Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 51

GABRIEL’S WING 

Arise in order that we may make the order of the sun’s journey 
fresh 
That we may make the burnt out spirit of evening and morning 
fresh. 

The heart of a diamond can be cut by the leaf of a flower; 
A soft and gentle word has no effect on a stupid man! 
—Bartari‐Hari 
[Translated by D.J. Matthews]  

1  * 
My epiphany of passion causes commotion in  All potent wine is emptied of Thy cask; 
the precinct of the Divine Essence,  Art Thou, indeed, a Cup‐bearer, may I ask? 
Strikes terror in the pantheon of His  Thou gavest me a drop from an ocean; 
Attributes.  Art Thou a miser in a Nourisherʹs mask? 
The houri and the angel are captives of my  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
imaginations— 
My glance ruffles Your Manifestations.  2 
My quest is the architect of the Mosque and  If the stars have strayed— 
the idol‐house,  To whom do the heavens belong, You or Me? 
Though my song causes tumult both in the  Why must I worry about the world— 
Ka‘bah and Somnath.  To whom does this world belong, You or Me? 

My sharp vision pierced through the core of  If the Placeless Realm 
existence;  Offers no lively scenes of passion and 
Confounded by my illusions at yet another time.  longing, 
Whose fault is that, my Lord?— 
Oh what a rash deed that You did not leave 
Does that realm belong to You or to me? 
me hidden: 
I was the only secret in the conscience of the  On the morning of eternity he dared to say 
universe!  ʹNoʹ, 
But how would I know why— 
[Translated by the Editors] 
Is he Your confidant, or is he mine? 
250  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Muhammad is Yours,  * 
Gabriel is Yours, 
Make our hearts the seats of mercy and love, 
The Qurʹan is Yours— 
And make them in Thy thought for ever 
But this discourse, 
move; 
This exposition in melodious tunes, 
Give the invincible power of Ali the brave, 
Is it Yours or is it mine? 
To one whom gavest Thou poor means to live. 
Your world is illuminated 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
By the radiance of the same star 
Whose loss was the fall of Adam, that  4 
creature of earth, 
Whether or not it moves you, 
Was it Yours or mine? 
At least listen to my complaint— 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir]  It is not redress this free spirit seeks. 

3  This handful of dust, 
This fiercely blowing wind, 
Bright are Your tresses: brighten them even 
And these vast, limitless heavens— 
more: 
Is the delight You take in creation 
Ravish the senses and the mind, ravish the 
A blessing or some wanton joke? 
heart and the eyes. 
The tent of the rose could not withstand 
Love concealed, and beauty too! 
The wind blowing through the garden: 
Reveal Yourself to me, or reveal me to myself. 
Is this the spring season, 
You are the limitless ocean and I am but a tiny  And this the auspicious wind? 
rivulet— 
I am at fault, and in a foreign land, 
Either make Your peer or turn me limitless at 
But the angels never could make habitable 
least. 
That wasteland of yours. 
If I am a mother‐of‐pearl, the lustre of my 
That stark wilderness, 
pearl is in Your hands, 
That insubstantial world of Yours 
But if I am a piece of brick, give me a 
Gratefully remembers my love of hardship. 
diamond’s sheen. 
An adventurous spirit is ill at ease 
If I am not destined to sing at the advent of 
In a garden where no hunter lies in ambush. 
Spring, 
Make this half‐enraptured breath a skylark of  The station of love is beyond the reach of 
the Spring.  Your angels, 
Only those of dauntless courage are up to it. 
Why did You order me to quit the Garden of 
Eden?—  * 
Now there is much to be done here—so just  Give to the youth my sighs of dawn; 
wait for me!  Give wings to these eaglets again, 
When the roll of my deeds is brought up on  This, dear Lord, is my only wish— 
the Day of Reckoning,   That my insights should be shared by all! 
Be ashamed as You will shame me.  [Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
[Translated by the Editors]  
1

                                                                                                                                               
1 Based on partial translations by Annemarie  Poet of Tomorrow edited by Khawaja Abdur Rahim; 
Schimmel and Sayyad Fayyaz Mahmood in Iqbal:  and Naim Siddiqui in Baal‐i‐Jibreel.  
Gabriel’s Wing 251 

5  To moon may wax with fuller light. 

What avails love when life is so ephemeral?  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
What avails a mortal’s love for the immortal?  * 
Love that is snuffed out by death’s passing  Thy world the fish’s and the winged thing’s 
blast  bower; 
Love without the pain, the passion that  My world a crying of the sunrise hour; 
consumes?  In Thy world I am helpless and a slave; 
A flickering spark I am, aglow for a fleeting  In my world is Thy kingdom and Thy power. 
glance 

Flow vain for a flickering spark to chase an 
Contrary runs our planet, the stars whirl fast, 
eternal flame! 
oh Saki! 
Grant me the bliss of eternal life, O Lord,  In every atom’s heartbeat a Doomsday blast, 
And mine will be the ecstasy of eternal love.  oh Saki! 
Give me the pleasure of an everlasting pain  Torn from God’s congregation its dower of 
An agony that lacerates my soul for ever.  faith and reason, 
And godlessness in fatal allurement dressed, 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
oh Saki! 
6  For our inveterate sickness, our wavering 
My scattered dust charged with Love  heart, the cure— 
The shape of heart may take at last:  That same joy‐dropping nectar as in the past, 
O God, the grief that bowed me then  oh Saki. 
May press me down as in the past!  Within Islam’s cold temple no fire of longing 
The Maids of Eden by their charm  stirs, 
May arouse my urge for song:  For still your face is hidden, veiled and un‐
The flame of Love that burns in me,  guessed, oh Saki. 
May fire the zeal of Celestial Throng!  Unchanged is Persia’s garden: soil, stream, 
The pilgrim’s mind can dwell at times  Tabriz, unchanged; 
On spots and stages left behind:  And yet with no new Rumi is her land graced, 
My heed for spots and places crossed,  oh Saki. 
From the Quest may turn my mind!  But of his barren acres Iqbal will not despair: 
A little rain, and harvests shall wave at last, 
By the mighty force of Love 
oh Saki! 
I am turned to Boundless Deep: 
On me, a beggar, secrets of empire are 
I fear that my self‐regard, 
bestowed; 
Me, for aye, on shore may keep! 
My songs are worth the treasures Parvez 
My hectic search for aim and end,  amassed, oh Saki. 
In life that smell and hue doth lack, 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
May get renown like lover’s tale, 
Who riding went on litter’s track!  * 
Due to Thy benevolence, I am not without 
The rise of clay‐born man hath smit 
merit, 
The hosts of heaven with utter fright: 
However, I am not a slave to a Tughral or a 
They dread that this fallen star 
Sanjar; 
It is my nature to see the world as it is; 
252  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

But, in no case, am I the Cup of any Jamshid!  My flagon small is blessing great, 
For the age athirst and dry: 
[Translated by A. Anwar Beg] 
In the cells where mystics swell 
8  Big empty gourds are lying by. 

Set out once more that cup, that wine, oh  In love a novice I am yet, 
Saki—  Much good for you to keep apart, 
Let my true place at last be mine, oh Saki!  For my glance is restive more 
Than my wild and untam’d heart. 
Three centuries India’s wine‐shops have been 
closed,  The dark unfathomed caves of sea, 
And now for your largesse we pine, oh Saki;  Hold gems of purest ray serene: 
The gems retain in midst of brine 
My flask of poetry held the last few drops— 
Their essence bright and clean. 
Unlawful, says our crabb’d devine, oh Saki. 
Through the poet’s quickening gaze 
Truth’s forest hides no lion‐hearts now: men 
The rose and tulip lovelier seem: 
grovel 
No doubt, the minstrel’s piercing glance 
Before the priest, or the saint’s shrine, oh Saki. 
Is nothing less than magic gleam. 
Who has borne off Love’s valiant sword? 
 [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
About 
An empty scabbard Wisdom’s hands twine,  * 
oh Saki.  At times, Love is a wanderer who has no 
Verse lights up life, while heart burns bright,  home, 
but fades  And at times it is Noshervan, the King of 
For ever when those rays decline, oh Saki;  Kings: 
At times it comes to the battlefield in full 
Bereave not of its moon my night; I see 
armor, 
A full moon in your goblet shine, oh Saki!  
And at times naked and weaponless. 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
[Translated by the Editors] 

10 
He is the essence of the Space as well as the 
Placeless Realm—  Slow fire of longing—wealth beyond 
And Space is nothing but a figure of speech:  compare; 
How could Khizer tell, and what,  I will not change my prayer‐mat for Heaven’s 
If the fish were to ask, “Where is the water?”  chair! 

[Translated by the Editors]  Ill fits this world of Your freemen, ill the next: 
Death’s hard yoke frets them here, life’s hard 
9  yoke there. 
My Saki made me drink the wine  Close veils inflame the loiterer in Love’s lane; 
Of There is no god but He:  Your long reluctance fans my passion’s flare. 
From the illusive world of sense, 
The hawk lives out his days in rocks and 
This cup divine has set me free. 
desert, 
Now I find no charm or grace  Tame nest‐twig‐carrying his proud claws 
In song and ale, or harp and lute:  forswear. 
To me appeal the tulips wild, 
The riverside and mountains mute. 
Gabriel’s Wing 253 

Was it book‐lesson, or father’s glance, that  * 
taught 
Grant me the absorption of the souls of the 
The son of Abraham what son should bear? 
past, 
Bold hearts, firm souls, come pilgrim to my  And let me be of those who never grieve; 
tomb;  The riddles of reason I have solved, but now, 
I taught poor dust to tower hill‐high in air.  O Lord! Give me a life of ecstasy. 
Truth has no need of me for tiring‐maid;  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
To stain the tulip red is Nature’s care. 
12 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  By dint of Spring the poppy‐cup, 
*  With vintage red is over‐flown: 
With her advent the hermit too 
Love, sometimes, is the solitude of Nature;  Temperance to the wind hath thrown. 
It is, sometime, merrymaking and company‐
seeking:  When great and mighty force of Love 
Sometime the legacy of the mosque and the  At some place its flag doth raise, 
pulpit,  Beggars dressed in rags and sack 
Sometime Lord Ali the Vanquisher of the  Become heirs true to King Parvez. 
Khyber!  Antique the stars and old the dome 
[Translated by the Editors]  In which they roam about and move: 
I long for new and virgin soil 
11  Where my mettle I may prove. 
Have You forgotten then my heart of old,  The stir and roar of Judgement Day 
That college of Love, that whip that bright  Hath no dread for me at all: 
eyes hold?  Thine roving glance doth work on me 
The school‐bred demi‐goddesses of this age  Like the Last Day’s Trumpet Call. 
Lack the carved grace of the old pagan mold!  Snatch not from me the blessing great 
This is a strange world, neither cage nor nest,  Of sighs heaved at early morn: 
With no calm nook in all its spacious fold.  With a casual loving look 
Weaken not thine fierce scorn. 
The vine awaits Your bounteous rain: no 
more  My sad and broken heart disdains 
Is the Magian wine in Persia’s taverns sold.  The Spring and dower that she brings: 
Too joyous the song of nightingale! 
My comrades thought my song were of  I feel more gloomy when it sings. 
Spring’s kindling— 
How should they know what in Love’s notes  Unwise are those who tell and preach 
is told?  Accord with times and the age. 
If the world befits you not, 
Out of my flesh and blood You made this  A war against it you must wage. 
earth; 
Its quenchless fever the martyr’s crown of  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
gold.  * 
My days supported by Your alms, I do not  The subtle point that life would not end with 
Complain against my friends, or the times  the death of the body 
scold.  I learnt from Abul Hasan 1: 
                                                           
[Translated by Victor Kiernan]  1  Abul Hasan Ash‘ari. 
254  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

The un, if it would hate its beam  14 
Will lose all its brilliance. 
Methought my racing field lay under the 
[Translated by Muhammad Munawwar Mirza]  skies, 
This plaything of water and clay, I regarded 
13 
as my world; 
Mine ill luck the same and same, 
Thy unveiling broke the spell of searching 
O Lord, the coldness on Your part: 
glances, 
No useful aim has been served, 
I mistook this blue vault for Heaven. 
By skill in poetic art. 
The Sun, the Moon, the Stars, methought, 
Where am I and where are You,  would keep me company, 
Is the world a fact or naught?  Fatigued, they dropped out in the twists and 
Does this world to me belong,  turns of space: 
Or is a wonder by You wrought?  One leap by Love ended all the pother, 
The precious moments of my life,  I fondly imagined, the earth and sky were 
One by one have been snatched:  boundless. 
But still the conflict racks my brain,  What I esteemed as the clarion call of the 
If heart and head are ever matched.  caravan, 
Was but the plaintive cry of a traveller, weary 
A hawk forgetful of its breed,  and forlorn. 
Upbrought and fed in midst of kites, 
Knows not the wont and ways of hawks,   [Translated by S.A. Rahman 1] 
And cannot soar to mighty heights.  * 
For song no tongue is set apart,  To be God is to have charge of land and sea; 
No claim to tongues is laid by me:  Being God is nothing but a headache!
What matters is a dainty song,  But being a servant of God? God forbid!
No matter what its language be.  That is no headache—it is a heartache! 
Faqr and Kingship are akin,  [Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
Though at odds may these appear: 
One wins the heart with single glance,  15 
The other rules with sword and spear.  Reason is either luminous, or it seeks proofs; 
Some have left the caravan train,  Proof‐seeking reason is but an excess of 
And some on Ka‘bah turn their back;  wonder. 
For leaders of the Faithful Band,  Thine alone is what I possess in this handful 
Winsome mode and manners lack.  of dust; 
[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah]  And to keep it safe is beyond my power, O 
Lord! 

My songs of lament were all inspired by Thee; 
This reason of mine knows not good from  If they have reached the stars, it is no fault of 
evil;  mine. 
And tries to exceed the bounds that nature 
fixed; 
I know not what has happened to me of late, 
My reason and my heart are ever at war.                                                             
1
 Quoted in ‘Chughtai and Iqbal’ by Arif Rahman 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Chughtai in Iqbal: Commemorative Volume edited by 
Ali Sardar Jafri and K.S. Duggal  
Gabriel’s Wing 255 

Art Thou pleased, O Lord, with man’s  Your paradise no‐one has seen: in Europe 
imperfection?  No village but with paradise can view. 
Why repeat a flawed attempt, and make his 
Long, long have my thoughts wandered 
shame eternal? 
about heaven; 
The Western ways have tried to make me a  Now in the moon’s blind caverns let them sty! 
renegade; 
I, dowered by Nature with empyreal essence, 
But why are our mullahs a disgrace to 
Am dust—but not through dust does my way 
Muslims? 
lie; 
Fools think man is a bondman of destiny; 
Nor East, nor west my home, nor Samarkand, 
But man has still the power to break the 
Nor Ispahan nor Delhi; in ecstasy, 
bonds of fate. 
God‐filled, I roam, speaking what truth I 
Thou hast Thy pantheon, and I have mine, O 
see— 
Lord!  
No fool for priests, nor yet of this age’s fry. 
Both have idols of dust; both have idols that 
die.  My folk berate me, the stranger does not love 
me: 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Hemlock for sherbet I could never cry; 

How could a weigher of truth see Mount 
This Adam—is he the sovereign of land and  Damawand 
sea?   And think a common refuse‐heap as high? 
What can I say about such an incompetent 
In Nimrod’s fire faith’s silent witness, not 
being!  
Like mustard‐seed in the grate, burned 
He is not able to see anything—himself, God, 
splutteringly— 
or the world!  
Is this the masterpiece of Your art?  Blood warm, gaze keen, right‐following, 
wrong‐forswearing, 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
In fetters free, prosperous in penury, 
16  In fair of foul untamed and light of heart— 
Lovely, oh Lord, this fleeting world; but why  Who can steal laughter from a flower’s bright 
Must the frank heart, the quick brain, droop  eye? 
and sigh?  —Will no one hush this too proud thing Iqbal 
Whose tongue God’s presence‐chamber could 
Though usury mingle somewhat with his  not tie! 
godship, 
The white man is the world’s arch‐deity;  [Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 

