional roll axis to increase anthropomorphism, depending on the
demands of the application.

Camera Convergence - situation where all available camera foci aim their gaze onto one point
in 3D space. Think of multiple human eyes focusing on a single object moving nearer and further
away from the group.

Camera Divergence – situation where all available cameras views appear as if they emanate
from a single point in 3D space. Picture a 360 degree panoramic image created by ten cameras
attached to single pole in the center of a large room.

Codec - a portmanteau of en-CO-ding and DEC-oding to represent a hardware device or


software algorithm that encodes and/or decodes a signal for transmission, storage or encryption.

Converged Network – a telecommunications wide area network where an array of applications


and traffic types are simultaneously supported.

CPE or “customer premise equipment” - networking and telecommunications systems typically


purchased for customer use and located at the customer’s location.

Concierge Service - in telepresence conferencing deployments, Concierge Services refers to


a class of service where employees of a managed service provider assist telepresence session

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 42


participants with scheduling, operating, and necessary adjustments during the meeting. In some
implementations they are present in silent observation mode and can be made available by asking
for the ‘operator.’

DS3 or T3 – digital signal level-3 T-carrier is a US telecommunications standard for 44.736 Mbps
transmission.

E1 or level 1 E-carrier - the international standard (not in Japan, USA, Canada and some
Caribbean countries) for transmission circuits operating at 2.048 Mbps throughput.

E.164 Numbering – the ITU-T standard for the worldwide telephone numbering plan. Also used
for ISDN services.

Endpoint – a camera, microphone, speaker, codec, and environment at one end of the
telepresence transmission path. A typical telepresence session connects the cameras, the
microphones, the monitors, the speakers, codecs, and environments between two sites.

Environmental Telepresence – a telepresence solution where the physical setting of a meeting


room or classroom is precisely modeled with the intent of simulating the experience of actually
being there. Techniques include creating mirrored spaces in multiple locations, architectural
elements that add to the illusion that both sides of a telepresence session create a single space,
and studio quality lighting and acoustics.

Field Maintenance – a service agreement where covered equipment is repaired, replaced, or


serviced on the customer’s site.

G.711 – an ITU-T standard for voice communications sampling at 8000 samples/second, with
logarithmic quantization to define each sample in 8 bits, generating a 64 kbps bit rate. G.711 is
widely used in telecom networks.

G.729 - an ITU-T standard for audio compression capable of 8 kbps or in some applications as
low as 6 kbps.

Gateway – a device that interfaces between disparate networks. In telepresence


implementations, gateways are necessary to connect telepresence systems to standard definition
IP video conferencing systems or to legacy IP video conferencing systems.

H.239 – an ITU-T standard for computer screen sharing.

H.263 – a ITU-T standard for video compression.

H.264 – also known as AVC and MPEG-4, is standard in video communications that provides
high quality video at very low bit rates. The algorithm uses advances in frame prediction, color
prediction, motion and compensation techniques.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 43


H.320 – an ITU-T standard for multimedia transmission over ISDN networks.
H.323 – an ITU-T standard for multimedia communications over any packet network.

Immersive - a term used to refer to certain types of sensory reproduction systems used in
VR and Telepresence where the user actually becomes or has the feeling of being part of the
experience, as opposed to observing the experience. For example, a user using a Head Mounted
Display or a Virtual Reality CAVE system would be immersed in the experience, whereas someone
viewing a remote location on a simple computer monitor would not be.

Interactive Whiteboard - a large interactive display showing the computer’s desktop on a


board’s surface, where users control the computer using a stylus or by physically touching the
surface.

ISDN - Integrated Services Digital Network refers to an ITU-T standard for circuit-switched digital
communications in 64 kbps increments of a Bearer service. Services are available in Basic Rate
Interface of 2B+D where D is a 16 kbps data channel for signaling for 128 kbps, and in Primary
Rate Interface of 23B+D where D is a 64 kbps data channel for signaling in North America and
30B+2D in Europe.

ISDN-IP Gateway - a device that converts media traffic, addressing and signaling information
from an ISDN network to an IP network and vice-versa.
Jitter - variability in the arrival rate of one packet as compared to the next. Usually measured
in ms.

