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NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

CHALLENGE ANNOUNCEMENT MANUAL


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Sponsored by:

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NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

CONTENT
1.

An Introduction to the NJRC

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2.

Format Of Competition

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3.

The NJRC Challenge


Primary Division Mission 1

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Secondary Division Mission 1

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15

Tertiary Division Mission 1

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21

All Division

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27

Trial / Practice Playing Fields

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31

4.

NJRC Awards

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32

5.

Open Category

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36

6.

Side Events

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37

7.

Challenge Week Schedule

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40

8.

World Robot Olympiad (WRO) 2014

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44

9.

Important Dates

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NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

An Introduction to the NJRC


The National Junior Robotics Competition (NJRC) is an exciting and unique event organised
by Science Centre Singapore and Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR).
Supported by the Ministry of Education (MOE), Tote Board and DSO National Laboratories,
this robotics competition encourages students to develop problem solving skills,
entrepreneurial skills, creative thinking skills and team spirit among the participants. The
NJRC is about celebrating the process of learning through interactive, meaningful
experiences. This competition promotes strategy building, teamwork and creativity among
student participants.
Over the past 15 years, more than 45,000 participants and 220,000 supporters have
gathered for this premier robotics competition. This year's NJRC is celebrating its 16th
Anniversary and NJRC 2014 promises to be filled with exciting changes to cope with
international robotics competition standards!
Theme for NJRC 2014
Every year, the NJRC revolves around a specific theme and a challenge is revealed to the
students around 8 weeks before the competition proper. This year the theme for NJRC is
Space the Final Frontier. It orbits around the idea of the challenges involved when
humankind pushes forth in conquering space, the moon and beyond.
Teams
The NJRC is divided into 3 categories:

Primary Category (Participants 12 years old and below at the competition year)
Secondary Category (Participants 13 to 16 years old)*
Tertiary Division (Participants 17 to 19 years old)
*Winning teams with 2 or more members with the age of 16 at the competition year
will not be eligible to compete in the WRO Junior High category.
The next best ranking team with the appropriate age requirements will qualify.

Each team; of not more than 5 students each, will work together in order to fulfill the
missions of the competition. One or more teachers and/or parents can mentor each team.
Mentors are to provide guidance and support, and are NOT allowed to work on the project
for the students. Teams have to canvass for funds from the community around them. During
the process of constructing their robots, students can request for assistance in technology
know-how and entrepreneurial skills from industry partners.
Expectations on Teams
After the Challenge Announcement in July, teams will work on the different aspects of the
competition. The primary task for the teams will be to build a robot to take on the challenge
during the NJRC event. Using the LEGO MINDSTORMS RCX (9794), NXT (9797) and
EV3 challenge kits, students have to construct and program their creation to overcome a
specially designed and challenging course called the playing field.
Their robots will compete with one another and garner the best score during one of the
scheduled days in the challenge preliminary rounds. The top 40 teams from each category
will vie for the top position during the Grand Finals on the last day of the NJRC.
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CHALLENGE MANUAL

Apart from the building the best robot, teams are expected to conduct research on this years
theme, which is Space the Final Frontier. They are to present their findings to a panel of
judges during the pre-event presentation rounds. Teams will also submit their learning
journals and present their competition learning journey that encapsulates their robot design,
building and programming work and all other work that they done for this competition.
NJRC is an excellent opportunity for students to interact with their peers, teachers and
judges (from tertiary institutions & various industries), during the course of the competition.
The NJRC is about celebrating the process of learning through interactive and
meaningful experiences.
Format of Competition
The competition will have three categories: Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Level. It will run
over a two week period, from 1st of September to 12th of September 2014. The first week of
the competition is the Presentation Week while the second week is the Challenge Week.
i.

Presentation Week (1 September - 6 September 2014)


During the presentation week, teams will present to a panel of judges the
work they have done for this competition. These teams will be assessed for a
number of awards which includes:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

The Best Mechanical Design Award


The Best Programming Award
The Best Research Award
The Best Learning Journey Award
The Best Presentation Award

It is strongly recommended that each team brings their own materials for
presenting, a laptop with the programme as well as the robot that they would
be using in the competition. The presentation plays an integral part for those
teams who wish to vie for the NJRC Championship Award.
Teams are allotted 10 mins (4 mins presentation, 3 mins learning journey
presentation, 3 mins Q&A) only.
Note: Details and judging criteria for each award is listed under the The NJRC Awards
section.

The Presentation
1) Presentation Content (4 mins)
This is an important section of your participation. Your findings will go on to
determine if you have the right stuff for the Championship Award.
The research topic this year will be to find out and learn the different
challenges involved when humans will be spending prolonged lengths of time
in a weightless or altered environment in outer space or maybe the moon.
What are the technologies involved or are currently being studied to solve and
address the different challenges humans will face while living outside of planet
Earth.

NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

2) Learning Journey (3 mins)


After the presentation of the research, teams are required to showcase their
entire learning journey, co-operative work and members reflections during
their participation in the NJRC. The presentation shall also include
explanation(s) of your robot design and programming.
Teams are required to submit their NJRC Journal upon registration. Judging of
the learning journey will be based from the NJRC Journal.
3) Q&A (3 mins)
Team members are to answer questions asked by the judges after their
presentation.
Presentation Preliminary (1 September 4 September 2014)
Teams will be allocated a specific time slot on one of the days to make their
presentations. Each team is to present to one panel of judges, pitching on the
awards for which the team is vying for.
The marketing booths area:
While waiting for their turn to present to the panel of judges, each team will
also be assigned a booth located within the main competition hall. Teams
may decorate their booths and use them as bases for their marketing
operations. The booth areas will be open to all competitors, supporters,
teachers, parents, public, etc.
Judges will be visiting the booths to assess each team for a variety of awards.
Teams are advised to have at least one member present at their booths. In
case all team members are not around at their booth area, the judges will be
notified when the team is back at their respective booth.
Each team will be assessed for the following awards:
a. Best Booth Design Award
b. Entrepreneur Award
Note: Details and judging criteria for each award is listed under the The NJRC Awards
section.

Presentation Finals (6 September 2014)


During the finals, shortlisted teams will give a presentation focusing on the
award for which they are being considered. E.g. Teams considered for the
The Best Research Award are to pitch their presentation towards their
research.
Each team is given only 10 mins (5 mins presentation, 5 mins Q&A) for the
presentation finals.

NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

Important notes:
Teams that are considered for the presentation finals will be informed through
their touch-point (either their teachers-in-charge or their team leaders). Each
team is to provide its touch-points contact number when they register
for the presentation preliminary.
ii. Challenge Week (8 September 11 September 2014)
This year the challenge comprises of 1 mission which will be made known
during Challenge Announcement. On competition day, surprise rule(s) will be
implemented to test the teams ability to adapt/modify their robot and
programming. Teams have 1 hour to modify their robots/programming on their
specified competition field.
Teams will be informed of their competition schedule at least 1 week before
challenge week. Teams must ensure that contact details are registered
and up to date.
Challenge Preliminaries (8 September - 10 September 2013)
Teams will spend a day at the competition venue during the challenge
preliminaries.
The competition hall will be divided into 2 sections:
(1) The quarantine area
Each team will be assigned a work station within the quarantine area where
they can work on their robot.
To ensure that teams can work free from distractions, there is a quarantine
period at the start of each challenge preliminary. All communication devices
and storage media are strictly prohibited during this period.
Teams must take note of the following:
The competition hall opens at 8 am for morning preliminary and 1:15 pm
for the afternoon preliminary.
Teams cannot leave the competition and quarantine area throughout the
preliminaries: 12:30 pm for the morning and 6 pm for the afternoon
preliminaries. Teams must not exit the hall during the quarantine period
unless the team has been disqualified, or under certain special
circumstances.
After quarantine starts, teams are to send 2 representatives to attend the
competition briefing where surprise rule(s) are announced.
Teams are given 1 hour to adapt/modify their pre-assembled robot to the
surprise rule(s), calibrate their sensors, and practice at their assigned
playing fields. Courtesy and good behavior must be maintained at all
times as other teams will be sharing the same competition playing field.
Teams must heed the instructions of NJRC officials at all times.
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After the allocated time no further trial runs are allowed on the
competition fields. Teams may use the trial playing fields within the
quarantine area.
After Run 1, teams are to return to their work stations in the
quarantine area and wait for the team coordinators to call for Run 2.
Teams may opt not to do Run 2.

(2) Public and Side Events area


Daily knockout rounds for the Sumo and Sprint competitions will be held
together with the preliminaries. Top teams from each day will be invited to the
Grand finals to determine the top 3 teams.
Grand Finals (12 September 2014)
The top 40 teams from each of the Primary and the Secondary Divisions and
the top 20 from the Tertiary Division will pit their robots against one another to
vie for the Best Robot Performance Award.
Details of the Surprise Mission will only be made known in the morning of the
Grand Finals. Teams will be given approximately 3 hours to modify their
robots to accomplish this mission. Results from the Surprise Mission will be
used to determine the Best Robot Performance Award.

NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

The NJRC Challenge


PRIMARY DIVISION
To start the journey into outer space we need a vehicle to take objects and living things high
and fast enough into space! The first rockets we know about were used in China in the
1200s. These solid fuel rockets were used for fireworks. Armies also used them in wars.
Over the next 700 years, people made bigger and better solid fuel rockets.
In 1969, the United States launched the first men to land on the moon using a Saturn V
rocket. New rockets are being developed today. They will launch astronauts on future
missions. These rockets will take satellites into orbit & astronauts into space. They will take
supplies to the International Space Station and maybe back to the moon!
The mission of the robot is to prepare the rockets for launch. Furthermore, the robot has to
ferry the remaining Scientists and Engineers out of the blast zone and into a safe area
before they can launch the rockets into space.
1. CHALLENGE OVERVIEW
The robots mission is to assemble Rocket Elements in the Assembly Area (blue), place the
Rocket Elements vertically over the Ramp (Ramp surface) in the Launch Table Area, and
evacuate all the Scientist and Engineers to the Safe Area (red). The robot must finish in the
Safe Area after completing the tasks.

The placement of the scoring elements is only an example.

NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

2. SCORING ELEMENTS

ROCKET ELEMENTS (W HITE X2, BLUE X2, RED X2)

SCIENTIST AND ENGINEERS

3. RULES AND MISSION SEQUENCE


3.1.
3.2.
3.3.

3.4.
3.5.

3.6.

3.7.

Each mission has 2 runs and the duration of each run is 2 minutes.
Only 2 team members are allowed in the playing field area.
Teams must heed all instructions from the referees during game play.
a)
Teams behaving in a rowdy manner or distracting the referees may
forfeit the run and be awarded zero points.
Teams are forbidden any form of communication devices or remote control
throughout the competition at any time during the competition.
Preparation for Mission:
a)
The robot must be placed completely and start in the Base.
b)
The robot must be switched on with the program chosen before the
start of the run. The robot must also be motionless.
c)
The robot may be programmed to retract its extensions before the
start of the run.
d)
Teams are not allowed to modify or add attachment(s) to scoring
elements in any manner.
Start of Run:
a)
When the referee signals, one team member may trigger the robot.
b)
Once the run has started, the robot can expand its extensions.
c)
During the run, the team cannot touch anything on the playing field
except for the robot and any scoring element (possessed2 by the
robot) in case of a restart.
Restarts:
a)
Teams may request a restart at any point during the run
b)
The intention to restart must be made clearly known to and
acknowledged by the referees.
c)
The entire robot1 must restart the run within the designated Base.
d)
In preparation for the restart, teams must not touch anything on the
playing field except their robot.
e)
If there are any scoring elements on the robot or possessed2 by it, the
scoring elements will be forfeited.
f)
The playing field, including the props and the scoring elements, will
not be reset for a restart.
g)
A restart does not constitute to another attempt, time runs on, even if
a restart is declared.
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3.8.

3.9.

3.10.

3.11.

3.12.

CHALLENGE MANUAL

h)
Only one restart is allowed per run.
End of Run:
a) The run ends when:
1) The entire robot1 enters the Base and stops.
2) The team declares the robot is unable to complete the run.
3) When time runs out.
4) If any props or scoring elements are damaged (accidentally or
otherwise), the run will be stopped by a referee.
5) If any team member touches anything on the playing field,
including the robot and any scoring element (except during a
restart), the run will be stopped by a referee.
b) If the run is stopped by a referee, teams must switch off the robot
immediately and will not score any points thereafter. If there are any
scoring elements on the robot or possessed2 by it, the elements are
forfeited.
Scoring:
a)
The referee will complete the score sheet and teams must sign on it to
acknowledge the score.
b)
Timing: The run time is taken from the start of run till the end of run.
Maximum time is given if the team declares the robot is unable to
complete the run.
c)
Appeals: Any team that wishes to appeal any of the referees
decisions must inform the referee after the run and before leaving the
playing field area.
Re-Run:
a)
The chief referee may call for a re-run if necessary. However the
following are not valid reasons for a re-run:
1) Battery failure.
2) Robot durability.
3) Any deviations in the playing field setup, within the declared
margins.
The chief referee has final say on all scoring, game play and re-run
decisions.
a)
Teams found acting in a disrespectful and/or rowdy manner may
be disqualified from the competition.
b)
The Centre reserves the right to protect its staff from any abuse.
c)
Teams are encouraged to clear any doubts about the rules, game
play and scoring before the start of the competition.
The chief referee and referees will not review any form of recording at any
time during the competition.

entire robot: robot, inclusive of its attachments, extensions etc. and any scoring elements

possessed: the scoring element must remain in approximately the same position relative to
the robot when the robot moves or changes orientation.

