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AGENDA

Ordinary Meeting of Council


6.00pm Wednesday 4 November 2015
*** Broadcast live on Phoenix FM 106.7 ***

QUESTION TIME WILL BE LIMITED TO WRITTEN QUESTIONS RECEIVED BEFORE


12 NOON ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING. THE QUESTIONS WILL BE READ BY A COUNCIL
REPRESENTATIVE AND ANSWERED BY THE MAYOR. THERE WILL NOT BE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR
QUESTIONS TO BE ASKED FROM THE FLOOR

VENUE:
Reception Room,
Bendigo Town Hall,
Hargreaves Street, Bendigo

NEXT MEETING:
Special Meeting of Council - Tuesday 10 November 2015
Ordinary Meeting of Council - Wednesday 25 November 2015
Bendigo Town Hall
Copies of the City of Greater Bendigo Councils Agendas & Minutes
can be obtained online at www.bendigo.vic.gov.au

PAGE 1

Council Vision
Greater Bendigo - Working together to be Australia's most liveable regional city.

Council Values
Council wants the community to continue to have reason to be proud of the city and will
do this through:

Transparency - Information about Council decisions is readily available and easily


understood;
Efficiency and effectiveness - Council provides services based on evidence of
need and demonstrates continuous improvement in the delivery of services;
Inclusion and consultation - Council uses a range of engagement strategies to
ensure community members can understand and take part in discussion that
informs the development of new strategies and actions;
Clear decisive and consistent planning - In a rapidly growing municipality, Council
undertakes to plan effectively for our long-term future;
Respect for community priorities and needs - Council will advocate for improved
services for community members and will consider community impact and
feedback the decisions it makes.

Themes
1.

Planning for Growth

2.

Presentation and Vibrancy

3.

Productivity

4.

Sustainability

5.

Leadership and Good Governance

PAGE 2

ORDINARY MEETING
WEDNESDAY 4 NOVEMBER 2015

ORDER OF BUSINESS:
ITEM

PRECIS

PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

PRAYER

PRESENT

APOLOGIES

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

CR WERAGODA'S REPORT

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

1.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

11

1.1

Petition: To Keep Bendigo Occasional Care Open

11

2.

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

13

2.1

Planning Scheme Amendment C212 - Corrections


Amendment - Consider for Authorisation

13

2.2

376-378 High Street Golden Square - Partial Demolition of


Existing Dwellings, Demolition of Two Carports and
Construction of a 22 Unit Motel, Car Parking Reduction,
Advertising Signage and Creation of a Vehicular Access
to a Category Road Zone 1

27

2.3

21-25 Curtin Street, Flora Hill - 7 Lot Subdivision

31

2.4

Commercial Land and Activity Centre Strategy

48

2.5

Rosalind Park Recreation Reserve Precinct Master Plan


and Management Framework

64

2.6

Bendigo Botanic Gardens Cast Iron Conservatory

69

3.

PRESENTATION AND VIBRANCY

81

PAGE 3

3.1

Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan Annual


Review

81

3.2

Positive Ageing Strategy 2011-2015 Completion Report

87

3.3

Violence Prevention Plan 2012-2015 Completion Report

93

4.

PRODUCTIVITY

97

4.1

Economic Development Strategy: 2014-2020


(Implementation Update)

97

4.2

Bendigo Tramways Study and Strategic Plan

101

4.3

Annual Summary of Operations - Capital Venues and


Events 2014/15

116

4.4

Annual Summary of Operations - Bendigo Art Gallery


2014/15

122

4.5

Annual Summary of Operations: Bendigo Airport 2014/15

127

4.6

Annual Summary of Operations - Bendigo and Heathcote


Tourism Visitor Information Centres 2014/15

132

4.7

Annual Summary of Operations - Major Events Unit


2014/15

141

4.8

Bendigo Small Business Festival 2015

146

5.

SUSTAINABILITY

150

6.

LEADERSHIP AND GOOD GOVERNANCE

151

6.1

City of Greater Bendigo Annual Report 2014/2015

151

6.2

Councillor Conduct Panel Decision

155

6.3

Council Meeting Dates 2015/2016

157

6.4

Audit Committee Chairperson's Annual Report 2014/15

159

6.5

Independent Review Progress Report November 2015

162

6.6

Record of Assemblies

172

6.7

Contracts Awarded Under Delegation

179

7.

