HORRIFIC STAMPEDE

TWIN TOWERS
RESURRECTED

LADY TIGERS
TAME GATORS

OVER 700 KILLED IN CRUSH OF HAJJ PILGRIMS IN SAUDI ARABIA

WEEKEND PAGE 21

SPORTS PAGE 11

WORLD PAGE 7

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015 • Vol XVI, Edition 34

Housing task force launches
Group to brainstorm solutions to gap between jobs and housing
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With the economy in boom, San Mateo
County has added tens of thousands of jobs in
the past few years but only a fraction of the
housing needed to accommodate them.
With rents up 50 percent in four years to an
average of more than $2,500 a month for a
one-bedroom apartment, many low-wage
earners can no longer afford to live in the

Don Horsley

county while a new glut of
high-tech workers and
other professionals can.
To address the gap in
housing to jobs, the San
Mateo County Board of
Supervisors convened a
task force to tackle the
housing crisis that met for
the first time Thursday
morning.

The
Closing
the
Jobs/Housing Gap Task
Force will work over the
next year to find ways to
preserve and increase
housing at all price levels
in the county.
It is comprised of elected officials, educators,
Warren Slocum nonprofit heads and business leaders.

The goal of the task force is to identify the
issues, strategize potential tools, solicit community input at a future date and create a
menu of options for participants to bring back
to their constituents and communities for consideration.
It is being co-chaired by supervisors Don
Horsley and Warren Slocum.
Horsley told the Daily Journal Thursday

See TASK FORCE, Page 35

Council balksat
regulationson
home sharing
South City postpones approving
short-term vacation rental policy
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL

San Mateo police found 26-year-old Tommy Ray Evans with syringes at the downtown Caltrain Station Thursday afternoon.
Police say Evans stole prescription drugs after allegedly holding a knife to a Walgreens pharmacist’s neck Tuesday.

Alleged pharmacy robber arrested
Florida man caught at San Mateo Caltrain station, charged with kidnapping
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Just two days after an armed man
allegedly held a knife to a pharmacist’s
neck while he stole prescription drugs
from a San Mateo Walgreens, police
arrested a 26-year-old Florida native
they believe is responsible.
Tommy Ray Evans was arrested at the
downtown Caltrain Station Thursday
around 2:40 p.m. after an alert San
Mateo police officer recognized him

from the store’s surveillance video.
Evans was booked into county jail on
two felony counts of armed robbery, kidnapping and related enhancements.
Depending on what the district attorney
decides to charge, he could be looking at
decades in prison after making off with
prescription drugs and syringes, said San
Mateo police Sgt. Rick Decker.
“This was a pretty desperate act,”
Decker said, noting the rise in cases
related to opioid addiction. “I can’t think
of another pharmacy robbery in San

Mateo, but it’s definitely becoming more
and more of a trend in California.”
Evans was allegedly caught on the
Walgreens surveillance cameras nonchalantly walking into the store on the 4000
block of South El Camino Real before
12:45 p.m. He’s then seen hopping over
the pharmacy counter wielding a large
knife. He grabbed the pharmacist around
the shoulders and held the knife near her
neck as he walked her to the back of the
pharmacy, according to police.

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See ARREST, Page 27

For now, South San Francisco residents can continue renting
their homes on short-term vacation websites without being
required to pay an additional fee, under a decision by the City
Council.
The South San Francisco City Council agreed Wednesday,
Sept. 23, to postpone imposing regulations on the short-term
vacation rentals, due to questions over whether the burgeoning
local market required oversight.
Officials had considered subjecting residents who wish to
temporarily rent their homes on Airbnb, VRBO, Homekey or
other similar websites to a $150 business license fee, as well
as additional taxes.
But ultimately, the council directed City Manager Mike
Futrell to come back at a yet to be determined date with more

See RENTALS, Page 35

Sustainable Seafood Saturday
Harbor District, fishermen host educational events
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Passionate about fresh seafood, sustainability and delicious
meals? Then check out two premier events bolstering the local
commercial fishing industry hosted in part by the San Mateo
County Harbor District.
This weekend, Sustainable Seafood Saturday will bring
industry and environmental experts to College of San Mateo to
highlight the benefits of indulging in locally-caught fish.
After learning staggering stats about how more than 90 percent of the seafood Americans consume is imported, the pub-

See SEAFOOD, Page 26

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“It is as fatal as it is cowardly to blink (at)
facts because they are not to our taste.”
— John Tyndall, English physicist

This Day in History

1890

President Benjamin Harrison signed a
measure establishing Sequoia National
Park.

In 1513, Spanish explorer Vasco Nunez de Balboa crossed the
Isthmus of Panama and sighted the Pacific Ocean.
In 1690, one of the earliest American newspapers, Publick
Occurrences, published its first — and last — edition in
Boston.
In 1775, American Revolutionary War hero Ethan Allen was
captured by the British as he led an attack on Montreal. (Allen
was released by the British in 1778.)
In 1789, the first United States Congress adopted 12 amendments to the Constitution and sent them to the states for ratification. (Ten of the amendments became the Bill of Rights.)
In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson collapsed after a speech
in Pueblo, Colorado, during a national speaking tour in support
of the Treaty of Versailles.
In 1932, the Spanish region of Catalonia received a Charter of
Autonomy (however, the Charter was revoked by Francisco
Franco at the end of the Spanish Civil War).
In 1957, nine black students who’d been forced to withdraw
from Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, because of
unruly white crowds were escorted to class by members of the
U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division.
In 1965, the first installment of “In Cold Blood,” Truman
Capote’s account of the 1959 murders of the Clutter family in
Holcomb, Kansas, appeared in The New Yorker. (The work
was published in book form the following year.)
In 1974, Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Tommy John underwent
an experimental graft reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament in the elbow of his throwing arm to repair a career-ending injury; the procedure, which proved successful, is now
referred to as “Tommy John surgery.”
In 1978, 144 people were killed when a Pacific Southwest
Airlines Boeing 727 and a private plane collided over San
Diego.

Birthdays

Broadcast
journalist Barbara
Walters is 86.

Actor-producer
Michael Douglas is
71.

Actor/rapper
Donald Glover is
32.

Folk singer Ian Tyson is 82. Former Defense Secretary Robert
Gates is 72. Actor Josh Taylor is 72. Actor Robert Walden is 72.
Model Cheryl Tiegs is 68. Actress Mimi Kennedy is 67. Movie
director Pedro Almodovar is 66. Actor-director Anson Williams
is 66. Actor Mark Hamill is 64. Basketball Hall of Famer Bob
McAdoo is 64. Polka bandleader Jimmy Sturr is 64. Actor Colin
Friels is 63. Actor Michael Madsen is 57. Actress Heather
Locklear is 54. Actress Aida Turturro is 53. Actor Tate Donovan
is 52. TV personality Keely Shaye Smith is 52. Basketball Hall
of Famer Scottie Pippen is 50. Actor Jason Flemyng is 49.

REUTERS

Firefighters assist victims after a crash between a bus and a tour vehicle on the Aurora Bridge in this picture from the Seattle
Fire Department, in Seattle, Wash.

In other news ...
Dead whale found on San
Francisco Bay Area parkland
FREMONT — Another dead whale
has washed ashore in the San Francisco
Bay Area.
The whale was discovered Tuesday
afternoon in a remote area about 150
yards south of the Alameda Creek on the
Don Edwards San Francisco Bay
National Wildlife Refuge in Fremont,
says East Bay Regional Park District
spokeswoman Carolyn Jones.
The whale is not in an area that is
readily accessible to the public, Jones
said. The juvenile whale is badly
decomposed. There are no plans to
remove it. A necropsy is planned.
It’s not uncommon for dead whales to
wash ashore on beaches in nearby
Alameda, California.
The carcass is the latest of at least a
dozen dead whales, including grays, a
humpback and a sperm whale, that have
been documented in Northern California
since March. Biologists don’t know
what’s killing the whales.

Injured hunter recovering
after dayslong crawl for help
BOISE, Idaho — A hunter who
crawled for days after breaking his leg
in rugged central Idaho is recovering in
a Boise hospital.
John Sain was tracking an elk alone
in remote wilderness near McCall last
week when his foot slipped between

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Sept. 23 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

8

29

41

58

51

5

TARAP

NOPVER

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

Sept. 22 Mega Millions
28

30

38

51

45

8
Mega number

Sept. 23 Super Lotto Plus
17

25

26

30

44

4

15

26

37

39

5

3

6

Daily Four
1

Daily three midday
5

16

two kids flew to Boise to be with him.
“It was hard just knowing that he’s out
in the hills just trying to stay alive,”
Jennifer Sain said. “It still doesn’t seem
real to me.”
Sain is an experienced hunter who
often hunts alone.
He plans to go hunting alone again,
but not without a satellite phone or GPS
locator.

Los Angeles beach closed
after waste washes ashore
LOS ANGELES — A Los Angeles
beach remained closed Thursday after
hypodermic needles, condoms and other
waste washed ashore and excessive bacteria levels were found in the water.
County health officials announced the
closure of Dockweiler State Beach on
Wednesday after the waste was spotted
in sand along the 4-mile beach near Los
Angeles International Airport.
Health officials collected at least 200
pounds of waste, Los Angeles Sanitation
District spokeswoman Tonya Durrell
said. Officials believe it was discharged
from a pipeline belonging to the cityowned Hyperion Treatment Plant.
The mile-long pipeline had been dormant but was brought back online last
week as a heavy storm strained the regular 5-mile pipeline.
“It may have been sitting there and as
a result, the heavy rain storm and first
flush of all of that may have pushed that
matter out into the bay,” Durrell said.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
Powerball

GAMEO

two logs and he fell. The accident broke
both of the bones in Sain’s lower leg,
leaving him badly injured and unable to
walk.
“I honestly didn’t think I was going to
make it out,” said Sain, a Darby,
Montana, native who lives in Riverside,
California.
The 50-year-old was miles from the
trail, didn’t have cellphone service and
was in a lot of pain. He briefly considered suicide, Sain said.
“Contemplated on just ending it right
there honestly,” he said.
But he changed his mind after writing
goodbye letters to his wife and kids.
Sain made a splint out of sticks and
ripped cloth and began the arduous
crawl toward the trail.
He had a little food, a water purifier
and a small survival kit, and he built a
fire each night for warmth. But on
Sunday — four days after his ordeal
began — Sain was dehydrated, in pain
and starting to break down. That’s when
two motorcyclists found him and summoned emergency crews.
“Thank God. I was praying the whole
way that it would happen and it did. My
prayers were answered for sure,” Sain
said.
The motorcyclists chopped down
some trees to clear a landing space for
an air ambulance. Sain was flown to a
Boise hospital, where he is expected to
stay for a few more days while he recovers from leg surgery.
Sain’s wife, Jennifer Sain, and their

3

8

Daily three evening

Mega number

3

3

2

The Daily Derby race winners are Solid Gold, No.
10, in first place; California Classic, No. 5, in second
place; and Winning Spirit, No. 9, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:47.65.

Friday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 70s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear in the evening
then becoming partly cloudy. Lows in the
upper 50s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph...
Becoming 5 to 10 mph after midnight.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs around 70. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 15
mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog. Highs in the upper 60s.
Sunday night and Monday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows
in the mid 50s. Highs in the upper 60s.

SUCOIN
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

-

Print your
answer here:

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: DUNCE
TALLY
GROOVY
ROSIER
Answer: The invention of the wheel was — REVOLUTIONARY

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Furry fun for the whole family
Pet Parade returns to Burlingame this weekend, with new attractions
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL

Members of the Burlingame community
will flock, walk, gallop and, in some cases
even, slither to the Pet Parade this weekend.
The annual event will take place Saturday,
Sept. 26, at 10 a.m. on Broadway, and feature
a variety of family-oriented fun and competitions recognizing best dressed pet, most original float and best pet trick, among many other
attractions.
New to the event this year is a best float
competition, which will be held between
members of the Burlingame school community, and the winner stands to receive $500
which will go toward benefiting educational
programming.
Karen Lyons, who is helping to spearhead
designing the Roosevelt Elementary School
float, said the school competition adds an
additional layer of intrigue to this year’s
event.
“This is all in good fun,” she said. “We will
support our other schools as much as we can.”
But she noted Broadway is the region which
feeds into enrollment at Roosevelt, so the
school feels a small desire to protect what it
considers its home territory.
Lyons said the students will build their float
around promoting the school’s annual chili
cookoff, which benefits its parent-teacher
association.
She said nearly 30 students have contributed to helping decorate the float, and
there will be a student’s dad acting as a mascot dressed in a jalapeño costume to lead the
school’s participation in the parade.
Community members who wish to walk
their pet in the parade are invited to register.
Most frequently people come with their dogs,
said Mayor Terry Nagel, but she said she has
seen a wide variety of pets at the event such as
mice, cats, birds or even more eclectic part-

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

3

Police reports
She doesn’t dig it
An elderly woman reported that holes had
been dug in her yard near the water lines
overnight on Northwood Drive in South
San Francisco before 1:05 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 18.

REDWOOD CITY
Reckless driver. A blue Infiniti was seen
speeding and tailgating on Woodside Road
before 3:10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 20.
Gun shots. Five rounds were fired on
Berkshire Avenue before 2:32 a.m. Sunday,
Sept. 20.
Theft. A group of juveniles was seen stealing alcohol and other items on Broadway
before 4:35 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17.
Carjacking. Somebody who gave a ride to a
couple was then threatened by them with a
knife and told to get out of the car on
Rolison Road before 12:47 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 17.
Reckless driving. A silver Subaru was seen
driving up and down the street while in
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BURLINGAME PET PARADE
Burlingame residents, and their pets, walk in the Burlingame Pet Parade last year. The event reverse on Samson Street before 12:12 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 17.
will return Saturday, Sept. 26.
ners such as an alpaca, blue skink and even an
ant farm.
“You name it, we’ve seen about every kind
of pet under the sun,” said Nagel.
Despite the close quarters the pets have
shared over the years, Nagel said there has
never been a dog fight or any other animal
animosity.
There are very few restrictions for participating, so long as the floats are not motorized
and there are no political campaign promotions or statements.
Registration is free, which Nagel noted as
one of the most appealing elements of the
event.
“The whole purpose is to have something
fun and get people out to enjoy each other’s

See PET Page 27

4

LOCAL/STATE

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Records detail dramatic
response to state wildfire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIDDLETOWN — A daughter
was worried about her elderly parents trying to flee a massive
California wildfire on horseback.
A couple needing help evacuating
waited for deputies in a creek near
their home. A woman fretted that
her mother with Alzheimer’s wouldn’t know to leave.
Those were just a few of the overwhelming number of calls the tiny
Lake County Sheriff’s Department
received during the fast-moving
blaze that began Sept. 12 about 100
miles north of San Francisco.
Dispatch logs released Thursday
showed the small department was
strained to its limits by the flames
that swept across the mountainous
county.
“The response was as quick as we

could do it,” Sheriff Brian Martin
said. “In some cases it didn’t reach
everybody.”
The logs show worried relatives
calling often to request checks on
elderly and sick residents feared
trapped in their homes. Screams for
help were reported from residents
unable to get out of the fire zone,
while other callers pleaded for
deputies to rescue livestock and pets
left behind.
The 40 pages of logs involving
dispatchers and deputies told the
story of the unfolding disaster,
detailing the frantic scramble to
evacuate people and animals as the
fire ripped through miles of dry vegetation.
Deputies were asked to help
enforce mandatory evacuation
orders just 30 minutes after the fire
started.

Linda Mary Taylor
Linda Mary Taylor, born Aug.
18, 1946, died Wednesday, Sept.
16, 2015, after a
long battle with
cancer.
She attended
Sequoia High
School. In 1965,
she married Ken
Taylor.
They
resided
in
Belmont
and
San Mateo for
the next 47 years, raising their
children Jennifer Taylor Szelenyi
and Kevin Taylor. In October
2012, they retired moving to El
Dorado Hills, California.
She leaves behind her husband
Ken of 50 years, her daughter
Jennifer and son-in-law Bob, her
son Kevin and three grandchildren
Wyatt, Tyler and Jessica.
Linda was an avid walker and
enjoyed walking her dogs. She
was well known by many from her
days at the “ballpark,” where she
was often seen supporting her hus-

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Obituaries
band and daughter and later her
granddaughter at their softball
games, or at the little league field
or Hillsdale High School where
she spent time with the Pop
Warner Football Association. She
later watched her grandson Wyatt
play for Hillsdale and Oak Ridge
high schools’ football teams.
“Linda enjoyed her family.
Family was most important to her.
She liked spending time making
memories.”
A celebration of life memorial
service will be held in El Dorado
Hills Oct. 11.

Cristin Marie Padilla
Cristin Marie Padilla, born Oct.
6, 1992, died 4 p.m. Sept. 18,
2015, at Sutter Health MillsPeninsula Health Services in
Burlingame, California, due to
surgery complications.
“Cristin had such a lively spirit
and always saw the positive side of
life. Cristin knew how to love

unconditionally and endlessly.
Cristin was well on her way to
moving to Southern California to
fulfill her craving of becoming an
actress.”
A resident of San Mateo, Cristin
is survived by her mother and
father, Christine and David
Padilla, her two younger sisters,
her godmother/aunt, her grandparents, boyfriend, family and
friends.
“She loved life and life loved
her. Although her life may have
been shortened, she is now resting
in love in heaven with the lord.”
If you would like to continue to
help support the family with the
expenses of Cristin’s Celebration
of
Life,
please
go
to 
gofundme.com/4v4kdngw
where you can donate any amount
of funds, if desired.
Cristin’s Celebration of Life will
be 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 25,
at Crippen & Flynn Carlmont
Chapel in Belmont, California.
She will be laid to rest at Skylawn
Memorial Park 11 a.m. Saturday,
Sept. 26.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/NATION

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

5

Pope appeals to Congress, SAINT JUNIPERO SERRA
tells U.S. nuns ‘I love you’
By Nicole Winfield
and Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Pope Francis plunged
into the melting pot of New York on
Thursday after reminding the country of
its immigrant origins in the first papal
speech before Congress. At an evening
prayer service in St. Patrick’s Cathedral,
he thanked American nuns for their
strength and courage in a deeply meaningful acknowledgement of their service
following a yearslong Vatican crackdown.
Over 40 hours in New York, the pope
will address world leaders at the United
Nations, participate in an interfaith service
at the Sept. 11 memorial and celebrate
Mass at Madison Square Garden. He will
visit a school in Harlem and take a drive
through Central Park, part of a whirlwind
tour of the Big Apple that got off to a
quintessential welcome with a high school
brass band serenading him with “New
York, New York,” on the airport tarmac.
The popular pontiff received raucous
cheers upon his arrival in Manhattan.
Thousands of people lined the streets
leading to St. Patrick’s to greet him, cheering, waving flags and adoringly chanting
his name as he gestured toward them from
his popemobile. On the steps of the
recently spruced up cathedral, dignitaries

REUTERS

Pope Francis departs after celebrating vespers, or evening prayers, and sharing a
reflection, at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan, N.Y.
including Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Mayor
Bill de Blasio and U.S. Sen. Charles
Schumer welcomed him for an evening
vespers service.
Once inside, the pews full of U.S.
priests and sisters erupted in applause
when Francis told American nuns he
wanted to thank them for their strength,
spirit and courage and to “tell you that I
love you very much.”

It was the strongest expression yet of
his gratitude after the Vatican under his
predecessor ordered an overhaul of the
largest umbrella group of U.S. sisters,
accusing them of straying from church
teaching. The nuns denied the charge and
received an outpouring of support from
American Catholics, and the crackdown
ended this year, two years early, with no
major changes.

McConnell moves ahead with stopgap spending bill
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Senate’s top
Republican moved swiftly to avoid a
government shutdown in six days, pushing legislation that would keep agencies
operating without a contentious fight
over money for Planned Parenthood.
The action of Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell, R-Ky., followed a decisive
Senate vote blocking a bill that would
have stripped Planned Parenthood of its
taxpayer funding while keeping the gov-

ernment
running
through Dec. 11.
The vote was 4752, falling short of a
majority and well
shy of the 60 votes
required to overcome
a filibuster led by
Democrats.
Eight
Republicans, several
Mitch
of whom support
McConnell
abortion
rights,
voted with 42 Democrats and two independents to kill the measure.
McConnell immediately offered a

bipartisan stopgap spending bill free of
the Planned Parenthood dispute that’s
expected to easily clear the Senate next
week by a wide bipartisan margin. He
has for almost a year promised that
Republicans controlling Congress won’t
repeat the government shutdown of two
years ago.
In the House, GOP leaders called a
meeting of their fractious rank and file
for Friday morning to discuss whether to
accept the Senate’s move or reject it at
the risk that continuing the fight over
Planned Parenthood would lead to a
government shutdown.

JORDAN ROSS

A bird’s-eye view of the packed Serra High School
gymnasium for the celebratory mass for Saint Junipero Serra.

Local brief
Residential burglary interrupted in Millbrae
Sheriff’s deputies are on the lookout for two men wanted for
breaking into a home on the 100 block of Minorca Way in
Millbrae early Thursday morning.
At approximately 5:54 a.m., deputies responded to the
report of a burglary after a home owner reported confronting
someone inside the residence. The man ran from inside with
the home owner following. He met up with another man waiting outside and both were last seen south on Minorca Way
toward Millbrae Avenue, according to the Sheriff’s Office.
Miscellaneous items of jewelry were taken and the resident
was not harmed. The investigation is still ongoing, but there
did not appear to be a forced entry. The suspect may have
entered the residence as an automatic garage door was in the
process of closing, according to the Sheriff’s Office.
The men were described as black, early 20s, tall and thin and
with gray hooded sweatshirts and dark pants, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
Anyone with information regarding this case to contact
Detective Victor Bertolozzi at (650) 259-2321 or vbertolozzi@smcgov.org or Detective Joe Cang at (650) 259-2417
or jcang@smcgov.org Those who wish to remain anonymous
are encouraged to call the Anonymous Tip Line at (800) 5472700.