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CHALLENGE MANUAL

4. MISSION GAME PLAY


4.1.

The team may place the robot at any part of the Base before the start of the run,
after which the team may not modify the robot or its software in any way.
a) Please refer to 3.5 Preparation for Mission for more details
4.2.
Before the start of the run, the scoring elements and their positions will be
random.

4.3.

There are a total of 6 scoring elements on the playing field, 3 Rocket Elements
and 3 Scientists/Engineers.
4.4.
The robot is not limited to moving along the black lines.
4.5.
All Rocket Elements must be placed in the Assembly Area. The Ramp surface is
considered as part of the Assembly Area.
4.6.
The assembled Rocket must be placed vertically over the Ramp in the Launch
Table Area.
4.7.
A referee will check verticality of the Rocket by using a steel wand (a pin or a
needle) 350 mm long, 3-5 mm in diameter. A mark of 250 mm on the wand will
be used to determine the height of the Rocket.
4.8.
The Rocket is considered to be in vertical position if the wand can be stuck into
the Rocket
a) Both ends of the wand are in the Rocket projection.
b) The mark on the wand is below of the highest part of the Rocket.
4.9.
The Rocket Elements must be assembled in the correct order:
a) Colors of the Rocket Elements are in the following order: White-BlueRed (top to bottom)
b) The Rocket Elements are placed with the LEGO studs in the up
direction.
c) Every Rocket Element touches the next Rocket Element in at least
one point
1) It is allowed that the bottom of the Rocket Element does not
touch the Ramp area)

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CHALLENGE MANUAL

d) Verticality

(The orders of the elements are correct for the picture above)

(The orders of the elements are incorrect for the picture above)
4.10.
4.11.

The Rocket must stay vertically on the Ramp for more than 30 seconds after the
attempt ends or till that time when the referees check its verticality.
Scientist and Engineers in the Blast Zones (green circles) need to be moved to
the Safe Area (red rectangle).

Please stay tuned for more updates on the use and installation of the Launch
Mechanism.

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CHALLENGE MANUAL

5. SCORING
5.1.
The score will be calculated at the end of the run.
5.2.
Maximum score of 100.
5.3.
5 points awarded for every Rocket Element that is completely outside the
Warehouse area.
5.4.
15 points awarded when all Rocket Elements are completely within the Launch
Table area.
5.5.
10 points awarded when at least one Rocket Element is placed on the Ramp.
5.6.
15 points awarded when all Rocket Elements are placed vertically over the
Ramp.
5.7.
20 points awarded when Rocket Elements are placed vertically over the Ramp in
the correct order.
5.8.
5.6 and 5.7 are cumulative i.e. when all Rocket Elements are placed vertically
over the Ramp and in the correct order will receive a total of 30 points
5.9.
5 points awarded for every Scientist or Engineer moved to the Safe Area.
5.10. 10 points awarded when the robot is completely motionless in the Safe Area

A rocket
element is
outside of
the
warehouse
Area

All
Rocket
Elements
in the
Launch
Table
Area

At least
one
rocket
Element
placed
over the
ramp

All
Rocket
Elements
placed
vertically

15 pts max
5 points per
element

15 points

10 points

15 points

13

All
Rocket
Elements
placed
vertically
in the
correct
order
20 points

Scientist &
Engineers
are moved to
the Safe
Area

Finish
in Safe
Area

15 pts max
5 points per
person

10
points

NJRC 2014

CHALLENGE MANUAL

6. TABLE SPECIFICATIONS (MM)

Drawings are available for download at http://www.njrc.com.sg/downloads.html


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CHALLENGE MANUAL

SECONDARY DIVISION
Orbiting around Earth is a number of eternal wanderers, left there by previous space
explorers.
Orbital debris, or space junk, is any man-made object in orbit around the Earth that no
longer serves a useful purpose. Space junk can be bad news for an orbiting satellite: On 11th
February 2009 a US communications satellite collided with a non-functioning Russian
satellite. The collision destroyed both satellites and created a field of debris that endangers
other orbiting satellites. After the collision, a group of scientists revealed that there are about
30,000 objects launched (and left) into space orbit, compared to 902 operational satellites.
1. CHALLENGE OVERVIEW
The robot begins in the Base and has to make its way into Satellite Orbit. The task is to
check for Failed Satellites and other Space Debris and move them out of orbit or load them
into the Factory Satellite for recycling. The robot must then return back to Base after
completing the task.

Placement of the scoring elements is only an example.

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2. SCORING ELEMENTS
2.1. Space Debris

2.2.

Satellites

Failed Satellite

Valid Satellite

3. RULES AND MISSION SEQUENCE


3.1. Each mission has 2 runs and the duration of each run is 2 minutes.
3.2. Only 2 team members are allowed in the playing field area.
3.3. Teams must heed all instructions from the referees during game play.
a) Teams behaving in a rowdy manner or distracting the referees may forfeit the
run and be awarded zero points.
3.4. Teams are forbidden any form of communication devices or remote control
throughout the competition at any time during the competition.
3.5. Preparation for Mission:
a) The robot must be placed completely and start in the Base.
b) The robot must be switched on with the program chosen before the start of the
run. The robot must also be motionless.
c) The robot may be programmed to retract its extensions before the start of the
run.
d) Teams are not allowed to modify or add attachment(s) to scoring elements in
any manner.
3.6. Start of Run:
a) When the referee signals, one team member may trigger the robot.
b) Once the run has started, the robot can expand its extensions.
c) During the run, the team cannot touch anything on the playing field except for
the robot and any scoring element (possessed2 by the robot) in case of a
restart.
3.7. Restarts:
a) Teams may request a restart at any point during the run
b) The intention to restart must be made clearly known to and acknowledged by
the referees.
c) The entire robot1 must restart the run within the designated Base.
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d)
e)
f)
g)
h)

CHALLENGE MANUAL

In preparation for the restart, teams must not touch anything on the playing field
except their robot.
If there are any scoring elements on the robot or possessed2 by it, the scoring
elements will be forfeited.
The playing field, including the props and the scoring elements, will not be reset
for a restart.
A restart does not constitute to another attempt, time runs on, even if a restart is
declared.
Only one restart is allowed per run.