His asses graze in fields of rose and poppy:  1 1 
One wisp of hay to genius You deny; 
In November, 1933, His Majesty the Leader 
His Church abounds with roasts and ruby  of  the  Faithful  the  now‐martyred  Nadir 
wines:  Shah  Ghazi  granted  the  author  permission 
Sermons and saws are all Your mosques  to  visit  the  shrine  of  The  sage  Sana‘i  of 
supply.                                                             
1 The numbering of poems in Gabriel’s Wing starts 
Your laws are just, but their expositors 
again after 16. The only plausible explanation is 
Bedevil the Koran, twist it awry;  that it marks a new section—while God was 
addressed in the previous section, the addressee 
here will be the humanity.  
256  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Ghazna.  These  verses  were  written  in  Subdued by the dexterous fiddler’s chords 


commemoration of the event, in imitation of  there murmurs 
a  famous  panegyric  by  the  poet—‘We  are  In the lowest string the wail of Europe’s 
coming after Sina‘i and Attar.’  woe— 
All Nature’s vastness cannot contain you, oh  Her waters that have bred the shark now 
My madness: vain, those wanderings to and  breed 
fro  The storm‐wave that will smash its den 
below! 
In deserts! By selfhood only are the spells 
Of sense broken,— that power we did not  Slavery—exile from the love of beauty: 
know.  Beauty—whatever free men reckon so; 
Rub your eyes, sluggard! Light is Nature’s  Trust no slave’s eyes, clear sight and liberty 
law,  Go hand in hand. His own resolves bestow 
And not unknown to Ocean its waves flow. 
The empire of To‐day on him who fishes 
Where reason and revelation war, faith errs  To‐morrow’s pearl up from Time’s undertow. 
To think the Mystic on his cross its foe, 
The Frankish glassblowers’ arts can make 
For God’s pure souls, in thralldom or on  stone run: 
thrones,  My alchemy makes glass flint‐hard. Pharaoh 
Have one safe shield, his scorn of this world’s 
Plotted and plots against me; but what harm? 
show. 
Heaven lifts my hand, like Moses’, white as 
But do not, Gabriel, envy my rapture: better  snow; 
For Heaven’s dounce folk the prayer and the 
Earth’s rubbish‐heaps can never quell this 
beads’ neat row! 
spark 
*  God struck to light whole deserts, His 
flambeau! 
I have seen many a wine‐shop East and West; 
But here no Saki, there in the grape no glow.  Love, self‐beholding, self‐sustaining, stands 
Un‐awed at the gates of Caesar or Khosro; 
In Iran no more, in Tartary no more, 
Those world‐renouncers who could  If moon or Pleiades fall my prey, what 
overthrow  wonder— 
Myself bound fast to the Prophet’s saddle‐bow! 
Great kings; the Prophet’s heir filches and 
sells  He—Guide, Last Envoy, Lord of All—lent 
The blankets of the Prophet’s kin. When to  brightness 
Of Sinai to our dust; Love’s eyes, not slow 
The Lord I was denounced for crying 
Doomsday  To kindle, hail him Alpha and Omega, 
Too soon, by that Archangel who must blow  Chapter, and Word, and Book. I would not go 
Its trumpet, God made answer—Is Doomsday  Pearl‐diving there, for reverence of Sina‘i; 
far  But in these tides a million pearls still grow. 
When Makkah sleeps while China worships?—
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
Though  
The bowl of faith finds none to pour, the 

beaker  Who is this composer of ghazals, who is 
Of modern thought brims with the wine of  burningly passionate and cheerful?  
No. 
Gabriel’s Wing 257 

He makes the thoughts of the wise full of  God mighty will that I 
madness.  Beside myself should be. 
Although poverty also has royal  I neither like nor claim 
characteristics,   Plato’s thought or Croesus’ gold: 
Kingship is only half complete without a  Clean conscience, lofty gaze 
kingdom.  And zeal is all I hold. 
Now in the cell of the Sufi, the same poverty  By Holy Prophet’s Ascent 
has not remained—  This truth to me was taught, 
The poverty whose charter is written in the  Within the reach of man 
blood of the hearts of lions.  High heavens can be brought. 
Ah circle of dervishes, see how the man of  The Life perhaps is still 
God is,  Raw and incomplete: 
In whose collar is the tumult of Judgement’s  Be and it becomes 
Day—  E’er doth a voice repeat. 
—who is as bright as a flame by the heat of  The West hath cast a spell 
repetition of God’s name;   On thine heart and mind: 
Who is quicker than the lightning by the  In Rumi’s burning flame 
swiftness of his thought.  A cure for thyself find. 
Kingship gives rise to signs of madness—  Through his bounty great 
They are the scalpels of Allah, be they Taimur  My vision shines and glows, 
of Genghis.  And mighty Oxus too 
In my pitcher flows. 
Thus Iraq and Persia give me praise for my verse:  
This Indian infidels sheds blood without  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
swords or spears. 1 

[Translated by D.J. Matthews] 
Fabric of earth and wind and wave! 
3  Who is the secret, you or I, 
The breath of Gabriel 
Brought into light? Or who the dark 
If God on me bestow, 
world of what hides yet, you or I? 
I may in words express 
What Love has made me know.  Here in this night of grief and pain, 
trouble and toil, that men call life, 
How can the stars foretell 
What future holds in store?  Who is the dawn, or who dawn’s prayer 
They roam perplex’d and mean  cried from the minaret, you or I? 
In skies that have no shore.  Who is the load that Time and Space 
To fix one’s mind and gaze  bear on their shoulder? Who the prize 
On goal is life, in fact:  Run for with fiery feet by swift 
To ego’s death to lead  daybreak and sunset, you or I? 
The thoughts that mind distract. 
You are a pinch of dust and blind, 
How strange! The bliss of self  I am a pinch of dust that feels; 
Having bestowed on me, 
Through the dry land, Existence, who 
                                                           
1 We have slightly altered Matthews’ translated  flows like a streamlet, you or I? 
line to bring it closer to the original. 
258  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  The soul that knows no stain 
Is something quite discreet: 
5  The glow and tint of blood 
(Written in London)  Is wrought by bread and meat. 

Thou art yet region‐bound,    [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
Transcend the limits of space; 

Transcend the narrow climes 
Of the East and the West.  Hill and vale once more under the poppy’s 
lamps are bright, 
For selfless deeds of men 
In my heart the nightingale has set new songs 
Rewards are less mundane; 
alight; 
Transcend the houris’ glances, 
The pure, celestial wine.  Violet, violet, azure, azure, golden, golden, 
mantles— 
Ravishing in its power 
Flowers, or fairies of the desert, rank on rank 
Is beauty in the West; 
in sight? 
Thou bird of paradise, 
Resist this earthly trap.  On the rosy‐spray dawn’s soft breeze has left 
a pearl of dew, 
With a mountain‐cleaving assault, 
Now the sunbeam turns this gem a yet more 
Bridging the East and West, 
glittering white. 
Despise all defences, 
And become a sheathless sword.  Town or woodland, which is sweeter, if for 
her unveiling 
Thy imam is unabsorbed, 
Careless beauty love towns less than where 
Thy prayer is uninspired, 
green woods invite? 
Forsake an imam like him, 
Forsake a prayer like this.  Delve into your soul and there seek our life’s 
buried tracks; 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Will you not be mine? then be not mine, be 
6  your own right! 
The free by dint of faqr  World of soul—the world of fire and ecstasy 
Life’s secrets can disclose:  and longing: 
With Gabriel faqr is bound  World of sense—the world of gain that fraud 
By ties of kinship close.  and cunning blight; 
The scholar, mystic and  Treasure of the soul once won is never lost 
The bard, by thinking wrong,  again: 
Many a bark have sunk,  Treasure gold, a shadow—wealth soon comes 
That was sound and strong.  and soon takes flight. 
You need a burning glance  In the spirit’s world I have not seen a white 
That cows down lions bold:  man’s Raj, 
Only the sheep and goats  In that world I have not seen Hindu and 
Heave sighs deep and cold.  Muslim fight. 
Love’s physician scanned my face  Shame and shame that hermit’s saying pouted 
And thus he did bespeak,  on me—you forfeit 
“You have no ailment, but  Body and soul alike if once you cringe to 
Your zeal is faint and weak.”  another’s might! 
Gabriel’s Wing 259 

[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  Free heart lends kingly state, 
To belly death is due: 
8  Decide which of the two 
(Written in Kabul)  Is better in your view. 

Muslims are born with a gift to charm, to  O Muslim, search your heart, 
persuade;  Of mullah don’t ask it, 
Brave men—they are endowed with a noble  “The sacred House of God, 
courtesy.  The righteous why have quit?” 

Slaves of custom are all the schools of old;  10 
They teach the eaglet to grovel in the dust.  Of passion’s glow your heart is blank, 
These victims of the past have seen the dawn  Your glances are not chaste and frank: 
of hope,  To wonder at then there is naught 
When I revealed to them the eagle’s ways.  That bold and dauntless you are not. 

The man of God knows but two words of  A longing strong for God’s display, 
faith;  Is also hid in self‐same clay: 
The scholar has tomes of knowledge old and  O heedless man, let this be known, 
new.  Brains alone you do not own. 

About wine and women I know not how to  The eye whose light and luster rest 
write;  On collyrium brought from West: 
Ask not a stone‐breaker to work on glass.  Is full of art, conceit and show, 
It gets not wet at others’ woe. 
O Iqbal! From where did you learn to be such 
a dervish: 1  How can the priest and monk assess 
Even among the kings there is talk about your  The height of craze that I possess? 
contentment!  still sound the hems of robes they wear, 
Which have no rifts and know no tear. 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
How long the stars shall hold their sway 
9  On fate of man, sprung from clay? 
Either bereft of life I drop, 
Through Love the song of Life 
Or the Wheel of Fate must stop. 
Begets its rhythmic flow: 
From Love the shapes of clay  Lightning I am and keep my eye 
Derive an endless glow.  On waste and hill that reach the sky: 
Heaps of straw and mounds of dust, 
Love makes its way to all 
Too low they are, avoid I must. 
The pores in human flesh, 
Like dewy wind of morn  That godly man gets world’s bequest, 
That makes the rose twig fresh.  Who risks his life in ceaseless quest: 
That man no Faith can claim at all 
If man denies his God, 
Who lives not up to Prophet’s call. 
On kings he has to fawn: 
By trust in God, the kings  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
To his door are drawn. 
11 
                                                            A host of peril though you face, 
1 The last two lines, “O Iqbal!… your contentment!”  Yet your tongue with heart ally: 
have been provided by the editors, since the  From times antique and hoar 
translator had left them out. 
260  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Qalandars on this mode rely.  [Translated by the Editors] 
Men congregate in numbers large  13 
In the mart where wine is sold, 
For polite and courteous seems  (Written in Cordoba) 
The Head of Mart, the Magian Old.  These Western nymphs 
Though the points by Razi touched  A challenge to the eye and the heart, 
May be subtle and profound,  Are bold of glance, 
Yet against infirm belief  In a paradise of instant bliss. 
No cure in them is ever found.  Thy heart is a wavering ship, 
The disciple blind shed copious tears,  Tossed by beauty’s assault 
Of sinful life he felt contrite.  These moons and stars that glisten, 
May God aid the shaykh as well  Are whirlpools in thy sea. 
To feel ashamed and do the right!  The warblings of the harp and lyre, 
Man is bound still hand and foot  Have wondrous powers— 
In chains by this talisman old,  Powers that cannot be captured 
For idols of the age of past  In the world of sound. 
Still men within their armpits hold.  By teaching him the monastic wont and way, 
Enough for me that I affirm  The Sufi has led astray the jurist of the town. 1 
With tongue alone my faith and creed:  The prostration that once 
A thousand thanks for mullah’s claim  Shook the earth’s soul, 
That he with heart avows, indeed.  Now leaves not a trace 
As good as Muslim’s true belief,  On the mosque’s decadent walls. 
If blessed with Love, unfaith is eke:  I have not heard in the Arab world 
Bereft of Love a Muslim true  The thunderous call 
Is no better than Zindiq.  The call to prayer that pierced 
[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah]  The hearts of hills in the past. 
O Cordoba! Perhaps 
12 
Some magic in thy air 
Rely on the witness of the phenomenal world  Has breathed into my song 
To know whether you are on the mark or  The buoyancy of youth. 
have gone astray: 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Neither kingship nor poverty for a Muslim 
who lacks in faith, 
14 
The one who has it is a king even if he be  A heart awake to man imparts 
poor.  Umar’s brains and Hyder’s manly parts: 
He depends on the sword if he lacks in faith:  If watchful heart a man may hold, 
If he has faith he may need no weapons in the  His dross is changed to sterling gold. 
fight.  Beget a heart alive and sound, 
 A Muslim without faith yields to what his  For, if it be in slumber bound, 
fate ordains;  You cannot strike a deadly blow, 
With faith, he is destiny incarnate.                                                             
1 The two lines, “By teaching him…the jurist of the 
I revealed the secrets and rent the veil,  town,” have been provided by the editors since the 
But your blindness has no cure.  translator had left them out. 
Gabriel’s Wing 261 

Nor even I can daring show.  15 
If sense of smell be full and stunted,  in the coquetry and fierceness of the self there 
The musk‐deer never can be hunted:  is no pride, there are no airs. Even if there 
If bereft of sense of smelling true,  are airs, then they are not without the 
Surmise and guess can yield no clue.  pleasure of submission. 
My sighs no more I can withhold,  The eye of love is in search of the living heart; 
When Muslims’ sloth I do behold:  hunting for carrion does not befit up to the 
If Muslims do not mend their way,  royal hawk. 
Magians their luck might steal away. 
In my song there is no charming and romantic 
These simple thralls of Yours, O Lord,  grace, for the blast of the trumpet of Israfil is 
From every house and door are barred:  not meant to please the heart. 
For kings, no less the acolytes, 
Are fraudulent and hypocrites.  I will not ask for wine from the Frank, saki, 
for this is not the way of the pure‐hearted 
The freedom that this age does grant  profligates. 
Does ever freedom’s essence want: 
Though freedom seems to outward sight,  The rule of love has never been widespread in 
Yet is no less than prison tight.  the world. The reason is this—that love is no 
time‐server. 
O Lord of Yathrib! Cure provide 
For doubts that in my breast abide:  One continual anxiety—whether absent or 
My wisdom to the West is due,  present! If I tell it myself, my story is not 
Girdled my faith like Brahman true.  long. 

[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah]  If you desire then read the Persian Psalms 1 in 


seclusion; the midnight lament is not bereft 
of secrets. 
[Translated by D.J. Matthews] 

16 
A recreant captain, a battle‐line thrown back, 
The arrow hanging target‐less and slack! 
Nowhere near you that shell which holds 
life’s pearl; 
I have dragged the waves and searched the 
ocean’s track. 
Plunge in your self, on idols dote no more, 
Pour our no more heart’s blood for paint to 
deck 
Their shrines. I unveil the courts of Love and 
Death: 
Death—life dishonoured; Love—death for 
honour’s sake. 

                                                           
1 We have changed the translator’s ‘Psalms of 
Persia’ to the more widely known title of the book. 
262  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

I gleaned in Rumi’s company: one bold heart  How can you catch this truth again, 
Is worth of learned heads the whole tame pack;  With bias if your mind be fraught? 
Once more that voice from Sinai’s tree would cry  One is the outward form of faith, 
Fear not! if some new Moses led the attack.  The other its spirit deep and true: 
He, who quaffs its spirits deep, 
No glitter of Western science could dazzle my 
Brings secrets hidden to his view. 
eyes 
The dust of Medina stains, like collyrium,  O pilgrim wise, who tread the [ath, 
black.  If passion strong for faith you lack, 
The bough of faith shall whither fast, 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
Obscure and dim become the path. 
17  Courage and valour are the signs 
(Written in Europe)  By which the state of Love is known: 
Not every zeal is pert and rude, 
At London, winter wind, like sword, was 
Nor daring by ev’ry person shown. 
biting though, 
My wont to rise at early morn I didn’t forego.  On the Day of Judgement too 
My frenzy will not let me rest: 
At times my heated talk to gathering pleasure 
With Mighty God I shall contend 
lent; 
Or rend to fragments my own vest. 
My holding ’loof at times perplexed them all, 
I trow.  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 

No hope for change is there, if workers rule  19 
the land, 
The way to renounce is 
For those who hew the rocks, like Parvez 
To conquer the earth and heaven; 
tricks do know. 
The way to renounce is not 
Statecraft divorced from Faith to reign of  To starve oneself to death. 
terror leads, 
O cultists! I like not 
Though it be a monarch’s rule or Commoners’ 
Your austere piety; 
Show. 
Your piety is penury, 
The streets of Rome remind of Delhi’s  Suffering and grief. 
glorious past, 
A nation that has lost 
The lesson same and charm are writ upon its 
Taimur’s great heritage, 
brow. 
Is unfit for piety, 
18  And is unfit to rule. 