URGENT BUSINESS

181

8.

NOTICES OF MOTION

181

9.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

181

10.

MAYOR'S REPORT

181

11.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

181

12.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

181

PAGE 4

12.1

Confidential Report in accordance with Section 89(2)(e) of


the Local Government Act 1989, relating to a proposed
development.

____________________________
CRAIG NIEMANN
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

PAGE 5

181

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY
PRAYER
PRESENT
APOLOGIES

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS


That Standing Orders be suspended to allow the conduct of Public Question Time.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME


Public Question Time Guidelines
Public Question Time Purpose
Council has provided the opportunity for members of the public to lodge written questions
of broad interest to Council and the community. Matters relating to routine Council works
should be taken up with Councils Customer Service Officers through its Customer
Request System.
Question time will be limited to written questions received before 12 noon on the
day of the meeting. The questions will be read by a Council representative and
answered by the Mayor.
No questions relating to planning matters on the Agenda will be accepted. By the time
planning matters have reached the council agenda, they have been through an extensive
process as required by the Planning and Environment Act. In addition, in most instances
mediation has been held between the parties involved. Throughout the process there are
many opportunities for people to ask questions.
Public Question Time Where, When And Who
The public question time is held at every Ordinary Meeting of Greater Bendigo City
Council. Meetings of Council commence at 6.00pm in the Reception Room, Bendigo
Town Hall, Hargreaves Street, Bendigo.
The public question time is held at the start of the meeting as close as practical to
6:00pm. A maximum of 30 minutes has been provided for registered written questions.

PAGE 6

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Acceptance of Questions
Councils Meeting Procedure Local Law does not allow for other questions or comments
during the remainder of the meeting.
1.

An individual may only lodge one question per meeting.

2.

In the event that the same or similar written question is raised by more than one
person, an answer may be given as a combined response.

3.

In the event that time does not permit all written questions registered to be
answered, questions will be answered in writing or referred to the next meeting if
appropriate.

4.

The Mayor and or CEO have the right to decline registration on basis of:
Legal proceedings;
More appropriately addressed by other means;
Vague or lacking in substance, irrelevant, frivolous, insulting offensive,
improper, defamatory or demeaning;
Answer likely to compromise his / her position;
Confidential, commercial-in-confidence.

5.

Each individual whose written question has been accepted or declined will be
advised by early afternoon on the day of the scheduled meeting.

6.

In the event of a written question being declined the question will be circulated to
the Council for information.

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS


That Standing Orders be resumed.

CR WERAGODA'S REPORT

PAGE 7

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST


Pursuant to Sections 77, 78 and 79 of the Local Government Act 1989 (as
amended) direct and indirect conflict of interest must be declared prior to debate
on specific items within the agenda; or in writing to the Chief Executive Officer
before the meeting. Declaration of indirect interests must also include the
classification of the interest (in circumstances where a Councillor has made a
Declaration in writing, the classification of the interest must still be declared at the
meeting), i.e.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)

direct financial interest


indirect interest by close association
indirect interest that is an indirect financial interest
indirect interest because of conflicting duties
indirect interest because of receipt of an applicable gift
indirect interest as a consequence of becoming an interested party
indirect interest as a result of impact on residential amenity
conflicting personal interest

A Councillor who has declared a conflict of interest, must leave the meeting and
remain outside the room while the matter is being considered, or any vote is taken.
Councillors are also encouraged to declare circumstances where there may be a
perceived conflict of interest.

PAGE 8

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES
Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Wednesday 14 October 2015.
The following items were considered at the Ordinary Council meeting held on
Wednesday 14 October 2015 at 6:00pm.