Latency - also known as delay; the short period of delay that occurs when devices must convert
or decode each other’s encoded signals. Typically measured in milliseconds.

LCD - Acronym for Liquid Crystal Display, a low power type of display found on a myriad of
devices from pocket calculators and digital watches to laptop computers and head mounted
displays.

Lumen – the unit for the perceived power of light. The light output of projectors are rated by their
lumen output.

Meeting Governance - refers to the ability to schedule meetings and telepresence or video
conferencing rooms with disparate organizations while maintaining organizational security. For
example it is helpful to know that Company Y’s 5th floor conference room is available for a call on
Monday, January 5th. It is not helpful to know that the executive conference rooms at Company
Y and Company are both booked at the exact same time three out of the next four days, fueling
the rumor that they are contemplating a merger.

MP3 - abbreviation of “MPEG Audio Layer 3”, a method of audio compression using perceptual
coding techniques. This allows high compression rates at high quality through use of knowledge of
the audio properties of the human ear. Commonly used at bandwidths of between 8kbps (telephone
quality) and 128kbps (CD quality). Superceded by AAC.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 44


Modular Telepresence – a category of telepresence conferencing systems which does not address
the surrounding environment of an installation space. These systems can usually be installed in a
traditional conference room without extensive preparations.

Orientation - the rotational state of an object relative to a set of reference axes. The orientation of an
object free to move in three dimensions has 3 components, sometimes referred to as pan, tilt and roll.

Overlay Network – an independent telecommunications network that is deployed to support


outsized, unusual or new applications such as telepresence and videoconferencing applications.
The network is named usually because it is usually deployed in addition to an organization’s existing
network that cannot support the quality required for real time video communications. Some
organizations deploy Overlay Networks so they can participate in Telepresence CoINs.

Pan - from a human viewpoint, moving one’s head from left to right or vice versa constitutes a panning
movement. More specifically, a pan is a rotation in the horizontal plane. Sometimes referred to as
azimuth.

Panoramic Display – a large format display, typically a video wall or large beam splitter that takes up
a large percentage of the participant’s peripheral vision.

Phase Lag - the ability of a tracking system to determine an object’s position within a given period of
time after a change in object position, determined by the sum of update rate and latency. This can
lead to a symptom known as simulator sickness since there is a conflict between what the eye sees
and the inner ear perceives.

Presence – dialtone for people the online state and willingness of a person to participate in a
communications.

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) - IETF-defined signaling protocol for controlling multimedia
communications such as voice and video between IP endpoints. SIP is a text-based protocol
incorporating many of the features of http and smtp allowing for rapid troubleshooting.

Stereo Sound - a method of sound recording and reproduction using two or more audio channels to
reproduce spatial depth in the sound.

Telepresence - the experience or impression of being present at a location remote from one’s own
immediate environment.

Telepresence CoIN – Telepresence Community of Interest Network – A telecommunications


network, usually an Overlay Network or a Virtual Private Network provided by a network provider
where an organizations.

Telepresence Conferencing - the science and art of creating visual conferencing environments
that address the human factors of the participants and duplicate, as closely as possible, an in-

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 45


person experience. Telepresence conferencing greatly improves end-user acceptance, which
dramatically increases usage and substantially improves demand, ROI and customer satisfaction.
While a variety of methods can be used to deliver telepresence solutions, they typically offer some
combination of the following improvements over the “talking heads” experience of traditional
videoconferencing:

• Life-size participants with accurate flesh tones


• Fluid motion
• Studio quality video, lighting and acoustics
• The absence of visible technology
• True eye contact, or the approximation of eye contact in large group settings
• Immersive and or mirrored environments where participants feel as if they are in the same
physical space
• A consistency-of-quality between disparate locations

Telepresence Multipoint – A multipoint telepresence session where participants from multiple


locations are capable of being presented life-size in continuous presence creating a virtual
roundtable.

Telesurgery - Use of telepresence and/or teleoperation techniques allowing a surgeon to operate


at a location remote from his real physical location. Sometimes also used to refer to remote
medical diagnosis of certain conditions, it is useful in areas where access to medical facilities is
scarce.