The ancient fane in which we live  If the sweet cup‐bearer 
Has heaps of thorns at every turn;  Listens not to me, it is good; 
Too hard to cross it safe and sound  When I say, “no more,” 
Without the aid of sighs that burn.  That will only bring me more. 

The tale of quarry shot by Love  The Sufi and his peers 
Is simple, brief and not too long:  Are all engrossed in a glimpse; 
The victim feels the joy of prick  They know not that concealment 
And then the rest of saddle thong.  Is itself a vision. 

The sterling truth to Muslim taught,  Bondage is freedom 
In feuds of different sects is lost;  With favours from on high, 
Gabriel’s Wing 263 

And when favours are withheld,  Your rank and state cannot be told 
Even freedom is bondage.  By one who reads the stars: 
You are living dust, in sooth, 
The West is a treasure‐house 
Not ruled by Moon or Mars. 
For the reason’s quest; 
But for the heart it is  The maids of Ed’n and Gabriel eke 
A source of decay and death.  In this world can be found, 
But, alas! You lack as yet 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Glances bold and zeal profound. 
20  My craze has judged aright the bent 
Though reason to the portal guide,  Of times wherein I am born: 
Yet entry to it is denied.  Love be thanked for granting me 
Beg God to grant a lighted heart,  The gown entire and untorn. 
For light and sight are things apart.  Spite of Nature’s bounty great, 
Though knowledge lends to mind a glow,  Its guarding practice, mark! 
No houris its Eden can ever show.  It grants the ruby reddish hue, 
But denies the heat of spark. 
How strange that in the present time 
No one owns the joy sublime!  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 

Some passions leave the mind intact,  22 
While others make it blind to fact. 
The morning breeze has whispered to me a 
The heart from unrest gets its life,  secret, 
What pity if it knows no strife!  That those who know their selfhood, are 
You die because from God you flee,  equal to kings. 
If living, linked with God shall be.  Selfhood is the essence of thy life and honour, 
The pearls have all their covering cleft,  Thou shalt rule with it, but without it be in 
Of urge to show you are bereft.  disgrace. 

Show unto me, though I too cry,  Thou hast not led my way, O man of wisdom! 
It is not tale of Moses and Sinai.  But why, complain? Thou knowest not the 
way. 
21 
Fakirs who know the wont and way of kings 
The self of man is ocean vast,  Are as yet being trained in my literary circle. 1 
And knows no depth or bound: 
Thy monastic cult is a strait and narrow path, 
If you take it for a stream, 
Which I like not, but thy freedom I respect. 
How can your mind be sound? 
This world of inferior prey is meant to 
The magic of this whirling dome 
sharpen thy claws, 
We can set at naught: 
Thou art an eagle‐hunter, but art a novice yet. 
Not of stone but of glass 
Its building has been wrought.  Whether thou art in the East or West, thy faith 
Is meaningless, unless thy heart affirms it. 
In Holy Trance in self we drown, 
And up we rise again; 
But how a worthless man can show                                                             
So much might and main?  1 Two lines, “Fakirs who know…my literary 
circle,” have been provided by the editors since the 
translator had left them out. 
264  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

23  Though blood in veins may race, 
To Life it lends no grace: 
Thy vision and thy hands are chained, earth‐ Only the glow of heart 
bound,  To Life can zeal impart. 
Is it thy nature’s fault, or of the thought too 
high?  Wherefore, O Tulip Bride, 
From me your charms you hide? 
The schoolmen have strangled thy nascent  I am the breath of morn, 
soul,  Your face I would adorn. 
And stifled the voice of passionate faith in 
thee.  What Frankish dealers take 
For counterfeit and fake, 
Absorb thyself in selfhood, seek the path of  Is true and real art— 
God,  Not valued in their Mart. 
This is the only way for thee to find freedom. 
Though indigent I be, 
Ask an unclad dervish what the heart doth  I am of hand yet free: 
say,  What can the Flame bestow 
May God show thee thy place in the world of  Except its spark and glow? 
men. 
25 
If bare‐headed, have a towering will, 
The splendour of a monarch great 
The crown is not for thee, but for the eagle 
Is worthless for the free and bold: 
alone. 
Where lies the grandeur of a king, 
When thou losest selfhood, thou losest power,  Whose riches rest on borrowed gold? 
too; 
You pin your faith on idols vain 
Blame not the stars and fate for thy fall. 
And turn your back on Mighty God: 
Monasteries and schools left me sad and  If this is not unbelief and sin, 
dejected,  What else is unbelief and fraud? 
No life and no love; no vision and no 
Luck favours the fool and the mean, 
knowledge. 
And exalts and lifts to the skies 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui]  Only those who are base and low 
And know not how to patronize. 
24 
One look from the eyes of the Fair 
The mind can give you naught, 
Can make a conquest of the heart: 
But what with doubt is fraught: 
There is no charm in the fair sweet, 
One look of Saintly Guide 
If it lacks this alluring art. 
Can needful cure provide. 
I am a target for the hate 
The goal that you presume 
Of the mighty rich and the great, 
Is far and out of view: 
As I know the end of Caesars great 
What else can be this life 
And know the freaks of luck or fate. 
But zeal for endless strife? 
To be a person great and strong 
Much worth the pearl begets, 
Is the end and aim of all; 
For guard on self it sets: 
But that rank is not real and true 
What else in pearl is found 
That is attained by the ego’s fall. 
Except its sheen profound? 
My bold and simple mode of life 
Has captured each and every heart; 
Gabriel’s Wing 265 

Though my numbers are lame and dull  The gist of all Gnostic knowledge is merely 
And lay no claim to poet’s art.  this: 
That life is an arrow spent and yet from the 
[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
bow it is not too far! 
26  Your station lies a little ahead of all the stars 
You are neither for the earth nor for the  and Pleiades: 
heaven:  Move on, for it is not a long way from the 
The world is for you, and not you for the  skies.  
world.  Lest he asks the guide to let him be! 
The sparks Reason and Heart are shed of the  —It would be no surprise from a traveller 
flame of Love:  who thinks too much. 
That one to burn the straw, this one for  [Translated by the Editors] 
burning the field of reeds. 
28 
This garden is for painful strains: 
Neither for enjoying the roses nor for making  (Written in Europe) 
a nest. 
My mind on me bestowed a thinker’s gaze, 
How long, while your ship remains in Ravi,  From Love I learnt a toper’s wont and ways. 
Nile and Euphrates? 
No wine, no flask, no goblet goes around, 
—When it is meant for the Ocean, which 
Sweet looks to banquet lend its hue and 
knows no bounds. 
sound. 
Once who were beacons to the brightest stars, 
Take not my rhymes for poet’s art, 
Have long been awaiting a guide to show 
I know the secrets of wine‐seller’s mart. 
them the way now. 
Behold the bud athirst for breath of Morn, 
High ambition, winsome speech, a passionate 
It tells the story of my heart forlorn. 
soul— 
This is all the luggage for a leader of the  Know not, absence or presence if it be, 
Caravan.  I am the alien here, all others free. 

It was a plain and simple truth but the  My stay in West I may prolong a bit, 
imagination of the Persian mind  My frenzy if this desert will admit. 
Has confounded it with the poetic license.  The stage of mind by Iqbal soon was crost, 
I am saving a song for the Placeless Realm—  But in the Vale of Love this sage was lost. 
A song that could shake even the trusty  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
Gabriel. 
29 
27  From the heavens comes an answer to our 
O Prisoner of Space! You are not far from the  long cries at last: 
Placeless Realm—  The heavens break their silence, the curtains 
That Audience Hall is not far away from your  rise at last! 
planet.  Little of change love’s fortunes inherit: born in 
Grieve not, for a meadow that faces no threat  anguish 
from the Autumn,  And fire, in fire and anguish its end it buys at 
Is not far away from your nest.  last. 
266  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

The destiny of nations I chart for you: at first  I know our priesthood, 
The sword and spear; the zither’s, the lute’s  how faint in action, 
soft sighs at last.  In sermons pouring 
a languid lotion. 
Outlandish are the customs that Europe’s 
tavern knows!  31 
It steeps men first in pleasure, the wine 
supplies at last.  Every atom pants for glory: greed 
Of self‐fruition earth’s whole creed! 
Be it the awe of Nadir, be it the glory of a  Life that thirsts for no flowering—death: 
Tamerlane:  Self‐creation—a godlike deed; 
At last all exploits are drowned in a barrel of  Through self the mustard‐seed becomes 
wine. 1  A hill: without, the hill a seed. 
The cloistered hour is over, the arena’s hour  The stars wander and do not meet, 
begins;  To all things severance is decreed; 
The lightning comes to asunder those cloudy  Pale is the moon of night’s last hour 
skies at last!  No whispered things of friendship speed. 
Own self is all the light you need; 
It was too hard to withhold the flood of these  You are this world’s sole truth, all else 
truths,  Illusion such as sorceries breed. 
At last the Qalandar revealed the secrets of  —These desert thorns prick many a doubt: 
the Book. 2  Do not complain if bare feet bleed.  
Comment [MSU1]: Pakistan Quarterly, 
[Translated by M.D. Taseer]  [Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  Karachi. April 1947 

30  32 
All life is voyaging, 
all life in motion,  This wonder by some glance is wrought, 
Moon, stars, and creatures  Or Fortune’s wheel has come full round: 
of air and ocean.  At last the Frankish charm has broke, 
The East by which in past was bound. 
To you the champion, 
the lord of battle,  By the building of my nest, 
Bright angels offer  This secret hid was brought to view 
their swords’ devotion—  That for the bards that sing and chant 
The choice of nest is bolt from blue. 
But of that blindness,  
that caravan spirit!  If slave to God, you grow divine, 
Of your own greatness  If slave to world a beggar mean: 
you have no notion.  You are the master of your fate, 
So make the choice the two between. 
How long this bondage 
to darkness? Choose now:  Of selfhood heedless never be, 
A prince’s scepter,—  Your gaze to self always confine: 
a hermit’s potion.  Who knows, you mat anon become 
The threshold of some sacred shrine. 
                                                           
1 Two lines, “Be it the awe of Nadir…a barrel of  O heir to creed no god but He, 
wine,” have been provided by the editors. The  In you I see no sign or trace 
translator had left them out.  Of mighty deeds that terror strike, 
2 Two lines, “It was too hard…the secrets of the 
Your talk devoid of charm and grace. 
Book,” have been provided by the editors. The 
translator had left them out. 
Gabriel’s Wing 267 

Your glances bold would strike the heart  34 
With awe, though sheathed within the 
breast:  When through the Love man conscious grows 
Alas! a qalandar’s fervent zeal  Of respect self‐awareness needs, 
In you is dead and is at rest.  Though in chains, he learns at once 
The regal mode and kingly deeds. 
Of Sanctuary’s secret hid 
Iqbal perhaps is well aware:  Like Rumi, Attar, Ghazzali and Razi, 
His speech and song display alike  One may be mystic great or wise, 
A confidential mode and air.  But none can reach his goal and aim 
Without the help of morning sighs. 
[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
No need for leaders sage and great 
33  To lose all hope of Muslim true: 
What should I ask the sages about my origin:  Though amiss this pilgrim be, 
I am always wanting to know my goal.  Yet can burn on fire like rue. 
Develop the self so that before every decree  O Bird, that yearn to merge with God, 3 
God will ascertain from you: “What is your  You must keep this truth in sight, 
wish?”  To suffer death is nobler far 
Than bread that clogs your upward flight. 
It is nothing to talk about if I transform base 
selves into gold:  A person poor and destitute, 
The passion of my voice is the only alchemy I  Who walks in steps of God’s Lion bold, 
know!  Is more exalt’d than monarchs great: 
He spurns the worldly wealth and gold. 
O Comrade, I beheld the secrets of Destiny in 
them—  Men bold and firm uphold the truth 
What should I tell you of those lustrous eyes!  And let no fears assail their hearts: 
No doubt, the mighty Lions of God 
Only if that majzub 1 of the West were living in 
Know no tricks and know no arts. 
these times,  
Iqbal could have explained to him the ‘I am.’  35 
My heart bleeds from the song of the early  Once more I feel the urge to wail 
morning:  And weep at dead of night: 
O Lord! What is the sin for which this is a  O traveller, stop a bit, perchance 
punishment?  I face some awful site. 

[Translated by the Editors] 2  Awhile in dark abyss of Fate 
Dive and see beneath: 
Out of this battlefield I come 
Like sword out of the sheath. 
                                                            This verse some man with witty mind 
1  Iqbal’s note—Nietzsche, the famous self‐absorbed 
On niche of mosque did write: 
German philosopher who could not interpret his 
These fools fell prostrate on the earth, 
inner experience correctly and was therefore 
misled by his philosophical thoughts.   When it was time to fight.” 
2 The first four lines are based on a partial 
O man, who at my misery scoff, 
translation by Annemarie Schimmel in ‘The Ideal  Follow the road you tread: 
of Prayer in the Thought of Iqbal,’ included in Iqbal: 
the Poet of Tomorrow, edited by Khawaja Adbur                                                             
Rahim.  3 Translator has made a gross error: Iqbal’s phrase 
  simply means the bird who flies to the Throne of God. 
268  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

When the cup to me was passed,  Of selfhood you appear bereft, 
The gathering all had fled.  To find the thing lost go on quest. 
Iqbal his glow to Muslims lent,  The stars do shine in boundless space, 
Who in India dwell:  Desire to get this lofty place. 
An easy‐going man he was 
Disrobed the houris of your mead, 
And served the sluggards well. 
The rose and tulip darning need. 
To find Iqbal for years on end 
Of urge, though Nature not deplete, 
I did chafe and fret: 
Yet where it fails you must complete. 
By effort great that kingly hawk 
Has come within my net.  38 
36  Alas! The mullah and the priest, 
Conduct their sermons so 
Devoid of passion’s roar 
That despite their efforts great, 
I can exist no more: 
The hearts of listeners fail to glow. 
What else can be this life 
But passion strong and strife?  O fellow stupid, get firm belief, 
For faith upon you can bestow 
My essence endlessly 
Dervishhood of such lofty brand 
Impels my minstrelsy: 
’Fore which the mighty monarchs bow. 
Some may in throng be still, 
Who feels for others’ ill.  Disunion’s ache that I do feel 
A thousand hues and garbs can don: 
Love’s flame can still set fire 
To rapture and surprise converts, 
To lodge and goods entire: 
Anon to sighs of early morn. 
If thirst be not aflame, 
Wherefore the saki blame?  Secrets of love and passion strong 
Transcend the ken of earthy breed: 
Your judgment of the West 
This much alone I learnt that death 
On glamour must not rest: 
Of heart disunion means indeed. 
Its essence seems so bright 
By means of electric light.  The Fair with His own Beauty drunk 
Is impelled to cast the Veil aside: 
The thoughts of world conquest 
The reasons of His remaining hid 
Can never shape in breast, 
Within my own dim sight abide. 
If blessed not be your gaze 
With world‐wide wont and ways.  The rules that govern the Turn of Fate 
No one can ever understand, 
I, even in winter drear, 
Else the heirs to Tamerlane 
Fell not in hunter’s snare: 
Were brave like those of Turkish Land. 
My nest’s branches bare 
Drew the hunter’s stare.  How have the beggars of the Shrine 
Brought Iqbal within their fold, 
Their plans shall end in smoke, 
Though monarchs great and princes strong 
Miscarry the destined stroke: 
A falcon white can’t get in hold? 
This fact with truth is fraught, 
No fiction of my thought.  39 
37  The magic old to life is brought 
By means of present science and thought: 
Nature before your mind present, 
The path of life cannot be trod 
Subdue this world of hue and scent. 
Gabriel’s Wing 269 

Without the aid of Moses’ Rod.  41 
The mind is skilful in artful tasks,  (Written in France) 
And can assume a hundred masks: 
Poor helpless Love that knows no guise  The West seeks to make life a perpetual feast; 
Ain’t mullah, hermit or too wise.  A wish in vain, in vain, in vain! 