Petition: Request for City of Greater Bendigo to Rethink Organic Waste Options
Response to Petition: Keep the Discovery Science and Technology Centre Open
Response to Petition: Kangaroo Flat (Browning Street) Leisure Centre
Building/Greater Bendigo Aquatic and Wellbeing Centre
Response to Petition: Request to Provide an Additional Access Road and Car
Parking within the Big Hill Primary School Vicinity
Petitions Not Requiring Council Resolution
Safe Haven Enterprise Visa Program
Draft Greater Bendigo Municipal Early Years Plan
Greater Bendigo Regional Food Hub - Draft Feasibility Study
Aquatic Facility Operations Summary 2014/15
2016-2017 Community Sports Infrastructure Fund
Timor Leste Report 30 September 2015
2015/16 Community Grants Program Round 1
Planning Scheme Amendment C214 - Domestic Wastewater Management Strategy For Adoption
Planning Scheme Amendment C219 - Applying the Heritage Overlay to Part of 16
Crook Street, Kennington - For Adoption
11-13 Weir Court, Kangaroo Flat - Subdivision of Land (4 Lots), Demolition of
Outbuildings; Removal of an Easement and Creation of an Easement
182 Wattle Street, Bendigo - Partial Demolition of Dwelling, Demolition of
Outbuilding, Three Storey Extension to Existing Dwelling and Construction of
Swimming Pool (Amended Plans)
485 Tannery Lane, Strathfieldsaye - 2 Lot Subdivision
142 Ryalls Lane, Strathfieldsaye - 2 Lot Subdivision of Land
73-77 Kennewell Street and 171 St Killian Street, White Hills - Staged Subdivision of
Land into 21 Lots and Removal of Native Vegetation
Unity Mining ERC - Nominations for Community Representatives
Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme Amendment C217 - Big Hill and Mandurang
Valley Landscape Assessment
Financial Statements and Performance Statement for the Financial Year 2014/2015
Bendigo Golf Club - Request to Reimburse Back Rates
Policies Applicable to Councillors
Councillor Dispute Resolution
Membership of Murray Darling Association
Submission to Heritage Act Review 2015
Record of Assemblies
Contracts Awarded Under Delegation
Appointment of Independent Member of the Audit Committee
Notice of Motion: Lake Eppalock
Confidential Section 89 Report: Contractual Matter

PAGE 9

10

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

The unconfirmed minutes have also been posted on the City of Greater Bendigo website
pending confirmation at this meeting.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on Wednesday 14 October
2015, as circulated, be taken as read and confirmed.

PAGE 10

11

1.

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

1.1

PETITION: TO KEEP BENDIGO OCCASIONAL CARE OPEN

[Petitions and joint letters with ten (10) or more signatures are included in the agenda or
tabled at the meeting, unless there is a separate legal process for considering the
petition or joint letter, as there is for planning submissions or submissions following
public notices (Section 223 LGA)].

A petition has been received from concerned residents and ratepayers regarding the
proposal to change the Bendigo Occasional Care to 'Long Day Care', as outlined below:
"We, the undersigned residents and ratepayers of Greater Bendigo City Council,
formally request Council to keep Bendigo Occasional Care as 'occasional child
care' instead of changing to 'long day care' from January 2016. There is no
alternative occasional care available in Bendigo for families that currently use this
crche or for families that will require occasional care in the future. Being used by
many families, this crche has been in operation since November 1988. Bendigo
Occasional Care has enabled parents to work casually or on a roster, to study and
go out on placement, for at risk families to have a break for an hour or two, for the
stay at home parent to be able to attend an appointment, these are only a few of
the reasons that care is needed, to lose this facility would be a great loss to the
Bendigo community".

Signatures

151

Officer comment (Pauline Gordon, Director Community Wellbeing)


Council resolved in late 2014 to convert the Bendigo Occasional Care Centre at the
Annie Galvin Learning Centre to a Long Day Care Early Learning Centre as from 1
January 2016.
The rationale for this decision was as follows:
The Occasional Care Centre was significantly underutilised and the cost of
providing the service was increasing
Virtually all the 18 Occasional Care Centres established in 1987 across the
country have now been converted to long day care centres due to the centres not
being viable
Council only provide around 13% of the total of childcare places available in the
City.

PAGE 11

12

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

There will still be capacity for 20 occasional care places across Councils Early
Learning Centres. In addition when there are absences in the long day care
places, it is a good business practice to fill these places with occasional care
users.
There is an overall loss of nine occasional care places and Council adopted the
transfer of occasional care places to long day care as a result of its low utilisation
of 49% and the expense incurred.
Given Council made this decision in late 2014, the transfer has already been
approved and is effective from January 2016. These long day care places are
already committed.
Other centres across Bendigo also provide occasional care, for reasons such as
appointments or socialisation purposes. Families are encouraged to contact early
learning centres to discuss their individual needs.
The Commonwealth is currently reviewing the Family Day Care and In Home
Services in recognition of the need to provide flexible and affordable child care.

