Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 2

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF SODA ASH BY DOUBLEINDICATOR TITRATION

Z.C. HACHERO
DEPARTMENT OF MINING, METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES, DILIMAN QUEZON CITY, PHILIPPINES
DATE PERFORMED: SEPTEMBER 19, 2015
INSTRUCTORS NAME: SEARLE AICHELLE DUAY

1. Discuss the use of a more dilute


NaOH
solution
for
the
standardization of NaOH.
2.
A stronger concentration
would make it impossible to titrate
accurately and actually see the
neutralization take place. With a
largely known dilution, you can
calculate the same reaction but the
'color indicator' will allow you to slowly
achieve the perfect amount in mL for a
pale solution and not overtitrate,
which will in the end make your
calculations off. That and NaOH is
VERY VERY bad to use concentrated.
3.
4. Discuss the rationale behind the
dilution and aliquoting of the
aspirin sample.
5.
Diluting and using only
the aliquot of the aspirin sample
allows an easier titration setup. Only a
small amount of the titrant was
needed to reach the endpoint.
6.
7. Discuss the principle behind the
use of back titration in the
analysis of aspirin tablet.

8.
Aspirin is an ester which
is very easily hydrolyzed. So easily
that during a normal titration with
NaOH, the alkaline conditions break it
down leading to errors in analysis. In
addition its water solubility is low. To
overcome these problems, Aspirin is
completely hydrolyzed to salicylic
acid and acetic acid with hot, excess
NaOH. The NaOH in excess is then
titrated with standardized acid (HCL
or H2SO4) to calculate the amount
used in the reaction with Aspirin and
thereby the amount of drug in the
flask.
9.
10.
Discuss the importance of
simmering the tablet in NaOH
solution for 20 minutes.
11.
The simmering process is
a crucial part of this experiment to
ensure that the aspirin sample which
is a monoprotic acid will completely
dissociate into acetic acid and salicylic
acid during the hydrolysis.
12.
13.
Discuss the possible sources
of errors and their effect on
calculated parameters.

14.
Possible sources of error
in the experiment include the faulty
titration
and
standardization
of
solutions, faulty weighing of samples
that can lead to over titration and
wrong computations, and incomplete
hydrolysis of sample.
15.
16.
REFERENCES:
17. [1] Skoog, D., West, D., Holler, F.J., Crouch,
S., Chen, S. Introduction to Analytical
Chemistry 8th ed.

18.
Cengage Learning, Singapore. 2012.
19.
20. [2] Harris, D. Quantitative Chemical
Analysis 8th ed. W.H. Freeman and Company,
New York. 2010.
21.
22.
[3] Determination of the
Carbonate Content of a Soda Ash
Sample.
http://www.csudh.edu/oliver/che230/l
abmanual/carbnate.htm. (Accessed
September 24, 2015)