Tilt - To move an item, such as a camera or human head, in an upwards or downwards rotation.
Technically, a camera rotation about an axis perpendicular both to the pan axis and the optic axis.

Unified Communications – refers to the integration of disparate communications applications


such as instant messaging and VoIP systems. Sometimes conferencing servers, IP PBX
and media such as voice and video services are bundled together to be sold as a unified
communications package.

Video Overlay Network - a video-specific network design operated independently from


underlying physical networks. See overlay networks.

WAN or Wide Area Network – a telecommunications network connecting points that are
separated by distances greater than found in a metropolitan area.

Zoom - The ability of a camera lens to change its focal length in order to view objects at varying
distances while retaining a sharp focus.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 46


Appendix D: Related Research
Telepresence 2009
Details. Telepresence has gained a great deal of attention and market penetration since it burst onto
the scene in later 2006. This report summarizes the views of 229 business users of telepresence and
video conferencing technologies gathered in mid-2009.

Video Communications 2.0


Details. Despite the fact that only 5% of respondents in the Video 2.0 panel of 2009 also participated
in our 2007 panel, a particularly consistent demographic across these two panels is maintained.
This report on the views and experiences of the Video 2.0 panel shows that the investments in video
communications endpoints, networks and services have worked to greatly improve user satisfaction,
leading to more frequent usage, particularly in room video communications sessions.

Tips for Improving the Users’ Experience


Details. This Brainshark presentation reviews a comparison of the experience of the Video 2.0
panel members (229 business users were polled in 2009) as compared to The Perfect Storm Panel
(450 business users were polled in 2007) and reviews in detail 20+ tips to improving the video
communications experience.

Cost Saving Strategies: Why Video Managed Services?


Details. This Brainshark video provides insights from research about the selection criteria and scope
of services for video managed service providers. We review IT communications priorities and how
managed services fit within that priority. We also discuss the economics of managed services, and
the four major building blocks you should look for in a video managed service provider. The critical
selection criteria for video managed service providers are also reviewed. Our goal is to show how
video managed service providers fit within the enterprise communications priorities and goals for 2009.

Why Video Communications is a Business Best Practice


Details. This report compares the performance of those who use video communications as part
of their business operations with the performance of those who don’t use video communications.
It clearly shows a distinct performance advantage that accrues to those who use video
communications. Results are based on responses from 228 business users from the Brockmann &
Company research panel. Based on a survey conducted in 2009 and updates the content presented
in The Perfect Storm: Why Video Will Dominate Business Communications.

The Perfect Storm: Why Video Conferencing Will Dominate Business Communications

Details. Critical factors driving the adoption of video communications are reviewed and presented in
this breakthrough report defining the conditions for ‘The Perfect Storm.’ Significant business benefits
have accrued to the Top Performers, making their debut in this report.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 47


Appendix E: Our Sponsors
Many thanks for the financial support of our sponsors.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 48


Global Networking Redefined
Company Overview
MASERGY, a global telecommunications company, has redefined enterprise wide-area networking by
providing superior service performance, an exceptional customer experience and innovative network
solutions, including global Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs) and hosted network services. The
privately held company is financially sound and continues quarter over quarter growth while maintaining
positive cash flow and zero debt.

MASERGY Advantage
With a proven track record in building superior network solutions, MASERGY simplifies the corporate wide-
area network (WAN) for enterprises across six continents with value-added offerings, including:
Global Ethernet Service Performance
• Proven, scalable network services reduce • Superior network quality purpose-built for real-
costs and simplify WAN management time application transport
• Less network equipment and virtually • Reduced implementation costs
no training • End-to-end service guarantees
• Seamless network solutions easily
accommodate corporate expansion

Embedded Services Customer Experience


• Award-winning advanced services offering • Superior technical sales support
unmatched network management and control • Aggressive service installation
• No hardware, software or integration costs • Responsive service support
• No capital and maintenance expenses • Simple, accurate bills
• Facilitates regulatory compliance

Global Networking Redefined


Masergy Communications, Inc. European Headquarters (UK)
2740 North Dallas Parkway, Suite 260 Masergy Communications, Ltd.
Plano, TX 75093 USA 32 Farringdon Street, 2nd Floor
Main (USA): +1 (866) 588-5885 [Toll-free] London EC4A 4HJ United Kingdom
Sales (USA): +1 (866) MASERGY (627-3749) Main: +44 (0) 207 173 6900
Fax: +1 (214) 442-5756 Fax: +44 (0) 207 173 6899
The right video network can take you anywhere

How far can your corporate network take you?