3.8. End of Run:


a) The run ends when:
1) The entire robot1 enters the Base and stops.
2) The team declares the robot is unable to complete the run.
3) When time runs out.
4) If any props or scoring elements are damaged (accidentally or otherwise), the
run will be stopped by a referee.
5) If any team member touches anything on the playing field, including the robot
and any scoring element (except during a restart), the run will be stopped
by a referee.
6) The Factory Satellite is moved off the Factory Satellite Orbit (See 4.6 c
Mission Game play).
b) If the run is stopped by a referee, teams must switch off the robot immediately
and will not score any points thereafter. If there are any scoring elements on the
robot or possessed2 by it, the elements are forfeited.
3.9. Scoring:
a) The referee will complete the score sheet and teams must sign on it to
acknowledge the score.
b) Timing: The run time is taken from the start of run till the end of run. Maximum
time is given if the team declares the robot is unable to complete the run.
c) Appeals: Any team that wishes to appeal any of the referees decisions must
inform the referee after the run and before leaving the playing field area.
3.10. Re-Run:
a) The chief referee may call for a re-run if necessary. However the following are
not valid reasons for a re-run:
b) Battery failure.
c) Robot durability.
d) Any deviations in the playing field setup, within the declared margins.
3.11. The chief referee has final say on all scoring, game play and re-run
decisions.
a) Teams found acting in a disrespectful and/or rowdy manner may be
disqualified from the competition.
b) The Centre reserves the right to protect its staff from any abuse.
c) Teams are encouraged to clear any doubts about the rules, game play and
scoring before the start of the competition.
3.12. The chief referee and referees will not review any form of recording at any time
during the competition.

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CHALLENGE MANUAL

entire robot: robot, inclusive of its attachments, extensions etc. and any scoring elements

possessed: the scoring element must remain in approximately the same position relative to
the robot when the robot moves or changes orientation.

4. MISSION GAME PLAY


4.1. The team may place the robot at any part of the Base before the start of the run,
after which the team may not modify the robot or its software in any way.
a) Please refer to 3.5 Preparation for Mission for more details.
4.2. Before the start of the run, the scoring elements will be placed at random.

4.3. There are a total of 8 scoring elements on the playing field.


4.4. The Factory Satellite moves counterclockwise along the Factory Satellite Orbit on
the playing field with a speed from 5cm/s to 10cm/s.
4.5. Once the robot is placed, the referee will give the signal to start when the Factory
Satellite has arrived at its starting position.

4.6. The robots mission is to collect all Space Debris and Failed Satellites and load them
into the Factory Satellite.
a) An object is considered loaded into the Factory Satellite only when the object is
completely loaded into the container of the Factory Satellite (white cylinder).

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CHALLENGE MANUAL

b)

The robot is allowed to touch the Factory Satellite, handicap its movements or
stop its motion completely.
c) Moving the Factory Satellite off the Factory Satellite Orbit (black line) will end
the run.
4.7. Valid Satellites must not be moved from their initial position.
a) A Valid Satellite is considered moved if it is shifted from its rubber ring mount or
if both Valid Satellite and its rubber ring mount are completely outside of the
Satellite Orbit (green line).
4.8. The robot is allowed to pass through the Base.
a) However, stopping within the Base area (e.g. to perform a turn) is considered to
end the run. (see 3.8 End of Run)
5. Scoring
5.1 The score will be calculated at the end of the run.
5.2 5 points awarded for each Space Debris or Failed Satellite that is moved completely
out of Satellite Orbit.
5.3 5 points awarded for each Space Debris loaded into the Factory Satellite.
5.4 10 points awarded for each Failed Satellite loaded into the Factory Satellite.
5.5 10 points awarded for robot stopping completely motionless within Base at the end of
the run.
5.6 10 points deducted for each Valid Satellite moved from its initial position on Satellite
Orbit. This penalty only applies if at least 2 Failed Satellites or Space Debris are
moved out of orbit.

Space Debris or
Failed Satellite that
is outside of
Satellite Orbit

Loading of Space
Debris

Loading of Failed
Satellite

Finish in Base

5 pt per item

5 pt per item

10 pt per item

10 pt

Example: Robot A moves 2 space debris and 1 failed satellite out of Satellite Orbit but
also moves 1 Valid Satellite out of its initial position. Robot A loads 1 space debris and 1
failed satellite into the Factory Satellite but could not find Base and is lost in space.
Space Debris or
Failed Satellite that is
outside of
the Satellite Orbit
3 x 5 = 15

Loading of
Space Debris

Loading of
Failed
Satellite

Finish in
Base

1x5=5

1 x 10 = 10

Final Score
15 + 5 + 10 +
0 - 10 = 20

Example: Robot B moves 1 Space Debri out of Satellite Orbit and 1 Valid Satellite out of
its initial position, then returns back to Base.

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Space Debris or
Failed Satellite that is
outside of
the Satellite Orbit
1x5=5

CHALLENGE MANUAL

Loading of
Space Debris

Loading of
Failed Satellite

Finish in Base

Final Score

10

5 + 0 + 0 + 10 =
15 (no penalty
applied)

Example: Robot C moves 1 Space Debris and 1 Failed Satellite out of Satellite Orbit.
Robot C also moves 1 Valid Satellite out of its initial position, but could not return to Base.
Space Debris or
Failed Satellite that is
outside of
the Satellite Orbit
2 x 5 = 10

Loading of
Space Debris

Loading of
Failed Satellite

Finish in Base

Final Score

10 + 0 + 0 + 0
10 = 0 (penalty
applied)

6. TABLE SPECIFICATIONS

Drawings are available for download at http://www.njrc.com.sg/documents.php

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TERTIARY DIVISION
Technology has been advancing rapidly for the past 30 years. As such, our power
consumption has been increasing too. There are more cars on the road, more electrical
devices leading to over consumption of fossil fuels that gradually leads to resource
depletion. Therefore, scientists over the world have been in search of an efficient and
renewable energy source to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.
There are several alternative energy sources today. Hydro-power being one of the options, it
is often used in conjunction with dams to generate electricity. Wind power can also be
harness via wind farms where airflows can be used to run wind turbines which produces
electricity. But perhaps the most viable alternative energy source has been shining on us
since the dawn of man. In 2011, the International Energy Agency said that the development
of affordable, inexhaustible and clean solar energy technologies will have huge longer-term
benefits.
An ambitious plan by a Japanese engineering firm, Shimizu, is to turn the moon into a giant
solar panel station. The Luna Ring would run around the 6,800 mile lunar equator and be
248 miles in width. It has the potential to generate a massive 13,000 terawatts of energy.
The solar energy collected would be converted and beamed back to earth as microwaves
and laser, where it would then be converted into electricity. It will be maintained by robots.
1. CHALLENGE OVERVIEW
The robot begins in the Base and has to pass through the Gate into the luna ring. The task
is to check for Bad Solar Panels (black colour) and replace them with functional ones from
the Warehouse. The robot also needs to detect and restore Inactive Solar Panels (coloured).
The robot must return to the Base after completing the task.

The placement of the scoring elements is only an example.