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to protect your family’s wealth.
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6

LOCAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Delays expected during PG&E
Broadway overpass construction
This Sunday, Pacific Gas and Electric will
begin work at the intersection of Rollins
Road and Broadway between 10 p.m. and 5
a.m. every night except Saturday through
Nov. 22 to improve an existing underground
electrical transmission main, according to
Burlingame police.
The work is within the intersection and
there will be lane reductions on all
approaches causing significant traffic
delays. For alternate routes into Burlingame,
PG&E’s contractor will place signs at the
Northbound 101 off-ramp at Peninsula
Avenue and the Southbound 101 off-ramp at
Millbrae Avenue. The PG&E work and lane
reductions are anticipated to continue until
mid-November, according to police. 

Junipero Serra County
Park to close for repairs
Junipero Serra County Park in San Bruno
will close Monday, Sept. 28, for repairs to
the park’s entrance, main road and ranger
gatehouse, which were damaged when a
water pipeline ruptured July 28, according
to the San Mateo County Parks Department.
Repairs are expected to take four to six
weeks. The department will be able to
announce a firm date for the reopening of
the park after the repair work begins. During
the repair period, the park’s main entrance
on Crystal Springs Road will be closed to
foot and car traffic. Area residents will be
able to access the park on foot using a
recently widened fire road connecting to the
Helen Drive park gate located at the south-

CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Foster City
Council is seeking residents who are interested
in serving full three-year
terms on several adviso-

Local briefs
west side of the park. San Mateo County
Park staff made improvements to the fire
road to provide additional emergency vehicle access to the park, according to the
department.
The park is located at 1801 Crystal
Springs Road in San Bruno.

One of two suspects
in chase, standoff back in
court after bench warrant arrest

Water customers in the Anchor Road area
of San Mateo may experience cloudy or discolored water until Oct. 31 while a 12-inch
water main is temporarily shut down to
upsize it in conjunction with a nearby construction project, according the Estero
Municipal Improvement District.
The line is redundant and should not affect
any customer’s current level of service and
the district will minimize discoloration as
much as possible by conducting strategic
hydrant flushing and monitoring system
pressure, flow and operations. Customers
who notice cloudy or discolored water
should run the tap briefly until only clear
water comes out. It should take only a few
moments to remove any discolored water,
according to the district.
Construction will occur in Tidelands Park
adjacent to 400 Mariners Island Blvd. in San
Mateo and is not expected to impact traffic
in the area.  The district serves Foster City
and a portion of San Mateo.
Anyone who notices any low water pressure or other significant change to water
service should contact the Estero Municipal
Improvement District at 286-8140.  For
more information contact Associate Civil
Engineer Laura Galli at 286-3280. 

One of two Oakland men who pleaded not
guilty in January to fleeing San Mateo police
and starting a lengthy SWAT standoff after
they were allegedly caught stealing from cars
was back in court Thursday after failing to
appear at a previous court date, according to
the San Mateo County District Attorney’s
Office.
The second suspect, however, remains a
fugitive.
Walter Mitchell, 26, allegedly pointed a
handgun at a police officer before fleeing into
a large apartment complex and getting into a
standoff with a SWAT team for most of the
night.
Mitchell missed a previous court date but
was back in court and in custody Thursday
after a $250,000 bench warrant was issued
for his arrest because he missed a Sept. 4
court date, according to prosecutors.
The second suspect, Andre Dupree-Lafleur
Jr., 22, who was arrested shortly after the two
crashed while fleeing from officers in San
Mateo, remains a fugitive, according to prosecutors.
Mitchell and Dupree-Lafleur allegedly
broke into cars in the Central Parking Garage
at East Fourth and Ellsworth avenues at about
7:20 p.m. Jan. 7.
The suspects allegedly fled the area in a silver Acura and police spotted a car with that
description nearby on East Fourth Avenue.
They attempted to stop the car, but the
driver fled, lost control of the car and
crashed into another car, a tree and a pole,
according to prosecutors.
Both occupants ran from the crash scene

ry committees beginning in January.
Seats are available on the Audit
Committee, which meets 7 p.m. in April
and November; on the Information
Technology Committee, which meets 7
p.m. bi-monthly the second Tuesday of the
month; and the Parks and Recreation

Committee, which meets 6:30 p.m. on the
first Wednesday of each month.
Applications are available online at
www.fostercity.org and are due by 5 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 29.
Applicants are required to attend the
November meeting of the committee for

Water main to be shut down

THE DAILY JOURNAL
and Mitchell allegedly pointed a handgun at a
police officer as he fled. Dupree-Lafleur was
found walking nearby, prosecutors said.
Mitchell allegedly fled into a large apartment complex at South Eldorado Street and
East Third Avenue. Police surrounded the
building and shut down streets with the assistance of a SWAT team and aid from several
other local police departments.
The standoff lasted until about 12:30 a.m.
the next day, when Mitchell came out of the
front door and surrendered, prosecutors said.
Mitchell was on parole for manslaughter,
according to prosecutors.

Pacifica post office closed
after vehicle crashes into it
The Pacifica main post office is closed for
repairs after a vehicle crashed into the building Monday, postal officials said Thursday.
The vehicle hit the front of the building at
50 W. Manor Drive at 7:45 a.m. causing
major damages to the retail window area
mainly, according to postal officials.
Police Capt. Joe Spanheimer said the driver was a 58-year-old Millbrae woman who
accidentally drove forward through the plate
glass windows into the lobby of the post
office.
The post office was closed at the time and
there were no injuries, Spanheimer said. The
driver was not arrested.
The Postal Service has transferred retail
service to Linda Mar Station and to the Daly
City Post Office, postal officials said.
The officials do not yet have an estimate of
when the repairs will be completed.
which they are applying and will be notified to attend the Dec. 21 council meeting
for appointment. For more information,
contact the city clerk at (650) 286-3250 or
clerk@fostercity.org.

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

7

Obama’s personal ties with
Xi yield mixed policy results
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Rescue workers carry bodies of Muslim pilgrims after a stampede at Mina, outside the holy Muslim city of Mecca.

Over 700 killed in crush of
hajj pilgrims in Saudi Arabia
By Aya Batrawy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MINA, Saudi Arabia — Two giant
waves of Muslim pilgrims collided
at an intersection Thursday near a
holy site in Saudi Arabia, and more
than 700 people were crushed and
trampled to death in the worst disaster at the hajj in a quarter-century.
“People were climbing over one
another just to breathe,” said
Abdullah Lotfy of Egypt. “It was
like a wave. You go forward and
suddenly you go back.”

The hajj, which drew 2 million
people from over 180 countries this
year, is a huge logistical challenge
for Saudi Arabia. The kingdom has
spent billions of dollars to accommodate the growing number of pilgrims and maintain safety and security at Islam’s holy cities of Mecca
and Medina for the annual event.
Saudi authorities began an investigation, said Interior Ministry
spokesman Maj. Gen. Mansour alTurki, adding that initial reports
showed two crowds coming from
opposing directions converged at an

WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama has invested more
time building personal ties with
Chinese President Xi Jinping than
with most other world leaders. But as
Xi arrived in Washington late
Thursday for a grand state visit, it’s
clear that Obama’s overtures have
produced decidedly mixed results.
During intimate walks and hours
of private discussion around the
world, Obama and Xi forged a historic breakthrough to combat climate
change and collaborated on efforts to
curb Iran’s nuclear program. But
there’s been little progress on a pair
of vexing security issues that will be
at the forefront of their latest round
of discussions: China’s cyberspying
in the U.S. and its disputed territorial

Barack Obama

Xi Jinping

claims in the Asian Pacific.
“The assumptions that many people had, that cooperation on transnational threats like climate change
would ameliorate problems in
geopolitical arenas were wrong,”
said Michael Green, White House
Asian Affairs director under
President George W. Bush and current senior vice president at the
Center for Strategic and International
Studies.

Audit finds basic security
flaws with HealthCare.gov
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar

intersection in Mina, on the outskirts
of Mecca, when the pushing and
shoving started.
“Unfortunately, these incidents
happen in a moment,” al-Turki said
at a news conference.
But four survivors questioned how
officials managing the flow of people could allow two big crowds
going in different directions to intersect on two streets packed with pilgrims.
“What happened was more than
they were ready for,” Lotfy, 44, told
the Associated Press.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The government stored sensitive personal information on millions of health insurance customers in a computer system with basic security flaws,
according to an official audit that
uncovered slipshod practices.
The Obama administration said it
acted quickly to fix all the problems
identified by the Health and Human
Services inspector general’s office.
But the episode raises questions
about the government’s ability to

protect a vast new database at a time
when cyberattacks are becoming
bolder.
Known as MIDAS, the $110-million system is the central electronic
storehouse for information collected
under President Barack Obama’s
health care law.
It doesn’t handle medical records,
but it does include names, Social
Security numbers, birthdates,
addresses, phone numbers, passport
numbers, employment status and
financial accounts of customers on
HealthCare.gov and state insurance
marketplaces.

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8

LOCAL/WORLD

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Diplomats jostle to lay out their
position on how to end Syria war A
By Lori Hinnant and Cara Anna
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — Europe’s top diplomats, the
United States and Russia jostled to lay out
their positions Thursday on how best to end
the civil war in Syria, which has sent millions
fleeing their homes and killed thousands.
A central issue at the U.N.’s largest gathering of world leaders next week will be how
and whether to include Syrian President
Bashar Assad in any talks about the future of
the country.
In the U.S., envoys said the Obama administration refused to negotiate over a Russian
statement they feared would strengthen
Assad’s hand at the United Nations. But
efforts to stem the long-running crisis have
new urgency in Europe, which is divided over
how to deal with a new influx of refugees fleeing the war zone.
Russia, meanwhile, is bolstering military
support for Assad, while U.S. support for
rebels fighting the Syrian leader has
foundered. About 4 million people have fled

Syria during the conflict, which the U.N. says
has killed more than 250,000.
A Kremlin spokesman has said Russian
President Vladimir Putin will meet President
Barack Obama on Monday.
A draft of Russia’s council statement,
obtained by the Associated Press, urges countries to fight extremist groups “in coordination
with the governments of the affected states.”
Sheba Crocker, the assistant U.S. secretary
of state for international organization affairs,
confirmed that the U.S. told Russia it couldn’t
back the proposed statement.
One Security Council diplomat, speaking on
condition of anonymity because the discussion was not a public one, said Russia’s new
military buildup in Syria was hindering any
hope for talks.
The diplomat noted the recent flurry of
diplomatic activity on Syria after the Iran
nuclear deal was announced, including a
meeting between U.S. Secretary of State John
Kerry and Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov
in Qatar, but said that window “slammed
shut” with Russia’s new military buildup.

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We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted.
One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associated with the receipt or
use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Reporters’ notebook

s part of her official duties, San
Mateo County’s Poet Laureate
Caroline Goodwin will continue
her “Poetry Is” campaign by launching her
“Poetry Is Autumn.” With the new season
here, some of the most beautiful images of
autumn usher us into a colorful playground.
If you are a poet who lives in San Mateo
County, submit your best work to the
“Poetry Is Autumn” contest, being held
until Thursday, Oct. 15. Your poem may be
in any form, up to 25 lines in length. Use
lots of sensory details to show your readers
what the season means to you. All ages,
styles and languages will be considered. A
selection committee will invite several poets
to participate in a celebration 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 18, at the Redwood
Shores Library.
Please submit your poem by email to
Anna Koch at koch@smcl.org. Or mail
your poem to the Foster City Library,
1000 East Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City, CA
94404, attn.: Anna Koch. For questions
regarding the campaign please contact
Kathleen Beasley at 591-8286 ext. 227; or
Anna Koch at 574-4842 ext. 227.
***
Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the San
Bruno Police Department and the Drug
Enforcement Administration will provide
the public its 10th opportunity to bring prescription pills for disposal to the San Bruno
Police Department at 1177 Huntington Ave.
The service is free and anonymous, no
questions asked.
***
On Sunday, the Episcopal Church of St.
Matthew, located in San Mateo on the corner of El Camino Real and Baldwin
Avenue, celebrated its 150th anniversary.
In a service led by the Rt. Rev Mark
Handley Andrus, bishop of California,
they celebrated the church’s first 150 years
as well as the completion a new addition to
the church and day school. The Rector, the

Rev. Eric Kimball Hinds and Associate
Rector, the Rev. Lindsay Hills, joined in
leading the worship service.
In 1865, San Mateo was a mere village of
150 people, with a few houses located near
the railroad depot. George H. Howard and
his wife, Agnes, donated 2 acres near the
corner of Baldwin and El Camino to build
the first Episcopal House of Worship on
the Peninsula’s Bayside. The first church
building was replaced by the current structure after the 1906 earthquake. The chancel
wall and roof of the church were seriously
damaged, and the bell tower collapsed.
Although the entire church building was not
demolished, the vestry decided to rebuild
the church rather then repair. The Gothic
style church, after an enlargement in 1957,
is what stands today.
***
In August, the South San Francisco
Conference Center was certified GOLD
under the “Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design — Existing
Buildings: Operations and Maintenance”
rating system.
Several factors led to South San
Francisco Conference Center achieving
LEED certification, including a commitment to energy efficiency with high efficiency HVAC equipment, LED lighting and
controls and water efficiency through low
flow sinks and urinals; outdoor site maintenance conducted by walking the site and
picking up trash by hand, versus using powered (gas or otherwise) equipment; environmentally friendly cleaning products for carpets, windows and pest management practices; and established policies to only buy
environmentally friendly equipment for the
interior including reduced mercury lamps,
office equipment and supplies.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection
of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Yes on Measure S

V

oters in San Mateo are
faced with a choice this
election whether they
want to extend a quarter-cent sales
tax passed in 2009 as a “temporary” measure to ensure financial
stability in the midst of the Great
Recession.
Though Measure S is officially
an extension, to call it such is not
necessarily true to its intent and its
essence. When passed in 2009,
Measure L was seen as necessary
to bridge a financial gap created by
dropping property and sales taxes
and ensure the city would not have
to make drastic cuts to its workforce. While the city enacted worker concessions to ensure fiscal stability, more was needed and
Measure L was able to provide
approximately $5 million a year to
keep city services stable. As that
measure is set to expire in 2018, it
might seem natural to allow it to
end and save the money of residents and others who buy products
in San Mateo — especially since
the city is enjoying an economic
recovery along with the rest of the
region. City finances are stronger,
and the threat of cuts has passed.
However, the city is also seeking
to rectify an ongoing issue with
flood control mandated by the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency. While significant strides
have been made in meeting the federal requirements and many resi-

Editorial
dents have been able to be taken
off a FEMA map requiring costly
insurance, there are still many residents — particularly in the North
Shoreview area — who still must
pay exorbitant rates for flood insurance. City officials explored a number of mechanisms to right this
wrong, including forming an infrastructure finance district that has
been recently allowed by the state
and forming an assessment district,
neither would have the capability
to pay for the estimated $23.5 million in needed projects. Residents
in other areas of the city could say
that this might not affect them and
they shouldn’t have to pay, but
water flows down and creates
issues from all origins in the city
on the Bayfront. Additionally, the
impact of severe flooding as theorized by FEMA would be costly to
the city overall, and thus to all its
residents. And there is the intrinsic
notion of ensuring that each and
every resident of this city deserve
support from all of its residents.
One of the rationales of having the
quarter-cent sales tax for 30 years
is that it is required for bonds that
would pay for the improvements.
Having a 30-year source of dedicated revenue would ensure the
city could borrow the money needed for the flood control improve-

ments at a decent interest rate.
Additionally, the city suffers
from failing infrastructure including 19 miles of failed streets. The
revenue created by Measure S
would provide additional funding
for street repairs and rehabilitation
that has been lacking. One could
ask why these streets have been
allowed to get into disrepair but the
short answer is that the city did not
have a pavement management program until 2001. That program
inspects streets every two years to
better inform officials on what
repairs are needed and when.
Before the program, street repairs
were complaint driven and while it
is easy to ask why that was, it
doesn’t matter in the present
because it just was at that time.
With 190 miles of streets in various
conditions, city officials have been
playing catchup since. This measure would allow for a quicker
catchup and a smoother ride for all.
The measure is still a “general
tax” and can be used for any city
service, and proponents point to
other needs like park maintenance
and public safety. While true that
the money can be used for any reason, $5 million a year goes relatively quick when contending with
flood control and street repair
needs. A citizens oversight commit-

For links to previous Daily Journal
endorsements
go
to
smdailyjournal.com/opinions.html
tee will be established to guide the
City Council on its decisions for
the remainder of the money and
that will provide some flexibility if
needs change.
It might be easy to say that the
city should not go back on its word
on a measure that was initially
envisioned as temporary, or that it
should live within its means and
find the money needed for essential
repairs elsewhere. City officials,
however, looked far and wide at
various ways to fund these needs
and determined a tax that is already
being paid by residents and visitors
to the city when they shop was the
best way forward. We agree. Vote
yes on Measure S.

Letters to the editor
Millbrae Councilman Wayne
Lee contradicts himself

Don’t give teachers
housing, give them raises

Editor,
In the story regarding red light
cameras (in the Aug. 13 edition of
the Daily Journal), Millbrae
Councilman Wayne Lee was quoted as saying, “I’m more concerned
about safety than someone’s pocketbook,” insinuating that by issuing $500 tickets for not making a
complete stop while turning right
on red he was changing people’s
behaviors and making the city
safer.
In the Sept. 21 edition of the
Daily Journal, Councilman Lee
was quoted as saying, “You cannot
social engineer people” in regards
to issuing citations for littering
downtown.
Mr. Lee, you’re talking from
both sides of your mouth.

Editor,
Buried in the San Mateo Union
High School District board agenda
for Sept. 24 is a staff recommendation to either lease or sell the
land that Peninsula High School
sits on to the city of San Bruno
(“New home sought for high
school” in the Sept. 19 edition of
the Daily Journal).
There is a suggestion to build
housing for teachers on this site
perhaps such as College Vista of
the San Mateo County Community
College District, something I
absolutely disagree with.
Why are we involving real
estate developers at all here? It
seems to me if the problem is that
teachers cannot afford to live here
— that is time to give every
teacher in the SMUHSD a substantial raise.
Teachers, like the rest of us
want to be part of the middle class

Steve Claesson
Millbrae

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not be

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Joe Rudino

and homeowners — not doomed
to live in government subsidized
“pack n’ stack” housing in a community they will never afford to
be homeowners in.
Create opportunity for the
developers in the market to build
more housing privately, give the
teachers a salary raise, reform the
obtuse land use policy and esoteric zoning ordinances that prohibit intelligent development, and
please stop pretending this false
“Robin Hood” transaction is even
good policy — it is not.

Doug Radtke
Millbrae

Presidential
candidates, don’t ignore
the issue of term limits
Editor,
Currently, we have presidential
candidates from both parties, all
vying for votes, position and even-

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta
Robert Armstrong
Kerry Chan
Irving Chen
Jim Clifford
Caroline Denney
Mayeesha Galiba
Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung
Jhoeanna Mariano
Dave Newlands
Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Samson So
Gary Whitman

accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number where we
can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred: letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are those

Other
voices

Daily Journal
Endorsements
San Bruno City Council: Irene
O’Connell, Michael Salazar
San Mateo City Council:
Maureen Freschet, Diane Papan
Redwood City Council: Alicia
Aguirre, Ian Bain, Rosanne Foust,
Shelly Masur
Belmont City Council: Davina
Hurt, Doug Kim
Millbrae City Council: Wayne
Lee, Gina Papan, Ann Schneider

tual nomination. They are avoiding being put on record for anything that could imperil their position. They have all avoided the
most pressing issue in the country
— term limits — in the Senate
and Congress. It’s time for a
change, or shortly, many of our
lawmakers will come to work in
an ambulance.

James G. B. DeMartini Jr.
Foster City

Editor’s note:
During election season, the
Daily Journal does not accept
guest perspective submissions
from candidates for office or on
election-related topics such as
local measures.
Letters to the editor of about
250 words on election-related topics or from candidates for office
will be accepted.

OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those who
live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis and
insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state, national and
world news, we seek to provide our readers with the
highest quality information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we choose to
reflect the diverse character of this dynamic and everchanging community.

SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
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any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107

9

Pope’s visit
The News & Observer
of Raleigh (North Carolina)

T

hose fortunate enough to
see Pope Francis on his
visit to the United States
will know it is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, one they’ll share
with friends and family all their
lives. And that feeling will apply
to non-Catholics as well as members of the church.
For Pope Francis has captured
the world’s attention not just with
his position, but with a message
that embraces all people with love
and forgiveness and understanding that goes beyond doctrine.
Indeed, long-time church
observers thought from the
moment he appeared as pope and
asked people for their prayers that
his might well be a transformative
period in the church’s history.
Francis certainly is not a revolutionary, in that he adheres to
and advocates many of the
church’s traditional beliefs. But
he has cleared the way for the
church and its leaders to be more
forgiving and more understanding.
He has given priests the right to
absolve the Catholic sin of abortion. He has acted to make annulment easier.
And he has repeatedly emphasized the need for all to help the
poor and disadvantaged. He has
preached for humility, for tolerance of those who are different.
And of late, he has spoken of
the threat of climate change and
the need to better care for the
environment and tied that together
with the needs of the less fortunate. A gifted writer, the pope
wrote in his encyclical policy on
social justice and the environment, "It must integrate questions
of justice in debates on the environment, so as to hear both the
cry of the earth and the cry of the
poor."
The pope conveys his view of
the church’s obligation to involve
itself in social issues with his own
itinerary in the United States.
Yes, there will be parades and
masses. But he will be visiting a
school, a charity and a prison.
And as he always does, this pope
will greet his crowds with kisses
and handshakes. He seems particularly touched by children,
embracing them when possible,
blessing them, kissing them. He
makes a special effort with those
children who are sick or handicapped.
The pope’s humanity is what
has caused him to be admired and
even adored by non-Catholics. He
is a person without pretense, who
chooses to live in humble rooms
at the Vatican and not the more
well-appointed apartment of his
predecessors. By example, he is a
leader of all, and though he’ll
address Congress and the United
Nations, he’ll likely admonish
them to serve all the peoples of
the world. And they will sit up
straight when he does.
Pope Francis has attained
extraordinary attention since
assuming the papacy. Yes, that’s
true of all new popes. But in this
case, the attention comes as much
because of his ideas and his forceful way of expressing them.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks drop on global growth worries
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
16,201.32
Nasdaq 4,734.48
S&P 500 1,932.24

-78.57
-18.27
-6.52

10-Yr Bond 2.12 -0.02
Oil (per barrel) 45.09
Gold
1,153.70

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Accenture PLC, down 9 cents to $97.77
The consulting company reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter
results, but provided a disappointing outlook.
Caterpillar Inc., down $4.40 to $65.80
The construction and mining equipment company plans to cut as many
as 5,000 jobs and reduce costs while dealing with a downturn.
General Motors Co., down 28 cents to $29.44
Shares in auto companies are slumping over concerns that Volkswagen’s
emissions scandal is a broader industry problem.
BHP Billiton Ltd., up 14 cents to $32.29
BlackRock cut its stake in the mining company and its CEO had his
compensation lowered as commodity prices continue to fall.
General Electric Co., down 23 cents to $24.91
The conglomerate will get up to $12 billion in financing from the United
Kingdom to create up to 1,000 energy sector jobs
KB Home, up 15 cents to $14.60
The homebuilder’s third-quarter profit fell because of higher costs, but
the results still beat Wall Street expectations.
Nasdaq
Arrowhead Research Corp., up 45 cents to $7.19
The biotechnology drug developer reported positive results from a
midstage study on its potential hepatitis B drug ARC-520.
Gilat Satellite Networks Ltd., down 33 cents to $3.62
The broadband satellite and networking services company lowered
projections for the year, citing delays in several large-scale projects.