Now more than ever businesses must reduce costs while staying connected with customers, prospects, partners and colleagues.
But their investments in high-definition conferencing equipment are being undermined by the limited capabilities of their existing
network providers. MASERGY’s global IP MPLS network is engineered specifically to support real-time applications, even across
a converged corporate network. MASERGY guarantees 100% packet delivery for global voice and video traffic between all office
locations, supported with advanced customer-controlled network management capabilities launched at the click of a mouse.
So whether your company is seeking to reduce travel budgets, sales cycles, time to market, or carbon footprints, MASERGY will
help you get there.

1-800-MASERGY | masergy.com
BCS Global – Solutions Overview
At BCS Global, we understand the complexity of implementing and maintaining an effective video conferencing
solution and the resources needed to deploy effective visual collaboration across the enterprise. Our mission is to make
video conferencing an easy-to-use and a reliable solution that becomes a part of your everyday business life – from
standard desktop applications to boardroom and high-end telepresence systems.

With a fully deployed Global Video Exchange, we simplify video conferencing by allowing you to easily connect with
clients, partners, and vendors that are critical to your business success. We provide a comprehensive and flexible set of
managed services that enable you to seamlessly conduct point-to-point and multi-point video meetings regardless of
your video system, network provider or type of connection. With our globally distributed point-of-presence systems
and support capabilities, we are able to interconnect with a multitude of private, carrier and public video networks – all
aimed at providing you with a superior user experience.

BCS Global – Managed Video Conferencing Services


BCS Global provides exceptional, reliable, secure and
consistent video conferencing services that are unmatched
in the industry for quality, breadth and global reach on
a network optimized specifically for video and audio
collaboration. Irrespective of the complexity of your
business needs - whether you require just bridging services
or a completely managed on-demand reservation-less video
service, our solutions enable you to collaborate seamlessly
from your desktop, home office or boardrooms.

Managed Services Video On the Move


Virtual Presence iView laptop/PC application

On-demand Video Telepresence


Virtual Rooms Virtual Telepresence

BCS Global – Company Overview


BCS Global Networks Limited is a leading worldwide managed service provider for video conferencing and telepresence
solutions. The company owns a fully deployed Global Video Exchange, which enables users across the world to meet
instantaneously regardless of their video system, network provider or type of connection. BCS Global provides video
services to some of the world’s largest public and private companies. BCS Global’s Virtual Presence suite of services
provide a scalable application that can traverse ISDN, IP, 3G mobile and standard broadband video connections to enable
on-demand virtual meetings. BCS Global provides live video and audio help desk services to its customers that are
available 24x7 globally and always attended by a qualified video engineer.

BCS Global is headquartered in the UK, with offices in New York, Toronto, Shanghai and Hong Kong.

www.bcsglobal.com
With Carin, its award-winning IP call recording suite, TC&C is extending its proven technology in video
call recording to include Cisco TelePresence endpoints. Carin can capture life-size, ultra-high definition
video, including spatial audio and auxiliary audio/video streams — enabling users to effectively share
presentations and documents. With the ability to record Cisco TelePresence solutions, companies can
take advantage of a value-added feature for preserving and sharing information applicable to:

• Remote expert applications in the financial services industry


• Healthpresence solutions in health care
• E-learning situations in education
• Compliance recording in various industries, including government, banking, and insurance.

The only true unified platform for voice, video, and


telepresence recording, Carin allows enterprises
to consolidate systems and access recordings
from a single, easy-to-use web interface. The Carin
TelePresence recording solution supports Cisco
TelePresence 3200, 3000, 1300, 1000, and 500
configurations, as well as multipoint conferences.
Additionally, TC&C is expanding its supported
TelePresence platforms and vendors to include
LifeSize, Polycom, Tandberg, and Vidyo. Carin’s
voice recording solution includes support for Cisco,
Avaya, Broadsoft and other SIP compliant systems.

