Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 8

2

lTErEf

THE PROBLEfUIIST

SUPPLEfUIENT
ISSUE 1O

JANUARY 1994
EDITOR:
SOLUTIONS EDITOR:
SELECTIONS EDITOR:

B D Stephenson,9 Roydfield Drive, Waterthorpe, SHEFFIELD, 519 6ND


M McDowell, 136 St. Luke's Road, SOUTHEND-ON-SEA,Essex, SS2 4AG
J R Coward, 25 Elmwood Avenue, HARROW, Middlesex. HA3 BAJ

normal

All originals printed here take part in the


Problemist ioumaments, so ihat publication in this
supplement is equivalent to publication in the main

he has seen the solution?)

magazine.

For this supplement, I am looking for straightforward


originals of all types. ldeally, they should be pointed, well
construc'ted, and have enterlainment value. lf you think
that you have anything suitable, please submit it to me at
the address above. I would appreciate it if composers

1st Prize, Brooklyn CC, 1913-'14

Once the solver

sees lhat the R is not

J DENSMORE

used at all in this line


and that it causes a
promising set line to

fail, it lhen becomes


clear lhat it can and
must be used in thJ

would submit problems clearly drawn or stamped on


diagrams, please. I would also be happy if composers
could somehow hide the solution, so that I may have a

chance of solving their originals. Many thanks!


The supplement has. its own unified solving ladder
and all are eligible to enter it. Prizes are in line with the
main magazine.
John Coward kicks us off with a solving commentary
on a classic lhree-mover and the end of the issue is fiiled
rvith a very welcome articl8 from our friend Thorsten
Zirkwitz from Shefiield's twin town of Bochum in Germany. Thorsten will be pleased to know that for part of
my daily joumey to work I travel along'Bochum parkway'
named in honour of his home lown!

BDS

line - the
unprovided 1...95.
It is easily said, but
try to find all the set
play in such positions;
it may disclose an unremaining

derworked

which
1, Ral-

1,.

K95

direct-mate problem where black has few

available first moves, the solver will be on the lookout for


waiting play; the problem is probably a complete or
incomplete block. As a start, he must spot the black

key.

In the following example (by the son-in-law of the


great Sam Loyd) | see slraight away that 1...g2 is
unprovided because 2.Qf4 95 3.Qh2 # is OK, but whet
about 2...9xf1=Q? | also do not see how lo meet either
1...K95 or 1...95. Whathave I missed?
1..,[Sl is already provided for by 2.Sf3+t ta/hy did I
miss it? Beceuse of the clever placing of the d - the
keypiece - on fl. This deceptivelysuggests to the solver

that the R is needed afrer 1...K95 to control possible


flight squares on the f-file, and 2.Sf3+ shuts off the R
altogether. Who sees the purpose of the wpds before

Kf5 3.Of4

model mates and

surprising key.

JRC

Kh6,

1. . .95 2. Ra4

Kf6 3.0f8

#
92
B- 3.exg4 #

3.ee1

moves for which mating lines are already set (not as

obvious in the longer problems as in 2-movers) and then


concentrate on finding replies to blacKs unprovided
moves. He must nevertheless remember that some
moves may possibly be met by a threat, and also that
some mating lines already set can b changed by the

ss 3.eh2 #

2.5f3+ gf,

SELECTIONS

In a

piece,
always the

prime suspect as
the key piece.
A neat little problem, with several

#3

!o
L. . .92 2.Qf4

is

soLUTtoNS (SEPTEMBER

I 9931

PSl36 (Steiner) 1.O97? 0 Sc7! 't.Q6? 0 Sd6! 1.Oal? 0


Sa3! l.Qb2! 0 1..S-/Sd4/exd3 2.Qb6/Qc1/Qe5 # 'Onty at

b2 does the Q avoid the conec'tion reach of the BS. Fine


Meredith.' (B.P.Bames) Ambush necessary otherwise
Black closes a crucial line. Neatly done.'(R.Smook) 'Nice
opposition duel.' (S.Rothwell)

e.ae g 1..Kxgt/Rf8/ef3/
=B 2.Qt1 tQg{texh2lBxbT tBtl I

PSl37 (Lincoln) 1.Bgl


hxg'l =Q,Rr/hxg'f =S/hxg1

Bxb7,Bf1

#'