Forbid the rest of lodge and bed  Aware of my state, my spiritual guide assures 
To those who road of Love do tread:  me, 
Like travellers they always roam,  Thy ecstasy has reached the plenitude of its 
Though they seem to stay at home.  power. 

Concern for journey’s food and steed,  Moses asked for a Divine glimpse, but I do 
Like burden great, retards your speed:  not: 
Of this dead weight, if one be free,  The demand was right for him; but is 
Like breeze can cross the mount and sea.  forbidden for me. 

No wealth is owned by dervish free,  The plaint of the men of God betrays a 
At call of death he yields with glee:  suppressed secret; 
He has not either gold or land,  But the ways of the men of God are not meant 
Of him no one can tithe demand.  for all. 

[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah]  Zikr in the Sufis’ circle was devoid of ecstasy, 
I remained unsatisfied, and so was everyone. 
40 
Love is thy goal, and mine, too, but both 
Other worlds exist beyond the stars—  Are so far novices on the path of love. 
More tests of love are still to come. 
Alas! Thou hast betrayed the secret of a fakir, 
This vast space does not lack life—  Though a fakir has wealth more than a king of 
Hundreds of other caravans are here.  men. 
Do not be content with the world of colour  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
and Smell, 
Other gardens there are, other nests, too. 
42 
If self with knowledge strong becomes, 
What is the worry if one nest is lost?  Gabriel it can envious make: 
There are other places to sigh and cry for!  If fortified with passion great, 
You are an eagle, flight is your vocation:  Like trump of Israfil can shake. 
You have other skies stretching out before  The scourge of present science and thought, 
you.  To me, no doubt, is fully known, 
Do not let mere day and night ensnare you,  Like Abraham, the Friend of God, 
Other times and places belong to you.  In its flame I have been thrown. 

Gone are the days when I was alone in  The caravan in quest of goal 
company—  By charm of lodge is led astray, 
Many here are my confidants now.  Though never can the ease of lodge 
Be same as joy to be on way. 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
If seeing eye you do not own, 
Among my listeners do not pause, 
For subtle points about the self, 
270  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Like sword, deep yawning wounds can  The dust that will break the spell of the 
cause.  passing time one day, 
Though it is entangled in the skein of Fate as 
Still to mind I can recall, 
yet. 
In Europe what I learnt by heart: 
But can the veil of Reason match  [Translated by the Editors] 
With joy that Presence can import. 
45 
From caravan you are adrift, 
And night has donned a mantle black:  To Lover’s glowing fire and flame 
For you my song that burns as flame,  The mystic order has no claim: 
Like a torch, can light the track.  They don’t discourse or talk of aught 
Save wonders by their elders wrought. 
The tale of the Holy Shrine, if told, 
Is simple, strange and red in hue:  Alas! The throne as well as the mat, 
With Ismail the tale begins  Alike are full of guile and craft: 
Ends with Husain, the martyr true.  Both royal hall and Holy Shrine 
Have lost their essence fine. 
43 
The scrolls of Sufis and mullah may 
The schools bestow no grace of fancy fine, 
Put them to shame on Judgment Day 
Cloisters impart no glow of Love Divine. 
Before the Throne of Judge Supreme 
The goal that Travellers seek is far and wide,  For being empty in extreme. 
Alas! There is no chief to lead and guide. 
How can this world or next contain 
No less than Khyber, the war of faith and  The man not bound to one domain? 
land,  The East or West is not his home, 
But warrior like Ali is not at hand.  Not tied to Syrian Land or Rome. 
Beyond the bounds of science for faithful  Intoxication due to nightly wine, 
thrall  No doubt, by now, is one decline, 
Is bliss of love and sight of God withal.  But saki’s glance still pricks the heart, 
Like a swift and piercing dart. 
The chief of tavern thinks that West has raised 
The house on shaking founds, whose walls  My bitter notes with patience hark, 
are glazed.  That I utter in this park: 
Bear it in mind that passion too 
[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
Oft can work like elixir true. 
44  More dear and precious song replete 
Events as yet folded in the scroll of Time  With lightning’s dazzling flash and heat 
Reflect in the mirror of my perception.  Than coffers full of yellow gold 
That mighty kings and chiefs do hold. 
Neither the planets, nor the spinning skies—  
Only my bold song—can tell you your  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
destiny. 
46 
Either my sighs are devoid of fire, 
Intuition in the West was clever in its power, 
Or else your straw and thorns as yet retain 
But had not the plenitude for absolute abandon. 
some sap; 
The quintessence of life is the force of faith 
Yet perchance my morning song 
supreme— 
May quicken the fire that your dust 
It is a force denied to all our seats of learning. 
contains— 
Gabriel’s Wing 271 

The galaxies, the planets, the firmament, are all  In whatsoever state you be, 
Waiting for man’s rise, like a star in heaven.  A fettered thrall or monarch free: 
No wonder ever can be wrought, 
Brains are bright and hearts are dark and eyes 
With Love, if courage be not fraught. 
are bold, 
Is this the sum and substance of what our age  48 
has gained?  A monarch’s pomp and mighty arms 
The world is a haystack for the fire of the Muslim  Can never give such glee, 
soul,  As can be felt in presence of 
But if thou art eyeless, thou canst not find thy  A qalandar bold and free. 
way.  The world is like an idol house, 
To a multitude of men, reason is the guide,  God’s Friend, a person free: 
They know not that frenzy has a wisdom of  No doubt, this subtle point is hid 
its own.  In words, No god but He. 

The world entire is a legacy of the Man of Faith: 1  The world that you with effort make 
I say it on the authority of We would not have  To you belongs alone: 
created it.  The world of brick and stone you see, 
You cannot call your own. 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
The clay‐made man is still among 
47  The vagrants on the road, 
O manly heart, the goal you seek  Though man beyond the moon and stars 
Is hard to gain like gem unique:  Can find his true abode. 
Get firm resolve and freedom true,  This news I have received from those 
If aim of life you wish to woo.  Who rule the sea and land, 
Like Sanjar great and Tughral just  That Europe lies on course of flood 
To rule and conquer learn you must:  ’Gainst which no one can stand. 
Or like a qalandar true and bold  A world there is quite fresh and new 
The wont and way of monarch hold.  In sighs at morn I have: 
Farabi’s thirst for lore beget,  Your portion seek within its tracts, 
Or Rumi’s fever great and fret:  Thus goal and aim achieve. 
You need a thinker’s lofty gaze,  Count my gourd an immense gain, 
Or Moses’ passion to amaze.  For pure and sparkling wine 
Learn the wolfish tricks and guile,  No more the seats of learning store 
Be like Franks in wit and wile:  Nor sells the Sacred Shrine. 
Else own the passion of God’s Hand,  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
Or strike the foes like Tartar band. 
49 
Act on Muslim law and rites, 
Or sit in fane like acolytes:  On me no subtle brain though Nature spent, 
Be it the Shrine or temple high,  My dust hides strength to dare the high 
Ever like a drunkard cry.  ascent— 
That frantic dust whose eye outranges reason, 
                                                            Dust by whose madness Gabriel’s rose is rent; 
1 Two lines, “The world entire…would not have 
That will not creep about its garden gathering 
created it,” have been provided by the editors since 
the translator had left them out. 
Straw for a nest—un‐housed and yet content. 
272  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

And Allah to this dust a gift of tears  To throngs of Heaven he has taught, 
Whose brightness shames the constellations, lent.   Like man, to fret and pine. 
To clay‐made man he fain would teach 
50  The wont and mode divine. 
By men whose eyes see far and wide new 
52 
cities shall be founded: 
Not by old Kufa or Baghdad is my thought’s  Over the tussle of heart and head 
vision bounded.  Rumi has won and Rizi fled. 
Rash youth, new‐fangled learning, giddy  Still bowl of Jamshid is alive, 
pleasure, gaudy plume,—  Without guile kingship cannot thrive. 
With these, while these still swarm, the 
Both you and I aren’t Muslims true, 
Frankish wine‐shop is surrounded. 
Though we say the prayers due. 
Not with philosopher, nor with priest, my 
I know the end of wrangle well 
business; one lays waste 
Where mullahs at each other yell. 
The heart, and one sows discord to keep mind 
and soul confounded;  Turkish and Arabic both are sweet, 
For talk of Love all tongues are meet. 
And for the Pharisee—far from this poor 
worm be disrespect!  The breed of Azar idols make, 
But how to enfranchise Man, is all the problem I  But Friends of God these idols break. 
have sounded.  You are alive and live for aye 
The fleshpots of the wealthy are for sale about  The rest is all a play with clay. 
the world;  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
Who bears love’s toils and pangs earns wealth 
that God’s hand has compounded.  53 
I have laid bare such mysteries as the hermit  Arise! The bugle calls! It is time to leave! 
learns, that thought,  Woe be to the traveller who still awaits! 
In cloister or in college, in true freedom may 
The confines of a monastery suit thee not— 
be grounded. 
The times have changed, thou seest, and so hast 
No fastings of Mahatmas will destroy the  thou. 
Brahmins’ sway; 
Thorny is the path, O seeker of salvation! 
Vainly, when Moses holds no rod, have all his 
Whether thy heart is the slave or the master of 
words resounded! 
reason. 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
The selfhood of one who bemoans all change, 
51  Is yet a prisoner of time, shackled by days and 
nights. 
To God the angels did complain 
ʹGainst Iqbal and did say  O songbird! Thy song is well rewarded when 
That rude and insolent is he,  It infuses fire into the rose’s bloom. 
Nature he paints much gay.  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Though born of mud and water, yet 
54 
A god assumes to be: 
Not bound to any home or land,  The Gnostic and the common throng 
Of earthly ties is free.  New life have gained through my song: 
I have conferred relish fine 
Gabriel’s Wing 273 

On them for Loveʹs fiery wine.  56 
Some Ajami near the Holy Shrine  In the maze of eve and morn, 
Did sadly sing this song and pine,  O man awake, do not be lost: 
“Alas! the robes by pilgrims worn  Another world there yet exists 
To threads and pieces now are torn.”  That has no future or the past. 
The place of Husain, the Martyr great  None knows that tumult’s worth and price 
Is fact, not bound to Space or Date,  Which hidden lies in future’s womb: 
Though the Syrians and the Kufis may  The mosque, the school and tavern too 
Often change their wont and way.  Since long are silent like a tomb. 
The gamblers who with you compete  In tears shed at early morn 
Are deft of band and they can cheat:  Is found the gem unique and best, 
Your fumbling shaky hands, I fear,  The gem, whose like is never held, 
May bring about your ruin so drear.  By mother shell within its breast. 
No wonder If the Muslims gain  The Culture New is nothing else 
Their ancient glory once again–  Save glamour false and show, indeed: 
Sanjarʹs splendour pomp and state,  If the face be fair and bright, 
The piety and faqr of mystics great.  Rouge vendors aid it does not need. 
The robe of art and lore I wear  Much care and caution must he take, 
Is through Your special bounty there:  Who sets the music of a song: 
You know my coarse and homely frame,  For oft the Voice Unseen inspires 
To honour great I have no claim.  Such airs as jarring are and wrong. 
55  57 
Through many a stage the crescent goes  The cloisters, once the rearing place 
And then at last full moon it grows:  Of daring men and royal breed, 
Perfection no one can attain,  Alas! Now nothing else impart— 
Save by dint of strife and strain.  To foxy ways they pay much heed. 

The bud that gets no share of light  The chiefs who lead the caravan train, 
From the sun that shines so bright,  Of that virtue quite are blank, 
And opens through its inner urge  Which is found in shepherd’s task 
Is bereft of life’s full surge.  And leads to Moses’ noble rank. 

If your gaze of sins be free,  How can the birds with voices sweet 
Then chaste and pure your heart shall be,  The thrilling joy of song attain? 
For God the Mighty has decreed  Alas! The birds in hostile mead 
That heart shall follow and gaze shall lead.  Cannot their breath for long sustain. 

The tulip red with heart afire  One type of rapture and surprise 
In avenue could not thrive and spire,  Is darkness deep and pitch complete; 
As this world of corn and wheat  The other rapture and surprise 
For tulip wild could not be meet.  With love and knowledge is replete. 

Great wars by Aibak and Ghauri fought  My thoughts sublime that soar aloft, 
By the world are all forgot;  Like the flash of lightning, show the way; 
But the lays of Khusrau still  Lest travellers in the dark of night 
Our hearts with joy and pleasure fill.  Should miss the track and go astray. 
274  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

58  Within your clay, if there exist 
A heart alive and wide awake, 
From Salman 1, singer sweet,  The glass of sun and moon as well 
This subtle point I know:  One look of yours forthwith can break. 
That world is wide enough 
For those who courage show.  60 
A man can live without  In my craze that knows no bound, 
The light of science and art;  Of the Mosque I made the round: 
But needs hawk’s zeal for quest  Thank God that outer vest of Shrine 
And tiger’s reckless heart.  Still was left untorn and fine. 
Desist from imitation  I wish good luck and pleasure great, 
Of peacock and nightingale:  To all, of faith who always prate 
The one is only hue,  But all the jurists of the town 
The other chant and wail.  With one accord upon me frown. 

59  Men, like Plato, still roam about 
Betwixt belief and utter doubt 
The crown, the throne, and mighty arms  Men endowed with reason, aye, 
By faqr are wrought these wonders all:  Ever on the heights do stay. 
In short, it is the chief of chiefs 
And king of other kings withal.  Unless the Bookʹs each verse and part 
Be revealed unto your heart, 
By means of learning mind and brain,  Interpreters, though much profound, 
No doubt, become refined and pure:  Its subtle points cannot expound 
Faqr makes the heart and gaze of man 
From earthly filth and dross secure.  The joy that Frankish wine does give 
Lasts not for long nor always live, 
Scholar and sage knowledge makes,  Though scum at bottom of its bowl 
But Christ and Moses by faqr are wrought:  Is always pure and never foul. 
To faqr the road is fully known, 
Of road the scholar knows not aught.  61 
The state of seeing faqr bestows,  Knowledge and reason work in manner 
But knowledge makes on new rely:  strange, 
Rapture in faqr is virtue great,  In case of Love ’gainst heart and sight they 
Whereas in knowledge sin so high.  range. 
One God there is that knowledge owns  The end of Muslim folk I know full well, 
To other God faqr lays a claim:  On theoretic points their preachers dwell. 
No god but He, I do proclaim, 
Though bird of mead hovers my lodge around, 
No god but He, I do proclaim. 
Yet has no share of my melodious sound. 
On the whetting stone of faqr, 
The Turks, I hear, between the lines can read, 
When sword of Self gets sharp and bright, 
Who can this verse so odd convey with speed? 
A single stroke by warrior bold 
Can out an army big to flight.  ʺYou take the West for neighbour sweet and 
dear, 
Though Stars to land of yours are close and 
                                                           
1
near.ʺ 
 Iqbal’s note—Salman [refers to] Masud Sa‘ad 
Salman, the famous poet of the Ghaznavid era who  [Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah] 
was probably born in Lahore. 
Gabriel’s Wing 275 

*  Western thought is bereft of the idea of 
Oneness, 
The rituals of the Sanctuary unsanctified! 
Because the Western civilization has no 
The Church commercialized. 
Ka‘bah. 
My torn apparel aught to be valued much, 
For madness has become rare these days!  [Translated by M. Munawwar Mirza] 1 
[Translated by the Editors]  * 
*  A restless heart throbs in every atom; 
It has its abode, alone, in a multitude; 
O wave! Plunge headlong into the dark seas, 
Impaled upon the wheel of days and nights, 
And change thyself with many a twist and 
It remains unchained by the tyranny of time. 
turn; 
Thou wast not born for the solace of the shore;  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Arise, untamed, and find a path for thyself. 