For more information, visit TPrecording.com.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 52


IPeak NETWORKS

IPeak Networks is a privately held Canadian networking technology development


company headquartered in Ottawa Canada. The company is focused on solutions for
one of the most vexing problems of IP communications: the problem of packet loss.

The company’s flagship


product, IPQ (for “Internet
Performance & Quality”) cuts
packet loss by more than 90%
while adding no latency to
telepresence conferences and
HD video conferences. With IPQ, enterprises
and organizations large and small can take
advantage of the business and environmental
savings made possible high quality video
conferencing while using only very low cost
business Internet bandwidth.

IPQ implements advanced algorithms to protect against packet loss at the transport layer.
It is application aware but completely application agnostic to support unconstrained
interoperability across applications, and between vendors and disparate end-point
technologies.

IPQ can be added at any end-point in any standards-compliant video conferencing


system installation with the plug-and-play IPQ Network Appliance to bring instant
performance and quality to any Internet connection. Off-
net B2B video conference callers, remote offices, and
teleworkers all enjoy the same great video conferencing To learn much more
experience as on-net participants. For more demanding about packet loss
situations, packet loss protection for telepresence and protection, IPQ, and
multiple simultaneous conferences is available in the
IPQ VCPro Series of concentrators that deliver VNOC-
IPeak Networks, visit
grade performance and reliability. our website at www.
ipeaknetworks.com
or get in touch.

IPeak NETWORKS

Brett McAteer – V.P. Marketing – IPeak Networks Incorporated


411 Legget Drive, Suite 410, Ottawa ON Canada K2K-3C9
Office +1-613-599-6267 ext 510 – Mobile +1-613-851-9779
brett@ipeaknetworks.com
TM

TM
BrightCom

H e l l o,
We�are�BrightCom.�We�design�and�manufacturer
fully�integrated,�processor�based,�and�software
driven, telepresence�and�video�conferencing
solutions.�BrightCom�offers�the�largest�range�of
options�to�connect�people,�content�and�data�from
home�offices,�mobile�devices,�desktops,
conference�rooms,�work�spaces�and�telepresence
suites�simultaneously�around�the�world.

One of a kind telepresence infrastructure


BrightCom’s�Visual�Collaboration�System�2.0�provides
a�robust�and�unique�infrastructure�for�Lumina
Telepresence�and�ClearView�Video�Conferencing.

Unlike�other�solutions,�VCS�2.0�is�a�single�network�appliance
that�can:
BrightCom’s�Visual�Collaboration�System�2.0

� Deliver�communication�in�one�package
Meeting�administration,�meeting�scheduling,�a
complete�set�of�Web�conferencing�features�and�NAT
firewall�traversal.

� Combine�people,�ideas�and�data
High�definition�video,�standard�definition�video�and
audio�broadcasts��with�multiple�data�broadcasts�in�a
multi-screen�layout�that�the�meeting�moderator�can
configure.

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Support�for�SIP�connects�BrightCom�to�any�other
standards�compliant�conferencing�vendor. BrightCom’s�Visual�Collaboration�System�2.0:�Screen�shot�of
Endpoints�display�up�to�16�video�screens�that�can�be web-based�environment.�Video�and�data�broadcasts�are
seen�by�an�unlimited�number�of�participants. displayed�and�managed�side�by�side.

BrightCom
Tel:�877-483-9737
Learn More... Email:�sales@brightcom.com
Website:�www.brightcom.com
TM

TM
BrightCom
One of the largest ranges of telepresence and video
conferencing solutions

Lumina�Telepresence
Instant, ever yday emotion and success
A�natural�environment�for�success
�life-like,�instant�communication
�eye�contact�and�spatial�audio
�environment�best�suited�for�natural�collaboration

Sizes�to�fit�any�size�meeting
Lumina�Telepresence:�L37�without�the
�personal�one�to�one optional�private�enclosure.�Suited�for�2�to�6
�small�teamwork�sessions people�for�instant�teamwork.�Each�solution
�presentation�and�large�meeting�sessions requires�the�VCS�2.0.
�custom�board�room�configurations

ClearView�Video�Conferencing
Get�your�message�across,�clearly�and�effectively
Clearview�Room�Conferencing�can�be
Face�to�face�connection�vital�for�effective�communication�and configured�with�1�to�3�displays.
collaboration
�high�definition�video
�standard�definition�video
�audio�broadcasting.