NEW YORK — More evidence that
global economic growth is slowing
pushed the U.S. stock market down for a
third straight day on Thursday.
The market fell sharply at the open,
pushing stocks close to their lowest levels of the month, before rebounding during afternoon trading to close with only
slight losses.
Caterpillar, a bellwether for industrial
companies, fell sharply after cutting its
sales outlook for this year and announcing that it would eliminate as many as
10,000 jobs to cut costs.
Also, the government reported that
orders for long-lasting U.S. manufactured goods dropped in August. A key
category that tracks business investment
plans was especially weak.
“We’re looking for that good news and
we’re not getting any,” said John
Toohey, vice president of equity investments at USAA.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
6.52 points, or 0.3 percent, to 1,932.24.
The Dow Jones industrial average lost
78.57 points, or 0.5 percent, to
16,201.32. The Nasdaq composite fell
18.27 points, or 0.4 percent, to 4,734.48.
The market has been in a funk for the
past month as investors worry that slow-

ing growth overseas, particularly in
China, will hurt U.S. companies. A decision by the Federal Reserve to hold its
benchmark interest rate close to zero last
week also made investors uneasy.
Policymakers held the Fed’s benchmark interest rate despite an improving
job market and a steady economy. Fed
Chair Janet Yellen told reporters after
the meeting that worries about China
and emerging markets were a factor in
their decision. Many economists expected that the central bank would instead
focus on the health of the U.S. economy.
Yellen said in a speech late Thursday
that she expects the Fed to begin raising
interest rates by the end of the year. She
also suggested that global economic
weakness will not be significant enough
to alter the central bank’s plan to raise its
key short-term rate from zero by
December. Her remarks came after the
market had closed.
On Thursday, Caterpillar was the
biggest decliner in the S&P 500.
The company slumped after cutting its
2015 revenue forecast by $1 billion to
about $48 billion. Caterpillar also said
sales would fall another 5 percent next
year. The company said it may eliminate
as many as 10,000 jobs between now
and 2018. The maker of mining and construction equipment is suffering as a
global slump in commodity prices hurts
mining companies. The stock dropped

$4.40, or 6.3 percent, to $65.80.
European
markets
also
fell.
Germany’s DAX dropped 1.9 percent,
Britain’s FTSE 100 declined 1.2 percent
and France’s CAC 40 lost 1.9 percent.
Automakers in Europe are still suffering in the wake of Volkswagen’s emissions scandal. While VW’s stock closed
flat on the day, fellow German carmaker
BMW fell 5.2 percent after a report said
one of its models had failed a test in
Europe. Fiat Chrysler fell 7.5 percent.
There was some strong earnings news
from Nike after the close of trading.
The sportswear company reported
earnings that surpassed analysts’ expectations as sales grew. Its stock climbed
$8.61, or 7.5 percent, to $123.35 in afterhours trading.
In commodities trading, benchmark
U.S. crude rose 43 cents to $44.91 a barrel on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. Brent crude, a benchmark for
many international oils imported by U.S.
refineries, rose 42 cents to $48.17 a barrel.
Bond prices rose, pushing the yield on
the 10-year Treasury note down to 2.12
percent from 2.15 percent a day earlier.
The dollar slipped to 120.06 yen. The
euro ticked higher to $1.1221.
The price of gold rose $22.30 to
$1,153.80 an ounce. Silver climbed 34
cents to $15.13 an ounce and copper
rose 0.7 cents to $2.30 a pound.

Yellen says she expects Fed to raise rates by year’s end
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Chair Janet Yellen said
Thursday that she expects the Federal
Reserve to begin raising interest rates from
record lows by the end of the year.
In a lecture at the University of
Massachusetts at Amherst, Yellen said she
thought inflation would gradually move up
to the Fed’s target rate of 2 percent as unusually low oil prices and other factors prove
temporary. And she suggested that global
economic weakness won’t likely be significant enough to dissuade the Fed from raising
its key short-term rate from zero by
December.
Yellen’s comments may help clarify doubts
about the Fed’s intentions that deepened last
week after its latest policy meeting ended.

The Fed chose not to raise
rates, citing global economic pressures and concern about excessively
low inflation.
That decision raised
worries that the Fed had
greater concerns about
economic problems in
Janet Yellen China and falling stock
markets than investors
had previously thought.
In her speech Thursday, Yellen said Fed
officials continue to monitor economic troubles abroad. But she said officials don’t think
those challenges will significantly influence
the central bank’s interest-rate decisions.
At a news conference last week, Yellen had
avoided saying whether she herself still
thought a rate hike would be justified this
year. She said she preferred to convey the

collective view of the Fed’s policymaking
committee, which establishes the central
bank’s rate decisions. But on Thursday,
Yellen included herself, saying, “Most of my
colleagues and I anticipate that it will likely
be appropriate to raise the target range for the
federal funds rate sometime later this year.”
As she has before, Yellen stressed that
when the Fed does begin raising rates, it
expects the increases to be extremely gradual. The central bank has left its benchmark
rate at a record low since 2008. It last raised
rates in 2006.
She also emphasized that the Fed has made
no final decision about a rate hike. The decision still depends on further progress toward
the Fed’s dual mandates: Maximizing
employment and maintaining price stability,
which the Fed defines as inflation rising at a
modest annual pace of 2 percent.
In August, the U.S. unemployment rate

Oculus takes aim at mainstream
with inexpensive gear, video
LOS ANGELES — Virtual reality is
taking a few steps closer to the mainstream with Samsung unveiling a headset
that brings the technology to its latest
smartphones at half the price of its previous model, Facebook launching support
for 360-degree video, and online video
services like Netflix and Hulu jumping
into the format.
The announcements at a developers
conference in Los Angeles for virtual
reality technology company Oculus represent attempts to push the platform
beyond a video-gamer-focused niche.
Facebook Inc. CEO Mark Zuckerberg,
who cut a deal to buy Oculus for $2 billion last year, told some 1,500 conference attendees Thursday that virtual reality is “the next logical step” in online
sharing after text, photos and video.
“In just a few years, VR has gone from
being this science fiction dream to an
awesome reality,” he said. “And now we
all here have a chance to change the way
we play, communicate and collaborate.”
Zuckerberg showed off a promo for the
upcoming “Star Wars” movie showing a
speeding vehicle zooming over the desert
landscape of fictional planet Jakku.
Users can look around in any direction
using their mouse as the video is playing.
Samsung said its new virtual reality
headset will be 22 percent lighter and

reached a seven-year low of 5.1 percent,
essentially achieving the Fed’s job goal. But
inflation has been running below the Fed’s
target for more than three years and recently
has fallen even farther from the 2 percent
goal. Ultra-low inflation has resulted in part
from a plunge in energy prices over the past
year and a higher-valued dollar, which has
made imports cheaper.
Yellen said Fed officials still think the
depressive effects of the dollar and energy
prices will fade, allowing inflation to return
to the 2 percent level. She noted that the Fed
expects low unemployment to eventually
accelerate wage gains.
Yellen’s comments came in a 23-page
speech that was accompanied by numerous
charts, economic formulas and footnotes,
which provided an extensive review of the
Fed’s views on factors that influence inflation.

Business briefs
cost $99, half the price of its previous
model. The Gear VR, which requires
users to insert the latest version of a
Samsung smartphone into the headset,
will ship in November.
Netflix content is available to be
viewed in Oculus or Samsung headsets
starting Thursday, while Hulu said it
would also bring its app to the Oculus
platform where users can stream 2-D
content as well as an original virtual reality short film called “The Big One,” from
YouTube
star
Freddie
Wong’s
RocketJump production company. A
Hulu launch date wasn’t announced.

State attorneys general launch
investigation of Volkswagen
LANSING, Mich. — At least 27 state
attorneys general are opening a multistate investigation into Volkswagen after
it came clean about rigging diesel emissions technology to pass U.S. smog tests.
Michigan Attorney General Bill
Schuette’s office said Thursday he and at
least 26 other attorneys general will send
subpoenas to the German automaker.
Spokeswoman Andrea Bitely says many
states will investigate both through their
consumer protection and environmental
protection divisions.
Volkswagen is reeling from revelations
it used secret software to thwart diesel

smog tests on nearly a half million vehicles in the U.S.

Nasdaq center aims to build
relationships with startups
SAN FRANCISCO — Nasdaq has
long been known as the “tech-heavy”
stock exchange, where some of Silicon
Valley’s best-known companies have
gone to sell shares. Now, as it faces stiff
competition from rival exchanges to lure
the next hot IPO, it’s reaching out to
business startups before they go public.
New York-based Nasdaq, through an
affiliated foundation, is opening what it
calls an “Entrepreneurial Center”
Thursday in a trendy commercial district
south of San Francisco’s Market Street.
It’s promising business training, mentoring and networking opportunities for
early stage startup founders — maybe
even the next Mark Zuckerberg or Larry
Page.
“We want to support amazing entrepreneurs, who may be starting a company
today or their next three companies down
the line, who will remember the things
they were taught as part of the Nasdaq
community,” said Nicola Corzine, a veteran startup investor who will operate the
center as its executive director.
Nasdaq executives say they have a
long tradition of working with young
companies, and the new center is open to
entrepreneurs in other sectors besides
tech.

CARDINAL FAVORITES: WITH OR WITHOUT STARTING QB, NO. 21 STANFORD STACKS UP STRONG AGAINST OREGON STATE >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 13, Royals punch ticket back
to playoffs by clinching AL Central
Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Tigers outlast Gators in clash
of volleyball powerhouses
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With two of San Mateo County’s best volleyball players going head-to-head, the clash
between Notre Dame-Belmont and Sacred
Heart Prep turned out to be not merely a display of superstars. It was an exhibition of
depth of two high-caliber teams that figure to
potentially collide again on the Central
Coast Section Division IV playoff stage.
It isn’t that Notre Dame-Belmont junior
Katie Smoot wasn’t a spectacle as the Tigers
(11-5) won in straight sets 25-18, 25-17, 2523 in non-league action Tuesday at Sacred
Heart Prep (11-5). The outside hitter, who
made her 2015 debut just last week after returning from an ankle injury, continued to make
up for lost time, firing a match-high 17 kills.
And as advertised, Gators sophomore Cate
Desler also showcased some elite play with a
team-high 12 kills.
With a SHP front-row blocking attack that
is going to give teams in the West Bay
Athletic League fits this season, it was the
Tigers’ terrific back-row play that won the
day. Smoot and fellow junior outside hitter
Tammy Byrne — known more for their ferocious kill velocity up front — teamed with
senior libero Katarina Warburton and sophomore defensive specialist Kat Ho to count-

er a surging Gators team
in Game 3 and ultimately
ensure the sweep.
“They’re great players
and in high-pressure
games they always step up
and do a good job,” Notre
Dame-Belmont
head
coach Jen Agresti said.
After winning the CCS
Katarina
Division IV title last seaWarburton
son — Notre Dame’s first
ever for volleyball — Tuesday’s win was a
no-nonsense statement that the Tigers are
out to do it again.
“It’s just another step on our journey,”
Warburton said. “We want to do something
special again. We want to make it to state
again and go even further. All these games
count towards that. We’re not taking anything for granted.”
Leading by two games, Notre Dame could
have easily backed off in Game 3 as SHP
mounted a comeback. After a back-and-forth
battle in the early going, the Gators took a
17-12 lead behind a stellar early scoring spree
by Desler, who totaled five kills in the set.
But the Tigers began chipping away with
exciting contributions — a block by senior

See NDB, Page 16

A wonderful life: Berra’s
family, Yanks honor Yogi
By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Bill Spahr tapped the
bronze Yogi Berra plaque in Monument Park
with his hand, nodded his head in tribute and
recalled the day he once talked to the
Yankees great for 15 minutes at an airport.
“It was easily the greatest experience I’ve
ever had,” Spahr said.
From the makeshift memorial outside the
main gate at Yankee Stadium to the extended
moment of silence before New York hosted
the Chicago White Sox, it was a time to
remember the beloved Berra with smiles and
tears Thursday night.
“We all looked up to Yogi,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “The champion he
was. A ring for every finger. I think we’d all
like to have that.”
White Sox manager Robin Ventura echoed

the sentiment, treasuring the days when he
played for the Yankees and Berra would wander into the clubhouse.
“When he came in, there wasn’t a guy who
didn’t want to talk to him,” Ventura said.
Berra died Tuesday at 90. In 2009, the Hall
of Famer threw out the ceremonial first ball
before the first regular-season game at the
new Yankee Stadium.
This pregame ceremony lasted 10 minutes, fitting for someone who played on a
record 10 World Series champions.
As both teams lined up outside their
dugouts, Girardi put a wreath of blue and
white flowers in the shape of Berra’s No. 8
in the catcher’s box. A Navy bugler played
“Taps” in a salute to Berra’s service aboard a
Navy gunboat during the D-Day invasion.
The Yankees wore No. 8 on their left

See YOGI, Page 12

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

Aragon WR Devin Grant is having a breakout year playing in the Dons’ pass-heavy offense.

Aragon historically
dominates Mateo
Game of the Week
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

If there are two football coaches who
know a thing or two about rivalry games,
it’s Aragon’s Steve Sell and San Mateo’s
Jeff Scheller.
Both were involved in the AragonHillsdale rivalry —  as both players and

coaches. Now, both are heavily invested in
another intra-city rivalry game, one that has
its own unique history. The Williams brothers, Britt and Buz, coached at Aragon and San
Mateo, respectively, essentially putting
those programs on the map. Then there is
the fact that many of the players know each
other, due to the fact many grew up going to

See GOTW, Page 14

Giants’ pen gives it up again, costs MadBum 19th win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — Pinch-hitter Alexi
Amarista’s RBI single in the ninth inning
lifted the San Diego Padres to a 5-4 victory
over San Francisco Giants on Thursday
night.
Derek Norris opened the inning with a
double off Mike Broadway (0-2), Norris’

third extra-base of the game. Travis
Jankowski ran for Norris and advanced to
third on Melvin Upton Jr.’s sacrifice bunt.
Pinch-hitter Brett Wallace was walked
intentionally before Amarista’s hit to leftcenter.
Craig Kimbrel (4-2) pitched the ninth to
earn the win.
Matt Kemp’s one-out double off reliever

Sergio Romo tied the score at 4-4 in the
eighth, after Cory Spangenberg reached on
a fielder’s choice.
Matt Duffy had three hits for San
Francisco, which fell eight games behind
the NL West-leading Los Angeles Dodgers
with 10 games left.
Giants starter Madison Bumgarner went
seven innings and was charged with three

runs, three hits and three walks while striking out nine.
It was Bumgarner’s second straight strong
performance against the Padres, as he was
four outs shy of a perfect game in beating
them 1-0 on Sept. 12. Bumgarner threw a
season-high 120 pitches.

See GIANTS, Page 13

12

SPORTS

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Stanford big
challenge for
Oregon State
By Anne M. Peterson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Even if Stanford
doesn’t have Kevin Hogan, Oregon State
still faces a considerable challenge in the
No. 21 Cardinal on Friday night.
Hogan injured his left ankle in Stanford’s
upset victory over USC last weekend and he’s
likely a game-time decision against the Beavers.
He shouldn’t be counted
out. Hurt in the second half
against the Trojans, he gritted out the win. The senior
quarterback completed 18
of 23 passes for 279 yards
and a pair of touchdowns,
Kevin Hogan earning Pac-12 offensive
player of the week honors.
Oregon State coach Gary Andersen
admired Hogan’s toughness in the victory,
adding that he fully expects him to play on
Friday night.
“He’s a well-rounded, experienced guy
with some very talented kids around him.
He’s in tremendous command of that
offense, also,” Andersen said. “There’s not a
lot of things he hasn’t seen and there’s not a
lot of offense that’s gonna be called where
he’s not going to be very comfortable,
obviously, producing.”
Hogan is now tied for fourth in school
history at 53 career touchdown passes, joining some illustrious company. Andrew Luck
is the Cardinal all-time leader with 82,
breaking John Elway’s mark of 77.
The Beavers, in the first season under
Andersen, have freshman Seth Collins at
quarterback.
Collins threw for 135 yards and a score in
Oregon State’s 35-21 victory over San Jose
State last weekend. But he did the most damage with his feet, running for 114 yards and
two touchdowns. Collins is the sixthranked rusher in the Pac-12 with an average
of 98 yards a game.
“Another quarterback in our league who is

See PAC-12, Page 16

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Roberts makes mark with game-winning TD

“We still holler at each other right now,”
Roberts said. “He hit me up after the game.
He said it’s a blessing to see us doing our
thing.”
Roberts signed with the Raiders as an
undrafted free agent last year and did enough
to earn a spot on the practice squad, where
he was able to learn the NFL game and add
needed strength.
“Talk about a guy that the first day we
threw routes on there, it didn’t look too
pretty,” Carr said. “Back in rookie minicamp days and just to watch him work,
watch him get better at his craft, to make the

team after being on practice squad and to
make the game-winning catch and he
deserves all the credit.”
Roberts put together a strong preseason
with 15 catches for 243 yards and a touchdown to make the 53-man roster this year as
part of a deeper receiving group that made
high-profile additions with Michael
Crabtree and Amari Cooper.
He improved enough over the past year to
beat out several receivers with NFL experience.
“We felt like the guys that were returning
would have a chance to develop and we just
wanted them to compete and compete on
special teams, compete for roles on
offense,” coach Jack Del Rio said. “Seth has
just taken that opportunity and run with it.”
Roberts had a shaky debut performance
when he caught three passes for 12 yards
and dropped two others in a loss to
Cincinnati. But the Raiders traded a former
drafted receiver, Brice Butler, to Dallas during the week and kept Roberts active last
Sunday ahead of Rod Streater, who led the
team in receiving in 2013.
Roberts played 49 snaps in his second
game. For the first 48, he was an afterthought as either a blocker on a run play or
decoy in the passing game.
But with the game on the line, Carr went
to Roberts for the winning score on a slant
over the middle.
“I kept my head in the game and stayed
focused,” he said. “I read the coverage and I
slipped inside, found a crease and got
open.”
The Raiders hope that will be the first of
many such plays.

question on the board, too, and the answer,
no surprise, was Berra.
Out in Monument Park, flowers honored
Berra. His plaque notes his three AL MVP
awards and famous “It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s
Over” saying and praises him as “a legendary Yankee.”
Fans posed for pictures with the plaque
and told stories about Berra. Spahr, 58 and a
lifelong Yankees fan, still plays softball
with Berra’s son, Larry.
“Yogi was the best,” Spahr said.
Flowers arranged in the figure of an 8 were
outside the stadium in a fan memorial, along
with candles, drawings and a picture of Berra
with Derek Jeter. A young girl asked her dad

what made Berra so special.
“He had some of the most famous quotes
in the world,” he told his daughter, “and he
won 10 championships.”
Earlier in the day, at a news conference at
the Yogi Berra Museum and Learning Center
on the campus of Montclair State
University in Little Falls, New Jersey, sons
Dale, Tim and Larry and granddaughter
Lindsay spoke about him.
“He was such a normal, regular guy to the
people he met,” Dale Berra said. “I think
because he grew up with immigrant parents
during the Depression and had to go to work
when he was in eighth grade, I think that
made him humble.”

By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA — When Seth Roberts
watched his old college teammate from
Division II West Alabama make the play
that decided the Super Bowl earlier this year,
it gave him the confidence that maybe he
too could succeed in the NFL despite his
small-school pedigree.
Two games into his NFL career, Roberts
has a game-winning play of his own to
match Malcolm Butler’s interception in the
Super Bowl for New England — even if it did
come on a much smaller stage.
Roberts caught the go-ahead touchdown
pass from Derek Carr with 26 seconds
remaining last Sunday to give the Oakland
Raiders their first win of the season, 37-33
over the Baltimore Ravens.
That one play turned Roberts from a mostly anonymous former practice squader into
an NFL contributor.
“I heard from a lot of people,” he said. “I
had to turn my phone off. I just want to be
the old Seth and just chill.”
Roberts has come a long way from the
player who had no scholarship offers out of
high school then spent two years in junior
college in Mississippi at Pearl River
Community College and then played two
more years at West Alabama.
He had 62 catches for 1,169 yards and 13
touchdowns in two years for a runningbased team but also had the opportunity to
go up against Butler each day in practice.
After struggling his first year, Roberts said
he held his own against Butler the next and
they still keep in touch.