I wish someone saw how I play the flute— 
Am I bound by space, or beyond space?  The breath is Indian, the tune Arabian!  
A world‐observer or a world myself?  My vision has a taint of the Western style;  
Let Him remain happy in His Infinitude,  I am a Ghaznavi by temper, but my fate is 
But condescend to tell me where I am.  that of an Ayaz! 
*  [Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
Confused is the nature of my love for Thee,  * 
And more confused is my song in Thy praise; 
Thy vision is not lofty, ethereal, 
For I sometimes do relish fulfillment, 
Thou dost not have the flight of a faith 
At other times, a yearning in my heart. 
inspired; 
*  Thou mayest be of an eagle breed, no doubt, 
Thou dost not have those bold, piercing eyes. 
I was in the solitude of selfhood lost, 
And was, it seemed, unaware of the Presence;  * 
I lifted not my eyes to see my Friend, 
Neither the Muslim nor his power survives; 
And, on the Day of Judgment, shamed myself. 
The Sufi has outlived his radiant soul; 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui]  Ask God for the heart and soul of men of the 
past, 

Become a fakir, first, to regain thy power. 
Faith, like Abraham, sits down in the fire; 

To have faith is to be drawn into God and to 
be oneself.  Distracted are thy eyes in myriad ways; 
Listen, you captive of modern civilization,   Distracted is thy reason in many pursuits; 
To lack faith is worse than slavery!  Forsake not, O heart, thy morning sighs! 
Chanting His name, thou mayest save thy 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
soul. 


Arabian fervour has within it the Persian 
melodies,  Selfhood in the world of men is prophethood; 
The hidden purpose of the Sanctuary is to  Selfhood in solitude is godliness; 
unify all nations. 
                                                           
1  A few words have been altered for brevity. 
276  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

The earth, the heavens, the great empyrean,  * 
Are all within the range of selfhoodʹs power. 
Dew‐drops glisten on flowers that bloom in 
*  the spring; 
The breeze, the jasmine, and the rose have 
The beauty of mystic love is shaped in song; 
failed 
The majesty of mystic love is abandon; 
To raise the tumult of joy and liveliness, 
The peak of mystic love is Hyderʹs power; 
For flowers here lack the spark and fire of life. 
The decline of mystic love is Raziʹs word. 


Conquer the world with the power of 
Where is the moving spirit of my life? 
selfhood, 
The thunder‐bolt, the harvest of my life? 
And solve the riddle of the universe; 
His place is in the solitude of the heart, 
Be intimate with thy shores, like the sea, 
But I know not the place of the heart within. 
But avoid the surf around the boundless deep. 

[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Thy bosom has breath; it does not have a 

heart; 
Thy breath has not the warmth and fire of life;  Reason makes the traveller sharp‐sighted. 
Renounce the path of reason; it is a light  What is reason? It is a lamp that lights up our 
That brightens thy way; it is not thy Final  path. 
goal.  The commotion raging inside the house— 
What does the traveller’s lamp know of it! 

[Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
I am not a pursuer, nor a traveller, 
I am not a goal, but a narrow track, 
I am not a harvest, but a thunder‐bolt, 
Born to set fire to straw, buried in the dust. 
*  A PRAYER 
Pure in nature thou art, thy nature is light;  (Written in the Mosque of Cordoba) 
Thou art the star in the firmament;  My invocations are sincere and true, 
Thou not an eagle of the King of Men,  They form my ablutions and prayers due. 
Thy preys are the nymphs and the angels 
bright.  One glance of guide such joy and warmth can 
grant, 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui]  On marge of stream can bloom the tulip plant. 
*  One has no comrade on Love’s journey long 
They no longer have that passionate love—  Save fervent zeal, and passion great and 
Muslims are drained of blood.  strong. 
The rows are uneven, the hearts adrift, the  O God, at gates of rich I do not bow, 
prostration joyless—   You are my dwelling place and nesting 
All this because the inner feeling is dead!  bough. 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir]  Your Love in my breast burns like Doomsday 
morn, 
The cry, He is God, on my lips is born. 
Gabriel’s Wing 277 

Your Love, makes me God, fret with pain and  Now sitting in judgement on you, 
pine,  Now setting a value on me. 
You are the only quest and aim of mine.  But what if you are found wanting. 
What if I am found wanting. 
Without You town appears devoid of life, 
Death is your ultimate destiny. 
When present, same town appears astir with 
Death is my ultimate destiny. 
strife. 
What else is the reality of your days 
For wine of gnosis I request and ask,  and nights, 
To get some dregs I break the cup and glass.  Besides a surge in the river of time, 
The mystics’ gourds and commons’ pitchers  Sans day, sans night. 
wait  Frail and evanescent, all miracles of 
For liquor of your Grace and Bounty great.  ingenuity, 
Transient, all temporal attainments; 
Against Your godhead I have a genuine  Ephemeral, all worldly accomplishments. 
plaint,  Annihilation is the end of all 
For You the Spaceless, while for me restraint.  beginnings. 
Both verse and wisdom indicate the way  Annihilation is the end of all ends. 
Which longing face to face can not convey.  Extinction, the fate of everything; 
Hidden or manifest, old or new. 
[Translated by Syed Akbar Ali Shah]  
Yet in this very scenario 
*  Indelible is the stamp of permanence 
The mysticʹs soul is like the morning breeze:  On the deeds of the good and godly. 
It freshens and renews lifeʹs inner meaning;  Deeds of the godly radiate with Love, 
An illumined soul can be a shepherdʹs, who  The essence of life, 
Could hear the Voice of God at Godʹs  Which death is forbidden to touch. 
command.  Fast and free flows the tide of time, 
But Love itself is a tide that stems all tides. 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
In the chronicle of Love there are times 
THE MOSQUE OF CORDOBA  Other than the past, the present and the 
future; 
(Written in Spain, especially Cordoba)  Times for which no names have yet 
The succession of day and night  been coined. 
Is the architect of events.  Love is the breath of Gabriel. 
The succession of day and night  Love is the heart of Mustafa. 
Is the fountain‐head of life and death.  Love is the messenger of God. 
The succession of day and night  Love is the Word of God. 
Is a two‐tone silken twine,  Love is ecstasy lends luster to earthly 
With which the Divine Essence  forms. 
Prepares Its apparel of Attributes.  Love is the heady wine, 
The succession of day and night  Love is the grand goblet. 
Is the reverberation of the symphony of  Love is the commander of marching troops. 
Creation.  Love is a wayfarer with many a way‐side 
Through its modulations, the Infinite  abode. 
demonstrates  Love is the plectrum that brings 
The parameters of possibilities.  Music to the string of life. 
The succession of day and night  Love is the light of life. 
Is the touchstone of the universe;  Love is the fire of life. 
278  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

To Love, you owe your being,  Like the profusion of palms 
O, Harem of Cordoba,  In the plains of Syria. 
To Love, that is eternal;  Your arches, your terraces, shimmer with the 
Never waning, never fading.  light 
Just the media these pigments, bricks  That once flashed in the valley of Aiman 
and stones;  Your soaring minaret, all aglow 
This harp, these words and sounds, just  In the resplendence of Gabriel’s glory. 
the media.  The Muslim is destined to last 
The miracle of art springs from the  As his Azan holds the key to the 
lifeblood of the artist!  mysteries 
A droplet of the lifeblood  Of the perennial message of Abraham 
Transforms a piece of dead rock into a living  and Moses. 
heart;  His world knows no boundaries, 
An impressive sound, into a song of  His horizon, no frontiers. 
solicitude,  Tigris, Danube and Nile: 
A refrain of rapture or a melody of mirth.  Billows of his oceanic expanse. 
The aura you exude, illumines the  Fabulous, have been his times! 
heart.  Fascinating, the accounts of his 
My plaint kindles the soul.  achievements! 
You draw the hearts to the Presence  He it was, who bade the final adieu 
Divine,  To the outworn order. 
I inspire them to bloom and blossom.  A cup‐bearer is he, 
No less exalted than the Exalted Throne,  With the purest wine for the connoisseur; 
Is the throne of the heart, the human breast!  A cavalier in the path of Love 
Despite the limit of azure skies,  With a sword of the finest steel. 
Ordained for this handful of dust.  A combatant, with la ilah 
Celestial beings, born of light,  As his coat of mail. 
Do have the privilege of supplication,  Under the shadow of flashing 
But unknown to them   scimitars, 
Are the verve and warmth of  La ilah is his protection. 
prostration. 
Your edifice unravels 
An Indian infidel, perchance, am I; 
The mystery of the faithful; 
But look at my fervour, my ardour. 
The fire of his fervent days, 
‘Blessings and peace upon the Prophet,’ sings 
The bliss of his tender nights. 
my heart. 
Your grandeur calls to mind 
‘Blessings and peace upon the Prophet,’ echo 
The loftiness of his station, 
my lips. 
The sweep of his vision, 
My song is the song of aspiration. 
His rapture, his ardour, his pride, his 
My lute is the serenade of longing. 
humility. 
Every fibre of my being 
The might of the man of faith 
Resonates with the refrains of Allah hoo! 
Is the might of the Almighty: 
Your beauty, your majesty,  Dominant, creative, resourceful, consummate. 
Personify the graces of the man of faith.  He is terrestrial with celestial aspect; 
You are beautiful and majestic.  A being with the qualities of the 
He too is beautiful and majestic.  Creator. 
Your foundations are lasting,  His contented self has no demands 
Your columns countless,  On this world or the other. 
Gabriel’s Wing 279 

His desires are modest; his aims exalted;  Its breeze, even today, 
His manner charming; his ways winsome.  Is laden with the fragrance of Yemen. 
Soft in social exposure,  Its music, even today, 
Tough in the line of pursuit.  Carries strains of melodies from Hijaz. 
But whether in fray or in social 
Stars look upon your precincts as a piece of 
gathering, 
heaven. 
Ever chaste at heart, ever clean in 
conduct.  But for centuries, alas! 
In the celestial order of the macrocosm,  Your porticoes have not resonated 
His immutable faith is the centre of the Divine  With the call of the muezzin. 
Compass.  What distant valley, what way‐side abode 
All else: illusion, sorcery, fallacy.  Is holding back 
He is the journey’s end for reason,  That valiant caravan of rampant Love. 
He is the raison d ’etre of Love.  Germany witnessed the upheaval of religious 
An inspiration in the cosmic  reforms 
communion.  That left no trace of the old perspective. 
Infallibility of the church sage began to 
O, Mecca of art lovers, 
ring false. 
You are the majesty of the true tenet. 
Reason, once more, unfurled its sails. 
You have elevated Andalusia 
France too went through its revolution 
To the eminence of the holy Harem. 
That changed the entire orientation of 
Your equal in beauty, 
Western life. 
If any under the skies, 
Followers of Rome,  
Is the heart of the Muslim 
Feeling antiquated worshipping the 
And no one else. 
ancientry, 
Ah, those men of truth, 
Also rejuvenated themselves 
Those proud cavaliers of Arabia; 
With the relish of novelty. 
Endowed with a sublime character, 
The same storm is raging today 
Imbued with candour and conviction. 
In the soul of the Muslim. 
Their reign gave the world an 
A Divine secret it is,  
unfamiliar concept; 
Not for the lips to utter. 
That the authority of the brave and 
Let us see what surfaces 
spirited 
From the depths of the deep. 
Lay in modesty and simplicity, 
Let us see what colour 
Rather than pomp and regality. 
The blue sky changes into. 
Their sagacity guided the East and the West. 
In the dark ages of Europe,   Clouds in the yonder valley 
It was the light of their vision  Are drenched in roseate twilight. 
That lit up the tracks.  The parting sun has left behind 
A tribute to their blood it is,  Mounds and mounds of rubies, the best from 
That the Andalusians, even today,  Badakhshan. 
Are effable and warm‐hearted,  Simple and doleful is the song 
Ingenuous and bright of countenance.  Of the peasant’s daughter: 
Even today in this land,  Tender feelings adrift in the tide of 
Eyes like those of gazelles are a common  youth. 
sight. 
And darts shooting out of those eyes, 
Even today, are on target. 
280  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

O, the ever‐flowing waters of Guadalquivir 1,  How whimsical and indifferent  


Someone on your banks  Is the Author of fates. 
Is seeing a vision of some other period of 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
time. 
Tomorrow is still in the womb of  FIRST DATE TREE SEEDED BY ABDUL 
intention,  RAHMAN THE FIRST 
But its dawn is flashing before my 
mind’s eye.  These verses from Abdul Rahman the First 
Were I to lift the veil  are  quoted  in  Tarikh  al  Muqqari.  The 
From the profile of my reflections,  following  Urdu  poem  is  a  liberal 
The West would be dazzled by its brilliance.  translation  (the  tree  mentioned  here  was 
Life without change is death.  planted in Madinatut Zahra) 
The tumult and turmoil of revolution  You are the apple of my eye, 
Keep the soul of a nation alive.  My heart’s delight: 
Keen, as a sword in the hands of Destiny  I am remote from my valley, 
Is the nation  To me you are the Burning Bush of Sinai! 
That evaluates its actions at each step.  You are a houri of the Arabian Desert, 
Incomplete are all creations  Nursed by the Western breeze. 
Without the lifeblood of the creator.  I feel homesick in exile, 
Soulless is the melody  You feel homesick in exile: 
Without the lifeblood of the maestro.  Prosper in this strange land! 
[Translated by Saleem A. Gilani]  May the morning dew quench your thirst! 
The world presents a strange sight: 
MU‘TAMID’S LAMENT IN PRISON 
The vision’s mantle is torn apart— 
Mu‘tamid  was  the  king  of  Seville  and  an  May valour struggle with the waves if it must,  
Arabic  poet.  He  was  defeated  and  The other side of the river is not to be seen! 
imprisoned by a ruler of Spain. Mu‘tamid’s  Life owes itself to the heat of one’s soul: 
poems  have  been  translated  into  English  Flame does not rise from dust. 
and published in the Wisdom of the East  The Syrian evening’s fallen star 
series.    Shined brighter in the exile’s dawn. 
In my breast,   There are no frontiers for the Man of Faith, 
A wail of grief,   He is at home everywhere. 
Without any spark or flash,   [Translated by the Editors] 
Alone survives,  

Passionless, ineffectual.  
A free man is in prison today,   That blood of pristine vigour is no more; 
Without a spear or a sword;   That yearning heartʹs power is no more; 
Regret overwhelms me   Prayer, fasting, hajj, sacrifice survive, 
And also my strategy.  But in thee natureʹs old dower is no more. 
My heart  
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Is drawn by instinct to chains.  
Perhaps my sword was of the same steel.   SPAIN 
Once I had a two‐edged sword– 
(Written in Spain—on the way back) 
It turned into the chains that shackle me now.  
                                                            Spain! You are the trustee of the Muslim 
 Note from Iqbal—“The well‐known river of 
1 blood: 
Cordoba, near which the Mosque is located.”  In my eyes you are sanctified like the Harem. 
Gabriel’s Wing 281 

Prints of prostration lie hidden in your dust,  They think of death, not as life’s end, 
Silent calls to prayers in your morning air.  But as the ennobling of the heart. 
In your hills and vales were the tents of those, 
Awaken in them an iron will, 
The tips of whose lances were bright like the 
And make their eye a sharpened sword. 
stars. 
Is more henna needed by your pretties?  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
My lifeblood can give them some colour!  * 
How can a Muslim be put down by the straw  This revolution of time is eternal;  
and grass,  Only you are real, the rest is nothing but tales 
Even if his flame has lost its heat and fire!  and legends.  
My eyes watched Granada as well,  No one has ever seen yesterday or tomorrow:  
But the traveller’s content neither in journey  Today is the only time that is yours! 
nor in rest: 
I saw as well as showed, I spoke as well as  [Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
listened,  
LENIN 
Neither seeing nor learning brings calm to the 
heart!  (Before God) 