Exceptionally attraclive key yields good

variety (RS) Well construcied Meredith. Key provides for


1..Of3.'(SR) 'A profusion of mates flow from a generous
key. A diverting Meredith.' (J.Mayhew)

PS13E (Paslack) Set 1..S-/Sxe4/Bb3 2.Sfl/So4/Sg4 #


1.BfS (2.ReO #) 1 ..S-/Sxf5/Bb3 2.Sc4/SflSf3 # 'Recipro-

74
cal coreclion presented with exemplary cladiy.' (RS) 'A
not uncommon switch of WS focus, but commendable for
Meredith setting.' (BPB) 'compelling central theme, but
would have liked a little more.'(JM)

PSl39 (Aleksandrovich) 1.ae4 (2.Qxd5 *) 1..hxgz

Sf3/Rhs/Rdl /Rd6/Rc5/Qxe4 2.Rxh6lRxc1 /Qe6/QcZSe5i


# 'Somewhat obvious reinforcmeni of the
long diegonal.' (RS)'Well-construcled pin-mate problem.'
(JM) 'Overwhelmingly strong key.' (J.Quah) BPB sends
for comoarison G.C-Quack, The Problemist July 1992
4sS2/6b1 i't KR5/3ks1 O 1 /4p3l3p4 I 5PAB7 #2 1 . Rf5

Sd4/Bxe/t

PS140 (Sokolow) 1.Se4?

f2!

1.Sd3? cxd3! 1.Sdl!

4lBe5lBd6/Bc7/Bb8 #) 1..exdl /Qf2lQxe3/


Ra5/Ra61Ra7/RaAlt2 2.8,e1 lBrtzlBf4/Be5/Bd6/Bc7lBb8/
Qd5 # 'ln the Fleck theme each of White's multiple
threats is forced separately. Where only one ihreat will
work whatever black plays we have a total Fleck; here
the existence of moves such as '1..c2 makes the problem
an illustration of a partial Fleck. The additional feature is
(2.E,e1 lBf2lBf

(Solution to the H#5 version in Brian's notes: 1.K92 e4


2.Kf3 Bg1 3.Kf4 d3 /t.Kes Kd2 5.Kd4 f4 #) 'A surprising
sequence - S-move version preferable for better disguise
of mating net without nice but out-of-keeping promolion.'
(BPB) 'Underpromotion no great wonder - BK tempo
moves preferable.' (JO) 'auirky suFpromotion gives the
edge snd edds charm - s-move setting offers only
greater economy.' (JM) 'Last move a wonderful gag.
Better than the H#5 - all W men et home and first K
move not forced.' (KR 'Yes, the House was well and
truly divided on ihis question!' (MM)

PSltlS (Hildebrand) 1.Ra3? Rxe2! 1.Rxds? esl 1.Ra6[?


d4! 1.Ra8 (2.e4+ dxe4 #) 1 ..Sf2 2.Sxg3+ Rxg3 # 1 ..Rxe2
2.Se3+ Rxe3 # 1..Qxh5+ 2.Q94+ Qxg4 # 1..d4+ 2.e4+
dxe3 e.p. # 'Choice of key square subtly forced.' (J.Gill)
'WPa2 gave lhe game away.' (BPB) 'Familiar outof-harm's-way type of key.' (K.Dewhurst) 'lnteresting
variations.' (JQ)

a new mate following 1..f2.' (MM) 'Very familiarthreat

PS149 (RothwelD 1.Od1 (2.Qxc2,Qc1 92 #) 1..cxd1B


2.8d3 and 3. captures bishop for 3..g2 # 1..cxd1S 2.h88
and 3. captures knight for 3..92 # 'Grab neatly introduced
by Q sacrifice.' (RS) 'A pleasure to solve.' (AW) 'Q could

mott)

be a R.' (A.Ettinger)'Superb key.' (BPB)