YOGI
Continued from page 11
sleeves, and Berra shirts dotted the crowd.
About four hours before game, stadium
workers prepared new Berra jerseys for sale
— the concession stands also featured Berra
bobbleheads brought in for the game.
Current and former Yankees were featured
in Yogi remembrances on the video board in
the early innings, some of them citing his
classic malapropisms. There was a trivia

KYLE TERADA/USA TODAY SPORTS

Raiders wide receiver Seth Roberts, middle, is
congratulated by Mychal Rivera, left, and
Latavius Murray after a game-winning touchdown catch Sunday against the Ravens.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

A’s fall to Rangers in Bassitt’s return
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — The Oakland A’s hope Chris
Bassitt can figure into their future plans.
First, he needs to pitch, even if his firstinning woes continue.
Bassitt, in his first start in nearly a month
because of a strained shoulder, lasted three
innings in Oakland’s 8-1 loss to the AL
West-leading Texas Rangers on Thursday.
The A’s have lost five straight and
dropped 25 games under .500 for the first
time since 1997.
Bassitt (1-7) was on a pitch count and was
lifted after allowing three runs on six hits
with 73 pitches. He walked one and struck
out three.
“It was important for him psychologically and physically to be back out there and
perform,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said.
“They made him work and made him throw a
lot of pitches.”
Bassitt gave up two runs in the first, an
inning that has plagued him all year. His

NFL brief
New York Giants’ early lead holds up
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The New York
Giants actually held onto a second-half lead,
dominating the Redskins and clinching a 3221 victory Thursday night
on Odell Beckham Jr.’s
30-yard touchdown catch.
New York fell apart in
the fourth quarter of losses
to Dallas and Atlanta.
This time, the Giants (12) stayed in front late in
the game against the
injury-plagued Redskins
Odell
(1-2), who lost veteran
Beckham Jr.
cornerback
DeAngelo
Hall to a right leg injury that looked serious.
The Giants scored in nearly every way
possible, beginning with Rashad Jennings
blocking Tress Way’s punt for a safety on
Washington’s opening series. Andre
Williams scored on a 1-yard run, Josh Brown
kicked three field goals, and Beckham toasted Bashaud Breeland to settle matters.
Prince Amukamara and Uani Unga had
interceptions of Kirk Cousins, who struggled once more against New York.

Chris Bassitt

ERA in the frame is a
gaudy 7. 36 and opponents hit .367 against
him. Overall, Bassitt has
an ERA of 3.07.
“I felt good, maybe a
little rusty, and I got the
ball up a little bit, ”
Bassitt said. “I got a lot
of weak fly balls that
turned into hits. That

happens.”
Bassitt has one more start this season and
hopes to carry that into the offseason, when
his main focus will be getting completely
healthy for spring training.
“I have no plans for the offseason other
than worrying about next year and being
ready for good things,” he said.
The A’s were outscored 26-10 as the
Rangers completed the three-game sweep.
The A’s have dropped four straight to Texas
and five of six.
Josh Reddick scored Oakland’s only run
on a fielding error in the second. He beat out

GIANTS
Continued from page 11
Ian Kennedy went five innings for San
Diego and was charged with four runs and 11
hits with two walks (one intentional) with a
balk. He struck out five.
The Giants scored twice in the fifth to go
ahead 4-3.
Marlon Byrd’s single knocked in
Alejandro De Aza, after his inning-opening
double. Brandon Crawford, who walked
took second on Byrd’s hit and third on a
wild pitch. Kennedy then balked in the goahead run, when interrupting his delivery as
Crawford distracted him leading off base.
San Francisco pulled to within 3-2 in the
third on De Aza’s RBI single, which followed Angel Pagan’s double.
Norris’ three-run homer in the second
gave the Padres a 3-1 lead; Norris’ shot to
right field skidded off the top of the fence. It
was his first home run since Aug. 14.
The Giants jumped to a 1-0 lead on
Crawford’s second-inning home run. It was
Crawford’s 20th of the season, one more

an infield single and stole second and third
before scoring when Delino DeShields
dropped a fly ball.
Cole Hamels (5-1) pitched six innings to
earn his fifth consecutive win, Prince
Fielder hit his 22nd homer and the Rangers
moved a season-high 14 games over .500
and extended their lead to 3 1/2 games over
the idle Astros in the AL West. Texas heads
to Houston to begin a three-game series on
Friday.
Texas turned four double plays in the first
five innings.

Trainer’s room
RHP Edward Mujica (right hamstring
strain) threw off a mound on Wednesday, and
manager Bob Melvin said it’s possible that
the veteran reliever could pitch again this
season.
RHP Sonny Gray (13-7) will start against
San Francisco on Friday. Gray beat the
Giants in his only other career start against
them on July 8, 2014.
than he had the last two seasons combined.
San Francisco threatened in the first when
Pagan doubled, but he was erased at the plate
on a relay from Wil Myers after Duffy’s single. Duffy then stole second, becoming the
third Giants rookie in franchise history
with at least 70 runs scored, 70 RBI and 10
stolen bases.

Trainer’s room
OF Hunter Pence (oblique)
and 1B Brandon Belt (concussion) remain out and
manager Bruce Bochy said
he doesn’t expect either to
play again this season.

Up next
RHP Mike Leake (10-9,
3.81) looks for his second
win in six decisions with
San Francisco as the Giants
open a three-game series at
Oakland. Leake lasted but
three innings in his last
start, taking the loss after
allowing three runs on eight
hits and a walk.

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

13

Royals clinch
Centralcrown
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Kansas City
Royals clinched the AL Central for their
first division title in 30 years, beating the
Mariners 10-4 Thursday night.
Johnny Cueto picked up his first victory in
nearly six weeks, and the
win, coupled with the
Twins’ 6-3 loss to the
Indians, ensured a title.
The Royals have dominated the division, leading
by as many as 14 games.
It’s the Royals’ first
division title since 1985,
when they won the AL
Johnny Cueto West en route to their
only World Series championship.
The Kauffman Stadium announced crowd
of 32,244 cheered when the Twins’ final
score was shown on the scoreboard in the
top of the ninth.
Kansas City became the first team to wrap
up a division title this year. St. Louis and
Pittsburgh have secured playoff berths in
the NL.
Cueto (3-6), who was acquired in a July 26
trade with Cincinnati, was 0-5 in his previous six starts since an Aug. 15 victory.

14

SPORTS

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Friday
Carlmont (1-2) at Menlo School (3-0), 3:15 p.m.
The Scots got off the schneid last week,
beating Yerba Buena 20-0. … The Knights
knocked out Soquel, 42-16. … Carlmont’s
offense has gotten better week by week.
After getting shutout in its opener, it scored
18 in a loss to Woodside in Week 2 before
last week’s breakthrough. … After scoring
28 points in each of its first two games,
Menlo broke out offensively last week by
nearly doubling its previous output. … The
Knights rolled up 545 yards of offense last
week. … The Menlo defense is also doing a
good job, having kept its last two opponents under the 20-point mark.

South City (2-1) at Burlingame (3-0), 7 p.m.
The Warriors were whipped by Serra 40-0
last week. … The Panthers pounded Alvarez
30-0. … Burlingame escaped with an 8-7
win over South City last season. … South
City hadn’t been shutout since last season’s
50-0 loss to Serra. … Ten different ball car-

Friday
Woodside (3-0) at Fremont-Sunnyvale (21), 7 p.m.
The Wildcats survived a wild 33-32 overtime win over city rival Sequoia last week.
… The Firebirds were fried 60-28 by Pacific
Grove. … Sequoia became the first team to
crack the 20-point barrier against Woodside
this season. … The Wildcats’ offense was
held to under 300 yards last week, with
Marcelous Chester-Riley accounting for a
majority of those. He finished with 161
yards rushing on just 13 carries. …
Woodside hasn’t been 3-0 since it’s CCS
championship year in 2004, when the
Wildcats were a perfect 13-0. … Fremont
went 9-2 overall last season, capturing the
Santa Clara Valley Athletic League’s El
Camino Division title –  the equivalent of
winning the PAL’s Ocean Division. …
Despite getting beat by more than 30
points, Fremont still managed more than
300 yards of offense last week. … The
Firebirds had allowed a total of 26 points in
their first two games combined.

Terra Nova (1-2) at Homestead (2-1), 7 p.m.
The Tigers picked up their first win of the
year with a 43-42 win over Willow Glen last
week. … The Mustangs snuck past Leland,
44-42. … The 43 points scored was a sea-

GOTW
Continued from page 11
grammar, elementary and junior high schools
together.
“It’s a really interesting dynamic between
Aragon and San Mateo,” Scheller said. “I
asked this week, ‘How many of you know
someone on the Aragon football team?’ One
hundred percent (of the San Mateo players)
raised their hand.
“From the (San Mateo) kids’ standpoint,
[Aragon] is probably a bigger rivalry than
Burlingame because it’s a neighborhood
rivalry.”
The Aragon-San Mateo matchup is similar
to the “Battle of the Fleas” in another regard:
Aragon domination. Before the Dons lost to
the Hillsdale at the end of the 2014 regular
season, Aragon hadn’t lost to the Knights
since 1991. Aragon’s streak against San
Mateo isn’t nearly as long —  the Bearcats
last won in 2010, 27-15 —  but the dominance dates back more than a few years.
Aragon and San Mateo have met 16 times
since 1996 — Aragon has won 15 of them.
But Sell is under no illusions his team will
automatically add to that domination this
season.
“You never know what you’re going to
get,” Sell said. “The PAL, on balance, has a
lot of good teams. The gap between the Bay
and Lake is so small now.”

Best bets
riers got touches for Burlingame last week,
but it was its big three —  Laipeli Palu,
Joevani Garcia and Ben Williams —  who
scored three of the team’s four touchdowns.
… Senior quarterback Cameron Kelaita had
the best performance of his varsity career,
throwing for 166 yards and a touchdown on
13-of-19 passing. … Despite being shutout
last week, South City is still averaging 28
points per game.

Monterey (1-2) at Menlo-Atherton (0-3), 7 p.m.
The Toreadores are coming off a heartbreaking, 22-21 overtime loss to Seaside
last week. … The Bears were beaten by
Riordan, 26-9. … Monterey mauled M-A
last season, 37-14. … Monterey rushed
for 248 yards as team last week, led by
Akili Jones, who finished with 142 yards
on 17 carries. He also caught two passes,
including one for a touchdown. …
Through three games, M-A has scored a

The rest
son high for Terra Nova. The 42 points
allowed was also a season high. … The
Tigers had 466 yards of offense last week,
led by QB Joey Pledger, who threw for 297
yards and three TDs on 25-of-39 passing. …
Homestead rushed for 302 yards last week,
with both Sebastian Knoefel and Rajah
Woard each going over the 100-yard mark
and both scoring two touchdowns. … The
Mustangs have allowed more than 40
points in each of its last two games and is
1-1 in those contests.

Sequoia vs. Vancouver College High
School (1-2) in Seattle, 7 p.m.
The Cherokees came up short against
Woodside in overtime last week, 33-32. …
The Irish are coming off a 20-0 win over St.
Thomas More. … This game represents
Sequoia’s annual intra- or inter-state contest. Since coach Rob Poulos’ second season with the Cherokees, he’s taken the program to games in South California, Utah,
Oregon and Idaho. … The Cherokees trailed
26-0 at halftime last week, but rallied to
force overtime. … Sequoia had two players
eclipse the 100-yard rushing mark last
week: Junior Alberto Vasquez had a teamhigh 157 yards, while Faavae Brown had
Critics will say a Bay Division team
(Aragon) should not be playing a Lake
Division (San Mateo) team because of the
supposed superiority the Bay has over Lake
division teams. But when it comes to a rivalry game, logic goes out the window.
“It’s definitely a fair fight. We don’t even
talk about what [division] they’re in. It’s kind
of irrelevant. It’s Aragon-San Mateo game,
which means it’s one of the most important
games of the year,” Sell said.
Last season, Aragon took a 14-0 lead, but
San Mateo was poised to cut the lead in half
when, at the Dons’ 1-yard line, the Bearcats
committed a personal foul, moving them
back 15 yards. Not only did San Mateo come
up empty, Aragon scored on the ensuing possession for a 21-0 lead.
San Mateo rallied to tie the game at 21 in
the third quarter before Aragon ultimately
pulled out a 35-27 victory.
Scheller said, however, that he hasn’t
dwelled on that result this season.
“I think last year is last year,” Scheller
said. “I think our guys believe that if we execute, we can beat anybody. They know anything can happen.”
San Mateo spent the first half of last week’s
27-14 loss to Mountain View not executing.
The Bearcats managed only 36 yards of
offense as they fell behind 20-0 at halftime.
San Mateo turned things around in the second
half, using long, methodical drives to score a
pair of touchdown to close to 20-14, but
could not finish the comeback.
If last week showed anything, it’s that San
Mateo is not dependent on the big play to get

combined 19 points against three very
tough teams. … The nine points last week
was a season high for the Bears. …  If
nothing else, the Bears have been balanced offensively this season. They are
averaging 76. 7 yards passing per game
and 73. 7 yards rushing.

Lowell (0-2) at Jefferson (2-1), 7 p.m.
The Cardinals were clipped by TennysonHayward last week, 48-0. … The Grizzlies
succumbed to Monta Vista-Cupertino 3534. … Jefferson rolled to a 43-23 win over
Lowell last season. … Lowell is struggling
to start the season, having been outscored
96-6 in two games. … Jefferson could easily be 3-0, if not for a failed two-point conversion in the final minute of last week’s
loss. … David Benjamin Jr. had a big game
for the Grizzlies last week. He rushed for
121 yards and a TD on 12 carries. He also
threw a 20-yard touchdown pass. …
Jefferson racked up 417 yards of offense last
week — 217 passing, 200 rushing.
109. Each scored two touchdowns. …
Vancouver College was 5-2 in 2014. … In a
2011 article on the official site of the
Canadian Football League, there was a headline titled, “Inside Vancouver’s football factory,” a story about the Vancouver College
High School program that has sent dozens
of players to colleges in the United States
and professional football.

Hillsdale (2-1) at Christopher-Gilroy (1-1),
7:30 p.m.
The Knights KO’d Capuchino last week,
31-13. … The Cougars were clubbed 42-14
by Live Oak. … Hillsdale was shutout by
Christopher last season, 16-0. … Hillsdale
running back Cameron Taylor rushed for
219 yards and scored four touchdowns
— three rushing, one on an fumble return.
… Christopher were held to just 258 yards
of offense last week. … In their opener,
however, the Cougars had 517 yards of
offense, with 331 coming on the ground, in
a 52-12 over Sobrato.

THE DAILY JOURNAL
Half Moon Bay (3-0) at El Camino (0-3), 7 p.m.
The Cougars crushed Los Altos 51-6. …
The Colts were corralled by Lincoln-SF, 277. … Half Moon Bay is averaging 50
points per game on offense, while the
defense has allowed a total of 13 points
through three games. … El Camino finally
got on the scoreboard last week, after being
dominated by Aragon two weeks ago, 55-0.

Saturday
Soquel (0-3) at Capuchino (0-3), 2 p.m.
The Knights were trumped by Menlo
School 42-16 last week. … The Mustangs
were muted by Hillsdale, 31-13. … Soquel
was held under 20 points for the second time
in three games last week. … The Knights
have given up 42 points in each of their last
two games. … Capuchino still hasn’t
eclipsed the 14-point mark this season, twice
having scored 13. … All three of Capuchino’s
opponents have scored 30 points or more.
decision to Santa Clara. … The Knights are
averaging nearly 450 yards of offense
through two games. … Sophomore running
back Maurice Washington III has only 24
carries, but has scored on six of them. He is
also averaging 16.4 yards per carry and is
averaging 197 yards a game. … King’s
Academy has allowed a total of 28 points so
far this season. … San Lorenzo Valley
racked up 405 yards of offense last week and
still came up short. … The Cougars will
counter King’s Washington with Brighton
Hart, who averages 13.4 yards a carry and
181 yards per game and has scored four
touchdowns.

Sacred Heart Prep (1-2) at Carmel (1-1), 2 p.m.

The Knights annihilated Overfelt 51-12
last week. … The Cougars dropped a 21-20

The Gators were beaten by Palma 31-28
last week. … The Padres picked up their first
win last week with a 32-24 victory over
Scotts Valley. … Before this season, SHP
had lost two games over the three previous
seasons combined. The last time the Gators
had more that two losses was 2011 when
they went 8-4. … SHP’s problems haven’t
been on offense, where it is averaging 32
points per game. The Gators’ defense, on
the other hand, is allowing 28.6, which is
double last season’s average. … Carmel
opened the season with a 28-21 loss to
Menlo School.

back into games. The Bearcats simply don’t
have the personnel to consistently hit a
home run.
“It’s got to be more of a coach-driven
thing,” Scheller said. “But that’s who we are.
… We’re grinding it out because that’s who
we are.”
The Bearcats certainly have the horses to
grind out yards on the ground. Josh Fakava is
an elite running back —  when healthy. He
suffered a leg contusion early in the game
against Mountain View and was limited to
just seven carries.
Luckily for San Mateo, Anderson Perdomo
was there to pick up the slack, rushing for a
team high 68 yards on 17 carries.
“I think we can get to a point where we can
be effective against them,” Scheller said.
“But keeping the ball out of the (Aragon)
offense’s hands is going to be our best
defense.”
Because the Dons have proven so far this
year that its not a problem for them to find
the end zone when they do have the ball.
Through three games, Aragon is averaging 43
points and are coming off a 42-14 win over
Lincoln-SJ.
And it may surprise you the way they are
going about it. While Aragon still employs a
featured back in VA Wilson, Sell is much more
apt to throw the ball this season.
“We throw the ball for more yards than we
run the ball. That’s got to be an all-time first.
And I truly don’t see that changing,” Sell
said. “It’s an athletic team. If you took our
skill guys, they’d be a formidable 4x100
relay team.”

Sell attributes the rise of senior quarterback
Tanner Nguyen for his change in strategy.
Nguyen transferred from Texas before the
start of last season and despite seeing flashes
of what Nguyen could do, determined he wasn’t quite ready for the rigors of the varsity
game, so he backed up Billy Mason last season.
This season, Sell said Nguyen has grown
into his body.
“When he first got to us, he had a good arm,
but he wasn’t physically strong enough. In
the last year, he lifted all year, played basketball. You could see him getting stronger,”
Sell said. “He threw a pretty ball last year.
Now he throws an impressive ball.”
With burners on the outside in Devin Grant
and Davion Cox, Nguyen certain has the
weapons around him to be successful.
The key to success in this game, however,
is the same for success in any game: control
the ball, don’t turn it over and consistently
execute on each play.
“As long as we are capable of doing the
things we know we can do, we should be in
the game,” Scheller said.
Sell echoed similar sentiments: “The way
we’ve been playing, if we don’t hurt ourselves, we can move the football. We’ve only
stopped ourselves in the first three weeks by
making silly mistakes. … If you’re only
playing against one team, you have a pretty
good chance of winning. I don’t care who
anyone is playing, if you don’t beat yourself,
you can be in every game.”
Even one with as much emotion as this
game.

Saturday
King’s Academy (2-0) at San Lorenzo Valley (1-1), 2 p.m.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Coach accused of ordering referee hit resigns
By Paul J. Weber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROUND ROCK, Texas — A Texas high
school football coach accused of ordering
players to knock down a referee who allegedly hurled racial insults at the team has
resigned, and state officials warned Thursday
that punishments to others may be coming.
Former bosses for Mack Breed, who was an
assistant coach at John Jay High in San
Antonio, told a governing board they
believe he ordered at least one player to retaliate against referee Robert Watts during the
waning moments of a game on Sept. 4.
Video from the game shows two players
lining up behind Watts, who was the umpire,
and then blindsiding him from behind after
the snap.
Breed did not attend the hearing near
Austin of the University Interscholastic
League, which oversees high school sports
in Texas. His attorney released a lengthy
statement that does not admit to telling the
players to strike Watts but acknowledges
that Breed made “some regrettable comments,” without listing them.

His attorney said witnesses have offered
conflicting stories about what Breed said and
that the account from one of the players who
hit the referee has changed over time.
“In hindsight, Mack feels he could have
handled the situation better,” attorney James
Reeves said. “Mack never intended for the
kids to hit or hurt the referee, but the result
was the same. While Mack is moving forward, others have yet to accept responsibility for their roles.”
Watts did not attend the hearing but submitted a five-page written account of the
game through his attorney, who also gave
the board two family photos. One shows
Watts at his wedding with his best man, who
is black, and another is of Watts’ grandmother, who is from Mexico.
Attorney Jay Downs denied again to the
board Thursday that Watts used racial slurs.
He said one of the false accusations being
floated is that Watts said “speak English,
this is America” while John Jay players were
talking to each other.
With Breed not in attendance, Gutierrez
took most of the heat from the board, which
could bring down hard sanctions against the

coach and school. But partly because Breed,
Watts and the players all did not attended the
hearing, the board abstained from taking
action and tentatively scheduled another
meeting for October.
The board publicly warned Gutierrez, however, that he could be disciplined with probation and questioned the culture in his program.
“This is a big, big incident, and you own it
as the head coach,” board member Gil Garza.
Watts said he has post-concussion syndrome and anxiety disorder. One John Jay
player told him after the hit, “You’re in the
way” and laughed, according to his written
statement.
Earlier in the game, Watts said, another
John Jay player had “smirked” at him after
pushing him for “no apparent reason.” That
player was later ejected, before Watts was hit.
Watts said he wound up with turf burn on
his forehead, a cut next to his eye and a large
red bruise on his arm.
The two suspended students, Michael
Moreno and Victor Rojas, appeared
Wednesday at separate disciplinary hearings,
which were closed to the public.