*  All space and all that breathes bear witness; 
truth 
The veiled secrets are becoming manifest— 
It is indeed; Thou art, and dost remain. 
Bygone the days of you cannot see Me; 
How could I know that God was or was not, 
Whosoever finds his self first, 
Where Reasonʹs reckonings shifted hour by 
Is Mahdi himself, the Guide of the Last Age. 
hour? 
[Translated by the Editors]  The peerer at planets, the counter‐up of 
  plants, 
Heard nothing there of Natureʹs infinite 
TARIQ’S PRAYER  music; 
(In the Battlefield of Andalusia)  To‐day I witnessing acknowledge realms 
That I once thought the mummery of the 
These warriors, victorious, 
Church. 
These worshippers of Thine, 
We, manacled in the chains of day and night! 
Whom Thou hast granted the will  Thou, moulder of all timeʹs atoms, builder of 
To win power in Thy name;  aeons! 
Let me have leave to ask this question, one 
Who cleave rivers and woods in twain, 
Not answered by the subtleties of the schools, 
Whose terror turns mountains into dust; 
That while I lived under the sky‐tentʹs roof 
They care not for the world;  Like a thorn rankled in my heart, and made 
They care not for its pleasures;  Such chaos in my soul of all its thoughts 
In their passion, in their zeal,  I could not keep my tumbling words in 
In their love for Thee, O Lord,  bounds. 
Oh, of what mortal race art Thou the God? 
They aim at martyrdom,  Those creatures formed of dust beneath these 
Not the rule of the earth.  heavens? 
Thou hast united warring tribes,  Europeʹs pale cheeks are Asiaʹs pantheon, 
In thought, in deed, in prayer.  And Europeʹs pantheon her glittering metals. 
A blaze of art and science lights the West 
The burning fire that life had sought 
For centuries, was found in them at last. 
282  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

With darkness that no Fountain of Life  Drunkards, jurists, princes and priests all sit 
dispels;  in ambush upon Your common folk: 
In high‐reared grace, in glory and in  The days in Your world haven’t changed as 
grandeur,  yet. 
The towering Bank out‐tops the cathedral 
Your rich are too unmindful, Your poor too 
roof; 
content— 
What they call commerce is a game of dice 
The slave as yet frets in the street, the master’s 
For one, profit, for millions swooping death. 
walls are still too high. 
There science, philosophy, scholarship, 
government,  Learning, religion, science and art are all 
Preach manʹs equality and drink menʹs blood;  means to fulfill lust: 
Naked debauch, and want, and  The grace of Love—the redeemer—is not as 
unemployment—  yet bestowed upon all. 
Are these mean triumphs of the Frankish arts!  The essence of Life is Love, the essence of 
Denied celestial grace a nation goes  Love is the self; 
No further than electricity or steam;  Alas! This cutting sword as yet rests in the 
Death to the heart, machines stand sovereign,  sheath! 
Engines that crush all sense of human 
kindness.   [Translated by the Editors] 
‐‐Yet signs are counted here and there that 
GOD’S COMMAND 
Fate, 
The chess‐player, has check‐mated all their  (To His Angels) 
cunning.  Rise, and from their slumber wake the poor 
The Tavern shakes, its warped foundations  ones of My world! 
crack,  Shake the walls and windows of the mansions 
The Old Men of Europe sit there numb with  of the great! 
fear;  Kindle with the fire of faith the slow blood of 
What twilight flush is left those faces now  the slaves! 
Is paint and powder, or lent by flask and cup.  Make the fearful sparrow bold to meet the 
Omnipotent, righteous, Thou; but bitter the  falcon’s hate! 
hours,  Close the hour approaches of the kingdom of 
Bitter the labourerʹs chained hours in Thy  the poor— 
world!  Every imprint of the past find and annihilate! 
When shall this galley of goldʹs dominion  Find the field whose harvest is no peasant’s 
flounder?  daily bread— 
Thy world Thy day of wrath, Lord, stands  Garner in the furnace every ripening ear of 
and waits.  wheat! 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  Banish from the house of God the mumbling 
priest whose prayers 
SONG OF THE ANGLES  Like a veil creation from Created separate! 
As yet the Reason is unbridled, and Love is on  God by man’s prostrations, by man’s vows idols 
the road:  cheated— 
O Architect of Eternity! Your design is  Quench at once My shrine and their fane the 
incomplete.  sacred light! 
Rear for me another temple, build its walls 
with mud— 
Gabriel’s Wing 283 

Wearied of their columned marbles, sickened  To whom should I say that the wine of life is 
is My sight!  poison to me: 
All their fine new world a workshop filled  I have new experiences while the universe is 
with brittle glass—  decadent entire. 
Go! My poet of the East to madness dedicate.  Is there not another Ghaznavi in the factory of 
Life?— 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
The Somnaths of the People of the Harem 
*  have been awaiting a blow for long. 
Theorizing is the infidelity of the self:  The Arabian fervour and the Persian comfort 
To be a Moses is the secret of the self;  Have both lost the Arabian acuteness and the 
Let me tell you the mystery of faqr as well as  Persian imagination. 
power:  The Caravan of Hijaz has not another Husain 
Guard your self while in poverty.  amongst it— 
Although the tresses of the Tigris and the 
[Translated by the Editors]  Euphrates are still as bright as ever. 
Intellect, heart and vision, all must take their 
ECSTASY 
first lessons from Love— 
(Most of these verses were written in Palestine)  Religion and the religious law breed idols of 
I could not go to my friends empty‐ illusion if there is no Love.  
handed  The truthfulness of Abraham is but a form of 
From an orchard!  Love, and so is the patience of Husain— 
And so are Badr and Hunayn in the battle of 
—Saadi  existence. 
Life to passion and ecstasy—sunrise in the  The universe is a verse of God and you are the 
desert:  meaning to be grasped at last; 
Luminous brooks are flowing from the  Colour and scent are the caravans that set 
fountain of the rising sun.  forth to seek you. 
The veil of being is torn, Eternal Beauty  The disciples in the schools are insipid and 
reveals itself:  purblind; 
The eye is dazzled but the soul is richly  The esoteric of the monastery have low aims 
endowed.  with empty bowls; 
The heavy night‐cloud has left behind it red  I—whose ghazal reflects the flame that has 
and blue cloudlets:  been lost, 
It has given a head‐dress of various hues to  All my life I pined after the type of men that 
the Mount Idam to wear.  exists no more. 
Air is clean of dust particles; leaves of date‐  The zephyr nurtures thorn and straw, 
palms have been washed;  While my breath nurtures passion in hearts;  
The sand around Kazimah is soft like velvet.  My song thrives upon my lifeblood: 
The remains of burnt‐out fire are observable  The strings of the instrument become alive 
here and a piece of tent‐rope there:  with the blood of the musician. 
Who knows how many caravans have passed  Give not occasion for conturbation to this 
through this tract.  restless heart; 
I heard the angel Gabriel saying to me: This  Bright are your tresses, brighten them even 
indeed is your station—  more. 
For those acquainted with the pleasure of 
separation, this is the everlasting comfort. 
284  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

You are the Sacred Tablet, You are the Pen  THE MOTH AND THE FIREFLY 
and the Book; 
This blue‐colored dome is a bubble in the sea  THE MOTH 
that you are.  The firefly is so far removed 
You are the lifeblood of the universe:  From the status of the moth! 
You bestowed the illumination of a sun upon  Why is it so proud 
the particles of desert dust.  Of a fire that cannot burn? 
The splendour of Sanjar and Selim: a mere 
hint of your majesty;  THE FIREFLY 
The faqr of Junaid and Bayazid: your beauty  God be thanked a hundred times, That I am 
unveiled.  not a moth– 
If my prayers are not led by my passion for  That I am no beggar 
you,  Of alien fire! 
My ovation as well as my prostrations would  [Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
be nothing but veils upon my soul. 
A meaningful glance from you redeemed both  TO JAVID 
of them:  A nation’s life is illumined by selfhood, 
Reason—the seeker in separation; and Love— Selfhood is the pathway to everlasting life. 
the restless one in Presence. 
The world has become dark since the sun has  This one thing that Adam is not without the 
set down;  Purpose— 
Unveil your beauty to dawn upon this age.  A manifold life, a manifold leisure! 1 

You are a witness on my life so far:  Earth‐bound crows cannot aspire to the 
I did not know that Knowledge is a tree that  eagle’s flights, 
bears no fruit.  But they corrupt the eagle’s lofty, noble 
The old battle was then revived in my  habits. 
conscience:  May God make thee a virtuous, blameless 
Love, all Mustafa; Reason, all Abu Lahab.  youth; 
It persuaded me with art, it pulled me by  Thou livest in an age deprived of decency. 
force: 
Strange is Love at the beginning, strange in its  Iqbal was not at ease in a monastery, 
perfection!  For he is bright, and sprightly, and full of wit, 
Separation is greater than union in the state of  MENDICANCY 
ecstasy; 
For union is death to desire while separation  A witty man in a tavern spoke with a tongue 
brings the pleasure of longing.   untamed: 
In the midst of the union I dared not cast a  “The ruler of our state is a beggar unashamed; 
glance;  How many go bare‐headed to deck him with 
Though my audacious eye was looking for a  a crown? 
pretence.  How many go naked to supply his golden 
Separation is the warmth of hot‐pursuit; it is  gown? 
at the heart of fond lamentation—  The blood of the poor turns into his red wine; 
It is why the wave is in search; it is why the  And they starve so that he may in luxury 
pearl is precious.  dine. 
                                                           
[Translated by the Editors]  1 Two lines, “This one thing…a manifold leisure!” 
have been provided by the editors. The translator 
left them out. 
Gabriel’s Wing 285 

The epicure’s table is loaded with delights,  It is the miracle of a desert‐dweller 
Stolen from the needy, stripped of all their  To make the grace a mirror to power. 1  
rights.  Mankind’s deliverance lies in the unity 
He is a beggar who begs money, be it large or  Of those who rule the body and those who 
small,  rule the soul. 
Kings with royal pomp and pride, in fact, are 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui]  
beggars all.” 
—Adapted from Anwari 
THE EARTH IS GODʹS 

[Translated by Naim Siddiqui]   Who rears the seed in the darkness of the 
earth? 
HEAVEN AND THE PRIEST  Who lifts the cloud up from the ocean’s 
waves? 
Being present there, my impetuous tongue 
Who summoned from the West the fruitful 
To silence I could not resign 
wind? 
When an order from God of admission on 
Whose soil is this? Or whose that light of the 
high 
sun? 
Came the way of that reverend divine; 
Who filled the grain like pearls, the ripe corn’s 
I humbly addressed the Almighty: O Lord, 
ear? 
Excuse this presumption of mine, 
Who taught the months by instruction to 
But he’ll never relish the virgins of heaven, 
revolve? 
The garden’s green borders, the wine! 
Landlord! This broad plough‐land is not 
For paradise isn’t place for a preacher 
thine, it is not thine; 
To meddle and meddle and mangle, 
Nor thy father’s land; it is not thine, it is not 
And he, pious man—second nature to him 
mine. 
Is the need to dispute and to jangle; 
His business has been to set folk by the ears   [Translated by Sir Abdul Qadir] 
And get nations and sects in a tangle: 
Up there in the sky is no Mosque and no 
TO A YOUNG MAN 
Church  Thy sofas are from Europe, thy carpets from 
And no Temple—with whom will he  Iran; 
wrangle?  This slothful opulence evokes my sigh of pity. 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  In vain if thou possessest Khusroe’s imperial 
pomp, 
CHURCH AND STATE  If thou dost not possess prowess or 
contentment. 
Monasticism was the church’s base 
Seek not thy joy or greatness in the glitter of 
Its austere living had no room for wealth. 
Western life, 
The anchorite and the king have ever been 
For in contentment lies a Muslim’s joy and 
hostile; 
greatness. 
One has humility; the other an exalted power. 
Church and state were separated at last;  When an eagle’s spirit awakens in youthful 
The revered priest was rendered powerless.  hearts, 
When church and state parted the ways for  It sees its luminous goal beyond the starry 
ever,  heavens. 
It set in the rule of avarice and greed. 
This split is a disaster both for country and                                                             
1 Two lines, “It is the miracle…to the power,” have 
faith, 
been provided by the editors since the translator 
And shows the culture’s blind lack of vision. 
had left them out. 
286  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Despair not, for despair is the decline of  * 
knowledge and gnosis: 
Iqbal recited once in a garden in Spring 
The Hope of a Believer is among the 
A couplet cheerful and bright in tone and 
confidants of God. 1 
spirit: 
Thy abode is not on the dome of a royal palace; 
Unlike the rose, I need no breeze to blossom., 
Thou art an eagle and shouldst live on the 
My soul doth blossom with my ecstasy. 
rocks of mountains. 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
SAKINAMA 
COUNSEL 
Spring’s caravan has pitched its tent 
An eagle full of years to a young hawk said— 
At the foot of the mountain, making it 
Easy your royal wings through high heaven 
Look like the fabled garden of Iram 
spread: 
With a riot of flowers—iris, rose, 
To burn in the fire of our own veins is youth! 
Narcissus, lily, eglantine, 
Strive, and in strife make honey of life’s gall; 
And tulip in its martyr’s gory shroud. 
Maybe the blood of the pigeon you destroy, 
The landscape is all covered with 
My son, is not what makes your swooping 
A multicoloured sheet, and colour flows 
joy!  
Even in the veins of stones like blood. 
POPPY OF THE WILDERNESS  The breezes blow intoxicatingly 
In a blue sky, so that the birds 
Oh blue sky‐dome, oh world companionless!  Do not feel like remaining in their nests 
Fear comes on me in this wide desolation.  And fly about. Look at that hill‐stream. How  
Lost travellers, you and I; what destination  It halts and bends and glides and swings 
Is yours, bright poppy of the wilderness?  around, 
No prophet walks these hills, or we might  And then, collecting itself, surges up 
be  And rushes on. Should it be stemmed, it 
Twin Sinai‐flames; you bloom on Heaven’s  would  
spray  Cut open the hills’ hearts and burst the rocks. 
For the same cause I tore myself away:  This hill‐stream, my fair saki, has 
To unfold; to be our selves, our wills agree.  A message to give us concerning life. 
On the diver of Love’s pearl‐bank be God’s  Attune me to this message and, 
hand—  Come, let us celebrate the spring, 
In every ocean‐drop all ocean’s deeps!  Which comes but once a year. 
The whirlpool mourning for its lost wave  Give me that wine whose heat 
weeps,  Burns up the veils of hidden things, 
Born of the sea and never to reach the land.   Whose light illuminates life’s mind, 
Man’s hot blood makes earth’s fevered  Whose strength intoxicates the universe, 
pulses race,  Whose effervescence was Creation’s source. 
With stars and sun for audience. Oh cool  Come lift the veil off mysteries, 
air  And make a mere wagtail take eagles on. 
Of the desert! Let it be mine too to share 
In silence and heart‐glow, rapture and grace.   The times have changed; so have their signs. 
New is the music, and so are the instruments. 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  The magic of the West has been exposed, 
                                                            And the magician stands aghast. 
1 Two lines, “Despair not…confidants of God,”  The politics of the ancient regime 
have been provided by the editors since the  Are in disgrace: world is tired of kings. 
translator had left them out. 
Gabriel’s Wing 287 