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2. SCORING ELEMENTS
2.1. FUNCTIONAL & DEFECTIVE SOLAR PANELS ARE REPRESENTED BY:

Defective Panels

Functional Panels

3. RULES AND MISSION SEQUENCE


3.1.
Each mission has 2 runs and the duration of each run is 2 minutes.
3.2.
Only 2 team members are allowed in the playing field area.
3.3.
Teams must heed all instructions from the referees during game play.
a)
Teams behaving in a rowdy manner or distracting the referees may
forfeit the run and be awarded zero points.
3.4.
Teams are forbidden any form of communication devices or remote control
throughout the competition at any time during the competition.
3.5.
Preparation for Mission:
a)
The robot must be placed completely and start in the Base.
b)
The robot must be switched on with the program chosen before the
start of the run. The robot must also be motionless.
c)
The robot may be programmed to retract its extensions before the
start of the run.
d)
Teams are not allowed to modify or add attachment(s) to scoring
elements in any manner.
3.6.
Start of Run:
a)
When the referee signals, one team member may trigger the robot.
b)
Once the run has started, the robot can expand its extensions.
c)
During the run, the team cannot touch anything on the playing field
except for the robot and any scoring element (possessed2 by the
robot) in case of a restart.
3.7.
Restarts:
a)
Teams may request a restart at any point during the run
b)
The intention to restart must be made clearly known to and
acknowledged by the referees.
c)
The entire robot1 must restart the run within the designated Base.
d)
In preparation for the restart, teams must not touch anything on the
playing field except their robot.
e)
If there are any scoring elements on the robot or possessed2 by it, the
scoring elements will be forfeited.
f)
The playing field, including the props and the scoring elements, will
not be reset for a restart.
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g)

3.8.

A restart does not constitute to another attempt, time runs on, even if
a restart is declared.
h)
Only one restart is allowed per run.
End of Run:
a)
The run ends when:
1) The entire robot1 enters the Base and stops.
2) The team declares the robot is unable to complete the run.
3) When time runs out.
4) If any props or scoring elements are damaged (accidentally or
otherwise), the run will be stopped by a referee.
5) If any team member touches anything on the playing field,
including the robot and any scoring element (except during a
restart), the run will be stopped by a referee.
c)
If the run is stopped by a referee, teams must switch off the robot
immediately and will not score any points thereafter. If there are any
scoring elements on the robot or possessed2 by it, the elements are
forfeited.

3.9.

Scoring:
a)
The referee will complete the score sheet and teams must sign on it to
acknowledge the score.
b)
Timing: The run time is taken from the start of run till the end of run.
Maximum time is given if the team declares the robot is unable to
complete the run.
c)
Appeals: Any team that wishes to appeal any of the referees
decisions must inform the referee after the run and before leaving the
playing field area.

3.10.

Re-Run:
a)
The chief referee may call for a re-run if necessary. However the
following are not valid reasons for a re-run:
4) Battery failure.
5) Robot durability.
6) Any deviations in the playing field setup, within the declared
margins.
The chief referee has final say on all scoring, game play and re-run
decisions.
a)
Teams found acting in a disrespectful and/or rowdy manner may
be disqualified from the competition.
b)
The Centre reserves the right to protect its staff from any abuse.
c)
Teams are encouraged to clear any doubts about the rules, game
play and scoring before the start of the competition.

3.11.

3.12.

The chief referee and referees will not review any form of recording at any
time during the competition.

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entire robot: robot, inclusive of its attachments, extensions etc. and any scoring elements

possessed: the scoring element must remain in approximately the same position relative to
the robot when the robot moves or changes orientation.
4. MISSION GAME PLAY
4.1. The team may place the robot at any part of the Base before the start of the run,
after which the team may not modify the robot or its software in any way.
a) Please refer to 3.5 Preparation for Mission for more details.
4.2. Before the start of the run, the scoring elements will be placed at random. Functional
but Inactive Solar Panels will be represented with the red side facing the left of the
playing field.

4.3. There are a total of 12 scoring elements on the playing field.


4.4. The robot must reactivate Inactive Solar Panels by turning it into the correct direction
(blue side facing the left of the playing field).
a) Inactive/Active Solar Panels must remain within the Challenge Object Area
(grey rectangle area).
4.5. The robot must replace any Bad Solar Panels with the functional panels in the
Warehouse.
a) The Bad Solar Panels must not be left in the Outer Space area; it must be
transported to the Space Station or to the Warehouse.
b) The robot is not allowed to reach/throw/climb or otherwise cross over the
barrier delimiting Space Station from the Outer Space. Such panels will not be
scored.
4.6. The robot must pass through the Gate to move to the Outer Space area or when
returning to the Space Station area.
b) If any wheels/tracks touch the barrier, the robot will be considered climbing over
the barrier.
c) The robot on the raised level platform is considered to be in the Space Station
area.
4.7. All functional solar panels must be completely in the corresponding grey area. Only
one panel is allowed to be in each grey area.

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4.8. If a functional solar panel loses one or more LEGO-elements, the panel will be
considered as an Inactive Solar Panel.
a) Refer to the illustration below for better understanding.

5. SCORING
5.1. The score will be calculated at the end of the run.
5.2. Maximum score of 100.
5.3. 3 points awarded for each functional & Active Solar Panel within the Challenge
Object Area.
5.4. 10 points awarded for each Bad Solar Panel that is replaced.
5.5. 3 points awarded for each Bad Solar Panel that is transported back to the Space
Station area.
5.6. 5 points awarded for each Bad Solar Panel that is transported back to the
Warehouse area.
5.7. 5.5 and 5.6 are cumulative i.e. a Bad Solar Panel that is transported to the
Warehouse area will receive a total of 8 points
5.8. 14 points awarded if there are no other solar panels in the Outer Space area except
for the 9 functional and Active Solar Panels in their respective Challenge Object
Areas.
5.9. 5 points awarded if the robot is completely motionless in Base.
5.10. The robot must at least move to the Outer Space area before it qualifies for any
points.
Functional
& Active
Solar Panel

Replaced Bad
Solar Panel

27 pts max
3 pts each

30 pts max
10 pts each

Bad Solar Panels


that are brought
back to the Space
Station area
9 pts max
3 pts each

25

Bad Solar Panels


that are brought
back to the
Warehouse area
15 pts max
5 pts each

All 9 solar
panels in
Outer Space
are Active
14 pts

Finish in
Base

5pts

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CHALLENGE MANUAL

6. TABLE SPECIFICATIONS

Drawings are available for download at http://www.njrc.com.sg/downloads.html

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FOR ALL DIVISIONS


1. General Rules
1.1. The controller, motors and sensors used to assemble robots must be from LEGO
MINDSTORMS sets (RCX, NXT or EV3) and the HiTechnic Color Sensor. Other
LEGO branded elements may be used to construct the remaining parts of the robot.
NJRC recommends use of Education versions of LEGO MINDSTORMS due to
extended service available from LEGO Education distributors.
1.2. Teams should prepare and bring all the equipment, software and portable
computers they need during the tournament.
1.3. Teams should bring enough spare parts. Even in the case of any accidents or
equipment malfunction, the council (and/or organizing committee) is not responsible
for their maintenance or replacement.
1.4. Coaches/Mentors are not allowed to enter the playing field or quarantine area to
provide any instructions and guidance during the competition.
1.5. Teams may pre-programme their robots.
1.6. Robots are not allowed to use screws, glues or tape to fasten any components.
Non-compliance will result in disqualification.
1.7. Control software must be either ROBOLAB NXT, EV3 software or LabView. See
chart below for eligible controller/software combinations for NJRC.
Robolab
RCX
NXT
EV3

NXT Software
x

RobotC**
x
x
x

EV3 Software
x

Labview*
x

*LabView is ONLY permitted in the Tertiary Division


**RobotC is NOT allowed

1.8. The motors and the sensors for the robot are supplied by LEGO and HiTechnic.
Any other products are not allowed. Teams are not allowed to modify any original
parts (for example: Controllers, motors, and sensors, etc). A robot made with
modified parts will be disqualified at that match.