RECOMMENDATION
That the petitioners be advised of Council's previous decision and that parents be
encouraged to discuss their individual childcare needs with the Childcare Centre
Coordinators.

PAGE 12

Planning for Growth - Reports

2.

13

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

2.1

PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C212 - CORRECTIONS


AMENDMENT - CONSIDER FOR AUTHORISATION

Document Information
Author

Frank Casimir, Statutory Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Amendment details:

This Amendment corrects technical and mapping errors in


the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme to further improve its
effective and efficient operation. It also provides for the
rezoning of one Council-owned property that Council has
identified as being a surplus asset.

Proponent:

City of Greater Bendigo - Planning Services

Key issues:

Remove unnecessary planning permit triggers resulting


from zoning or overlay mapping errors.
On-going improvements to the operation of the Greater
Bendigo Planning Scheme.
Rezone Council owned 15-17 Balmoral Drive, Golden
Square to General Residential Zone as Council has
already resolved to sell this land.

Recommendation:

Council requests the Minister for Planning to authorise


Amendment C212 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme,
and when authorised, exhibit the Amendment.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2015-2016 Update)
Planning for Growth:
Council manages the planning and development of the City through the preparation
of major Strategies and effective amendments to the planning scheme.
o Continue to review and improve planning systems and procedures.

PAGE 13

Planning for Growth - Reports

14

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Background Information
The key steps in the Amendment process are summarised below:

Amendment prepared

Council decides whether to seek


Ministerial Authorisation

We are at this
point

Public Exhibition of Amendment

Submissions received

Council requests an Independent


Panel to consider submissions

Panel Hearing held

Council decides to Adopt or


Abandon the Amendment

Send to Minister for Approval


and Gazettal

The Amendment forms part of the on-going identification of errors in the Planning
Scheme by City planning officers and the general public. The amendment is part of the
Planning Units regular system improvements programme.
The amendment has been prepared to correct 73 identified anomalies and errors in the
Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. The anomalies and errors are minor in nature and
the corrections will mostly reflect the current land use and/or ownership. It is expected
that these corrections will result in the more effective operation of the Scheme.
Out of the 73 proposed corrections, 27 have previously been considered by Council as
part of Amendment C210. Amendment C210 went to the Minister for Planning as a
request under the Prescribed Ministerial Amendment process where the Minister
undertakes fast track amendments to fix errors. Unfortunately, the Minister refused to
correct all of the errors submitted.

PAGE 14

Planning for Growth - Reports

15

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

The amendment also includes 15-17 Balmoral Drive, Golden Square, identified by
Council as a surplus asset to be disposed of and already supported by Council for
authorisation for rezoning. This amendment is a step forward toward the rezoning of this
property before it can be sold.

Previous Council Decisions


06 May 2015

Council resolved to sell 15-17 Balmoral Drive, Golden Square (part)


subject to section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989 after
requesting the Minister for Planning authorisation to prepare and
exhibit an amendment rezone it.

18 June 2014

Council resolved to request the Minister for Planning to prepare, adopt


and approve Prescribed Amendment (Corrections and Anomalies)
C210.

Report
The Planning and Environment Act 1987 allows for a Planning Scheme Amendment to
be initiated by a municipal Council, or a Council can respond to a request for an
Amendment by any person or body.
When requesting authorisation from the Minister for Planning, an Explanatory Report
must be submitted that discusses the purpose, effects and strategic justification for the
Amendment. Key issues identified in the Explanatory Report are summarised below.
Land Affected by the Amendment & What the Amendment does
The amendment affects the following 73 properties. Due to the number of properties
involved, it is not practical to provide a map in this report to show them all.
The amendment proposes to correct zone, overlay and text errors in the Greater Bendigo
Planning Scheme. The errors come mainly from mapping errors, historic uses or land
having been transferred from public to private ownership or vice-versa without the
appropriate required rezoning.
The amendment proposes to correct the zones for 49 properties, correct overlays on 14
properties and corrects zoning and overlays on 10 properties.
The amendment also includes the following change:
In the Local Planning Policy Framework Clause 22.26 (White Hills Residential
Character Policy), the Objectives and design response for the White Hills Precinct 3
(WH3) is amended to identify the following correction:
o The second design response now reads as Buildings should be setback between
1 and 3 metres from both side boundaries, based on the predominant pattern in
the streetscape.
o The third design response now reads as The front setback should be not less
than the average setback of the adjoining two dwelling.
PAGE 15