PS141 (Stepochkin) 1.Qa2 (2.Rxc3 #) 1..8e1+/Bf6+/Kd3


2.R93/Rg5/Rd5 #'BB released for neatly paired crosschecks.' (BPB) 'The long sweeps of the WRs give this
cross-checker its character.' (RS)

PSl50 (Hussed) a) 1..a88 2.Kh8 Be4 = b) 1..e8S 2.Kh8


56 = c) 1..e8Q 2.Kh6 afi = d) l..Kes 2.Ke8 Ke6 = e)
1..e8Q 2.Kh7 af8 = f) t..e8R 2.Kh5 Rh8 #'As pointed
out in the last issue, the stipulation to 0 was incorecl.
Any H#2 solution will score full marks.' (MM) '0 is a

separation.' (E.Petite) 'Speclacular Fleck with one sdded


mate.' (JQ) 'Rather crowded south-east comer.' (A.Will-

PS142 (Mayhew) 1.8d7? (2.8b5 #) Sc3! 1.8e6? (2.8c4


(2.BeZ #) sc3! 1.8h3! (2.Bf1 #)
1..Se3ielse 2.Bd7 lBf'l+'A fi ne lightweight, but originality
in doubt.' (JO) '...is a representative comment on this
problem. The closest forerunner I can find is by
B.Blikeng and N.A.Bakke, v.Dagbladet 1969 483/3s4/
32l5K1pnk #3 1.8f7? Sf6! 1 .Bhs? Se5! 1.896! although
the sweeping key is also reminiscnt of H"Hultberg, 2nd
Prize Swedish Chess Assn. '1928 40lB7lp7lk1Ks4 #4
1.8f8!' (MM)

#) Sb2! 1.8,94?

PSl43 (Edwards) 'l.Rcl (2.Rc5 and 2.Rc6) 1..8b3


2.Bxb3 and 3.8ff # 1.Bc2 2.R91 and 3.Rxh4 # '1..f2

2.Bxd1 and 3.R95 # 'The remaining defences lead to one


or other of the threats. Careful play by W forestalls BB
checks. Decoy elements and precision timing.' (JM) 'No
clear theme.' (JO) 'The double threat is unforlunate.'
(SR)

PSl,t4 (Sikdar) 1.h7 (2.h8=a #) 1..8ffi 2.Rxf6

Ke7

3.h8=B Ke8/KdB 4.Kd6/Re6 1..Ke8 2.R97 Be7 3.h8=Q+


and many 4th move continuations. 'Not difficult, but play
after B promotion is satisfyingly accurete.' (BPB) 'lnteresting play.' (K.Funk) 'The point is slender, but so is the
expenditure of force. Just worth doing.' (RS)

Ps145 (Kalotay) Black begins 1.Rf8 Re8 2.R98 Bb2 #;


1.Rb8 Rg2 2.Rb2+ Rxb2 # White begins 1.Rel Rb8
2.Ral Bg8 #; 'l.Ka1 Rb8 2.Ra2 Rb1 # 'A lot of
well-varied activity from a small force.' (RS) 'Not very
harmonious, but a fair achievemenl with this material.'
(JM) 'Quite a few solvers overlooked that there were two
solulions in each part!'(MM)
PS146 (Dudchenko) 1.Qa7 Re7+ 2.Kf8 RxaT #; 1.Bgo
Rxg6+ 2.Kxh7 Rxgl #'W interferenoe and s,veeping WR
captures to discover mate give this problem particular
piquancy.' (JM) 'Not quite accurate match made this
difficult.'(BPB) 'The fact that in each solution a WB lies
idle came in for some criticism.' (MM)
PS147 (Levitt) 1.K92 f3 2.K93 e4 3.K14 Kf2 4.hlB d4 #

cheap trick to complete the AUW.' (SR) 'The trouble with


such minimal minimals is that they tend to be just that,
although the composer has probably done as much as
can be done with such meagre material.'(JM) 'Rather

trivial.'(JQ)

PS{51 (Mayhew) 1.Ke3 Kg2 2.Sd4 Bxd2 (BSb8)

#;

1.Se4 Be3+ 2.K13 Bxe2 (BSg8) # 'Lovely chameleon


echo.' (RS sim. SR) 'Beautifully done.' (BPB) 'Splendid.'
(KF)

Ps152 (Sobey) 8.Kxh1 WSbl) 10.Kxg3 (WBc1) 14.Kxd6


(WPd2)

6.