The age of capitalism has passed,  Rescue me and grant me mobility. 
The juggler, having shown his tricks, has  Tell me about the mysteries of life and death, 
gone.  For Your eye spans the universe. 
The Chinese are awaking from their heavy  The sleeplessness if my tear‐shedding eyes; 
sleep.  The restless yearnings hidden in my heart; 
Fresh springs are bubbling forth from  The prayerfulness of my cries at midnight; 
Himalayan heights.  My melting into tears in solitude and 
Cut open is the heart of Sinai and Faran,  company; 
And Moses waits for a renewed theophany.  My aspirations, longings and desires; 
The Muslim, zealous though about God’s  My hopes and quests; my mind that mirrors 
unity,  the times 
Still wears the Hindu’s sacred thread around  (A field for thought’s gazelles to roam); 
his heart.  My heart, which is a battlefield of life, 
In culture, mysticism, canon law  Where legions of doubt war with faith— 
And dialectical theology—  O Saki, these are all my wealth; 
He worships idols of non‐Arab make.  Possessing them, I am rich in my poverty. 
The truth has been lost in absurdities,  Distribute all these riches in my caravan, 
And in traditions is this ummah rooted still.  And let them come to some good use. 
The preacher’s sermon may beguile your 
In constant motion is the sea of life. 
heart, 
All things display life’s volatility. 
But there is no sincerity, no warmth in it. 
It is life that puts bodies forth, 
It is a tangled skein of lexical complexities, 
Just as a whiff of smoke becomes a flame. 
Sought to be solved by logical dexterity. 
Unpleasant to it is the company 
The Sufi, once foremost in serving God, 
Of matter, but it likes to see 
Unmatched in love and ardency of soul, 
Its striving to improve itself. 
Has got lost in the maze of Ajam’s ideas: 
It is fixed, yet in motion, straining at 
At half‐way stations is this traveller stuck. 
The leash to get free of the elements. 
Gone out is the fire of love. O how sad! 
A unity imprisoned in diversity, 
The Muslim is a heap of ashes, nothing more. 
It is unique in every form and shape. 
O Saki, serve me that old wine again,  This world, this sex‐dimensioned idol‐house, 
Let that old cup go round once more.  This Somnat is all of its fashioning. 
Lend me the wings of Love and make me fly.  It is not its way to repeat itself: 
Turn my dust to fireflies that flit about.  You are not I, I am not you. 
Free young men’s minds from slavery,  With you and me and others it has formed 
And make them mentors of the old.  Assemblies, but is solitary in their midst. 
The millat’s tree is green thanks to your sap:  It shines in lightning, in the stars, 
You are its body’s breath.  In silver, gold and mercury. 
Give it the strength to vibrate and to throb;  Its is the wilderness, its are the trees, 
Lend it the heart of Murtaza, the fervour of  Its are the roses, its are the thorns. 
Siddiq.  It pulverises mountains with its might, 
Drive that old arrow through its heart  And captures Gabriel and houris in its noose. 
Which will revive desire in it.  There is a silver‐grey, brave falcon here, 
Blest be the stars of Your heavens; blest be  Its talons covered with the blood of 
Those who spend their nights praying to You.  partridges, 
Endow the young with fervent souls;  And over there, far from its nest, 
Grant them my vision and my love.  A pigeon helplessly aflutter in a snare. 
I am a boat in a whirlpool, stuck in one place. 
288  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Stability is an illusion of eyes,  It is unlimited both ways. 
For every atom in the world pulsates with  Swept on by the waves of time’s stream, 
change.  And at the mercy of their buffeting, 
The caravan of life does not halt anywhere,   It yet changes the course of its quest 
For every moment life renews itself.  constantly, 
Do you think life is great mystery?  Renewing its way of looking at things. 
No, it is only a desire to soar aloft.  For it huge rocks are light as air: 
It has seen many ups and downs,  It smashes mountains into shifting sand. 
But likes to travel rather than to reach the  Both its beginning and its end are journeying, 
goal;  For constant motion is its being’s law. 
For travelling is life’s outfit: it  It is a ray of light in the moon and 
Is real, while rest is appearance, nothing  A spark in stone. It dwells 
more.  In colours, but is colourless itself. 
Life loves to tie up knots and then unravel  It has nothing to do with more or less, 
them.  With light and low, with fore and aft. 
Its pleasure lies in throbbing and in fluttering.  Since time’s beginning it was struggling to 
When it found itself face to face with death,  emerge, 
It learned that it was hard to ward it off.  And finally emerged in the dust that is man. 
So it descended to this world,  It is in your heart that the Self has its abode, 
Where retribution is the law,   As the sky is reflected in the pupil of the eye. 
And lay in wait for death. 
To one who treasures his self, bread 
Because of its love of duality, 
Won at the cost of self‐respect is gall. 
It sorted all things out in pairs, 
He values only bread he gains with head held 
And then arose, host after host, 
high. 
From mountains and from wilderness. 
Abjure the pomp and might of a Mahmud; 
It was a branch from which flowers kept  
Preserve your self, do not be an Ayaz. 
Shedding and bursting forth afresh. 
Worth offering is only that prostration which 
The ignorant think that life’s impress is 
Makes all others forbidden acts. 
Ephemeral, but it fades only to emerge anew. 
This world, this riot of colours and of sounds, 
Extremely fleet‐footed, 
Which is under the sway of death, 
It reaches its goal instantly. 
This idol‐house of eye and ear, 
From time’s beginning to its end 
In which to live is but to eat and drink, 
Is but one moment’s way for it. 
Is nothing but the Self’s initial stage. 
Time, chain of days and nights, is nothing but 
O traveller, it is not your final goal. 
A name for breathing in and breathing out. 
The fire that is you has not come 
What is this whiff of air called breath?  Out of this heap of dust. 
A sword, and selfhood is that sword’s sharp  You have not come out of this world; 
edge.  It has come out of you. 
What is the self? Life’s inner mystery,  Smash up this mountainous blockade, 
The universe’s waking up.  Go further on and break out of 
The self, drunk with display, is also fond  This magic ring of time and space. 
Of solitude;—an ocean in a drop.  God’s lion is the self; 
It shines in light and darkness both;  Its quarry are both earth and sky. 
Displayed in individuals, yet free from them.  There are a hundred worlds still to appear, 
Behind it is eternity without  For Being’s mind has not drained 
Beginning, and before it is  Of its creative capabilities. 
Eternity without an end; 
Gabriel’s Wing 289 

All latent worlds are waiting for releasing  At last its own nesting‐place is scorched by 
blows  the restless lightning it cannot still: 
From your dynamic action and exuberant  To them the trade‐wind belongs, the sky‐way, 
thought.  to them the ocean, to them the ship— 
It shall not serve them to calm the whirlpool 
It is the purpose of the revolution of the 
by which their fate holds them in its grip! 
spheres 
But now a new world is being born, while this 
That your selfhood should be revealed to you. 
old one sinks out of sight of men, 
You are the conqueror of this world 
This world the gamblers of Europe turned 
Of good and evil. How can I tell you 
into nothing else than a gambling‐den. 
The whole of your long history? 
That man will still keep his lantern burning, 
Words are but a strait‐jacket for reality: 
however tempests blow strong and cold, 
Reality is a mirror, and speech 
Whose soul is centred on high, whose temper 
The coating that makes it opaque. 
the Lord has cast in the royal mould. 
Breath’s candle is alight within my breast, 
But my power of utterance cries halt.  [Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
Should I fly even a hairbreadth too high, 
The blaze of glory would burn up my wings. 
THE ANGELS BID FAREWELL TO ADAM 

[Translated by M. Hadi Husain]  You have been given the restlessness of Day 
and Night, 
TIME  We know not whether you are made of clay 
or mercury; 
What was, has faded: what is, is fading: but of 
We hear you are created from clay, 
these words few can tell the worth; 
But in your nature is the glitter of Stars and 
Time still is gaping with expectation of what 
Moon. 
is nearest its hour of birth. 
Your sleep would be preferable over much 
New tidings slowly come drop by drop from 
wakefulness 
my pitcher gurgling of time’s new sights, 
If you could behold your own beauty even in 
As I count over the beads strung out on my 
a dream! 
threaded rosary of days and nights. 
Your morning sighs are invaluable 
With each man friendly, with each I vary, and 
For they are the water to your ancient tree. 
have a new part at my command: 
Your melody unravels the secret of life 
To one the rider, to one the courser, to one the 
For it is Nature that has attuned your organ. 
whiplash of reprimand. 
If in the circle you were not numbered, was it  [Translated by the Editors] 1 
your own fault or mine? 
To humour no‐one am I accustomed to keep 
ADAM IS RECEIVED BY THE SPIRIT OF THE 
untasted the midnight wine!  EARTH 
No planet‐gazer can ever see through my  Open thy eyes and look above, 
winding mazes; for when the eye  Look at the streak of dawn; 
That aims it sees by no lights from Heaven,  Look at the veiling of the vision; 
the arrow wavers and glances by.  Look at the banishment unfair; 
That is no dawn at the Western skyline—it is  Look at the battle of hope and fear. 
a bloodbath, that ruddy glow! 
Await to‐morrow; our yesterday and to‐day 
are legends of long ago. 
                                                           
From Nature’s forces their reckless science  1 Based on a translation provided by S.A. Vahid in 
has stripped the garments away, until  ‘Iqbal and Western Poets’ in Iqbal Poet‐Philosopher of 
the East (1971), edited by Hafeez Malik. 
290  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Thine are the clouds, the rains, the skies,  What doth it know about this mystery— 
Thine are the winds, the storms,  Who is the friend, and what is the friend’s 
The woods, the mountains, the rivers are  voice? 
thine;  The sound of music is a dirge 
The world of the angels was a void;  In the West’s crumbling pageant. 
Look at the peopled earth, which is thine. 
RUMI 
Thou wilt rule it like a king;  Every ear is not attuned to the word of 
The stars will gaze in wonder;  truth, 
Thy vision will encompass the earth;  As a fig suits not the palate of every bird. 
Thy sighs will reach the heavens; 
Look at the power of thy pain and passion.  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
The spark in thee is a radiant sun;  I have mastered knowledge of both the East 
A new world lives in thee;  and the West, 
Thou carest not for a borrowed heaven;  My soul suffers still in agony. 
Thy life‐blood has it concealed; 
RUMI 
Look at the reward of anguish and toil. 
Quacks sicken you more; 
Thy lyre has an eternal plaintive string,  Come to us for a cure. 
Panting with the passion of love; 
Thou guardest eternal secrets divine,  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
And livest a life of obedient power;  Thy glance of wisdom brightens my heart; 
Look at the world as shaped by thy will.  Explain to me the order for jihad. 

*  RUMI 
My nature is like the fresh breeze of morn:  Break the image of God by the command of 
Gentle sometimes, at other times strong;  God, 
I give a velvet mantle to flower petals,  Break the friend’s glass, with the friend’s stone. 
And to prickly thorns, the sharpness of the 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
needle. 
Oriental eyes are dazzled by the West; 
THE MENTOR AND THE DISCIPLE  Western nymphs are fairer than those in 
Paradise. 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE  
Discerning eyes bleed in pain,  RUMI 
For faith is ruined by knowledge in this age.  Silver glisters white and new, 
But blackens the hands and clothes. 
RUMI 
Fling it on the body, and knowledge  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
becomes a serpent;  The warm‐blooded youths in schools, 
Fling it on the heart, and it becomes a friend.  Alas, are victims of Western magic! 

THE INDIAN DISCIPLE:  RUMI 
Master of love; of God!  When an unfledged bird begins its flight, 
I do remember thy noble words:  It becomes a ready feline morsel. 
‘Wherefrom comes this Friendly voice— 
Thin, feeble, and dry as a reed?’  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
The world today has an eternal sadness,  How long this clash between church and 
With neither joy, nor love, nor certitude,  state? 
Is the body superior to the soul? 
Gabriel’s Wing 291 

RUMI  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
Coins may jingle at night,  My peers consort with kings in court, 
But gold waits for the morrow.  While I am a beggar, uncovered, 
bare‐headed. 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
Tell me about the secret of man,  RUMI 
Tell how dust is a peer of the stars.  To be the slave of a man with an illumined 
heart, 
RUMI  Is better than to rule the ruler’s of’ the land. 
His outside dies of an insect’s bite, 
His inside roams the seven heavens.  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
I am at a loss to know the puzzle 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE  Of free will and determination. 
Dust with thy help has a luminous eye, 
Is man’s purpose knowledge or vision?  RUMI 
Wings bring a hawk to Kings; 
RUMI  Wings bring a crow to the grave. 
Man is perception; the rest is skin; 
Perception is the perception of God.  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
What is the aim of the Prophet’s path— 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE  The rule of the earth, or a monastery? 
The East lives on through your words! 
Of what disease nations die?  RUMI 
Prudence in our faith decrees war and 
RUMI  power, 
Every nation that perished in the past,  In the faith of Jesus—a cave and mount. 
Perished for mistaking stone for incense. 1 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE  How to discipline the body? 
Muslims have now lost their vigour and force;  And how to awaken the heart? 
Wherefore are they so timid and tame? 
RUMI 
RUMI  Be obedient, ride on the earth like a horse, 
No nation meets its doom,  Not like a corpse borne on shoulders. 
Until it angers a man of God. 2 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE  The secret of faith I do not know; 
Though life is a mart without any lustre,  How to believe in the Day of Judgement? 
What kind of bargain doth offer some gain? 
RUMI 
RUMI  Be the Judgement Day, and see the 
Sell cleverness and purchase wonder;  Judgement Day; 
Cleverness is doubt; wonder is perception.  This is the condition for seeing everything. 
                                                           
1  Four lines, “The East lives…for incense” are  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
provided by the editors since the translator had left  The selfhood soars up to the skies— 
them out.  It preys upon the sun and the moon— 
2 Two lines, “No nation…a man of God” are from 
Deprived of the Presence, relying on existence, 
the editorial material in What Should Then Be Done 
wearied: 
O People of the East (1977) by B.A. Dar: 
  Impoverished by its own preys. 
292  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

RUMI  RUMI 
Love alone is fit to be hunted,  Knowledge and wisdom are born of honest 
But who can ever ensnare it! 1   living; 
Love and ecstasy are born of honest living. 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
Thou knowest the heart of the universe;  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
Tell how a nation can be strong?  The world demands me to meet and mingle, 
But the song is born in solitude. 
RUMI 
If thou art a grain, it will be picked by birds,  RUMI 
And if a blossom, it will be picked by  Keep away from strangers, not from Him, 
urchins.  Wrap thyself for winter, not for spring. 
Hide thy grain, and be the trap; 
Hide thy blossom, and be the grass.  THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
India now has no light of vision or yearning; 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE  Men of illumined hearts have fallen on evil 
Thou callest me to seek the heart;  days. 
To be a seeker of the heart, and to be in a 
conflict;  RUMI 
My heart is in my breast,  Imparting heat and light is the task of the 
Like a mirror, it shows my powers.  brave; 
Cunning and shamelessness are the refuge 
RUMI  of the mean. 
Thou sayest thou hast a heart 

The heart is not below, but in the empyrean, 
Thou thinkest thy heart is a heart,  Thy body knows not the secrets of thy heart, 
Forsaking the search for illumined hearts.  And so thy sighs reach not the heights of 
heaven; 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE  God is disgusted with bodies without souls; 
My mind soars in ethereal flights,  The living God is the God of living souls. 
But I grovel in the dust; 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
I have failed in the affairs of the world; 
Kicks and buffets are my lot;  GABRIEL AND IBLIS 
Why is material world beyond my reach? 
Why are the wise in faith, fools in the  GABRIEL 
world?  Old friend, how goes the world of colour 
and smell? 
RUMI 
One who can scale the heights of heaven,  IBLIS 
Can tread the path of earth with ease.  Burning and suffering, scars and pain, 
seeking and longing! 
THE INDIAN DISCIPLE 
What is the secret of knowledge and  GABRIEL 
wisdom?  They are all talking about you in the 
And how to be blessed with passion and  celestial spheres. 
pain?  Could your ripped garment still be 
mended? 
                                                           
1 The italicised lines are provided by the editors; 
the translator had left them out. 
Gabriel’s Wing 293 

IBLIS  THE PRAYER‐CALL 
Ah, Gabriel, you do not know this secret:  
When my wine‐jug broke it turned my head.  One night among the planets 
I can never walk this place again!  The Star of Morning said— 
How quiet this region is! There are no  “Has ever star seen slumber 
houses, no streets!   Desert Man’s drowsy head?” 
One whose despair warms the heart of the  “Fate, being nimble‐witted,” 
universe  Bright Mercury returned, 
What suits him best, ‘Give up hope’ or Don’t  “Served well that pretty rebel— 
give up hope!  Tame sleep was what he earned!” 
“Have we,” asked Venus, “nothing 
GABRIEL  To talk about besides? 
You gave up exalted positions when you  Or what is it to us, where 
said “No.”   That night‐blind firefly hides?” 
The angels lost face with God—what a  “A star,” the Full Moon answered, 
disgrace that was!  “Is man, of terrene ray: 
You walk the night in splendour, 
IBLIS  But so does he the day; 
With my boldness I make this handful of  “Let him once learn the joy of 
dust rise up.  Outwatching night’s brief span— 
My mischief weaves the garment that reason  Higher than all the Pleiades 
wears.”  The unfathomed dust of Man! 
From the shore you watch the clash of good  Closed in that dust a radiance 
and evil.   Lies hidden, in whose clear light 
Which of us suffers the buffets of the  Shall all the sky’s fixed tenures 
storms—you or I?   And orbits fade from sight.” 
Both Khizr and Ilyas feel helpless:  —Suddenly rose the prayer‐call, 
The storms I have stirred up rage in oceans,  And overwhelmed heaven’s lake; 
rivers, and streams.  That summons at which even 
If you are ever alone with God, ask Him:   Cold hearts of mountains quake.  
Whose blood coloured the story of Adam? 
I rankle in God’s heart like a thorn. But what  SESTET 
about you?  Though I have little of rhetorician’s art, 
All you do is chant ‘He is God’ over and  Maybe these words will sink into your heart: 
over!  A quenchless crying on God through the 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir]  boundless sky— 
A dusty rosary, earth‐bound litany— 
*  So worship men self‐knowing, drunk with 
The mentor exhorted his disciples once:  God; 
Listen to my words, in value greater than  So worship priest, dead stone, and mindless 
gold:  clod.  
The Western wine is poison for the people, 
When the offspring knows neither pride nor  LOVE 
skill. 
The martyrs of Love are not Muslim nor 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui]  Paynim, 
The manners of Love are not Arab nor Turk! 
Some passion far other than Love was the 
power 
294  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