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

15

NFL brief
NFL gets consent for use of drones
NEW YORK — The NFL’s sky-high popularity will now include drones.
The league has received permission from
the Federal Aviation Administration for limited use of drones.
NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said in an
email to The Associated Press that the drones
will not be used on the day of games; the
league prohibits the use of drones on game
day in stadiums and in parking lots.
McCarthy said NFL Films will be allowed
to use drones and teams may film their own
practices if they comply with local, state and
federal guidelines.
“NFL Films will use the unique visual images
captured by drones to enhance their filmmaking and storytelling,” McCarthy said.
Drone crashes two days apart, at the U.S.
Open in New York and before a Kentucky
football game, made news earlier this month.
But over the past two years, more than 50
unmanned aircrafts have flown over Major
League Baseball and NFL stadiums, coming
and going quietly — usually controlled by a
hobbyist who either lost control of the
device or wanted a picture of a favorite team
in action.

16

SPORTS

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

NDB
Continued from page 11
middle Jess Beering and an ace by
junior opposite Mele Fakatene
made it 17-15 — before back-toback Smoot kills tied it 19-19. The
match hung in the balance with the
game still deadlocked at 23-23, but
that’s when the three amigas of
Smoot, Byrne and Warburton made
some magic in the back row.
To break the tie, Warburton produced a skillful dig off a crisp SHP
attempt. Her quick lateral lurch didn’t allow her to steer the ball, but
Byrne tracked it down to bump a
back-row set into position. Smoot
capitalized from deep in the defensive zone, buzzing a long shot to
the Gators’ back row that had so
much velocity behind it, even the
far-traveled shot was too much to
handle for the SHP defender, giving
the Tigers game point at 24-23.

PAC-12
Continued from page 12
tough to prepare for. He does so
many things. He can make
throws, ” Stanford coach David
Shaw said. “They are still growing
as an offense. They give you a
variety of looks. They keep you
on your toes.”
Some other things to know
when the Cardinal (2-1) visit the
Beavers (2-1) at Reser Stadium:
Hi s to ry : Stanford leads the alltime series 53-25-3 and has won the
last five straight and six of the last
seven. On a side note, Hogan made
his first-ever start for Stanford
against the Beavers in 2012, passing for 254 yards and three touchdowns in a 27-23 comeback win.
The backups : Waiting in the
wings at quarterback for Stanford are
Ryan Burns and Keller Chryst, the
son of San Francisco 49ers offensive
coordinator Geep Chryst. Burns
appeared in two games last year and
completed his only pass attempt,
while Chryst played in one game and
completed a pass for 20 yards.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

The Gators’ sixth unforced error of
the set ended it on the next rally.
They committed 23 errors on the
evening to Notre Dame’s 15. Nearly
half the Tigers’ errors came in the
early going of the first set, but they
were able to make adjustments with
their passing in a hurry.
Game 1 was a tight back-and-forth
battle as well until Notre Dame
broke a 16-16 tie. Desler looked to
give the advantage to the Gators
with a crosscourt shot, but Smoot
had the wherewithal to let it go; the
attempt hit just beyond the sideline
to give the Tigers the point. Byrne
ultimately ended the set with her
first of seven match kills.
Game 2 was also deadlocked early,
until Fakatene stepped to the service
line for Notre Dame and reeled off
five straight points, including an
ace to give the Tigers the lead for
good at 7-6. Notre Dame led by as
much as 21-11, when Smoot fired
one of her two match kills.
In Game 3, SHP refused to back
down. Desler had produced a block
early in the second set that, at the

time, created a spark of energy for the
Gators. In the final set, though, they
showed their defensive depth up front
even with setter Lilika Teu rotating
through the front row. Teu and middle
blocker Natalie Zimits paired up for
several key denials with Smoot firing from the left side. Zimits totaled
two blocks in the set and Teu had one,
giving the Gators the early lead.
“Any time you stuff a block, especially against a profound hitter, it’s
going to inspire a lot of momentum,”
SHP head coach Ali Magner said.
One of SHP’s offensive sparkplugs
in Game 3 was senior middle Ma’ata
Makoni, who totaled three kills in
the set. Makoni is a three-sport athlete who also plays basketball and
runs track. Notre Dame’s Beering is a
mirror image of Makoni, as Beering
is also a three-sport standout, only
playing volleyball during high
school volleyball season.
Beering finished with six kills
and a block. For SHP, senior libero
Jorden Schreeder had a team-high 10
digs. Teu totaled 25 assists.
Notre Dame begins West Catholic

WHAT’S ON TAP

NFL GLANCE

FRIDAY
Football
Carlmont at Menlo School, 3:15 p.m.; San Mateo at
Aragon, South City at Burlingame, Terra Nova at
Homestead,Monterey at Menlo-Atherton,Half Moon
Bay at El Camino, Woodside at Fremont-Sunnyvale,
Lowell at Jefferson, Sequoia vs.Vancouver Collegiate
in Seattle, 7 p.m.; Hillsdale at Christopher-Gilroy, 7:30
p.m.
SATURDAY
Football
Sacred Heart Prep at Carmel, King’s Academy at San
Lorenzo Valley, Soquel at Capuchino, 2 p.m.
Cross Country
Ram Invitational at Westmoor, all day
Girls’ water polo
Sequoia tournament, all day; Sacred Heart Prep at
California Capital Challenge tournament, all day
Boys’ water polo
Serra/Sacred Heart Prep at St. Francis tournament

NFL SUNDAY
Atlanta at Dallas, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at New England, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago at Seattle, 1:25 p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 1:25 p.m.
Denver at Detroit, 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 28
Kansas City at Green Bay, 5:30 p.m.

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T
New England 2 0 0
N.Y. Jets
2 0 0
Miami
1 1 0
Buffalo
1 1 0
South
W L T
Jacksonville 1 1 0
Tennessee
1 1 0
Indianapolis 0 2 0
Houston
0 2 0
North
W L T
Cincinnati
2 0 0
Cleveland
1 1 0
Pittsburgh
1 1 0
Baltimore
0 2 0
West
W L T
Denver
2 0 0
Oakland
1 1 0
San Diego
1 1 0
Kansas City 1 1 0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T
Dallas
2 0 0
N.Y. Giants
1 2 0
Washington 1 2 0
Philadelphia 0 2 0
South
W L T
Atlanta
2 0 0
Carolina
2 0 0
Tampa Bay
1 1 0
New Orleans 0 2 0
North
W L T
Green Bay
2 0 0
Minnesota
1 1 0
Detroit
0 2 0
Chicago
0 2 0
West
W L T
Arizona
2 0 0
St. Louis
1 1 0
San Francisco 1 1 0
Seattle
0 2 0

Athletic League action Oct. 6 hosting St. Ignatius at 6:30 p.m. SHP
opens WBAL play next Tuesday at
Harker at 5:45 p.m.
In other WBAL action, MercyBurlingame defeated Pinewood 2517, 25-18, 25-19.

Carlmont 3, Half Moon Bay 1

PAL Bay Division
Aragon 3, Mills 0
The Dons (2-0 in PAL Bay, 9-6)
downed Mills 25-15, 25-12, 2517. Aragon’s Melanie Moore had a
team-high 10 kills. Mills was
paced by 11 kills from Adrienne
Lee, Chloe Kim had five aces and
Emily Huang tabbed 22 assists.

Burlingame 3, Sequoia 2
The Panthers (1-1, 3-4) rallied
back for a 23-25, 25-21, 25-22, 1825. 15-9 win over Sequoia (1-1, 113). Julia Haupt paced Burlingame
with 17 kills, Katie Karson had 20
digs and Amanda Mills notched 57
assists. Julia Carson led Sequoia
with 12 kills.

Menlo-Atherton 3, Hillsdale 1

PA
53
17
33
54

Pct
.500
.500
.000
.000

PF
32
56
21
37

PA
40
42
47
51

Pct PF
1.000 57
.500 38
.500 64
.000 46

PA
32
45
46
56

Pct PF
1.000 50
.500 50
.500 52
.500 51

PA
37
66
52
51

Pct PF
1.000 47
.333 78
.333 55
.000 34

PA
36
72
59
46

Pct PF
1.000 50
1.000 44
.500 40
.000 38

PA
44
26
61
57

Pct PF
1.000 58
.500 29
.000 44
.000 46

PA
40
36
59
79

Pct PF
1.000 79
.500 44
.500 38
.000 48

PA
42
55
46
61

Thursday, Sep. 24
N.Y. Giants 32, Washington 21

The Scots (2-0, 5-5) won 25-16,
25-20, 23-25, 25-12 over the
Cougars (0-2, 5-5) Carlmont’s
Alexis
Morrow and Maya
McClellan had 18 kills apiece.
McClellan added a team-high 11
digs. Hailey Merkes paced Half
Moon Bay with 16 kills and Olivia
Hedding had a match-high 12 digs.

PAL Ocean Division
Westmoor 3, Capuchino 0
The Rams (1-1 in PAL Ocean, 6-9)
rolled to a 25-14, 25-18, 25-18 win
over Cap (1-1, 8-6). Christie Tam
paced Westmoor with eight kills
amd Kailea Nobleza had 20 assists.

Terra Nova 3, San Mateo 0

The Bears (2-0, 7-3) won 25-12,
23-25, 25-8, 25-9 over the

The Tigers swept the Bearcats 2518, 25-17, 25-20. Terra Nova’s
Kristiana Wolf-Blake had 14 kills.

AL GLANCE

NL GLANCE

East Division
Pct PF
1.000 68
1.000 51
.500 37
.500 59

Knights (0-2, 3-6). M-A’s Lenna
Collins fired a match-high 16
kills, setter Kirby Knapp had 42
assists and Alexa Roumeliotis had
29 digs. Jenna Smith paced
Hillsdale with seven kills and
Taylor Kwan had 32 digs.

W
Toronto
87
New York
84
Baltimore
76
Tampa Bay 75
Boston
72
Central Division
W
x-Kansas City 89
Minnesota 78
Cleveland
75
Chicago
72
Detroit
71
West Division
Texas
83
Houston
80
Angels
78
Seattle
74
A’s
64

East Division
L
65
68
76
78
80

Pct
.572
.553
.500
.490
.474

GB

3
11
12 1/2
15

L
63
74
76
81
81

Pct
.586
.513
.497
.471
.467

GB

11
13 1/2
17 1/2
18

69
73
74
79
89

.546
.523
.513
.484
.418


3 1/2
5
9 1/2
19 1/2

W
New York
86
Washington 78
Miami
66
Atlanta
62
Philadelphia 57
Central Division
W
z-St. Louis
97
z-Pittsburgh 93
Chicago
89
Milwaukee 64
Cincinnati
63
West Division
W
Los Angeles 87
Giants
79
Arizona
73
San Diego 72
Colorado
63

L
67
74
87
91
96

Pct
.562
.513
.431
.405
.373

GB

7 1/2
20
24
29

L
56
60
63
89
89

Pct
.634
.608
.586
.418
.414

GB

4
7 1/2
33
33 1/2

L
65
73
80
81
90

Pct
.572
.520
.477
.471
.412

GB

8
14 1/2
15 1/2
24 1/2

z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
Thursday’s Games
Texas 8, Oakland 1
Baltimore 5, Washington 4
N.Y. Yankees 3, Chicago White Sox 2
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 2
Cleveland 6, Minnesota 3
Kansas City 10, Seattle 4
Friday’s Games
ChiSox (Rodon 8-6) at NYY (Sabathia 5-9), 4:05 p.m.
Rays (Odorizzi 8-8) at Jays (Dickey 10-11), 4:07 p.m.
Twins (Pelfrey 6-10) at Detroit (Boyd 1-5), 4:08 p.m.
O’s (Gausman 3-6) at Boston (R.Hill 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
Tribe (Carrasco 13-11) at K.C.(Volquez 13-8),5:10 p.m.
Texas (Gallardo 12-11) at Astros (Kazmir 7-10),5:10 p.m.
S.F. (Leake 10-9) at Oakland (S.Gray 13-7), 7:05 p.m.
M’s (Nuno 1-3) at Angels (Richards 14-11), 7:05 p.m.

Thursday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 3
Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 4
Baltimore 5, Washington 4
N.Y. Mets 6, Cincinnati 4
Miami 1, Philadelphia 0
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 3
San Diego 5, San Francisco 4
Friday’s Games
Bucs (G.Cole 17-8) at Cubs (Lester 10-11), 11:20 a.m.
Phils (Eickhoff 1-3) at Nats (Zimmermann 13-8),4:05 p.m.
Atl. (Weber 0-1) at Miami (Fernandez 5-0), 4:10 p.m.
NYM(Syndergaard8-7)atCinci(DeSclafani9-11),4:10p.m.
L.A. (Bolsinger 6-4) at Colorado (Hale 4-5), 5:10 p.m.
Brews (Pena 2-0) at St. L (Martinez 14-7), 5:15 p.m.
S.F. (Leake 10-9) at Oakland (S.Gray 13-7), 7:05 p.m.
DBacks (De La Rosa 13-8) at S.D. (Kelly 0-0), 7:10 p.m.

Sunday, September 27th

Autumn Moon Festival
and Kaiser Permanente
Generation walk for
wellness

Starting with the Generation Walk, the Autumn Moon Festival begins with
multicultural music, dance, activities, booths and food! Stay for a full day
of FAMILY FUN in San Mateo Central Park for everyone.
8:30

Registration for Generation Walk For Wellness

9:30

One-Mile Walk in Central Park Begins

10:15 Opening Autumn Moon Presentations
Senior Center Stage
10:30 Crocker Middle School Drumline

All proceeds benet Self-Help for
the Elderlya 501 (c) 3 non-prot.

10:50 Peninsula Girls Chorus
11:10 Kirkpatrick Dance
11:25 Shorinji Kempo Martial Arts
11:40 Ballet Folklorico Teotihuacan of San Mateo
12:00 Hai Yan Chinese Dance group
12:30 California Chinese Youth Orchestra
1:00 Scarlet Brass Jazz Band
1:30 Borel Toyonaka Band
2:00 Program Ends

FULL SERVICE SALON

Thank you to our Generious Business Sponsors and the Generation Walk & Autumn Moon Festival
Planning Committee Members:David Lim, Roz Koo, PK Kilty, Donna Divodi, Saili Gosula, Carrie
Chao,Laura Wong, Ben Toy, Kelly Chew, and Yvonne Leung.

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Founded in 1966, Self-Help for the Elderly is a community-based organization
committed to promoting the independence, dignity, and self worth of seniors.
Each year the agency serves over 35,000 seniors in San Francisco, San Mateo,
Santa Clara, and Alameda Counties by providing a comprehensive range of
multicultural and multilingual services.
Every effort has been made to provide inclusive services along a continuum of
core for seniors. These now include eight service departments specializing in
Senior Employment and Training, Social Services, Nutrition & Senior Centers,
Community-Based Adult Services, Licensed HomeCare & Hospice, Senior Housing, Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly and Healthy Insurance Counseling
and Advocacy Program.
Our vision is to be the premier provider of senior services in the San Francisco
Bay Area with a commitment to excellence and achievement.

Main Office
731 Sansome Street, #100
San Francisco, CA, 94111
Tel: (415) 677-7600
www.selfhelpelderly.org

Compassionate Care and
Comfort When Needed Most
~
· Personalized plan-of-care to meet the

unique needs of every patient and family
· Providing medical, emotional, social
and spiritual support
· Specialists in palliative care
Serving the Peninsula since 1979

650-554-1000 | www.missionhospice.org

San Mateo Senior Center
50 East Fifth Avenue
San Mateo, CA, 94401
Tel: (650) 342-0822

MOON 2015

AUTUMN MOON 2015

SAN MATEO MEDICAL OFFICES
We’ve expanded our services
The second floor of the San Mateo Medical Offices is now open and services
have been expanded. We’ve added 15 physicians to Adult Medicine,
a physician to Family Medicine, and 2 pediatricians. In addition, our new
HealthED Technology Learning Center makes HealthED services even more
accessible by providing information in-person, online, or in print.

Get great care for the whole family
You can take advantage of a broad range of outpatient services, all under
one roof. For added personalized service and convenience, you can also
choose one doctor for your whole family. Services include:
• Adult Medicine
• Care in Chinese
• Family Medicine
• Health Education
• Imaging
X-ray/Mammography

• Laboratory
• ObstetricsGynecology
• Pediatrics
• Pharmacy
• Physical Therapy

• Ultrasound
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Kaiser Permanente
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Optical Center

Convenient Location

NOW OPEN
New hospital at our
Redwood City Medical Center
1100 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City, CA 94063
650-299-2000
kp.org/redwoodcity

Kaiser Permanente
San Mateo Medical Offices
1000 Franklin Parkway
San Mateo, CA 94403
650-358-7000
kp.org/sanmateo

Located just 6 miles north of the Redwood City Medical Center, we’re right
off Highway 101, at the Hillsdale Boulevard exit, with plenty of free parking.
If you would like to know more about becoming a member,
please call 1-800-324-7684.

A loving resurrection of
the Twin Towers in ‘Walk’
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — In the months and years
after Sept. 11, the World Trade Center was
swept out of the movies. The Towers were
removed from such films as “Zoolander” and
“Serendipity” that were shot before the
tragedy. Since then, the skyline where the
Towers once formed the “H” in the poster for
Woody Allen’s “Manhattan” has seldom been
more than glimpsed on the big screen.
But when Robert Zemeckis’ “The Walk”
opens the 53rd New York Film Festival on
Saturday, New York will see the Twin Towers

cinematically resurrected unlike they’ve been
before. The film, which opens in theaters Oct.
2, is about high-wire artist Phillippe Petit’s
(Joseph Gordon-Levitt) cabled walk between
the Towers in 1974.
Petit considered his stunt a love letter to the
World Trade Center, which was then just
being finished. And though “The Walk” never
directly references Sept. 11, the film derives
significant poignancy from the very large
presence of Petit’s monolithic co-stars.
“We should never forget. And when we
remember, it’s very important that we remember the tragedy,” Zemeckis, the “Back to the
Feature” and “Forrest Gump” director, said in

a recent interview. “But I think it’s also
important that we remember beautiful things
that happened during their existence as well.”
“The Walk” captures the World Trade
Center not merely as a background cameo,
but casts them front-and-center — in a leading role and in 3-D. To recreate the skyscrapers, Zemeckis, production designer Naomi
Shohan and visual effects supervisor Kevin
Baillie spent months on the digital effects,
models and sets that would double for the
Towers.
Zemeckis had long wanted to make the film
about Petit, whose exploits were memorably
the subject of James Marsh’s 2009 Oscar-win-

ning documentary “Man on Wire.”
“He always spoke of the Towers as if they
were these living, breathing accomplices of
his,” Zemeckis says of the Frenchman. “The
idea that he did this kind of spiritual thing
where he united them and put a human face
on them, I thought, was a nice way, a kind of
emotional way, to remember the Towers
through this audacious but very beautiful and
human act.”
Oliver Stone’s “World Trade Center” featured, in its first act, a digital recreation of
pre-9/11 Lower Manhattan. But Stone’s docu-

See WALK, Page 26

22

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

‘Sweeney Todd’ gets operatic treatment in San Francisco
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

“Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of
Fleet Street” is widely regarded as one of
Stephen Sondheim’s greatest accomplishments.
With his rich score and inventive lyrics,
along with the book by Hugh Wheeler, this is
musical theater with operatic qualities. It’s no
surprise to find it at the San Francisco Opera.
The title character, played by baritone Brian
Mulligan, has returned to London in the
1860s, 15 years after being sent to Australia
by a corrupt judge who desired his wife, Lucy.
Upon his return, he learns that Lucy had
taken poison and that their infant daughter has
become the judge’s ward.
He opens his barber shop above a pie shop
owned by Mrs. Lovett (mezzo-soprano
Stephanie Blythe), and vows to find his
daughter and exact revenge on the judge.
After he kills a man who recognizes him, he
and Mrs. Lovett devise an ingenious way to
dispose of the body. It will go into her meat
pies.

As Sweeney becomes more vengeful, more
victims become pie filling.
In the meantime, his sailing companion,
Anthony (baritone Elliot Madore), sees
Sweeney’s daughter, Johanna (soprano Heidi
Stober), at the home of Judge Turpin (bassbaritone Wayne Tigges), and vows to rescue
her.
By the end of the show, which runs about
two hours and 50 minutes with one intermission, most of the principals are dead. The only
survivors are Anthony, Johanna and Tobias
(tenor Matthew Grills), Mrs. Lovett’s assistant.
The musical and dramatic elements are
mostly present, but this production doesn’t do
them justice. Director Lee Blakeley spreads
the action across the vast stage designed by
Tanya McCallin, losing much of the drama’s
immediacy.
Likewise, Blakeley doesn’t handle the big
choral scenes well. Conducted by Patrick
Summers, the orchestra does full justice to
Sondheim’s powerful score.

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See PLAY, Page 26

Mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe as Mrs. Lovett in Sondheim’s ‘Sweeney Todd.’