Ke4 1 9.dxe3 (WPe2) 2o.exd2

21 .d 1 R

22.Rd4

'ldeal mate, full use of the Circe condition, a


delight to solve.' (KD) 'A classic circe sequence. clever
Sc3

pawn work!' (BPB) 'Very enjoyable.'(JQ)

PSl53 (Quah) 1.Q92 Lh8 2.Ob7 LgqB #; 'l.Qh2 Lg2


2.ObB Lhhl #'Very nice demonstration of the Leo.' (SR)
'Elegant and dainty geometry.' (Rs) 'classically elegant

and none too easy.' (JM) 'Nice diagonaForthogonal

MM

transformation.' (AE)

ORIGINALS
Before presenting lhis issue's originals, I must apologise to the composer of PSllS in lssue 7 (July 1993).
His name is Fabio Bosetti and not B Fabio as I wrote.
The #2 under Psl72 to Psl77 means 'White to play
and mate in two moves against any defence.' PSl78 to
PSl80 are also directmates, but longer.
After an appetiser from Russia, the inepressible Bob
Lincoln (thanks for the postcerd from the Big Apple!)
offers us more substantial fare with PSl73 and PSl74.
Mr Lang provides another solid contribution in PSl75
and lhen Christian Poisson teaches us a modem theme
with PSl76. In this problem dont forget to look for the
try by White that fails to only one black defence. Only by
finding this will the solver fully appreciate the idea of the
problem. We finish off the 2-ers with the traditional
PSt77 from Arthur Willmott.

In PSITE Mr Yanuarta shows us that pattem pley is

not limited to the two-mover. Once you have

PRESIDENTIAL PRODUCTIONS

irvritten

down th solution the pattem should be clear. Our young


visitor from Grmany. Torsten Linss, weaves anothei
pattem of a kind in PSl79. pslEo, by Ronatd Tumbull,
should present a slemr challenge for ihe solver.
The H#2 under PSIE' to psl84 meens helpmate in
?moves. In these Black ptays fi.sl and co-operltes with
White to mate Black on his second move. The firsl three
are twins whero there is more that one position to solve.
The notation under the diagrams ahould be stfexplanatory.

_ The presence in this issue of the original pSlES by


the cunent President of the FIDE problem Commission.
Klaus Wenda, prompts me to show two prizewinning
problems by previous
Presidents that I hope
(A) C MANSFIELD
readers will enjoy.
They were each composed many years before their composeF
u/ere to achieve their

1st Prize, BCM,1932

The S#3 undsr PSI8S meens selfmate in three

presidential status.

moves, in which White plays first and forces Black lo

mate him on Black's thid move.


_ PSl86, given to me in Andemach last year by Norben
Geissler, is
helpmete in 2jA, whici is
normal
helpmat in 2 but with a white move tagged onto the
beginning. In Rois Ttansmut6s Kings in check move
only like..the checking unit. Note that the White King has
been deliberately len off the boerd.
PSIET is another minimalfrom Gideon Hussert. lt is a
helpstalemate in 2, which is like a helpmate, but the aim
is the stalemate of Black. lt is a zeropositiol where the
diagram is not for solving, but the twihs are fomed from
!||9 dlagram posilion. The twins here are (a) bKh$>b6;
(b) wPdT->a7; (c) wPd7->e7; (d) wKrU->f4;'(e) lhe same
position as (d) but the stipulation is l-f#2 end there are
two solutions. I hope for both Mr Husserl's and the

of composition and great

solvers' sakes that this time

have made no enor in

presenting a multi-part composition!