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1.9. Allowed sensors and motors:


RCX Sensors and Motor

NXT Sensors and Motor

9758
Light Sensor

9842
Motor with Tacho
9843
Touch Sensor

5225
Lego Technic
Gear Motor
9889
Temperature
Sensor (9V)
9891
Angle Sensor
(9V)
9911
Touch Sensor
And Leads

9844
Light Sensor
9845
Sound Sensor
9846
Ultra Sonic Sensor
9694
Color Sensor
HiTechnic NXT
Color Sensor

EV3 Sensors and Motor


45502
Large Motor
45503
Medium Motor
44504
Ultra Sonic Sensor
44506
Color Sensor
44507
Touch Sensor
44509
Infrared Sensor

Note*: EV3 Gyro Sensor is not allowed for all 3 Divisions in NJRC 2014.
Also, if you are using the EV3 you may only use three (3) motor ports.
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2. Robot Regulations
2.1. The maximum dimensions of the entire robot* before it starts the mission must be
within 250mm 250mm 250mm. After the robot starts, the dimensions of the robot
are not restricted.
a) Robots using attachments must be sized with the attachments attached to the
robot. If there are multiple attachments, each attachment(s) configuration must
be sized with the robot
b) All extensions may be retracted and must not touch/lean on the sizing box
during inspection.
c) The robot can be powered to retract the extensions. However, it must be
motionless.
d) Teams will be asked to remove any part of the robot that fails these criteria and
the robot will be re-inspected.
2.2. Teams are allowed to use only one controller (RCX, NXT or EV3).
2.3. The number of motors and sensors to be used is not restricted.
2.4. Mixing of parts from all 3 platforms (RCX / NXT / EV3) is allowed.
2.5. Attachments must not be built with a NXT, RCX or EV3 microcontroller.
2.6. The robot and its attachments will be checked by a Robot Inspector to ensure that
only legal parts are used.
a) Teams may be disqualified if any illegal parts are used.
2.7. Teams can only use any version of EV3, NXT-G, RoboLab or NI LabView to
program their robots. Teams who are found using any other software can face
immediate disqualification from the entire Mission.
2.8. Team members are not allowed to interfere or assist the robot while it is running.
Teams that violate this rule will be disqualified at that match.
2.9. A robot must be autonomous and finish the mission by itself. Radio
communication, remote control or wired control systems are not allowed while the
robot is running. Teams that violate this rule will be disqualified at that match.
2.10.
If the robot is equipped with a NXT or EV3 controller, Bluetooth and Wi-FI
function must be switched off at all times.
2.11.
Teams are not allowed to use a Multiplexer (a multiplexer makes it possible
to add to the number of sensors and motors in use)!

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3. Prohibited Matters
3.1. Destruction of competition courts/tables, materials or robots of other teams.
3.2. Use of dangerous items or behaviors that may interfere with the competition.
3.3. Teams are not allowed to tamper, copy, upload or download programs to/from
another teams EV3/NXT/RCX. Teams that violate this rule will be disqualified
immediately.
3.4. Inappropriate words and/or behavior toward other team members, other teams,
audience, judges or staff.
3.5. Bringing a cellular/mobile phone or a medium of wire/wireless communication into
the quarantine/ challenge area.
3.6. Team members using any communication devices and methods while the
competition is in process. Anyone outside the competition area is also banned from
talking to or communicating with competing students. Teams violating this rule will
be considered as disqualified and should quit the competition immediately. If
communication is necessary, the committee may allow team members to
communicate with others under supervision by tournament staff or by exchanging a
note under permission by judges.
3.7. Bringing food or drink into the quarantine/ challenge area.
3.8. Any other situation which NJRC officials might consider as interference or violation
of the spirit of the competition.

The NJRC Chief Robot Inspector will have the final say on all robot build and
regulations decisions.
a) Teams found acting in a disrespectful or/and rowdy manner may be
disqualified from the competition.
b) The Centre reserves the right to protect its staff from any abuse.
c) Teams are encouraged to clear any doubts about the robot regulations
before the start of the competition.
*entire robot: robot, inclusive of its attachments, extensions, etc, and any scoring elements
attachments: an assembly of parts that add functionality to the robot. A part alone is not
considered an attachment. (e.g. a motor or a sensor are considered parts. A motor with a
beam attached to it, for mounting purposes, is considered an attachment)

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Trial/ Practice Playing Fields


To help teams prepare for the challenge, trial playing fields will be set up at the
Science Centre. (2 for Primary, 2 for Secondary, 1 for Tertiary)
These trial fields will be available for use (through reservation) from 14 July 2014
to 22 August 2014.
All teams may book the trial fields from Monday to Friday on a first-come-firstserved basis. Each booking is for 2 hours, i.e. 9-11am, 11am-1pm, 1-3pm and 35pm.
Each school is allowed to reserve up to 2 bookings per week only.
Bookings can be done via email to njrc@science.edu.sg.
Bookings are confirmed ONLY when a confirmation email is sent to the applicant.
(Please allow a minimum of 3 working days for processing of bookings).

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The NJRC Awards


The Championship Awards
This is the most prestigious award that a team can win. It is bestowed on the team that
embodies the NJRC spirit.
Teams are considered for the Championship Award based on their overall excellence
and total learning experience during the course of the competition.
As a Championship Award recipient, the winning team is recognised as being
outstanding and the assessment is based on the scores of the top 40 finalists according
to the following weightage:

30% on Robot Performance (Surprise Mission Score)


30% on Best Presentation (40% Learning Journey, 20% Research, 40% Presentation
skills)
20% on Technical Excellence (50% Mechanical & 50% Programming Skills)
20% on Soft Skills (50% Best Booth Design, 50% Entrepreneurship)

Technical Awards
The Best Robot Performance Award
For the team whose robot accumulates the highest scores in achieving the various
mission objectives on the playing field, based on the Surprise Mission in the finals.
The Best Mechanical Design Award
For the team that best demonstrates a sound understanding and appropriate application
of mechanical design principles, as shown by their robust or sturdy, consistent and
dependable robot.