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
KENNETH
LONERGAN’S
THIS IS OUR YOUTH: THE
CUSTOM MADE THEATRE
CO. STARTS ITS NEW SEASON, AT ITS NEW THEATER,
WITH A HIT. It seemed like a good
idea at the time. 19-year-old screwup Warren, who has been kicked out
of the family home by his fed-up
father, steals $15,000 of his dad’s
cash on the way out the door, and
seeks refuge at the apartment of his
drug dealing buddy Dennis. Dennis,
initially reluctant to harbor Warren,
relents as he sees possibilities of
leveraging the cash into a major
drug deal and warms Warren to the
idea by promising him romance in
the person of Jessica, the girl Warren
pines for. And so the action starts.
Playwright Kenneth Lonergan’s
This is Our Youth follows 48 hours
in the things-are-really-getting-outof-control lives of three very lost
young souls in 1982 New York City.
Settle into your seat and enjoy a
crisp, scorchingly funny script wonderfully executed by a talented trio
of engaging actors. Written by
Kenneth Lonergan. Directed by
Brian Katz. Two hours with one
intermission.
TICKET AND PERFORMANCE INFORMATION: $20$42. 7:30 Wednesday; 8 p.m.
Thursday and Friday; and 2 p.m. and
8 p.m. Saturday. Senior and student
discounts
available.
custommade.org/tickets.
STAGE DIRECTIONS: The
Custom Made Theatre Co., formerly

located at The Gough Street
Playhouse, has a new home at 533
Sutter St. (between Powell and
Mason), two blocks from Union
Square in the heart of San Francisco.
The 99-seat theatre keeps the audience close to the action. Reasonably
priced parking can be found at the
Sutter/Stockton
Garage
(two
blocks). The Powell/Market St.
BART is five blocks away.
AN ASIDE: The Custom Made
Theatre Co.’s Artistic Director Brian
Katz said: “This is Our Youth is a
living snapshot of the moment when
young people first find themselves
on the threshold of adulthood – far
more sophisticated than their parents
realize, and far less effectual than
they themselves can possibly imagine.”
AND DID YOU KNOW?
Playwright Kenneth Lonergan wrote
and directed both You Can Count on
Me, a 2000 film starring Laura
Linney, Mark Ruffalo, Rory Culkin,
and Matthew Broderick and the currently-in-production
film
Manchester-by-the-Sea, starring
Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams
and Kyle Chandler.
***
RE-ORIENT 2015 THEATRE
FESTIVAL
&
FORUM
EXPLORING THE MIDDLE

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(650) 340-0492
Mon–Fri 8:30–5:30 PM
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EAST. Think you know the Middle
East? Think again. ReOrient 2015
presents innovative, spirited and
thought-provoking theatre from and
about the Middle East. Find plays
and artists from Armenia, Egypt,
Iraq, Iran, Israel, Lebanon,
Palestine, Syria, Turkey, the United
Kingdom and the U.S., all on one
stage. With plays, talkbacks, panels,
roundtable conversations, a family
show and a recital for Arabic music
lovers, ReOrient 2015 is an artistic
celebration and political exploration
for curious and engaged theatre
lovers and those passionate about
international themes. Through Oct.
4. Z Below, 470 Florida St. San
Francisco.
Learn
more
at
www.goldenthread.org, (866) 8114111 or information@goldenthread.org.
***
LIZZIE BORDEN TOOK AN
AX AND GAVE HER MOTHER
FORTY WHACKS ... NOW TO A
ROCK SCORE. Ray of Light
Theatre offers the Bay Area premiere of Lizzie, based on the story
of America’s favorite ax-wielding
double-murderess, Lizzie Borden,
primary suspect for her father and
stepmother’s 1892 brutal murder.
Lizzie imagines the story behind the
legend of Lizzie Borden with a cast
of four women and a driving rock
score, melding this infamous 19th
century story with a modern-day
twist. Sept. 25 through Oct. 17 at the
historic (1908) 480-seat Victoria
Theatre at 2961 16th St. in San
Francisco’s Mission District. Tickets
at www.rayoflighttheatre.com.
***

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

23

JAY YAMADA

From left, Katie Robbins (as Jessica), Sam Bertken (as Warren) and David
Raymond (as Dennis) portray young New Yorkers having trouble finding
traction in the adult world, in Kenneth Lonergan’s This is Our Youth, at The
See CITY, Page 26 Custom Made Theatre Co. in San Francisco through Oct. 17.

24

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

25

Flavorful, creamy
soup with no dairy
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

This time of year, with the
weather getting colder, I love to
serve soup for supper. It’s an easy
sell at my house, where The
Husband is a soup-aholic. But with
a soup this good, I firmly believe
you can sell anyone on it. The trick
is to amp up the flavor, vary the
texture, and make it substantial.
Here I started by roasting — not
boiling — the cauliflower.
Roasting eliminates excess water,
brings the natural sugars to the
fore, and concentrates the flavors
(adding some nuttiness in the
process). Next, I make sure not to
obscure the cauliflower’s flavor
with too many other ingredients.
Yes, there is onion and garlic, but
they play only supporting roles.
Likewise, the stock, diluted with
water, is designed not to overwhelm. The greens — because
they’re not pureed, and not added
until the very end — pack a satisfying little punch of their own
without compromising the cauliflower taste.
You may notice that there’s no
dairy in this recipe. While it’s true
that dairy adds luxuriousness to a
soup’s texture, it also tends to blot
out flavor, particularly delicate
vegetable flavors. That’s why I
almost always leave it out.
Similarly, there’s no flour or
cornstarch here. This soup owes its
rich thickness to the pureeing of
some of the cauliflower, onion and
garlic in the company of a lone
Yukon Gold potato (for silkiness).
I’d always rather thicken a soup by
pureeing some of its ingredients
than by adding flour or another
starch. Starchy thickeners are distracting.
The right tool for pureeing a

soup is a blender. Neither a food
processor nor an immersion
blender will make it quite as
smooth. Just take care not to pack
the blender with too much hot soup
at a time. Fill it no more than a
third full for each batch, otherwise
you may end up wearing it (and
that can burn!).
At the end of the recipe, to provide some crunchy contrast to the
creamy base, I added roasted cauliflower florets. Finally, there are
those garlicky cheese rye toasts —
Yum! — which contribute yet more
crunch as well as big flavor,
whether you tear them up and toss
the pieces into the soup or happily
munch them on the side.
The finished product is a tasty,
hearty, healthy and affordable soup
for supper. And if you use vegetable broth, it’s vegetarian, too.
Either way, it’s fully capable of
standing on its own, or with just a
small salad.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER
AND GREENS SOUP WITH
CHEESY RYE TOASTS
Start to finish: 1 hour (35 minutes active)
Servings: 4
1 head cauliflower (about 2 1/2
pounds)
3 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons
extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Kosher salt
1 cup sliced yellow onion
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 medium Yukon Gold potato
(about 3 to 4 ounces), thinly sliced
3 cups low-sodium chicken or
vegetable broth
2 cups water
5 ounces baby greens (such as
kale, spinach, arugula, mustard or a
mix)
1 tablespoon lemon juice

While it’s true that dairy adds luxuriousness to a soup’s texture, it also tends to blot out flavor, particularly delicate
vegetable flavors.
Ground black pepper
4 slices rye bread
1 ounce grated Parmesan cheese
Heat the oven to 450 F.
Cut off and discard the tough
bottom of the cauliflower stem.
Separate 3 cups of small cauliflower florets (each about 1/2 inch
in diameter) and set aside. Cut the
rest of the cauliflower into 1-inch
pieces, then mound them on a
rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with
1 tablespoon of the olive oil and
sprinkle with about 1/2 teaspoon of
salt. Toss well to coat, then spread
in an even layer. Roast on the
oven’s middle shelf, stirring once
or twice, until it is golden brown at
the edges, 20 to 25 minutes.
In a large saucepan over medium, heat 1 tablespoon of the
remaining oil. Add the onion and
cook, stirring occasionally, until
softened, about 5 minutes. Add the
garlic and cook, stirring, for 1
minute. Add the potato, the roasted

cauliflower, the broth and water.
Simmer the mixture until the potato is tender, about 15 minutes.
While the soup is simmering, on
the rimmed sheet pan, toss the
reserved florets with 2 teaspoons
of oil and about 1/4 teaspoon of
salt. Roast until they are golden
brown and tender, about 20 minutes.
Transfer the hot soup in small
batches to a blender and blend until
smooth. Return the soup to the
saucepan, stir in the greens and
simmer until they are wilted and
tender, about 5 minutes. Add the
roasted florets and cook for 1
minute. Add the lemon juice, then
season
with salt
and pepp e r .
Adjust the
consistency,
as
desired,

with an additional splash or two of
water.
Brush the rye bread with the
remaining tablespoon of oil and
toast on the oven’s middle shelf
until golden, about 5 minutes.
Sprinkle the cheese evenly over the
toasts and return to the oven and
bake for another 2 minutes. Ladle
the soup into serving bowls and
serve each portion with a toast.
Nutrition information per serving: 300 calories; 140 calories
from fat (47 percent of total calories); 15 g fat (3 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 5 mg cholesterol; 770
mg sodium; 32 g carbohydrate; 6 g
fiber; 6 g sugar; 10 g protein.

26

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

SEAFOOD
Continued from page 1
lic is encouraged to swing over to Half Moon
Bay for the first Fish and Fleet Festival this
Sunday.
The commercial industry at Pillar Point
Harbor will be on display with friendly fishermen seeking to share tales, and food trucks
serving culinary delights made from locallycaught seafood. There will also be live music,
craft beer, children’s activities and professional surfers from Titans of Mavericks.
Nicole David, a marine biologist and vice
president of the Harbor District’s Board of
Commissioners, organized the educational
event to empower consumers. After hearing
presentations from a research scientist with the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conservation experts and local fishermen, attendees can ask questions about where their food
originates.
“I think we need to do more to bring a better
balance to the disconnect that is there between
the locally caught fish and the imported fish,”
David said. “Over 90 percent of the seafood,
not just fish but shellfish, that Americans consume is imported. While at the same time,
more than two-thirds of the local catch is
shipped overseas for consumption and processing. The seafood we import is less expensive, but it also comes at a trade-off. It’s potentially at a lower quality and farmed, when we
have really healthy sustainably caught seafood
right off our coast.”
Pillar Point Harbor is home to dozens of

PLAY
Continued from page 22
Murky lighting by Rick Fisher sometimes
leaves principals in the dark, and miking by
sound designer Tod Nixon can be inconsistent. Lorena Randi’s choreography works best

commercial fishermen who brave the seas to
pull in a variety of seafood like crab, salmon,
squid and more, said Lisa Damrosch, executive director of the Half Moon Bay Seafood
Marketing Association.
“Commercial fishing is alive and well. It’s a
great time to celebrate it and it’s great to have
the San Mateo County Harbor District that
also wants to celebrate,” Damrosch said.
“People will be able to chat with the fishermen
and talk about sustainable seafood and learn
about our industry. Learn about where your
food comes from.”

Sustainable fisheries
Commercial and sport fishermen in San
Mateo County have been extremely active
over the years in efforts to promote sustainable
fisheries — particularly looking out for the
drought-afflicted salmon.
Local commercial fishermen sit on state
boards that oversee the salmon stamp program
— a permit regulating how many fish can be
caught to prevent depletion of the fishery.
Sports fishermen also contribute through a netpen program, which trucks and releases hundreds of thousands of juvenile salmon from
upstream hatcheries out to the ocean.
With seasonal opportunities for the public to
buy locally-caught seafood directly from fishermen selling off their boats at Pillar Point
Harbor, David said consumers have an opportunity to promote a more sustainable industry.
“The majority of our fish goes to Asia for
processing and often, it comes back frozen or
canned. So that comes at a huge carbon footprint,” David said adding she hopes Saturday’s
seminar will encourage attendees to “ask more
questions. And to make sure they know they
in “Poor Thing,” when Mrs. Lovett tells what
happened to Lucy.
Vocally, the production is generally fine,
especially with Mulligan’s menacing
Sweeney and Blythe’s clever Mrs. Lovett.
They have the show’s comic highlight with
“A Little Priest,” when they evaluate the culinary possibilities of various professions.
Stober’s Johanna excels with the coloratura
of “Green Finch and Linnet Bird,” but

have a choice every time they go to the market
or the store or a restaurant. They could ask for
locally and sustainably caught fish. Because
it’s the consumer that drives change in the
market.”
Oftentimes, fish that comes from overseas or
raised in overly dense farms are subject to
increased risk of viruses or is treated with
antibiotics, David said. Just like farmers’ markets and labeling products organic, David said
she’d like to promote a more conscientious
mindset for seafood consumers.
“A lot of people don’t mind paying a little
bit more for organic produce just knowing that
it doesn’t come with chemicals and it’s good
for the environment. I think we can also make
that same step with seafood,” David said.
Eventually, David said she’d like to see
some type of labeling system that could indicate when fish is locally caught and help consumers make wise choices.

Fish and Fleet Festival
Sunday’s event will serve as a great opportunity for consumers to learn how to prepare
fish, pick up a few recipes and discuss sustainable efforts currently employed by local fishermen, David and Damrosch said.
The Fish and Fleet Festival will provide a
fun environment to meet the passionate individuals driving the local industry, said Harbor
District Commissioner Sabrina Brennan.
“These fishermen are small businesses,
they’re fishing sustainably when you compare
it to some of the larger vessels out at sea catching a lot of fish and just boxing it up,” Brennan
said. “Here, it’s very small scale and when
you’re buying fish at Pillar Point Harbor,
you’re supporting small businesses and help-

THE DAILY JOURNAL

ing the local economy.”
Damrosch said the Seafood Marketing
Association, which is hosting the event, is
excited to present the fishermen who will be
clad in orange shirts and full of tales.
“It’s a great opportunity for us as an industry
to interact with our community,” Damrosch
said. “It’s good for people to recognize fish
doesn’t come in a package. Someone went out
and got that and worked hard and in some
cases, risked their lives to do it. That connection has been the goal, the connection between
these guys that have worked so hard and the
people that enjoy what they do.”
Sustainable Seafood Saturday is Sept. 26
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at College of San
Mateo’s Choral Room in Building 2, 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd. Parking is recommended in the
Beethoven Lot 2. The Fish and Fleet Festival
is Sunday, Sept. 27, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
Pillar Point Harbor in Half Moon Bay.

Madore’s voice is too dark for Anthony’s
“Johanna.”
The best singing comes from Grills with
Tobias’ “Not While I’m Around.”
Other major roles are filled by soprano
Elizabeth Futral as the Beggar Woman (she’s
not raggedy or raunchy enough); and tenor AJ
Glueckert as Beadle Bamford, the judge’s
accomplice.
Although this production doesn’t measure

up to most of the others seen locally since the
original touring production with Angela
Lansbury and George Hearn in 1981, it’s still
worthwhile because of the genius of the
show’s creators.
It will continue at the War Memorial Opera
House, 301 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco,
through Sept. 29. For tickets and information
call
(415)
864-3330
or
visit
www.sfopera.com.

CITY

The Fort Mason Center Chapel can be reached
through the Fort Mason entrance at Bay Street
and Franklin in San Francisco. Tickets $45
through www.fortmason.org/boxoffice or
(415) 345-7575. We Players has transformed
public spaces into realms of participatory theater for almost 15 years, presenting Macbeth at
Fort Point, Twelfth Night on Hyde Street Pier,
The Odyssey on Angel Island State Park and
Hamlet on Alcatraz. For more information visit
www.weplayers.org.

Continued from page 23
WE PLAYERS BRINGS MYTHS AND
MONSTERS TO FORT MASON. In one of
its trademark site-integrated productions, We
Players presents HEROMONSTER at the Fort
Mason Center Chapel. Performers Ava Roy
and Nathaniel Justiniano work with an original
score by award-winning composer Charlie
Gurke to present a feast of poetry, mythology
and interactive storytelling inspired by the
ancient poem Beowulf. Oct. 9 - Nov. 1. All
performances begin at sunset, so times vary.

WALK
Continued from page 21
drama kept largely to the street-level perspectives of people and rescuers.
In “The Walk,” Zemeckis’ camera swoops
along the steel trusses of the 110-story facade
and recreates the vertigo-inducing views atop
the buildings. It’s probably the most loving

Susan Cohn is a member of the San Francisco Bay
Area Theatre Critics Circle and the American
Theatre Critics Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.

big-screen ode to the Towers (which weren’t
so beloved when first built) since the poet-tour
guide Timothy “Speed” Levitch lied between
them, gazing upward wondrously, in Bennett
Miller’s 1998 documentary, “The Cruise.”
Premiering “The Walk” at the New York
Film Festival, Zemeckis says, was the natural
fit.
“It’s such a New York story,” says the director. “It’s the perfect venue for the movie to
open.”

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
FRIDAY, SEPT. 25
Spring Valley Water System
Outing. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 86 Cañada
Road, Woodside. Travel by bus to
tour the Crystal Springs Dam,
Stanford’s Searsville Dam at Jasper
Ridge, and the Pulgas Water Temple.
For more information call 364-8300.

jewelry, artwork, toys and more.

Speak up, Save a Life: Suicide
Prevention Forum. Noon to 1:30
p.m. San Mateo County Library (Oak
Room), 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
San Mateo County Health System’s
Behavioral Health and Recovery
Services is partnering with Caltrain
and StarVista to raise awareness
about the warning signs of suicide.
Featuring keynote speaker Dr. Jorge
Wong. Refreshments will be provided. For more information contact
578-7165.

Cookin’ the Market. 11 a.m. South
San Francisco Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco. A
program focusing on quick, nutritious meals using fresh, locally
grown ingredients. For more information call 829-3860.

Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont. All
proceeds benefit the Belmont
Library. Sponsored by Friends of the
Belmont Library. To learn more, call
593-5650 or visit www.thefobl.org.
‘Collective’ Reception. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Gallery House, 320 S. California
Ave., Palo Alto. For more information
call 326-1668.
Adult Films: ‘Chinatown.’ 7 p.m.
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Popcorn and refreshments
will be served. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
Snap — Singles Night Alive. 7:30
p.m. to 9 p.m. 1900 Monterey Drive,
San Bruno. Discussion on a variety of
dating topics, traits of safe and
unsafe dating, what to look for in
finding that special someone and
Q&A at the end. Snacks and beverages provided. For more information
email
jomer.Deleon@gmail.com.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 26
Foster City Village Garage Sale. 8
a.m. to 11 a.m. 240 Staysail Court,
Foster City. Proceeds help seniors
remain in their homes. For more
information
email
lindagrant1@aol.com or call 5740520.
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast.
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. $8 per person, $5
for each child under 10. There will be
an omelet bar, pancakes, bacon,
French toast, juice, coffee and tea.
Classic Car Show and Rummage
Sale, Barbecue and Raffles. 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Our Lady of Mercy School,
7 Elmwood Drive, Daly City. Food,
fun and hoping for sun. Free for
spectators. For more information go
to olmbulldogs.com.
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m.
Washington Park, 850 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. Free program of
the San Mateo County Medical
Association’s Community Service
Foundation that encourages physical activity. For more information
and
to
sign
up
visit
smcma.org/walkwithadoc or call
312-1663.
San Mateo Health and Wellness
Fair. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Beresford
Recreation Center, 2720 Alameda de
las Pulgas, and San Mateo Senior
Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas.
Event spread out over two locations
is geared for adults of all ages and
will feature community resources,
free screenings and health and wellness vendors. For more information
call 522-7490.
Autumn at Filoli Festival. 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Children can run races
and pick pumpkins as adults enjoy
the beauty of autumn. Includes a
puppet show, magician, San
Francisco Zoomobile and more.
Event has live music, barbecue
lunch and café refreshments. $25 for
adult non-members and $8 for children. Advance purchase for lunch
required. For more information visit
http://www.filoli.org/autumn-festival/ or call 364-8300.
Christmas Card Writing Party for
Our Military. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church, 301
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame.
Supplies provided, all ages welcome.
For more information call 344-3040.
Artistry in Fashion. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cañada College, 4200 Farm Hill Blvd.,
Redwood City. This shopping extravaganza features dozens of designers
selling clothing, jewelry and other
fashions. Visitors can tour the
Fashion Department’s open house
to view student projects from noon
to 3 p.m. $10 donation to benefit
student scholarships. For more information call 306-3370.
Half Moon Bay Antiques and
Collectibles Show. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
I.D.E.S. Society Hall, 735 Main St.
Admission $5. Features a variety of
dealers and a diverse spectrum of
merchandise including decorative
items, ceramics, furniture, glassware,

Fall Festival. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. St.
Catherine of Siena School, 1300
Bayswater
Ave.,
Burlingame.
Entertainment, prizes and carnival
games and fabulous food. For more
information call 344-7176.

Eighth Annual Salsa Festival.
Noon to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
Live entertainment and a salsa competition and tasting. For more information call 780-7340 or visit
www.redwoodcity.org/events/salsafest.html.
¡Sana, Sana! Noon to 4 p.m. Cunha
Intermediate School, 600 Church St.,
Half Moon Bay. Encouraging Latino
families to take charge of their physical and emotional health and help
people understand that small
changes can make a significant difference in their physical and mental
health. Activities include Yogiando (a
combination of yoga and dance), a
bounce house, cooking demonstrations and tips on how to set and
meet health goals every day. For
more information contact 573-3935.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont. All
proceeds benefit the Belmont
Library. Sponsored by Friends of the
Belmont Library. For more information, call 593-5650 or visit www.thefobl.org.
Introduction to Fermentation with
Master Food Preserves. 3 p.m. to 4
p.m. Community Classroom, New
Leaf Community Market, 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. $10.
Learn about fermentation, probiotic
health benefits and equipment
options in this hands-on class.
Worship Musical. 7 p.m. 1900
Monterey Drive, San Bruno. This production is a collaborative effort
between the Highlands Christian
Schools and the Church of the
Highlands. This highly acclaimed
musical will be free. For more information email julie.somers@highlandsministries.com.
Redwood Symphony — Brahms,
Daughtery, Hindemith. 8 p.m.
Cañada College Main Theatre, 4200
Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City. Free
parking. There will be a pre-concert
lecture at 7 p.m. For more information
or
for
tickets
visit
http://www.redwoodsymphony.org
/ c o n c e r t s / 2 0 1 5 16/concert1_2015.html.
National Singles Week party. 8
p.m. to midnight. Fattoria e Mare
restaurant, 1095 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. Celebrating National
Singles Week with single adults in
the Bay Area, sponsored by The
Society of Single Professionals. Cost
is $20 at the door. For more information about singles parties in the Bay
Area call (415) 507-9962.
Hawaiian Nights with Hiram Bell
and The HUI. 8:30 p.m. Angelica’s,
863 Main St., Redwood City. Enjoy an
evening of unique island music and
hula. Tickets are $14 online and $20
at the door and can be bought at
angelicasllc.com.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 27
Worship Sunday School. 10:30 a.m.
2000 Woodside Road, Redwood City.
Discuss what it means to ‘do good.’
For more information call 368-3376.
Sunday Line Dance. 1 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road. $5.
2015 Mid-Autumn Festival. 1:30
p.m. to 4 p.m. Foster City Library,
1000 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Enjoy storytelling, music, dance and
many children’s activities, along with
special moon cake treats. Free. For
more information call 574-4842.
Nathan Oliviera: The Kestrel, and
Windhover
Related
Works
Reception. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wiegand
Gallery, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The gallery will be presenting works
in various media by the late Nathan
Oliveira from Sept. 18 to Oct. 31. For
more information call 508-3595.
MONDAY, SEPT. 28
College
Application
Essay
Workshop. 7 p.m. Belmont Public
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas.
Workshop by college instructor
Megan Streicher Nichols on how to
craft the right essay. Covers criticalthinking skills, reading and source
analysis, and proper research tools
to produce high-quality essays.
Free. No registration required. For
more
information
email
perez@smcl.org.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

27

‘CSI’ ends its 15-season
run with reunion finale
By Frazier Moore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — There was scant evidence suggesting it would be a hit.
“CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”
was a last-minute pickup by CBS,
plugged into a Friday lineup whose
widely forecast surefire hit would be a
reboot of “The Fugitive,” not a quirky
little drama dwelling on hair fibers and
blood spatter.
“I thought it was never going to succeed,” says Jorja Fox. At the time she
had a recurring role on “The West
Wing” as a Secret Service agent, “but I
thought, ‘How fun would it be just to
take this ride for a little while!’ By
Christmas, I figured I would be back on
‘The West Wing.”’
“I figured there would be an audience
for it,” says William Petersen —

PET
Continued from page 1
company,” she said.
Irene Motoviloff, who is leading the
effort to design the Franklin Elementary
School float, said her family is excited to
participate for the first time since moving to Burlingame.
Franklin Elementary School is hosting
an annual fundraiser the same day as the
Pet Parade, so the float will be inspired
by the medieval theme of the school’s
carnival, said Motoviloff.
Motoviloff said her son will walk in
the parade with the family’s dog Elvis, a
Great Dane dressed in a costume as the
king, and their neighbor’s dog will be
the partner as a princess.