,, PS{88 (also given to me at Andemach), with its


distinguised composer, b,ings us to our regular Circe

example. Circe is defined as follows. When captured, a


piec (not a K) is immediately replaced on its iquare of
origin (game anay square) if that square is empti; in the
case of R, B or S on the square of the same'c6iour as
that on which it was capturd. Thus a wR captured on h8
(a_ black squere) would be replaced on al,
frovided that

a1 was empty;

(A), is by the late


Comins Mansfield,

if a1

was occupied the R would be

removed from the boad as in a normal caplure. pawns


go to ihe initial square ofthe file they are ciptured on. A
replaced R is deemed not to have moved for casllino
purposes. Fairy pieces (like the black Nightrider on b7j
are replaced on the promotion square of ihe file of theii
capture. Thus if bNbT were captured on b7 it would be
replaced on b1. A naghtrider moves in knight leaps for
as many leaps as it likes until it is blocked Uy the edge of
the.board or by a friendly piece. bNbT in the diagram
posnron can moveto dE, d6, f5, h.l, c5 and a5.
Our busy Treasurer lvor Sanders has found time to

compose PS{89 for us.

Grendmaster

master

with a perfect key.

Ngte how the key introduces the second


thematic variation

#2

].Qe2l
1. .

(2. ee8 #)

Bxc5

1...Qe3
L...fxe?r
L...f2+
'Se7

2,Qa6

1...1xe2+ and elimi


netes the set dual after 1...f2+.

2.sxb4 #
2.Sc3#
2.se3 #

2.s(x)e7

(B), by the

cding Wenda,

illustrates two popular


three and more-mo\re
themes and contains quiet (non-checking) play throughout. Afler lhe key, any move by the bSbT defends
against the threat by lhreatening to play 2...8xd5+.
1...Scs allows 2.So4, and then 3.Se3 # cant be s{opped

becaus 2...8b6 would be ineffective as the bS has

interfered with its guard of e3. Such interference. where


the piece interfered with has not yet moved inlo position,
is called anticipatory Interfercnce. The second defence.
1...Sd6, allows 2.Sxd3 afler which 3.Sf4 # is unstoppable
because the black bishop can no longerdefend from c7.
The third defenc, 1...Sd8, allows 2.Sxf3 and then 3.Sh4

# cen't b stopped because black can no longer play

to guard h4.
Such an idea. where
2...BdE

(B)

J HANNELIUS

one black piece occupies a square so that

1st Prize, OhqvistMem., 1950

it cant be occupied
later by another black
piece, is celled ob-

struction.

BDS

last issue for more details of this g-enre.

to

Michael

2 months of
BDS

CHESS
by East West Consultants
Results, in briel of this yea/s competition.
were 30 and maximum time allowed i6O minutes
st A Zude, 271'lOO;2nrt A J Mesiel 25.5t122:3rd J D
251122;4th C A McNab 201132: sth M
/153; 6th_D Friedgood 171126. A full report wilt appeaf
' 'BD
the next

Problenist.

Jan

Hannelius of Finland,
is a three-mover that

serieshelpmate in 7
moves in which Black plays 7 consecuiive moves
(without White playing at all) to reach a position where
White can mate in one. See Barry Bamea' article in the
McDowell (address on front page) within
receiving this issue. Happy solving!

Presi-

dent immediately pre-

lt is a

Send your solutions and comments

of the two-

mover, and shows lhe


cross-check theme

1.e4!

2.Rb1 6 3.ef1 #I

1...Sc5 2.sc

e 3.se3
1....sd6 2.sxd3 & 3.sf4
1,. . .