Wide�variety�of�endpoints
�office�desktop�PCs
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ClearView�Mobile�Carts�are�flexible�for�any�size
�mobile�cart-based�conferencing workspace.�ClearView�Desktop�PC�delivers�instant
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Tel:�877-483-9737
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Website:�www.brightcom.com
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8%'")*)).-"%&%)$%-
Developing an Inter-Company Telepresence
& Visual Collaboration Program
Conference & Working Group
April 22nd, 2010 – Reston, Virginia

Conference
How to leverage your investment in telepresence and
videoconferencing to connect with partners, vendors, and
customers to reduce the shared costs of the relationships,
improve productivity, and do business during a crisis.

Working Group
Don’t just come yourself. Bring your partners, vendors,
and customers for highly productive private break-out
sessions focused on setting up your own program.

Who Should Attend


Chief Collaboration Officers • Chief Productivity Officers
Telepresence Managers • Videoconferencing Managers
Corporate Travel Managers • Supply Chain Managers

Topics Include
Estimating, Measuring, and Tracking ROI
Connecting with Partners, Vendors, and Customers
Operational Best Practices
Collaborating on Data and Physical Objects
Understanding & Overcoming Technical Hurdles

About the Organizers


The Human Productivity Lab has consulted for Fortune 20 energy companies,
Human
international investment banks, and others on telepresence and literally wrote Productivity
the book on inter-company telepresence and effective visual collaboration. Lab

About the Venue


Hyatt Regency Reston
1800 Presidents Street,
Reston, Virginia, USA 20190
Tel: +1 703 709 1234 Fax: +1 703 925 8295
http://reston.hyatt.com

Cost
$595 Before February 28th, 2010
$750 After February 28th, 2010
Breakfast and Lunch on the 22nd,
Course Materials

www.TelepresenceOptions.com/conference
Human Productivity Lab Consultants
& Contributors
Howard S. Lichtman is the founder and president of the Human
Productivity Lab, the leading telepresence consulting firm to global Fortune
500 enterprises, as well as telepresence manufacturers, managed services,
and network providers. Before founding the Human Productivity Lab in 2005,
Mr. Lichtman was the Vice President of Business Development at TeleSuite,
the world’s first commercially successful telepresence provider. Lichtman
was the Co-founder, President, and Chief Product Officer at Powwow
Networks, a telepresence start-up in 2000 dedicated to improving the
human factors, reliability, and cost-effectiveness of both visual and data
collaboration. Prior to his interest in telepresence, Mr. Lichtman launched and directed the
financial vertical sales organization at Savvis Communications, a company that specialized in
providing managed services and networking solutions for Wall Street trading floor technology,
and market data applications.

He is the co-author of Telepresence, Effective Visual Collaboration and the Future of Global
Business at the Speed of Light (2006), and was a contributing author to Emerging Technologies
for Teleconferencing and Telepresence (2005). He is currently working on Telepresence
Options 2010. Howard Lichtman is a frequent industry analyst whose commentary on telepresence
and video conferencing has appeared in U.S. News and World Report, Reuters, Pro AV Magazine,
The Chicago Tribune, CXO Magazine, Killer App Magazine, and CFO Magazine, among others.

About the Human Productivity Lab

HPL Consulting
The Human Productivity Lab is the leading telepresence consulting firm for global financial
institutions, multinational telecommunications and pharmaceutical companies, and other Fortune
5000 corporations across a broad range of industry sectors. The Lab was founded by Howard S.
Lichtman, a productivity-focused technologist who advises firms how Human
to successfully deploy telepresence to enhance internal and external Productivity
communications, cut costs and improve organizational productivity,
and increase bottom line revenue. Lab

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 62


HPL Publishing
With over 30,000-plus unique visitors a month from over 165-plus countries,
HumanProductivityLab.com and TelepresenceOptions.com rank as the top destinations on the
Internet for news, research, and analysis on the emerging telepresence industry.