ARREST
Continued from page 1
Evans allegedly demanded prescription drugs from another employee who
complied and gave him Dilaudid — an
opioid, Decker said.
Evans also stole a box of syringes,
which was in his possession when he
was found Wednesday, Decker said.
Although officers didn’t immediately
find the Dilaudid on Evans, there was
evidence of drugs in the used syringes,
Decker said.
Evans appears to have only been in
California a few weeks and may be a

“among those people who do crossword
puzzles. I never thought the audience
would also be everyone who’s NEVER
done a crossword puzzle!”
Though set in Las Vegas, “CSI” occupies the world of forensic investigators
who solve criminal cases not in the
streets or an interrogation room, but in
the lab, where the truth reveals itself in
the evidence they probe.
Premiering in October 2000, “CSI”
was an out-of-nowhere smash. (”The
Fugitive” flopped.) But that was just for
starters. It would spawn two long-running spin-offs, set in Miami and New
York, and recently gave birth to a third,
“CSI: Cyber,” which now will survive it
as the 15-season run of the original
“CSI” comes to an end Sunday at 9 p.m.
EDT.
The two-hour farewell brings back
bygone
stars
including
Marg

Helgenberger (who played exoticdancer-turned-investigator Catherine
Willows until departing three seasons
ago) and Petersen (who headlined for
eight-plus seasons as lab boss Gil
Grissom).
Petersen recalled that in 2000 he was
looking for a TV series, “but I didn’t
want to play a lawyer, a cop or a
divorced dad. ‘CSI’ was something different, and while we didn’t know what it
was going to be, we wanted a chance to
figure it out.”
He got his chance and loved the experience, he says, then moved on in 2008
to pursue theater work. (Now he is joining another series, WGN America’s
“Manhattan,” for its second season
starting Oct. 13.)
Being back on the “CSI” set for the
finale “was like no time had passed,” he
says. “It felt like yesterday.”

She said her family might even bring
their two guinea pigs, Angel and Lou
Seal, to the event as well.
Initially, Motoviloff said she feared
that she would be solely responsible for
putting together the school’s float, but
found recently students and her children
have been motivated to get involved.
“I thought I was going to have to do it
all,” she said. “But they have helped out
a lot, so that is nice.”
As a transplant to the city, Motoviloff
said she is excited to participate in an
event which brings the Burlingame community together.
“I’ve never heard of this in any other
city,” she said. “It’s great.”
Nagel said she is proud of the
growth of the event, from its initial
year in 2004 when almost no one
attended, to a large celebration which

draws more than 1,000 people.
“It is a lot of fun,” said Nagel. “It’s my
favorite day of the year. I think it is just
hysterically funny.”
The Burlingame High School Band
and Los Trancos Woods Community
Marching Band will play musical
arrangements during the parade, and the
San Mateo Elks Concert band will play
afterward.
Those who wish to participate should
report by 9:30 a.m. to the parking lot
near Broadway and Chula Vista Avenue.
The award ceremony will be held after
the parade.
Visit www.BurlingamePetParade.com
or call 342-2073 for more information.

transient with a last known address in
Tampa, Decker said. Evans may have
spent quite a bit time riding Caltrain and
police are unaware of where he’s been
staying since he arrived in San Mateo,
Decker said.
San Mateo cops were called to the
downtown station on an unrelated matter
when one of the department’s newer
detectives recognized Evans’ distinctive
tattoos, which included a red triangle
near the corner of his eye. He also
appeared to be wearing the same clothes
as the suspect in the video, Decker said.
No one was injured during the crime
and two witnesses from the pharmacy
positively identified Evans as the armed
robber, Decker said.
Prescription drug addiction is a trend-

ing and regulating the industry has been
somewhat difficult for medical professionals and law enforcement as abusers
often go to multiple doctors or even
order substances online, Decker said.
With reports estimating pharmacy
robberies have increased 56 percent in
California between 2013 and 2014,
Decker said it’s important to crack
down on prescription abuse-related
crimes.
“In the last five years, more and more
you see prescription drug abuse versus
illegal drugs,” Decker said. “That’s why
the big push now is enforcement of
impaired driving and not just drunk driving. Because the people that are abusing
stuff like Vicodin and opiates, they drive
just as bad as anyone drinking.”

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

28

COMICS/GAMES

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL
CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 News summary
6 Yma —
11 Falsely incriminated
13 Natural
14 Campaign event
15 Indigenous
16 Lean-to
17 — -Magnon man
18 Oz. or tsp.
21 Sherpa’s country
23 Aberdeen river
26 Like sushi
27 Applies frosting
28 “Cope Book” aunt
29 Weather pattern
31 Convoy
32 Pitchfork parts
33 Armed conflict
35 Mountain goat
36 Himalayan sighting
37 Dugout VIP
38 Cow’s mouthful
39 Crush
40 Thumbs-up vote

GET FUZZY®

41
42
44
47
51
52
53
54

Jamaican export
Pub order
Piercing cry
Not saying a word
William S. Porter (2 wds.)
Proven reliable
Piece of turf
Track events

DOWN
1 P.O. service
2 Before, to bards
3 Taxi
4 Memsahib’s nanny
5 Bedding plants
6 Show teeth
7 A law — itself
8 — tai cocktail
9 Dune buggy kin
10 Fair grade
12 Sniff out, perhaps
13 Cuzco founders
18 Frigid region
19 Beach near Los Angeles
20 Grew like ivy

22
23
24
25
28
30
31
34
36
39
41
43
44
45
46
48
49
50

Shortstop — Reese
Given to reverie
Surface
Cafe customers
North Pole toymaker
Tijuana loc.
More lacy
Finally (2 wds.)
Delicious
Couple of pints
Nevada town
“Frozen” sister
Grass
T’ai — ch’uan
Gun the engine
And so forth
Born as
NFL events

9-25-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2015
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Self-discipline will enable
you to turn your dream into a reality. Getting involved
in a group, organization or club will bring influential
contacts. Your eye for detail will be an asset.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You are responsible for
your future. Make a change to your current situation
that is in your best interest. Working from home will be
a viable option. Discretion will be required.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Don’t make
promises you can’t keep. Someone will try to take
advantage of your generosity. Look out for someone in
a vulnerable position; your help will be appreciated.

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Important
information is being withheld. Devote your energy to
finding out what steps you need to take to achieve your
goals. The extra effort will pay off.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Romantic and social
events will turn out to be intriguing. You can make a
move if you keep your expectations realistic. Favorable
results will ensue if you apply past experience.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Don’t make impulsive
or emotional decisions. Change requires careful
thought and planning. Someone will try to get ahead
by leading you astray. Don’t share secrets. Be
discreet and diplomatic.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Your love life will
blossom. Making money and getting ahead will

9-25-15
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

boost your confidence. Don’t rely on secondhand
information. Research prospective deals and make
an informed decision.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Participate in events or
activities that will help sharpen your people skills. With
a professional, confident attitude, you will make an
excellent impression that will promote your prospects.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Not everyone has your
best interest at heart. You will be coerced into doing
something against your principles if you aren’t careful.
Be wary of people with questionable motives.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You have the energy
and the ability to take on extra duties that will lead to
increased earnings. Keep your business and personal
lives separate if you want to avoid gossip.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Overspending or
overindulging will have negative repercussions,
adding stress to your life. Make home or personal
improvements, but stick to a set budget. Love and
romance will be your saving graces.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Take on a new challenge
in order to move forward. Financial rewards are
available if you work hard. You have what it takes to
turn a negative into a positive.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

104 Training

106 Tutoring

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

HERZBERG TUTORING

CAREGIVERS

DRIVERS
WANTED

High School and College
History/Social Studies
English Lang/Literaure
Essay Writing CA TA Credential

(650) 579-2653
110 Employment

CAREGIVER -

Looking for compassionate team
member for Assisted Living in Burlingame. (650)771-1127.

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000

110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SOFTWARE Threat Stream Inc. has openings for
Principal Software Engs in Redwood
City, CA. Res., design, dev & test operating sys-level software. Apply by sending
resumes to jobs@threatstream.com w/
job ref #11168.4.

San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Routes

Early mornings, six days per week,
Monday through Saturday
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.
and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.

CAREGIVERS NEEDED

Pay dependent on route size.
Call 650-344-5200.

No Experience Necessary
Training Provided
FT & PT. Driving required.

(650) 458-2202

NOW HIRING:
t Room Attendants t Laundry Attendants
t Housekeeping Inspector/Inspectress
t Line/Banquet Cook t Banquet Set-Up
t Dishwasher t PBX Hotel Operator

1660 S. Amphlett Blvd., Suite 115
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.homebridgeca.org

AM & PM Shifts Available
Employee Benefits Package

Call Michelle D. (650) 295-6141
1221 Chess Drive Foster City 94010

Exciting Opportunities at
Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence welcome to apply.

CANDY MAKER TRAINING PROGRAM
t 4UBSUJOHSBUFIPVS
t 2VJDLSBUFQSPHSFTTJPOCBTFEPOBUUFOEBODFBOEQFSGPSNBODF
t 2VBMJmDBUJPOTJODMVEF CVUBSFOPUMJNJUFEUP'PMMPXJOHGPSNVMBT TUBOEJOH
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t 1PTJUJPOBWBJMBCMFBU&M$BNJOP3FBM 4PVUI4BO'SBODJTDP

SEASONAL OPPORTUNITIES
SEASONAL QUALITY ASSURANCE INSPECTOR
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t $IFDLUIFXFJHIU BQQFBSBODFBOEPWFSBMMRVBMJUZPGUIFQSPEVDUBUWBSJPVT
TUPQTPGUIFNBOVGBDUVSJOHQSPDFTT
SANITATION
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t 2VBMJmDBUJPOTJODMVEF CVUBSFOPUMJNJUFEUPMJGUJOHMCTGSFRVFOUMZ
MACHINE OPERATOR
t 4UBSUJOHSBUFIPVS
t 0QFSBUF DBSFBOEBEKVTUBMMLJUDIFONBDIJOFSZPSXSBQQJOHFRVJQNFOU
t 2VBMJmDBUJPOTJODMVEF CVUBSFOPUMJNJUFEUPMJGUJOHMCTGSFRVFOUMZ

Requirements for all positions include:
t
t
t
t

"QQMJDBOUTNVTUCFBWBJMBCMFUPXPSLEBZPSOJHIUTIJGUBOEPWFSUJNF
.VTUCFBCMFUPSFBE TQFBLBOEXSJUF&OHMJTI
1PTJUJPOTBWBJMBCMFJO4PVUI4BO'SBODJTDPPS%BMZ$JUZ
1SFWJPVTFYQFSJFODFJONBOVGBDUVSJOHQSFGFSSFE

If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at
(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE.

Caregiver
Open House
& Hiring Events
F/T and P/T Opportunities
No experience required
Training Available
Driving Required
CNA/HHA a plus

Candidates must RSVP
For more information
and to reserve your space:

Call (650) 458-2200
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd., Ste. 115
San Mateo, CA 94402

On-the Spot Interviews &
Refreshments Provided
Sign-On Bonus, Great benefits
for F/T positions

Tuesday
Sept. 22 – 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Wednesday
Sept. 23 – 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Friday
Sept. 25 – 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

29

www.homebridgeca.org

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015
110 Employment

110 Employment
MANUFACTURING -

Jeweler/Setters
Setting + repair
Top Pay + ben + bonus

650-367-6500 FX: 367-6400

jobs@jewelryexchange.com

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

203 Public Notices
LIEN SALE 10/12/2015 9am at 2900
MIDDLEFIELD RD, REDWOOD CITY
‘99 FREIGHTLIN Lic# 8C12648 Vin#
1FV3GFAC8XHB41373

HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

Sales Associates, Asst Managers,
Store Managers for
Convenience & Gas Station
Retail locations
in Peninsula and South Bay
Call now: 1-510-270-3347
https://greatjobs.hua.hrsmat.com/ats

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #264187
Name of the persons abandoning the
use of the Fictitious Business Name: 1)
Ekaterina Temnov 2) Vladislav Temnov
Name of Business: Katya’s Family Daycare. Date of original filing: 2/25/2015.
Address of Principal Place of Business:
145 Anza Way, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066.
Registrants: 1) Ekaterina Temnov 2) Vladislav Temnov, 145 Anza Way, SAN
BRUNO, CA, 94066. The business was
conducted by a Married Couple.
/s/Vladslav Temnov/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 09/16/15. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/18/15,
09/25/15, 10/02/15, 10/09/15).

RESTAURANT -

Weekend Dishwasher Sat/Sun a.m. San
Carlos
Restaurant,
1696
Laurel
Street. Call 650 592 7258 or Apply in
person

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:
HENRY JAMES SCOTT AKA HENRY J.
SCOTT
CASE NO. 125993
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the WILL or
estate, or both of HENRY JAMES
SCOTT AKA HENRY J. SCOTT.
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been
filed by SHIRLEY A. SCOTT in the Superior Court of California, County of SAN
MATEO.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SHIRLEY A. SCOTT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act with
limited authority. (This authority will allow
the personal representative to take many
actions without obtaining court approval.
Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have
waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an
interested person files an objection to the
petition and shows good cause why the
court should not grant the authority.
A HEARING on the petition will be held
in this court as follows: 10/13/15 at
9:00AM in Dept. 28 located at 400
COUNTY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the
petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the
hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must
file your claim with the court and mail a
copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first
issuance of letters to a general personal
representative, as defined in section
58(b) of the California Probate Code, or
(2) 60 days from the date of mailing or
personal delivery to you of a notice under
section 9052 of the California Probate
Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner
PAMELA LEGGETT COOKE - SBN
213035
LAW OFFICES OF PAMELA LEGGETT
COOKE
1900 POWELL ST. STE 600
EMERYVILLE CA 94608
9/24, 9/25, 10/1/15
CNS-2797158#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT M-259592
Name of the person abandoning the use
of the Fictitious Business Name: William
Ho. Name of Business: Peninsula Family
Smile Center. Date of original filing:
2/18/2014. Address of Principal Place of
Business: 1828 El Camino Real, Suite
603, Burlingame, CA 94010. Registrants:
William Ho, DDS APPC, 2210 Gellert
Blvd, #5305, SSF, CA 94080. The business was conducted by a Corporation.
/s/William Ho/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 09/01/15. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/04/15,
09/11/15, 09/18/15, 09/25/15).

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266374
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Suits & More 2) ABA Limos, 884
Mahler Rd, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Award Bay Area
Limousine Sedan Services, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Jalal Iwais/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 08/10/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/15, 09/25/15, 09/02/15, 10/09/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266647
The following person is doing business
as: Lexy’s At The Spot, 110 Park Place,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030. Registered Owner: Veronica Alexandria Hernandez, 116
Chadbourne Ave, #2, MILLBRAE, CA
94030. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Veronica Alexandria Hernandez/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/10/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/15, 09/18/15, 09/25/15, 10/02/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266597
The following person is doing business
as: Burlingame Smile, 1828 El Camino
Real, Suite 603, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: William Ho,
DDS, A Professional Dental Corporation,
CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/William Ho/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/01/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/15, 09/11/15, 09/18/15, 09/25/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 266767
The following person is doing business
as: Amor Salon, 2115 Broadway Suite
24, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered Owner: Andrea Alejandrino, 181
Irene Court #1, BELMONT, CA 94002.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Andrea Alejandrino/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/15, 10/02/15, 10/09/15, 10/16/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266595
The following person is doing business
as: VARJAGI, 44 E 41ST PL, APT C,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered
Owner: Karl Hansa Severin Lindholm,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Karl Lindholm/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 08/31/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/15, 09/11/15, 09/18/15, 09/25/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 266750
The following person is doing business
as: Natural Green Releaf, 136 Clay Ave,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: Luis Paredes, 1584
Vista Del Sol, SAN MATEO, CA 94404.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Luis Paredes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/15, 10/02/15, 10/09/15, 10/16/15)

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Monday, October 05, 2015 at 7:00 p.m.
(or as soon thereafter as
the matter is heard) in the
Millbrae City Council Chamber, 621 Magnolia Ave.,
Millbrae, CA, the Millbrae
Planning Commission will
hold a meeting to conduct a
public hearing regarding the
following matters:
DESIGN
REVIEW
and
SETBACK EXCEPTION to
allow construction of an approximately 700 square foot
second floor addition, with
reduced front and left side
second story setbacks, to
an existing 4,043 square
foot house, including a 706
square foot garage, on a
19,980 square foot lot located in the R-1-LL Single
Family Residential Large
Lot Zoning District. (Public
Hearing).
DESIGN REVIEW to allow
the remodel and expansion
to the existing first and second floor, and a SETBACK
EXCEPTION to allow less
than the minimum required
2 nd floor setback of a single-family house located in
the R-1 Single-Family Residential
Zoning
District.
(Public Hearing).
At the time of the hearing,
all interested persons are
invited to appear and be
heard. For further information or to review the materials regarding these matters,
please contact the Millbrae
Community
Development
Department 621 Magnolia
Avenue, Millbrae at (650)
259-2341; or contact: Tonya Ward, Community Development Director (650)
259-2436.
9/25/15
CNS-2798214#
SAN
MATEO
DAILY
JOURNAL

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266463
The following person is doing business
as: Caro’s House Cleaning, 91 Parnell
Ave, DALY CITY, CA 94015. Registered
Owner: Soledad Hernandez, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Soledad Hernandez/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 08/17/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/15, 09/18/15, 09/25/15, 10/02/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 266780
The following person is doing business
as: R&P Auto Sales, 3537 Branson
Drive, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: Ralph Eichenbaum III,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Ralph Eichenbaum III/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/24/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/15, 10/02/15, 10/09/15, 10/16/15)

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

31

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

294 Baby Stuff

299 Computers

304 Furniture

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266773
The following person is doing business
as: Paqueteria San Luis, 815 Warrington
Ave Unit F, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063. Registered Owner: Ana Varela,
319 Winton Ave, Hayward CA 94544.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Ana Varela/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/23/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/15, 10/02/15, 10/09/15, 10/16/15)

claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
FILED: 9/09/15
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on 9/18/15, 9/25/15, 10/02/15

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

BABY JOGGER ll, Three Wheel in good
condition $ 20. 650 367 8146

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Margaret Joan Sarmento
Case Number: 126054
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Margaret Joan Sarmento. A Petition for Probate has been filed
by David Sarmento in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that David
Sarmento be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: Oct 09, 2015 at
9:00 a.m., Department 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your

210 Lost & Found
FOUND-LARGE SIZED Diamond Ring in
San Carlos Bank Parking Lot on 5/21.
(650)888-2662.
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301

BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291

AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898

LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

DAS ECHOLOT - fuga furiosa Ein kollektives Tagebuch Winter 1945, 4 vol,
boxed New $45. (650)345-2597
MAGAZINES. SIX “Arizona Highways”
magazines from 1974 and 1975. Very
good condition. $15. 650-794-0839.

LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012

MARTHA STEWART decorating books.
Two oldies, but goodies. Both for $10.
San Bruno. 650-794-0839.
NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861
STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Better protected
6 “Poppycock!”
10 Badlands Natl.
Park site
14 Coarse
15 Suspicious of
16 Pup follower?
17 Up for grabs, in a
way
18 Lit. intro
19 “Willard”
antagonists
20 The joke at the
audiologists’
convention __
23 Solo, say
24 Indian author
Santha Rama __
25 Century-starting
year
26 The joke at the
chemists’
convention __
32 Not treat lightly
34 Normandy river
35 “Defending Our
Nation. Securing
The Future” org.
36 __ swings
37 “POV” airer
38 Extreme degrees
39 “The Trumpet of
the Swan”
monogram
40 Boxed dozen
42 Vail topper
44 The joke at the
firefighters’
convention __
47 Part of a
friskiness
metaphor
48 Jersey’s chew
49 “The Simpsons”
leisure suit
wearer
52 The joke at the
cashiers’
convention __
56 Not even close
57 Lightest meson
58 Ex-TV host
Stewart
59 Kick back
60 Required bet
61 “R.U.R.” writer
Capek
62 Language that
gave us “bard”
63 Old Royale 8’s
64 Gambling aids:
Abbr.