Sd8 2. sxf3 & 3. sh4

#
#
#

PSt74

PS172 VKOZHAKIN&OSAKS

PS'r75 JCVI-ANG

PS176 C POISSON
(France)

(colchester)

PS178 S YANUARTA
(lndonesia)

A LINCOLN
(usA)

(Russ,a)

PSl79

T LINSS
(Nawcastle)

PS177 A WILLMOTT
(Australia)

PS18O RTURNBULL
(Thornhill)

77

PSl8t TIGRDOSIHEBERT
(Hungary &Gemeny)

l-t#2

P8IE2 HBFBOUMEESTER

(b) bKc3->f4;
2 sols in oach part

PSI84

C PSYOENHAM

PSIE3 B KOLUDROVIC

(Nothelands)

(Croalia)

FHl2

PSIES V TINEBRA

(b)wBfl (c)wRtl

PSl85

(London)

N GEISSLER
(Gemany)

H#2% RoisTransmut6s:
2 sols (no wK)

PS{87

G HUSSERL
(lsrael)

H=2

ZeroDosition - see te)d

PSI88 KWENDA
(Austia)

l-l#6 CIRCE; NightriderbT

PSt89

'' I SANDERS
Wmbome)

7A

A SHORT INTRODUCTION TO THE


BOHEMIAN GHESS PROBLEM
by Thorsten Zirl$ttitz
In Chess Composilion, as in many other fields of art,
different schools developed over the years, each expressing their own view of how the ideal work of art - in
this cese lhe chess problem - should look like. Without
going into details you may have come across such
names as The New German School, The Strategic
School or The Bohemian School, the latter being the
subject of this article.

"There are good and bad problems, right? So why


bother with this highly artificial matter anyway?" the
occasional reader of problem columns might rightfully
ask the author. This commonplace argument can hardly
be refuted. But it has to be pointed out that with this view
in mind one is likelyto miss some important features of a
chess problem representing a specific school. What,
then, is so special about The Bohemian School? Let us
first take a look at a Bohemian twomover by the Czech
composer Joseph Cumpe (1666
with the "Bohemian essentials".

1943), before we deal


Black seems

to

rather tied up. The

(A) J CUMPE

black king and the

Svetozor, 1929

pinned knight cannot


move, and after 1...94
Vvhite has the set
mate 2.Qxh4 #. The
only move that doesnt
do any harm is 1...f4.
Since a mere waiting
move wouldnt suffice.
White is forced to take
action. lt is highly im-

probable that lhe

white queen's only


task is simply to pin

the black

f2

knight.

"Wouldnl it be nice if

1...54

2.Qxh4

(2.8s'7 #\

ohl #
2.Bf4 *

2.

the queen moves lo

the left comer..."


hear John

Beasley

murmuring. And he is
right: 1.Qa1l threatens
2.47 # and aner the

strong 1...Sx96 we
can mate with the

beautiful s,witchback 2.Qhl #. Afier 1...94 we have the


changed mate 2.8f4 # (2.Qxh4 # in the set play).
After investigating the mating positions more closely
we soon notice that the maies of the post key play have
something in common:

1. Each square adjacent to the black klng is either


guarded by only one white man o. is occupied by

a black piece.
2. Every white man (except the white kingl takes part
in the mating position.
There we go! These two features (with the exceptions

I will mention shortly) form the basis of The Bohemian


School. Mates which share the characterislics of l. are
called pure mates, the ones featuring 2, are called

economical mates. Mating positions that are both pure


and economical are lermed model males.
(Please note that the set mate 1...Qxh4 # is not pure
due to the double guard of h5 and h7 by White's queen

(c) GALBULL

Th6 intelligent key

puts Black

'lst Prize, BCM, 1932

into

zugzrvang. The three

main variations are


given below lhe diagram.
1

...

Kbs

foudh

2.Qc7

# leads to

h{xa4 3.8c6

unthematic

model mate.

we

cen

see that in the first

three variations the


meting constellation
didnl change. Only its

posilion has

shifted

#3

the a5-e1 diago-

1.Ra4! o

nal (from

white
point

1...Sa3 2.Qc7+ Kd4 3.Qc3 #


1.,.Kb6 2.Qb8+ Kc5 3.Qxb4 #
1...s95 2.Qe5+ Kb6 3.Qa5 #

(D)

the
queen's

of

These

are

view).

mates

called

monochrome

(E) M HAVEL
Zata Praha. 1911

echoes. because the colour of


th6 black king's
square did not
change. In case the
colour of the black
king's square does
change, the model