Telepresence Options, the Lab’s annual multi-media overview of telepresence, has over 1,500
subscribers to the hard cover Telepresence Options Yearbook, while our newsletter, the
Telepresence Options Telegraph, has over 2,900 subscribers to the representing the largest
identifiable audience interested in telepresence and effective visual collaboration.

HPL Sales Force Training


Arming Telepresence Commission-Driven Mercenaries is the Lab’s competitive overview of the
telepresence landscape for sales, marketing, and product management organizations. While
maintaining confidentiality on forward-looking technology roadmaps, customers, and other
sensitive information, the Lab offers a comprehensive “open source” overview of the various
telepresence systems, managed services and inter-networking solutions providers. Employing our
“no-holds barred” approach on the pros and cons of various offerings, the Lab provides teams
with strategies that can shorten sales cycles. Many telepresence vendors serving the Fortune
500 have availed themselves of the Lab’s sales force training great success.



Although the Human Productivity Lab embraces the advances in individual and organizational
productivity made possible by telepresence and effective visual collaboration, our mission is
guided by an overarching respect for human values and interests.

While Productivity is our Middle Name we always put the Human First.
- Howard S. Lichtman

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 63


Peter Brockmann
is a frequent author and commentator on telepresence, video conferencing,
mobile and business communications technologies. His insights are
imbedded in Brockmann & Company, a high tech analyst and consulting
company serving the needs of users, equipment vendors and service
providers. Prior to forming Brockmann & Company, Brockmann was the
Senior Vice President of Sales, Marketing and Business Development for
FirstHand Technologies, an innovator in mobile VoIP software. Brockmann
facilitated a rebranding, repositioning and refocusing of the company that led
to a successful C round of investment by Canadian venture capitalists.

Brockmann also worked at 3Com where he was responsible for the product introduction of
the 3Com Convergence Applications Suite as the Vice President, Enterprise Voice Solutions
Marketing, was Vice President Marketing for bTrade and co-founder of A4 Networks Corporation,
a startup focused on business-to-business process automation software.

Prior to 2001, Brockmann held various executive, product marketing, and business development
positions at Nortel Networks in customer relationship management software, enterprise data
products, and enterprise telephony businesses. In 1998 he served as an expert witness before
the United States Department of Justice and the European Commission during inquiries into the
Nortel acquisition of Bay Networks.

Brockmann is a Wikipedia contributor and a regular blogger for TMCnet.com where he writes
the ‘Outside of The Box’. An accomplished pianist, Brockmann has an MBA from McMaster
University in Hamilton, Canada, a Bachelor of Engineering Science from the University of
Western Ontario in London, Canada, and a piano performance degree from the Western Ontario
Conservatory of Music in London Canada.

About Brockmann & Company


Brockmann & Company is a consulting and advisory firm serving
high tech equipment & application vendors and service providers.
Clients accelerate growth through customer research & thought
leadership. Our motto: “In God we trust, all others bring data.”

Customers Know Best


Where else can you get customer insights? We have always been a big fan of learning from
and learning about customers. Just about any marketing challenge, positioning question can
and must be considered from the customers’ viewpoint. That’s a perspective you can’t learn in
business school, but only from customers themselves.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 64


This is much more than anecdotal recitation. We provide statistical analysis and believe that data
about the user experience is a most powerful of all customer insights. Our motto from Dr W.
Edwards Deming: In God we trust, all others bring data.

User Organization Services


Brockmann & Company offers services to provide fact-based implementation consulting services
for global user organizations. Our practical ideas for implementing corporate goals addressing:

• Unified communications or video conferencing consumption in lieu of business travel


• Improving Green performance
• Accelerating mobile applications while overcoming regional cultural challenges are based
on sound team-based problem solving skills first learned two decades ago as a Quality
Circle facilitator and honed with experience as a process engineer, marketing executive and
change agent. These skills enable higher business performance as proven with the Brockmann
& Company research program.