That taught Ghazni’s high ruler to dote on his  Am I in my land or in banishment? 
slave.  The vastness of this desert fills me with fright. 
When the spirit of Love has no place on the  I know not the enigma of this life of mine; 
throne,  I know not where to find one who knows. 
All wisdom and learning vain tricks and  Avicenna wonders where he came from; 
pretence!  And Rumi wonders where he should go. 
Paying court to no king, by no king held in  With every wayfarer I pace a little; 
awe,  I know not yet who my leader is 1. 
Love is freedom and honor, whose scorn of 
the world 
A LETTER FROM EUROPE 
Holds more than the magic that made  We venture not beyond the shores— 
Alexander  Being to the senses confined. 
His fabulous mirror—its magic makes man.  But Rumi is an ocean, 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  Stormy, mysterious. 
Iqbal! Thou, too, art moving 
THE STAR’S MESSAGE  In that band of men— 
That band of men of passion, 
I fear not the darkness of the night; 
Of which Rumi is the guide. 
My nature is bred in purity and light; 
Rumi, they say, 
Wayfarer of the night! Be a lamp to thyself; 
Is the guiding light for freedom; 
With thy passion’s flame, make thy darkness 
Has he, indeed, a message, 
bright. 
For the age we live in? 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
REPLY 2 
TO JAVID 
“Eat not hay and corn like donkeys; 
(On receiving his first letter in London)  Eat of thy choice like the musk‐deer; 
Build in love’s empire your hearth and your  He dies who eats hay and corn, 
home;  He who eats God’s light, becomes the Quran.” 
Build Time anew, a new dawn, a new eve!  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Your speech, if God give you the friendship of 
Nature,  AT NAPOLEON’S TOMB 
From the rose and tulip’s long silence weave.  Strange, strange the fates that govern 
No gifts of the Franks’ clever glass‐bowers  This world of stress and strain, 
ask!  But in the fires of action 
From India’s own clay mould your cup and  Fate’s mysteries are made plain. 
your flask.  The sword of Alexander 
My songs are the grapes on the spray of my  Rose sun‐like form that blaze 
vine;  To make the peaks of Alwand 
Distil from their clusters the poppy‐red wine!  Run molten in its rays. 
The way of the hermit, not fortune, is mine;  Action’s loud storm called Timur’s 
Sell not your soul! In a beggar’s rags shine.  All‐conquering torrent down— 
[Translated by Javid Iqbal]  And what to such wild billows 
Are fortune’s smile or frown? 
PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 
Wherefore this succession of day and night?                                                             
And what are the sun and the starry heavens?  1  The italicized lines are from Ghalib in Urdu. 
2  These lines are from Rumi in Persian. 
Gabriel’s Wing 295 

The prayers of God’s folk treading  But pray tell me if it is by Your permission 
The battlefield’s red sod,  That the angels bestow riches upon the 
Forged in that flame of action  worthless ones? 
Become the voice of God! 
[Translated by the Editors] 
But only a brief moment 
Is granted to the brave—  TO THE PUNJAB PEASANT 
One breath or two, whose wage is 
What is this life of yours, tell me its mystery— 
The long nights of the grave. 
Trampled in dust is your ages‐old history! 
Then silence at last the valley 
Deep in that dust has been smothered your 
Of silence is our goal, 
flame— 
Beneath this vault of heaven 
Wake, and hear dawn its high summons 
Let our deeds’ echoes roll! 1  
proclaim! 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  Creatures of dust from the soil may draw 
bread: 
MUSSOLINI 
Not in that darkness is Lifeʹs river fed! 
What is the originality of thought and  Base will his metal be held, who on earth 
action?—a taste for revolution.  Puts not to trial his innermost worth! 
What is the originality of thought and  Break all the idols of tribe and of caste, 
action?—the age of youth for a nation.  Break the old customs that fetter men fast! 
Originality of thought and action creates  Here is true victory, here is faithʹs crown— 
miracles of life:  One creed and one world, division thrown 
It turns pebbles into ruby stones.  down! 
O Great Rome! Your conscience has changed  Cast on the soil of your clay the heartʹs seed: 
altogether:  Promise of harvest to come, is that seed! 
Is this a dream I see or is this for real! 
Your old have the gleam of life in their eyes; 
NADIR SHAH OF AFGHANISTAN 
The flame of desire warms up the hearts of  Laden with pearls departed from the 
your young.  presence‐hall of God 
This warmth of love, this longing and this  That cloud that makes the pulse of life stir in 
self‐expression:  the rose‐budʹs vein 
Flowers cannot hide themselves in the season  And on its way saw Paradise, and trembled 
of Spring.  with desire 
Songs of passion fill your air now—  That on such exquisite abode it might descend 
The instrument of your nature was awaiting  in rain. 
someone to play on it!  A voice sounded from Paradise: “They wait 
Whose benevolent eye has graced this miracle  for you afar, 
upon you?  Kabul and Ghazni and Herat, and their new‐
He whose vision is like the light of the Sun!  springing grass; 
   Scatter the tear from Nadirʹs eye on the 
poppyʹs burning scar, 
A QUESTION 
That never more may be put out the poppyʹs 
A self‐respecting tramp was saying to the  glowing fire!” 
Almighty: 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
I dare not complain for my woes of poverty; 

                                                           
1 The italicised lines are from Hafiz of Shiraz in 
Persian. 
296  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

THE LAST TESTAMENT OF KHUSH‐HAL  Chains may hold fast the men of Tartary, 
KHAN KHATTAK 1  But Godʹs firm purposes no bonds endure 
Is this what life holds—that Turaniaʹs peoples 
Let the tribes be lost in the unity of the nation,  All hope in one another must abjure? 
So that the Afghans gain prestige!  Call in the soul of man a new fire to birth! 
The youth to whom the stars are not out of  Cry a new revolution over the earth!” 
bounds 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
Are the ones I love indeed— 
In no way is this child of the mountains  WORLDS APART 
Inferior to the Mughal. 
May I tell you my secret, O Comrade:  When the heart is enlightened, 
Khush‐hal Khan would much like that his  It is blessed with an inward eye. 
burial place  The initiate has a different level 
Be far from the reaches of the dust blown by  Of space and time in each position. 
the Mughal cavalry,  The mullah’s and the crusader’s azan, 
Carried by the mountain wind.  The same in words, are apart in spirit. 
The vulture and the eagle soar 
[Translated by the Editors]  In the same air, but in worlds apart. 
THE TARTARʹS DREAM  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
Prayer‐mat and priestly turban have turned  ABU AL ‘ALA AL‐MA‘ARRI 3 
footpad, 
With wanton boysʹ bold glances men are  It is said that Ma‘arri never ate meat; 
flattered;  He lived on fruit and vegetables. 
The Churchʹs mantle and the creed in shreds,  A friend sent him a roasted partridge, 
The robe of State and nation torn and tattered.  To allure that clever gentleman into eating 
I cling to faith but may its spark not soon  meat. 
Lie quenched under these rubbish‐heaps  When Ma‘arri saw that elegant tray 
thick‐scattered!  He, the author of Ghufran 4 and Lazumat 5 said, 
Bokharaʹs humble dust and Samarkandʹs  “O You helpless little bird, would you tell me 
The turbulent billows of many winds have  your sin 
battered.  For which this punishment has been awarded 
A gem set in a ring of misery  to you? 
That circles me on every side, am I. 2  Alas, you did not become a falcon; 
Your eye did not perceive the directives of 
Suddenly quivered the dust of Samarkand,  Nature. 
And from an ancient tomb a light shone, pure  It is the eternal decree of the Judge sitting in 
As the first gleam of daybreak, and a voice  Judgement on destinies— 
Was heard:—“I am the spirit of Timur!  That weakness is a crime punishable by death.  
                                                           
[Translated by M. Munawwar Mirza] 
1 Iqbal’s note—Khush‐hal Khan Khattak was a 
well‐known patriotic poet of Pushto who forged a 
union of Afghan tribes of the Frontier to liberate 
Afghanistan from the Mughals. Only the Afridis                                                             
among the tribes remained on his side till the last.  3 Iqbal’s note‐‐ Abu al ‘Ala al‐Ma‘arri, a famous 
About a hundred of his poems were published in  Arabic poet. 
translation from London in 1862.   4 Iqbal’s note—Risala tul Ghufran is the title of a 

2 Iqbal’s note—This couplet is anonymous.  famous book by him. 
Nasiruddin Tusi quoted it, probably in Sharah  5 Iqbal’s note—Lazumat is the collection of his 

Isharat.  panegyrics. 
Gabriel’s Wing 297 

CINEMA  FAQR 
Cinema—or new fetish‐fashioning,  There is a faqr that teaches the hunter to be a 
Idol‐making and mongering still?  prey; 
Art, men called that olden voodoo—  There is another that opens the secrets of 
Art, they call this mumbo‐jumbo;  mastery over the world. 
That—antiquityʹs poor religion:  There is a faqr that is the root of needfulness 
This—modernityʹs pigeon‐plucking;  and misery among nations; 
That—earthʹs soil: this—soil of Hades;  There is another that turns mere dust into 
Dust, their temple; ashes, ours.  elixir. 
 
[Translated by the Editors] 
TO THE PUNJAB PIRS  THE SELF 
I stood by the Reformerʹs tomb: that dust 
Barter not thy selfhood for silver and gold; 
Whence here below an orient splendour 
Sell not a burning flame for a spark half‐cold; 
breaks, 
So says Firdowsi, the poet of vision and grace, 
Dust before whose least speck stars hang their 
Who brought to the East the dawn of brighter 
heads, 
days: 
Dust shrouding that high knower of things 
Be not a churl for filthy lucre’s sake, 
unknown 
Count not thy coppers, whatever they may make. 
Who to Jehangir would not bend his neck, 
Whose ardent breath fans every free heartʹs  [Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
ardour, 
SEPARATION 
Whom Allah sent in season to keep watch 
In India on the treasure‐house of Islam.  The sun is weaving with golden thread 
I craved the saintsʹ gift, other‐worldliness  A mantle of light about earthʹs head; 
For my eyes saw, yet dimly. Answer came:  Creation hushed in ecstasy, 
“Closed is the long roll of the saints; this Land  As in the presence of the Most High. 
Of the Five Rivers stinks in good menʹs  What can these know—stream, hill, moon, 
nostrils.  star— 
Godʹs people have no portion in that country  Of separation’s torturing scar? 
Where lordly tassel sprouts from monkish  Mine is this golden grief alone, 
cap;  To this dust only is this grief known. 
That cap bred passionate faith, this tassel 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
breeds 
Passion for playing pander to Government.”  MONASTERY 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  Talking in signs and symbol is not for this age, 
And I know not the art of artful sniggers; 
POLITICS 
No more are those who said: Rise, in God’s name! 
Ranks must be determined for this game;  The ones alive are sweepers and grave‐diggers. 
Let you be the firzine and I the pawn by the 
[Translated by Naim Siddiqui] 
grace of the chess‐player. 
The pawn, indeed, is an insignificant token,  SATAN’S PETITION 
Even the farzine is not privy to the chess‐
To the Lord of the universe the Devil said:— 
player’s strategy. 
A firebrand Adam grows, that pinch of dust 
[Translated by the Editors]   Meager‐souled, plump of flesh, in fine clothes 
trussed, 
298  Collected Poetical Works of Iqbal 

Brain ripe and subtle, heart not far from dead.  THE EAGLE 
What the East’s sacred law made men abjure, 
The casuist of the West pronounces pure;  I have turned away from that place on earth 
Knowest Thou not, the girls of Paradise see  Where sustenance takes the form of grain and 
And mourn their gardens turning wilderness?  water. 
For fiends its rulers serve the populace:  The solitude of the wilderness pleases me— 
Beneath the heavens is no more need of me!  By nature I was always a hermit— 
No spring breeze, no one plucking roses, no 
[Translated by V.G. Kiernan]  nightingale,  
And no sickness of the songs of love!  
BLOOD 
One must shun the garden‐dwellers— 
If blood is warm in the body, there is no fear  They have such seductive charms! 
nor anxiety,  The wind of the desert is what gives 
And the heart is free of tribulations.  The stroke of the brave youth fighting in 
The one who has received this bounty  battle its effect. 
Is neither greedy for wealth nor miserable in  I am not hungry for pigeon or dove— 
poverty.  For renunciation is the mark of an eagle’s life.  
To swoop, withdraw and swoop again 
FLIGHT 
Is only a pretext to keep up the heat of the 
The tree said to a bird of the desert one day:  blood. 
“Creation is founded on the principle of injustice;  East and West ‐these belong to the world of 
For the Creation could have been so much  the pheasant,  
more pleasant  The blue sky—vast, boundless—is mine! 
If I had also been granted the gift of flight.”  I am the dervish of the kingdom of birds— 
The bird gave him a good reply:  The eagle does not make nests. 
“Woe! You regard justice to be injustice; 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
He is not entitled to fly in this world, 
Whoever is not free from earth‐rootedness.”  DISCIPLES IN REVOLT 
TO THE HEADMASTER  Not a rushlight for us,—in our Master’s 
Fine windows electric lights blaze! 
The headmaster is an architect 
Town or village, the Muslim’s a duffer— 
Whose material is the human soul. 
To his Brahmins like idols he prays. 
A good advice has been left for you 
Not mere gifts—compound interest these 
By the sage Qa‘ani: 
saints want, 
Do not raise a wall against the Sun 
In each hair‐shirt a usurer’s dressed, 
If you wish the courtyard illuminated.” 
Who inherits his seat of authority 
THE PHILOSOPHER  Like a crow in the eagle’s old nest. 

He could fly high but he wasn’t daring and  [Translated by V.G. Kiernan] 
passionate, 
THE LAST WILL OF HARUN RASHID 
The sage remained a stranger to the secret of 
Love.  Harun said to his son when his hour came, 
The vulture roamed around the air like an eagle,  “You’ll will also pass this way some day. 
But could not get acquainted with the taste of  The Angel of Death is an unseen to the infidel, 
a fresh prey.  But it is not hidden from a Muslim’s eyes.” 

[Translated by the Editors] 
Gabriel’s Wing 299 

TO THE PSYCHOLOGIST  Though God‐gifted intellect is the lamp of an 
age, 
Transcend the intellect if you have courage to  The freedom of thought is a Satanic concept. 
do so: 
There are islands hidden in the ocean of the  [Translated by the Editors] 
self as yet. 
THE LION AND THE MULE 
The secrets of this silent sea, however, do not 
yield  THE LION 
Until you cut it with the blow of the Moses’ rod.  You are so different and unlike 
[Translated by the Editors]  All the other dwellers of the wild and the 
desert! 
EUROPE  Who are your parents and ancestors? 
The Jewish money‐lenders, whose cunning  And what is your tribe? 
beats the lion’s prowess, 
THE MULE 
Have been waiting hopefully for long. 
Perhaps your highness does not know 
Europe is ready to drop like a ripe fruit, 
My uncle—my motherʹs brother: 
Let’s see in whose bag it goes. 
He gallops like the wind, and is 
—Adapted from Nietzsche  The pride of the royal stable! 
[Translated by the Editors]  —Adapted from German 

FREEDOM OF THOUGHT  THE ANT AND THE EAGLE 
Falling down is the destiny of that bird 
THE ANT 
Whose duality of nature renders him unable 
I am so miserable and forlorn— 
to fly. 
Why is your station loftier than the skies? 
Not every heart is an abode to the trusty 
Gabriel,  THE EAGLE 
Nor can every thought ensnare the Paradise  You forage about in dusty paths; 
like a bird.  The nine heavens are as nothing to me! 
The ecstasy of thought is dangerous in a nation 
[Translated by Mustansir Mir] 
Where the individuals observe no rule.