M HAVEL

Zlata Praha.

been

along

gnerations of Bohemians tried to break new ground. In


the course of the following decades we saw Bohemian
problems in which to some extent strategic effecls were
combined with model mates. Others tried to harmonise
the play of the main variations or to create even more
oomplex models. The fourmover beceme lhe main forn
of presenting Bohemian ideas. In defianc of all sceptical
views, however, The Bohemian School does live on and there is still something to discover! "Nice problems,
rally." Our occasional reader of problem columns might
remart afrer glancing over the selecied compositions and
add: "But despite their model mates!" Would you agree
or can you sens The Bohemian Style?
The solutions to the following problems only contain
the mein variations. Try to unravel the by-play ending
with impure mates. I'd be delighted to receive any
comments or questions conceming the article. My
address: Thorsten Zi*lwi|.jz. Schwerins{rasse 45a. 44805
BOCHUM, Germany.

lg04

mates are called cha-

meleon echoes (and


are said to be more
difficult to compose).
Miroslav Havel (pseudonym of Miroslav Kostal,1881-1958), the
#:|

1. Se4

! (2.

Qe8+

. a5
2. Qd6+ Kb5 3. Sc3 #
(3.sc5 #)
1...Kd? 2.Kb7

Ke6 3.Qe8

1. Bc5

The

1...Ke4 2.5f2+ KdS 3.Rc7 #


(3.994#)
1-...Kf4 2.Sxf6
e4 3.sd? #

Bohemian

School. demonstrates two unu-

1, .

sual chameleon
echoes with admirable ease:

! (2. Rxf6+ Ke4 3. sf2

outstanding

composer of

Kb6 3. sc4 #)

#3

(F)

#)

M HAVEL

1st Prize, Czas. Czesk. Sach., 1920

.#;"[*

moder mate of the threet is echoed


1...a5. The fine model after 1...Kd7 is a nice addition."lf":

"""

Before

gems,

I leave you with four unforgettable Bohemian

would like to sum up the principles of The

Bohemian School.

We have leamed that model mates, conslituted by


pure and economical mates, are the piltars of every
Bohemian chess problem. In many compositions echo

models serve lo emphasise a special mating position.


Bohemian masters strive for perfec{ion both in the us of
force and in lhe variations leading to model mates. This
means economical end lightweight positions on the one
hand (you will find only three white pawns in the
problems of this article) and unobslrusiv, if possibl
quiet, white moves introduced by a surprising key on the
other (sacrifices ar rarely seen in Bohemian problems).
Strategy mostly takes second place to the presentation
of complex mating pictures.

The golden age

of The Bohemian

#3

1.Qe8! [2.Qa4

Qd1 #)

Kxe2 3.Se1 #l

L.,.8c7 2.Qc6

School was

between the end of the 19th and the beginning of the


20th century. The possibilities of model mates in th6 lwoand threemover seemed to be exhausted and new

(3.Qc2,

1. . . sd? 2. Qs6

(3.ec2 #)

3.sf4

Kxe2 3.Sh4

Kxe2

(3.ec2 #)

80

(G) VPACHMAN

Clearly the composer's intention is the key, 1...|Gc4+


2.Rd2 #, and 1...fxe2 2.af7 *. In 2.Rd2 #, b3 must be
blocked and using a bB to do this, as Fink did, giving us
the extra variation 1...8xc4 2.Oxf3 #, very quickly
suggests itself. But what of
the rost of the wood scattered
{B} matrix
around, both black and white?
Surely less pieces could be
used? Reducing the position
to its essentials and stopping