DOWN
1 Shining target
2 Journey frontman
Pineda
3 Mature
4 Henry James
biographer
5 Backtalk
6 The Carpenters,
e.g.
7 Regarding
8 Mississippi
travelers
9 “Meet the
Fockers” co-star
10 Channel relative
11 Word John
doesn’t want to
see?
12 They’re seen in
columns
13 Lapidary’s meas.
21 Some flatbreads
22 Nero’s “Behold!”
27 Ref. shelf filler
28 Singer Rihanna’s
first name
29 Where a love
story may be
written
30 Workers’ rights
org.
31 Tweed
lampooner
32 Drake, maybe

295 Art

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

FOUND: WEDDING BAND Tuesday
September 8th Near Whole Foods, Hillsdale. Pls call to identify. 415.860.1940

LOST DOG, 14 year old Bichon, white
and Fluffy. Reward $500 cash. Her name
is Pumpkin. Lost in Redwood City.
(650) 281-4331.

GRACO DOUBLE Stroll $90 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

33 Start of a
dramatic
question
37 Like new snow
38 End to peace?
40 Evita’s man
41 As expected
42 Complacent
43 Grizzly
Alaskans?
45 Walk wearing
Luvs
46 Dramatic units

50 Principle
51 Dividing range
52 When one __
closes ...
53 Hardly blessed
events
54 Till opener
55 Crack up
56 NFL team with a
home field
bleachers section
called the Dawg
Pound

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

296 Appliances

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
DESIGNER LADIES hand bag, yellow
three zippers. purchase price $150.0 sell
price $45 (650)515-2605

BOOKCASES. 6 all wood Good condition. 32"W x 70"H x 12"D $15. ea. 305283-5291

5 RARE purple card Star Wars figures
mint unopened. $75. Steve, 650-5186614.

BRASS / METAL ETAGERE 6.5 ft tall.
Rugs, Pictures, Mirrors. Four shelf. $200.
(650) 343-0631

COMPLETE 1999 UD1&2 set of 525
baseball cards - mint. $50. Steve, 650518-6614.

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

PLAY KITCHEN Step 2, accessories,
sink, shelves, oven, fridge, extendable,
perfect , $50. 650-878-9511

COFFEE TABLE @ end table Very nice
condition $80. 650 697 7862

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE 12 Foot Heavy Duty Jumper
Cables $10. (650)368-0748

HAMILTONBEACH juicer new still in
original packing. purchase price $59.99
sale price $25. (650)515-2605

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

ICE MAKER brand new $90. (415)2653395

HAND DRILLS and several bits & old
hand plane. $40. (650)596-0513

JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

KIRBY MODEL G7D vacuum with accessories and a supply of HEPA bags.
$150 obo. 650-465-2344
PORTABLE AIR conditioner by windchaser 9000 btu s cools 5,600 ft easily
$90 obo (650)591-6842
SHARP MICROWAVE CAROUSEL II
oven small in perfect condition and clean
$ 35. [510] 684-0187
UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleane, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco
WEBBER BBQ + chimney + tongs, all
only $20, 650-595-3933

297 Bicycles
2 BIKES for kids $60.My Cell 650-5371095. Will email pictures upon request.
LANDRIDER
AUTO-SHIFT.
Never
Used. Paid $320. Asking $75.(650)4588280

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
CHERISHED TEDDIES Figurines. Over
90 figurines, 1992-1999 (mostly '93-'95).
Mint in Boxes. $99. (408) 506-7691

MONOPOLY GAME, 1930's, $35, 650591-9769 San Carlos
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
RECORDS WANTED-JAZZ, Rock, Soul,
etc. (LP’s, 45’s). Also, factory recorded
reel to reel tapes. (510) 969-8988.
jymnstuff@hotmail.com

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
CORNER NOOK, table and two upholstered benches with storage, blond wood
$65. 650-592-2648
CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222
DECORATIVE MIRRORS, set of 4, $40
(650)996-0026
DESKS. TWO glass/metal, 62"L x 30"W
and 44"L x 30", w/monitor shelf 16"D.
$25. ea 305-283-5291
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

OLD COFFEE grinder with glass jar.
$40. (650)596-0513

DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

PAIR OF beautiful candalabras . Marble
and brass. $90. (650)697-7862

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

FREE 2 piece china cabinet. Pecan finish. Located in SSF. I'll email picture.
650-243-1461

303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BASUKA BASS tube speakers/ amplifier 20" x 10" auto boat never used $100.
(650)992-4544
BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
COMPACT- DVD Video/CD music Player never used in Box $45. (650)9924544
COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/ equalizer, with CD deck music player 2 Spkrs+.
$50. (650)992-4544
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

FULL SIZED mattress with metal type
frame $35. (650)580-6324
GLASS TOP dining table w/ 6 chairs
$75. (415)265-3395
INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR RECTANGULAR with silver
frame approx 50" high x 20 " wide $25
(650)996-0026
MIRROR, OAK frame oval on top approx 39" high x 27" Wide. (650)996-0026
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OFFICE DESK and chairs #95.
(650) 283-6997
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

PATIO tables, 48” round, detachable
legs; $30. (650) 697-8481

PORTABLE AC/DC Altec Lansing
speaker system for IPods/audio sources.
Great for travel. $15. 650-654-9252
RECORD PLAYER - BIC Model #940.
Excellent Cond. $30. (650) 368-7537.

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

SONY CD/DVD PLAYER model dvpn5575p brand new silver in the box. $50.
[510]684-0187

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

BEAUTIFUL MANTLE MIRROR, 4.5 by
4 ft. $95.00. (650)283-6997.
BOOK SHELF $95.00. (650) 283-6997

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

ELVIS SPEAKS To You; 78rpm; 1956
Rainbow Record; good condition; $50;
650-591-9769 San Carlos

09/25/15

300 Toys

ART PAINTINGS and prints $25 each.
(650) 283-6997.

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

ELECTRIC FIREPLACE on wheels in
walnut casing made by the Amish exl.
cond. $99. 650-592-2648

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858

xwordeditor@aol.com

RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

304 Furniture
2 WHITE bookcases. 69"H x 27"W x
10"D $10. ea 305-283-5291

PATIO tables, Oblong green plastic 3’x5’
detachable legs. $30. (650) 697-8481
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
SET OF 3 oak entertainment cubbies on
casters. 30"W x 20"H x 17"D $10.
ea 305-283-5291
SOFA. BEAUTIFUL full-size (80”). Excellent condition. Hardly used. You pick
up. $95. San Bruno. 650-871-1778.
SOLID WOOD stackable tables, Set of 3
$25. (650)996-0026
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344
TV STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168
TWIN SIZED mattress like new with
frame & headboard $45. (650)580-6324
VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE BOOKCASE :H 72" x W 30" x D
12" exc condition $30. (650)756-9516.
WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65. (650)504-6058

By Amy Johnson
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

09/25/15

WOODEN MINI bar with 2 bar stools
$75. (415)265-3395

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015
306 Housewares

309 Office Equipment

312 Pets & Animals

318 Sports Equipment

BAG OF tupperware. $99 (650)515-2605

STAND WITH shelves, 29" high. Can be
used for TV, computer, printer. $10. Pacifica (650)355-0266

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

TAYLORMADE BURNER Driver 10.5 W/
Diamana Senior Shaft $73.
(650)365-1797

310 Misc. For Sale

315 Wanted to Buy

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

BBQ UTENSILS, Stainless steel, Grillmark, flippers tongs, baster, winebarrel,
staves, $25. (650) 578 9208.
BBQ UTENSILS, Stainless steel, Grillmark, flippers tongs, baster, winebarrel,
staves, $25. (650) 578 9208.

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

HOUSEPLANT 7 1/2 ' with large pear
shaped
leaves
in
pot $65, would
cost $150 in flower shop 650-592-2648.

INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133

PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.
SCALE. 25 lb. capacity counter top model. Very good condition. $15. San Bruno.
650-794-0839
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

308 Tools
14 FT Extension Ladder. Extends to 26
FT. $125. Good Cond. (650)368-7537
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CHIPPER/SHREDDER 4.5 horsepower,
Craftsman $150 OBO. (650) 349-2963
COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Electric Driven. $875. (650) 3336275.
COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Motor Driven. $1,350. (650) 3336275.
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
DEWALT DRILL/FLASHLIGHT Set $99
My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.
HEAVY DUTY Mattock/Pick, Less Handle $10. (650)368-0748
PULLEYS- FOUR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
SKILL SAW 7/1/4" CRAFTMAN profesional unused $ 45. (650)992-4544
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

LIONEL ENGINE #221 ‘Rio Grande diesel, runs good ex-condition
$90.
(650)867-7433

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

VINTAGE GOLF Set for $75 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

316 Clothes

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

BAG OF indian clothes. $99 (650)5152605

321 Hunting/Fishing

LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708

HUNTING
CLUB
Membership
$2,600.Camanche Hills Hunting Preserve, Ione CA. Pheasants, Ducks, Chukar and sporting clay range. Excludes
annual dues and bird card. Call 209-3041975.

LEATHER JACKET, New Dark Brown ,
Italian style, Size L $49 (650) 875-1708

TELESCOPE. CSTAR 600 power refractor telescope including tripod. $25.
Very good condition. 650-871-1778.

PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

SUNGLASSSES UNISEX TOMS Lobamba S007 w/ Tortoise Frames. Polarized lenses 100% UVA/UVB NEW
$65.(650)591-6596

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

AMES CLIPPERS, fan rake, shovel, all
only $15, 650-595-3933

VEST, BROWN Leather , Size 42 Regular, Like New, $25 (650) 875-1708

340 Camera & Photo Equip.

VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

CANON CAMERA SD1100IS accessories, battery charger, cable chargers
CD all for only $10 650 520-7045

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments
ALVAREZ ACOUSTICAL guitar with
tuning device - excellent to learn on, like
new $95. 925-784-1447

317 Building Materials
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

335 Rugs
CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

335 Garden Equipment

345 Medical Equipment
ADULT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

EXTERIOR BRASS lanterns 20" 2 NEW,
both $30. (650)574-4439

HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296

FREE, 3 interior solid core paneled doors
with hardware. Reply
tmckay1@sbcglobal.net

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, free.
call 573-7381.

NEW CPAP mask, hose, strap sealed
packs $50, 650-595-3933

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

TRAVEL WHEEL chair Light weight travel w/carrying case. $300. (650)596-0513

WOODEN SHUTTERS 12x36" Six available. $20. (650)574-4439

Garage Sales

KIMBALL MAHOGANY Baby Grand
Piano, Bench and Sheet Music. $1,100.
(650)341-2271
MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549

318 Sports Equipment
UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

309 Office Equipment

FRENCH BULLDOG puppies. Many
colors.
AKC Registration. Call
(415)596-0538.

Cabinetry

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858

WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

PRINTER. HP Photosmart C5100 All-InOne series. Good working condition.
FREE. 650-871-1778.

WE BUY

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066

Cleaning
ANGIE’S CLEANING &
POWERWASHING

Move in/out; Post Construction;
Commercial & Residential;
Carpet Cleaning; Powerwashing

650.918.0354

www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

GOLF BALLS-15 dozen. All Brands: Titeslist, Taylor Made, Callaway. $5 per
dozen. (650)345-3840.
GOLF CLUBS, 2 sets of $30 & $60.
(415)265-3395
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347
TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

Cleaning

620 Automobiles

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

SALE

9/26 10AM-4PM

Antique Furniture, Tools, Pictures Clothes.
206 Alta Loma Dr, S. San Francisco

YARD SALE

FRI AND SAT 25TH AND 26TH
10AM - 4PM

120 BURNS AVE,
ATHERTON
ART, BOOKS, MISC HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS AND MORE!

Concrete
AAA CONCRETE DESIGN
Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

Call (650)344-5200

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484

470 Rooms

DUCATI ‘01 750 Monster, 15K miles,
very clean. ONLY $3,800. (650)455-1699
This is a steal!

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

620 Automobiles
BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149

GARAGE

BB GUN. $29 (650)678-5133

Garage Sales

1985 CHRYSLER Le Baron convertible.
Original owner, original condition. 112K
miles. Absolutely beautiful. No Damage.
Mark Cross ED. $3,450. (650) 345-3951.

AA SMOG

Complete Repair& Service
$29.75 plus certificate & fee
869 California Drive .
Burlingame

(650) 340-0492
FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

MOTORCYCLE GMAX helmet and all
leather jacket, both black, Large, new,
never used. $85. 305-283-5291
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

670 Auto Parts
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
NEVER
MOUNTED
new Metzeler
120/70ZR-18 tire $50, 650-595-3933

NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
OIL/FILTER CHANGING, pan, wrench,
funnels ++ all $10, 650-595-3933
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted

NISSAN ‘06 Sentra 4D, Silver, 87K,
clean title, $6300. (650)342-6342

Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Construction

Construction

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$4,200 OBO (650)481-5296

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Construction

Housecleaning

O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING

• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596a

(650)278-0157

Decks & Fences

PENINSULA
CLEANING

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Gardening
CALL NOW FOR
FALL LAWN
PREPARATION

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Flooring
SPECIALS
AS LOW AS $2.50/sf.

Mention this ad for
Free Delivery
See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119

Lic#1211534

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771

Hauling

Hauling

AAA RATED!

Plumbing

33

Window Washing

CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY CLOGGED
DRAINS! with proper access
Installation of: Water Heaters •
Faucets •Toilets • Sinks • Gas • Water
& Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

(650)461-0326 or
(650)226-3762
Lic.# 983312

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

Notices
Handy Help

CHAINEY HAULING

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)296-0568

Free Estimates

NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

Junk & Debris Clean Up
Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Lic.#834170

SENIOR HANDYMAN

“Specializing in any size project”

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retired Licensed Contractor

Roofing

THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

REED
ROOFERS

650-201-6854

Licensed General and
Painting Contractor

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting
Lic#979435

Landscaping

AUTUMN LAWN

PREPARATION!

(650)701-6072

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial
License #931457

Call for Free Estimate

(650) 591-8291
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Painting

CRAIG’S PAINTING
Residential & Commercial
Interior & Exterior
10-year guarantee
craigspainting.com

Free Estimates

(650) 553-9653
Lic#857741

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA Lic 982576
(415)828-9484

Tree Service

Hillside Tree

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635

34

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing

$5 CHARLEY'S

Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

(650)771-6564

Dental Services
Do you want a White,Brighter
Smile?
Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

Maui Whitening
650.508.8669

1217 Laurel St., San Carlos
(Between Greenwood & Howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

I - SMILE

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

Dental Services

Food

Health & Medical

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

THE CAKERY

EYE EXAMINATIONS

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

A touch of Europe

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

Financial

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

(650)697-9000

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Food

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

BRUNCH EVERY

Fitness

Omelette Station, Carving Station
$24.95 / adult $9.95 /Child

LOSE WEIGHT

SUNDAY

Houlihans

& Holiday Inn SFO Airport
275 So Airport blvd.
South San Francisco

In Just 10 Weeks !
with the ultimate body shaping course
contact us today.

(650) 490-4414
www. SanBrunoMartialArts.com

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

NOTHING BUNDTCAKES
Make Life Sweeter
*864 Laurel Street, San Carlos

650.592.1600

Furniture

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

Health & Medical

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

*140 So. El Camino Real, Millbrae

650.552.9625

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

KAY'S HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381 El Camino Real
Millbrae

(650)697-6868

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Insurance

AFFORDABLE
LIFE INSURANCE

Legal Services

Massage Therapy

LEGAL

GRAND
OPENING

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract

Asian Massage
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(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
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provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Relaxing & healing massage
$50 per hour
$5 off with this ad!

GROW

39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1
San Mateo

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

Music
Massage Therapy
BEST ASIAN BODY
MASSAGE

$35/hr First time visitors
$39.99/hr Current Clients

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame

(510)282.2466
Larry Hutcherson
Belmont, CA

(650)557-2286

Open 7 days 10am - 9pm
Free parking behind bldg

Sign up for the free newsletter

Home Care Assistance
Health Care Consultant

LIFE INSURANCE
America's Lowest Cost!

L & R WELLNESS
CENTER

Marketing

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

Eric L. Barrett,

(650)556-9888
633 Veterans Blvd #C
Redwood City

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

Bronstein Music

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

(650)692-1989

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

Lic #OJ11250

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$48

Belbien Day Spa

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399
Weight Loss

FREE
TRIAL

FOR WEIGHT LOSS
in Menlo Park
Call 650 322 7000

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

TASK FORCE
Continued from page 1
that it’s unlikely the state or federal government will provide any assistance to solve one
of the richest county in California’s housing
crisis.
“We have to help ourselves,” Horsley said.
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-Menlo Park,
opened up the task force’s first meeting by
acknowledging that the county has run out of
land on which to build.
The only way to build more housing is to
change density and that cannot be accomplished without a good transportation system,
Gordon said.
Transit-oriented development along El
Camino Real, the county’s major transportation corridor, will be part of the discussion,
Gordon said.
He said, however, that the state should partner with the county to help solve the housing
crisis. There’s a bill on Gov. Jerry Brown’s
desk now that would provide additional tax
credits for the creation of affordable housing.

RENTALS
Continued from page 1
information illustrating the demand for shortterm rentals in South San Francisco, due to
skepticism over whether the industry bears
monitoring.
“The bottom line is I’m not convinced, at this
point in time, with the information I have, we
have such a big volume of these activities that
we need to regulate,” said Councilman Pradeep
Gupta.
Those sentiments were echoed by Vice
Mayor Mark Addiego.
“This is not registering as a problem yet,” he
said.

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

35

With the loss of redevelopment agencies, a
dedicated source of funding at the state level
should be in place to build housing, Gordon
said.
Horsley said that making better use of
underutilized properties along El Camino
Real should be part of the solution. That will
mean that buildings along the corridor will
have to be taller than they are now.
One of the big obstacles is trying to get the
community to support the effort to build more
housing, Slocum said.
More housing means more traffic but the
public needs to know that without more housing and skyrocketing rents, many low-wage
earners will have to travel great distances to
do the jobs they do here.
Gordon said that for every tech job created,
another four service level jobs are created that
pay lower salaries.
“Those are the people that if we cannot
house them here will clog up our roads,”
Gordon said. “You can’t talk about housing
without talking about transportation.”
Thursday’s meeting was essentially an
opportunity for the task force members to
meet each other. No policy discussions took
place.

Daly City Councilman David Canepa is on
the task force and said it’s time for the county
to think big when it comes to solving the
housing crisis.
Currently, cities are exploring ways to
charge developers impact fees and commercial linkage fees to construct affordable housing based on nexus studies that link new
office construction to the need to build additional housing.
Canepa thinks the fees could make a difference but will urge other members of the task
force to consider floating a bond to build more
housing.
In San Francisco, voters will decide in
November the fate of a $300 million affordable housing bond that Canepa and housing
advocates in the area will keep a close eye on.
If it passes, it could be the impetus for starting the conversation in San Mateo County,
said Canepa, who supports putting a $500
million bond on the ballot in the future to
build affordable housing.
“We have a housing crisis that is unparalleled,” Canepa said.
Canepa was pleased with how the first
meeting of the task force went.

“It’s tremendous to get people from the
north and south county together,” he said. “It
was a great starting point.”
Beginning with Thursday’s kickoff, the task
force will meet for eight meetings over nine
months. A public input process is anticipated
for spring 2016.
The task force’s members, appointed by the
Board of Supervisors, will include two county supervisors, city councilmembers, planning
commissioners, both profit and nonprofit
housing developers and members of the
Housing Leadership Council of San Mateo,
the Housing Endowment and Regional Trust,
HIP Housing, San Mateo County Board of
Realtors,
the
California
Apartment
Association, chambers of commerce, League
of Women Voters and the San Mateo County
Economic Development Association.
The task force next meets Oct. 22.

There are a handful of listings offering rooms
or homes in South San Francisco, ranging from
about $60 to $250 per night, on various shortterm vacation rental websites.
City staff forwarded the effort to regulate the
rentals in advance of a potential influx of visitors to the Bay Area coming to attend the Super
Bowl in Santa Clara.
Those renting residences in South San
Francisco could contribute to existing parking
and traffic congestion issues in neighborhoods,
as well as potentially pose public safety threats
which would have an adverse effect of the
quality of life to local residents, among a variety of other concerns, according to a city staff
report.
But ensuring those renting their homes
through websites are properly permitted would
largely be based on complaints by neighbors,

which would be an inefficient method of
enforcement, said Councilwoman Karyl
Matsumoto.
She said imposing the regulations could
cause a “bureaucratic nightmare,” and questioned how effective the proposed policy might
be in meeting its goal.
Mayor Richard Garbarino though said he felt
those who rented their rooms or home for profit were essentially operating businesses, and
should be subject to the same oversight as other
local companies.
Under the recommendation, listings on vacation rental websites would have also been subject to the city’s transient occupancy tax, or
hotel tax, which takes 10 percent of the gross
rent paid by guests. The city’s conference center tax would take an additional $2.50 per occupied room per night, as well.
The regulation would have gone into effect
as a pilot program, lasting one year, which
would have given officials an opportunity to
gauge the effectiveness of the policy against
the cost of operating permitting and enforcement.
Also, under the proposed policy, renters
would not be able to stay longer than 90 days

in a home where the host is not present, but
hosted renters would not be regulated in terms
of length of stay.
Addiego said he appreciated the opportunity
for residents to rent out space in their home,
while being a good host to visitors to South San
Francisco, and making a little additional
income in the process.
“Unless it becomes a neighborhood problem,
I don’t think it needs to be regulated,” he said.
Councilwoman Liza Normandy said as other
local communities, such as San Mateo and
Belmont, consider similar regulations on the
short-term rental market, South San Francisco
officials should examine the policies being discussed.
She expressed a willingness to eventually
regulate the industry, but would need more
information before making a decision.
Garbarino echoed those sentiments.
“For the moment, this could probably be put
back on the shelf until when it becomes necessary,” he said.

'3&&

Sunday, October 25
12:00 - 4:00

Hillsdale Shopping Center
Macy’s Center Court
Sixty 31st Avenue, San Mateo

Parents! Get . . . .
access to answers,resources, and products for
raising babies, toddlers, preschoolers & beyond.
Talk with expert providers of:
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Go to housing.smcgov.org/task-force to
learn more about the task force.

bill@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

36

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Sept. 25, 2015

OYSTER PERPETUAL DATEJUST II

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