1
2
3
4

Criteria
Structural design
Locomotion
Navigation
Overall design & integration

The Best Programming Award


For the team that demonstrates a sound understanding of programming and the
challenge requirements by creating the most ingenious and sound programme to run
their robot effectively and efficiently.

1
2
3
4

Criteria
Overall understanding of the programme
Modularity
Strategy
Overall design & integration

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The Best Strategy Award


For the team that best demonstrates a sound understanding and appropriate application
of mechanical design and programming principles, as well as translating their knowledge
and skills into robots with excellent performance in the mission.
Criteria
Mechanical design
Programming
Preliminary Mission
Final Mission

Weightage (%)
25
25
25
25

Team Performance Awards


The Best Presentation Award
For the team that best exhibits creativity, fluency, confidence and flair in its presentation,
and that demonstrates that WOW factor to the panel of judges during the interview
session.
Criteria
1 Creativity
2 Fluency
3 Confidence
4 Flair
The Best Research Award
For the most informative research related to the theme.

1
2
3
4

Criteria
Contents
Research skills
Learning value
Teamwork

The Best Learning Journey Award


For the team that best demonstrate the highest levels of learning, application, analysis,
synthesis, critical evaluation, self-awareness and the ability to maintain a reflective log of
their learning journey.
Teams must submit a printed copy of their NJRC Journal upon Registration on
Presentation day.

1
2
3
4

Criteria
Contents
Critical & creative thinking
Reflection & self awareness
Teamwork

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Other Awards
The Best Booth Design Award
For the team that designs and puts up the most creative and outstanding booth.

1
2
3
4

Criteria
Aesthetic value
Creativity
Originality
Team effort

The Entrepreneur Award


For the team that displays entrepreneurship through their exceptional (marketing) efforts
with the most effective, interesting or original marketing ideas and/or gimmicks. It can be
in the form of a product, a service or advertising and/or promotional media, with the
purpose of selling their team and championing their cause. In addition, they must
secure sponsorship (financial or otherwise) from other agencies and/or organizations.

1
2
3
4

Criteria
Finance
Management
Sales & marketing
Corporate image

The Best Newcomer Award


For the most enthusiastic and spirited novice team from a school participating for the first
time, and which shows overall excellence in its performance.
The Best Cheer Team Award
For the school which gives the best cheer to support their participating teams with the
most innovative stunts, high-spirited members and spectacularly visual and audio
cheer(s).
The Best Mascot Award
For the most creative mascot designed and displayed or the most impressive attire the
school wears on any of the competition days.

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The Side Events Awards


The side events are designed to encourage participants who are new to robotics and
would like to have a go at it. The NJRC has 2 side events:
SumoBot
Sprint Race
The Most Bizarre Robot Design Award
For the team that shows the most outstanding creativity in their robot design (during the
side events): the most unique, bizarre, aesthetic design screams for and grabs ones
attention! Robots may look attractive, weird or humorous, but they must look unique.
Special Recognition Award
The Judges Award
Apart from the awards listed above, the Judges may present up to FIVE (5) other awards
to teams and/or individuals that have displayed outstanding attributes (during the
competition) that set them apart in a unique way. These awards allow the judges the
freedom to recognise the most remarkable teams for which a standard does not exist.
Judges awards include:
The Against-All-Odds Award
For the team who has faced numerous difficult tasks in their NJRC journey, due to unexpected and external factors, and yet, is able to accomplish the challenge.
The Risk Taker Award
For the team that takes the initiative to achieve its mission objectives through intelligent
and well calculated risk management skills and strategies as well as a willingness to plan
and execute dangerous maneuver.
The Sportsmanship Award
For those teams and/or individuals that demonstrate great sportsmanship during the
competition cheering, encouraging other teams and/or schools, celebrating others
success as much as their own. This award is based on nominations by the competing
teams.
*Judges may not give the Judges Awards should there be no deserving teams.

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The Open Category


The open category aims to encourage creative expression and innovative ideas of robot
design. The theme of this years competition is Space the Final Frontier and teams
are to design and create robots that will assist humankind in solving different tasks in
Space.
This category is open to the following age groups:
Primary Category (Participants 12 years old and below at the competition year)
Secondary Category (Participants 13 to 15 years old)
Tertiary Division (Participants 16 to 19 years old)
Each participating team is allowed to have a maximum of 5 team members and teams
are allowed to use any material in the construction of their robot.
Each team is to design and build a robot based on the theme. The robot must NOT be
for static display only. There is no restriction on the balance between LEGO elements
and other materials. All robots must be operated by RCX, NXT or EV3 controller and
any software. Robots may be preassembled and software programs may be pre-made!
The size of the robot must not exceed 2m x 2m x 2m
Each team is given 8 mins to present its robots, 4 mins to introduce and demonstrate its
robot and the remaining 4 mins to respond to Judges questions.
Assessment for this award will be based on:

Creativity (25%)
Technical Design (25%)
Relevance to Theme (25%)
Entertainment Value (25%)

The winning team across all categories wins the following prizes;

$1,000 education fund


Sponsored trip to WRO 2014 in Sochi, Russia

Registration
Registration is open to all students. Students do not need to be from the same school.
However, all the students of a team must be in the same category age group to qualify.
Registration for the Open Category starts on 7 July 2014 and closes on 23 August
2014.
To participate, please fill up the registration form (available for download at
www.njrc.com.sg) and send it back to us at njrc@science.edu.sg or fax 6561 6361.
Registration closes on 23 August 2014.

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Side Events SumoBot & Sprint Race


This year, NJRC will have the SumoBot and Sprint Race as our side events on
the day of the Grand Finals. In these two competitions, participants are only
allowed to use the components from ONE (1) LEGO Team Challenge Kit
(RCX/NXT).
There will be Side Events challenges going on everyday throughout the duration
of the challenge week. For more info please check out our website
http://www.njrc.com.sg

SumoBot

SumoBot Competition Playing Field


(Drawings not to scale)

In SumoBot, two robots pit their strength and strategy against one another,
somewhat similar to the Sumo wrestling sport. The robots start behind the line at
position A and B. When the referee signals the stat of the game, the robots must
be activated and make contact with each other. The winning robot is determined
through any of the following scenarios.
i.

The robot wins by pushing the opposing robot out of the circle.

ii.

The robot wins by pushing its opponent such that both robots are in
the opponents side of the circle at the end of 45 seconds.

iii.

If (i) and (ii) do not apply after 45 seconds, the robot furthest away
from its individual starting point while pushing its opponent, wins.
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The weight of the robot must not exceed 1.1 kg.

Only LEGO parts set (RCX, NXT & EV3) will be allowed although RCX
will be allowed up to three motors and EV3 restricted to 3 motor ports.

Prior to the competition, robots will undergo inspection. If they dont


meet the requirements, players will be given 15 minutes to modify,
otherwise, they will be disqualified.