Customer Insight Research Goals & Topics


The Brockmann & Company research agenda is centered around investigating user challenges
in communications equipment, services and applications especially inter-company telepresence,
mobility and unified communications. Our vendor clients support our research program to create
customer-education content and to learn from the experiences of their customers and their
competitors’ customers. Our blinded research methodology assures the highest quality research
and quality consulting. The Brockmann & Company can also conduct blinded private studies.

Customer Insight Services


Brockmann & Company delivers four services for our clients:

• Advisory services provides access to the analysts, access to the data and periodic strategy
briefings on the market and competition.
• Research services provides customer insights gained from statistical analysis and both online
and telephone market research.
• Consulting services allows Brockmann & Company staff to engage in the execution of
strategy, marketing or business development as appropriate. Assignments can be to provide
the thought leadership to launch a new product, or to provide the channel development plan
and materials to support a new product, or as a strategic assessor of a merger candidate
for example.
• Marketing services leverages the network of services known to Brockmann & Company
to generate leads and reach users. Content for web site optimizations or reports hosted
through various partner web sites may be a component of this service portfolio. We allow the
marketing executive the opportunity to gain unbiased customer insight with which to improve
the effectiveness of the marketing effort and therefore the productivity of the sales organization.

Learn more: www.brockmann.com.

The Inter-Company Telepresence & Video Conferencing Handbook 65


Productivity Lab Human Human Produ
Human P
oductivity Lab
Huma
Human Productivity Lab
Productivity
Human Productivity Lab

vity Lab Lab


Human Productivity Lab
man Productivity Lab Human Productivi
Human Productivity Lab

The Human Productivity Lab is the


leading consulting firm focused on
telepresence and effective visual Consulting Services Include:
collaboration. Since 2005 we have
helped Fortune 20 energy companies,
ROI Modeling and Cost Justification
international investment banks, Telepresence Solutions Design
and international standards bodies RFP / RFI Development
understand their telepresence options Acquisition Consulting
and future proof their telepresence
investments.

On the investor side, we have worked


with investment banks, institutional
Consulting Services Include:
investors, and hedge funds to help them
rapidly understand the telepresence Investor Due Diligence
and video conferencing landscape. Evaluation of Value & Risks
We have an outstanding track Review of technology, marketplace,
record of success in predicting the
competitors, future products and
technology, geopolitical, and economic
trends that shape the market for visual services, exit strategy and goals, etc.
collaboration solutions.

www.HumanProductivityLab.com | www.TelepresenceOptions.com
The Human Productivity Lab publishes Telepresence Options the #1 publication and website on the internet
following telepresence technologies, telepresence managed services, and inter-networking telepresence. 66
GET
20%
WHEN YOU
OFF ORDER NOW*
Telepresence Exchange is a new class of service that brings carriers and enterprise telepres-
ence and video conferencing networks together, overcoming challenges in DiffServ classifica-
tions, addressing, performance and security practices. Services for directory, bridging and ISDN
gateways are often readily available. Exchanges are the missing link in maximizing the utility and
value of telepresence and video conference investments since they can easily and automatically
connect enterprises with their customers, partners and suppliers.

The Inter-Company Telepresence and Video


Conferencing Exchange Review is the first comprehen-
sive report on the leading service provider operations and technologies at
the heart of the industry’s fastest growth segment.

“Inter-company telepresence and video conferencing reduces


the cost of doing business, improves productivity and assures
business continuity whenever business travel becomes more
dangerous, more costly or more inconvenient.”

Credit card: O Mastercard O Visa O AMEX (check one)


O Bill me later:
Credit card number:
Expiry (MM/YY):!! ! Security code:!
Billing Address:
*fax your order to:
City, State, ZIP
+1-480-393-5435.
Telephone:
You will be billed $1,400.00
if received before
Signature:
January 31, 2010. Regular
price is $1,750.00.

This report is a collaboration of Human Productivity Lab and Brockmann & Company.
www.HumanProductivityLab.com • www.Brockmann.com
Human
Productivity
Lab

www.HumanProductivityLab.com | www.Brockmann.com
© 2009 Human Productivity Lab and Brockmann & Company. All rights reserved. No portion of this document may
be reproduced or distributed in print or electronically without prior written permission of the copyright holder.