Planning for Growth - Reports

16

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Summary of Abbreviations
CZ

Commercial Zone

FZ

Farming Zone

GRZ

General Residential Zone

IZ

Industrial Zone

LDRZ

Low Density Residential Zone

MUZ

Mixed Use Zone

PCRZ

Public Conservation & Resource Zone

PPRZ

Public Park & Recreation Zone

PUZ

Public Use Zone

RDZ

Road Zone

RLZ

Rural Living Zone

SUZ

Special Use Zone

TZ

Township Zone

BMO

Bushfire Management Overlay

DDO

Design & Development Overlay

DPO

Development Plan Overlay

EAO

Environmental Audit Overlay

ESO

Environmental Significance Overlay

HO

Heritage Overlay

LSIO

Land Subject to Inundation Overlay

NCO

Neighbourhood Character Overlay

PO

Parking Overlay

SLO

Significant Landscape Overlay

VPO

Vegetation Protection Overlay

Property
Address

Current Zones /
Overlays

Proposed

Reasons

Dairy
Flat
Road, Argyle

FZ/PCRZ, BMO
and ESO3

Rezone CA B16R
from PCRZ to FZ.
No change to
overlays

Private land in two zones


(Mapping error). PCRZ not
appropriate for private land.

8 Sugarloaf
Road, Axedale

RLZ,
VPO2

Include the
existing house in
the Planning
Scheme Map
(34HO).

The house is listed in the


Schedule to the Heritage
Overlay (HO741) but was
not mapped. Correction of
a mapping error/omission

ESO1,

PAGE 16

Planning for Growth - Reports

Property
Address

17

Current Zones /
Overlays

Proposed

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Reasons

77-85 Pall Mall,


Bendigo (former
Police Station),
Bendigo

PUZ6 (Local
Government),
DDO5, HO227,
PO1

Rezone to PUZ7
(Other public
use). No change
to the overlays

Public land not used by


local government (being
used by the Bendigo
Magistrate Court).

30 Myers Street
Bendigo

GRZ,
DDO5,
NCO1, PO1

Rezone to MUZ

Isolated residential parcel,


rezoning will facilitate
orderly zoning pattern.

133-145 Lily
Street Bendigo
(St John of God
Hospital Site).

SUZ2
(Private
Hospital), HO11
in part

Delete HO11

HO11 covers the site at


138-140 Lily Street and
encroaches into part of the
adjoining Lily Street road
reserve. This road reserve
has now been acquired to
form part of the hospital site
and therefore, the HO is no
longer required on this
portion of land.

208 Forest
Street, Bendigo

PPRZ /GRZ

Rezone to GRZ

Private land incorrectly in


two zones with existing
residential use. PPRZ not
appropriate.

32 Myers
Street, Bendigo

MUZ, NCO1,
PO1, DDD5

Delete NCO1

NCO1 not appropriate to the


zoning of the land (MUZ).

4/84 Mollison
Street, Bendigo

MUZ,
NCO1,
PO1, DDO5

Delete NCO1

NCO1 not appropriate to the


zoning of the land (MUZ).

18 Rose Street,
California Gully

GRZ

Rezone to PPRZ

Public land used as a park.


COGB is committee of
management and wants the
land to remain as a park.

3 Staley Street,
California Gully

GRZ,
HO329

Apply HO329 to
the whole site

Correction of a mapping
error as the HO has only
been applied to half of the
property.

18
Hodgson
Street,
Eaglehawk

GRZ/PCRZ

Rezone the whole


site to PCRZ.

Public land (DELWP). GRZ


not appropriate.

30
Whipstick
Road,
Eaglehawk

FZ/GRZ/PCRZ/
RCZ

Rezone the whole


site to PCRZ

Public land (DELWP).

19 Walls Street,
Eaglehawk

GRZ/ PPRZ

Rezone the whole


site to GRZ

Private land in two zones


with existing residential use.
PPRZ not appropriate.