'lst Prize, SVTVS, 1954

the mates in one, we

can

rapidly come up with the mashown in diagram (B)


where the intention works with
the added 1...SfE,Sf4.Se5
2.R(x)e5 #. bBh2 could have
been used instead of bsgo
but this B is the only black piece able to stop 2...Rxfl
after 2.Rd2+.
Sadly there are six cooks. The first four are easy to
eliminate. 1.Rd4+ Rxd4 2.Ob5 #, cured by adding bP at
a6. l.RxgG (2.Rgs,BeG #) 1...8xc4/Rd4 2.Qxf3/Rxd4 #,
cured by adding bPh7. l.Res+ SxeS 2.Se7 #, cured by
adding bS at c8 and removing bPc7. l.Ree,l (2.BeG #)
1...8xc4/Rd4/Sf8,Sf4,Se5 2.Qxc4/Rexd4/R(x)e5,Se7 #,
cured by adding bQ at a2 and bP at b2 or c2. The fourth
and fifth are more intractable. 1.Re3 (2.BeG #) 1...Bxc4/
Sf8,Sf4,Se5 2.Qxf3/R(x)e5,Se7 # and l.Rxel (2.8e6 #)
1...Rxe1/Bxc4/Sf8,Sf4,Ses 2.Qd3/Qxf3/R(x)e5,Se7 #.
Now we see why Fink had bsg2 and wSc2. 1.Re3? was
refuled by 1...S2f4! when e3 is blocked by the wR, a try
ihat adds value to the oroblem. This means lhat we can't
use a bS to stop the 1.Re5+ cook, which in turn means
that wScO is impossible. We will have to settle for the
square guarding used by Fink. We also see that 1.Re1?
in (A) is refuted by 1...Qxe1, which seems the only way
to do it.
Eventually we get to the sound problem (C) which is
similar to (A) but more economical. Why did Fink use
more pieces? bRh6 stops duals 2.Be5,Re5 # after

trix

#4

1.93

2.5f3+ Bxf3 3.Sf5+ Ke4 4.d3 #


Sf5+ Bxf5 3. Sf3+ Ke4 4.Qc6 #
1...Sc4 2.Qxc4+ Ke5 3.Sge4 e 4.d4 #
1...S-

1. . . Sd3 2.

(H)

V F RUDENKO

1st Prize, Czoskos/ovensky Sach, 1956

#4

1.Ba7! (2.Qc8+ Kb5 3.Qc4+ Ka5 4.Qa4

1...Sh8,Se7 and bPhTstops 1...Rh8+. bPa4 stops

#)

1...Qa4,Qa2,Qxa1 after which there would be the duals


2.Rc5,Be6 #. The only black move that allows duals in
(A) is 1...Qd2 (2.Rc5,8e6 #) and he must have been sad

1. . . Sc3 2. Sd7+ Kd5 3. Qb7+ Kc4 4. Se5 *

1...Rf4 2.sc4+ Kds 3,Qb5+ Ke4 4.sd2

RECONSTRUCTION WORK
One way

(A)

Pittsburgh Gazetta nmos, 1914

1.Re2!

(2.Be6 f)

1...Bxc4 2.Qxf3 #
!...fxe2 2.af7 *
1. . . Qc5 2. Rxc5 #

(C) Version by BDS

to

leam
to
analyse the work of others, finding out the purpose of every piece on
the board. lf one clears
the board of all but the
pieces needed for the
theme and then tries io
conslruc;t a sound version, it is possible to
leam much about the
art of construclion. As
an example take a look

how

A J FINK

that he couldnl stoo


that. In his day such
duals were considered

serious flaws. Nowadays duals after black


moves that do not de-

to compose is

feat ihe lhreat are considered unimportant.

Thus the only reason

that our position is better that Fink's is because conventions have


changed!

Finally, what about


wPbO in (A)? I think it
merely makes the key

at (A), a famous problem wilh a spectacular

1.Re2! (2.Be6*) 1...sf8,

key.

1...8xc4 2.Qxf3 #

1...Kxc4+

1...56L...s2f4,
Se3

2.Rdz *

2.R(xle

5#

2.s(x)e3

s6f4,

Se5

L...fxe2 2.Qf? # L...s2f4,


1...Qc5
2.Rxc5 #
Se3
,..Kxc4+ 2.Rd2 #

2.R(x)e5
2.S(x)e3#

more unexpec{ed after the set line 1...cxb6 2.Rd6 #.

BDS