Non-LEGO parts will not be allowed.

Maximum of 5 members per team.

The overall winner is decided through a knockout system of play.


The Referees decision is FINAL.

Sprint Race

Start B

Start A

End B

End A
Sprint Race Playing Field
(Drawings not to scale)

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In the Sprint Race, two robots compete in tracking a black line from one end to
the other.
The robot that reaches the end point first eliminates its opponent. If a robot
deviates from the black line, the opponent robot wins.
The overall winner is determined through a knock-out system.
Referees decision is FINAL.
i.

Only parts from LEGO sets (RCX, NXT & EV3) will be allowed
although NXT & EV3 will be allowed up to two light sensors and RCX
will be allowed up to 3 motors.

ii.

Prior to the competition, robots will undergo inspection. If they dont


qualify for the requirements, players will be given 15 minutes to
modify, otherwise, they will be disqualified.

iii.

Non-LEGO parts will not be allowed.

iv.

Maximum of 5 members per team

Humanoid Robot Dance Rules and Judging


Rules:

Open to any Humanoid Robot that can perform autonomously.


Humanoid robots can be rented or owned.
Individual or teams of maximum 4 members.
Robot must be programmed only by the team members.

Points will be awarded or deducted accordingly:

Max 10 points for the synchronization of movement to the music.


Max 10 points Originality of music and robot movements.
Max 10 point Smoothness of movements.
Max 10 points Difficulty of movements.
20 points awarded for Stability and not falling. 2 points deducted for each restart if
robot falls. 3 points deducted if in participants have to touch/hold robot during dance
routine to prevent robot falling.
2 points deducted if routine not between 60 and 90 seconds.

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Challenge Week Schedule


(The schedule in tentative and is subjected to changes)
Challenge Preliminary (8 9 September 2014)
Daily Timetable
Registration at Annex Foyer
Each team will be assigned a booth
number and a playing field number
Quarantine begins. All visitors are to
vacate from the quarantine area.

0800
0815

Briefing for all teams in the Competition


Area

0830
0845

1000
1015

Sensor calibration at playing fields


Assembly/re-programming of robots
Robot Controllers to wait at work station
for Team Coordinators to bring them to
the competition area
Competition begins
Mission 1 (Run 1)

1115

Mission 1 (Run 2)

1230

End of AM Competition Session


Registration of Open Category at Annexe
Foyer

1315
Each team will be assigned a booth
number and a playing field number
Quarantine begins. All visitors are to
vacate from the quarantine area.
Briefing for all teams in the Competition
Area

1330
1345
1400
1515
1530

Sensor calibration at playing fields


Assembly/re-programming of robots
Robot Controllers to wait at work station
for Team Coordinators to bring them to
the competition area
Competition begins
Mission 1 (Run 1)

1630

Mission 1 (Run 2)

1745

End of Competition Day

Note*:
Trial playing fields are available for use during periods of quarantine only.

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Day 3 (10 Sept 2014) All Tertiary, Open Category Teams and Other Side
Events Teams

Registration at Annex Foyer


Each team will be assigned a booth
number and a playing field number
Quarantine begins. All visitors are to
vacate from the quarantine area.
Briefing for all teams in the Competition
Area

0800
0815
0830
0845
1000
1015

Sensor calibration at playing fields


Assembly/re-programming of robots
Robot Controllers to wait at work station
for Team Coordinators to bring them to
the competition area
Competition begins
Mission 1 (Run 1)

1115

Mission 1 (Run 2)

1230

End of AM Competition Session


Registration at Annex Foyer

1315

1330
1745

Each team will be assigned a booth


number and a playing field number
Open Category Judging and dance
Robot competition
End of Competition day

41

NJRC 2014
CHALLENGE MANUAL

Day 4 (11 Sept 2014) LEGO Space Competition (EV3)

Registration at Annex Foyer


Each team will be assigned a booth
number and a playing field number
Quarantine begins. All visitors are to
vacate from the quarantine area.

0800
0815

Briefing for all teams in the Competition


Area

0830
0845
1000
1015

Sensor calibration at playing fields


Assembly/re-programming of robots
Robot Controllers to wait at work station
for Team Coordinators to bring them to
the competition area
Competition begins
Mission 1 (Run 1)

1115

End of Practice Sessions

1230

LUNCH

1330

Quarantine begins

1400

Run 1

1500

Run 2

1600

End of Competition day

42

NJRC 2014
CHALLENGE MANUAL

Grand Finals Day (12 September 2014)


(The schedule in tentative and is subjected to changes)
Timetable
Registration at Annexe Foyer
Each team is assigned a booth number
and a playing field number
0730
Hall closed to public/schools
Only qualifying teams are allowed in
Booth Area
0800

Briefing/Surprise Mission announcement

0820

Booth area quarantine begins

0830

Surprise Mission preparation begins

0900

Halls open to public/schools

0930

Open Category Judging

1130

Teams are to bring their robots to Robots


Quarantine Area

1145

Booth area quarantine ends

1150

Lunch

1230

Surprise Mission

1330

Setup of Side Events Finale and Best


Performance Showcase

1415

Arrival of the Guest of Honour

1500

Closing
Ceremony
Presentation

1600

End of Competition

43

and

Prizes

NJRC 2014
CHALLENGE MANUAL

The 2014 World Robot Olympiad (WRO 2014)


The 2014 World Robot Olympiad (WRO) Competition is a worldwide robotics competition.
Participants must progress through a number of qualifying stages (the NJRC) before they
can be selected to participate in the 2014 WRO final. This year, the WRO will be held in
Sochi, Russia from 21 to 23 November 2014.
Individuals/teams interested in participating in the competition should direct enquiries to the
National Organizers (Science Centre Singapore). Further details and rules of the competition
can be found at http://www.wro2014.org/welcome_to_rus/
The following award winners from NJRC 2014 will be sponsored by NJRC and represent
Singapore in WRO 2014:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The Best Robot Performance Award Primary Division


The Best Robot Performance Award Secondary Division
The Best Robot Performance Award Tertiary Division
Championship Award Tertiary Division
Winner of Open Category

44

NJRC 2014
CHALLENGE MANUAL

Important Dates to Remember

Registration Deadline for the Open Category and Side Event


All entry forms must reach us by Saturday, 23 August 2014.
Presentation Week
1 September to 4 September 2014 Preliminaries
6 September 2014 Presentation Finals
Schedule for Presentation preliminaries will be uploaded to the official NJRC
website http://www.njrc.com.sg
Challenge Week
8 September to 10 September 2014 Preliminaries
11 September 2014 Special Events
12 September 2014 Challenge Finals
Schedule for Challenge preliminaries will be uploaded to the official NJRC
website http://www.njrc.com.sg
Side Events and Open Category
8 September to 10 September 2014 Preliminaries
10 September 2014 Open Category
12 September 2014 Grand Finals

45