25 Walls Street,
Eaglehawk

GRZ/ PPRZ

Rezone the whole


site to GRZ.

Private land in two zones


with existing residential use.
PPRZ not appropriate.

Part

PAGE 17

Planning for Growth - Reports

Property
Address

Current Zones /
Overlays

18

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Proposed

Reasons

36
Burnside
Street,
Eaglehawk

PPRZ/GRZ

Rezone the whole


site to GRZ.

Private land in two zones


with existing residential use.
PPRZ not appropriate.

20 Lester
Street,
Eaglehawk

GRZ, HO371

Delete HO371

Apply HO22

The dwelling individually


listed as HO371 has now
been removed from the site
and this HO is no longer
relevant.
HO22 which
applies to the whole precinct
should be applied to this site
instead.

91-99 Midland
Highway,
Epsom

C2Z/PPRZ/
FZ, ESO1, LSIO

Rezone the whole


site to C2Z.
No change to the
overlays.

Private land in three zones


with existing commercial
development. PPRZ and
FZ not appropriate.

52 Simmie
Street, Elmore

PUZ4

Rezone to TZ

Private land with existing


residential use.

54 Simmie
Street, Elmore

PUZ4

Rezone to TZ

Private land with existing


residential use.

56 Simmie
Street, Elmore

PUZ4

Rezone to TZ

Private land with existing


residential use.

58 Simmie
Street, Elmore

PUZ4

Rezone to TZ

Private land with existing


residential use.

60 Simmie
Street, Elmore

PUZ4

Rezone to TZ

Private land with existing


residential use.

65-69 Railway
Place, Elmore
(developed with
dwelling and
post office)

RDZ1

Rezone to TZ

Private land with existing


residential use (Mapping
error).

2 Dean Close,
East Bendigo

LDRZ/PUZ1,
DPO4, DDO17,
EAO2

Rezone the whole


site to LDRZ.
No change to the
overlay.

Land in two zones with


existing residential use.
PUZ1 (Service & Utility) not
appropriate for residential
land.

22-24 Hammer
Street, Flora Hill

GRZ

Rezone to C1Z

Private land
commercial
(coffee shop)

26-30 Hammer
Street, Flora Hill

GRZ

Rezone to C1Z

Private land being used for


commercial purposes
(Pharmacy) for 15+ years.

29 Wirth Street,
Flora Hill

GRZ/PUZ2

Rezone the whole


site
to
PUZ2
(Education)

La Trobe University
Campus (Mapping error).

PAGE 18

used for
purposes

Planning for Growth - Reports

Property
Address

19

Current Zones /
Overlays

70-74
Woodward
Road, Golden
Gully

PCRZ/LDRZ,
DPO4, BMO

32-34
MacCullagh
Street, Golden
Gully

Proposed

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Reasons

Rezone the whole


site to PCRZ.

Park erroneously
LDRZ

Delete DPO4

DPO4 not applicable on


PPRZ zoned land.

LDRZ/PPRZ,
VPO1, ESO1

Rezone the whole


site to LDRZ.
No change to
overlays

Private land in two zones


with existing residential use.
PPRZ not appropriate.

97
Maple
Street, Golden
Square

GRZ

Rezone to PCRZ

Public land (DELWP). GRZ


not appropriate.

119
Hattam
Street, Golden
Square

GRZ/IN1Z

Rezone the whole


site to PCRZ.

Public land (DELWP)


surrounded by a residential
area. PPRZ required for
consistency with adjoining
public land.

77A Mackenzie
Street West,
Golden Square

GRZ/PPRZ

Rezone the whole


site to PPRZ.

Public land (DELWP). GRZ


not appropriate.

21-27
Inglewood
Street, Golden
Square

GRZ/PUZ2

Rezone the whole


site to PUZ2
(Education)

Public land used for


education. GRZ not
appropriate.

67 Inglewood
Street, Golden
Square

LDRZ/GRZ/
PUZ1

Rezone the whole


site to PUZ1
(Service & Utility)

Public land (Coliban Water).


GRZ and LDRZ not
appropriate.

15-17 Balmoral
Drive Golden
Square

PPRZ

Rezone to GRZ

Council has resolved that


the land is surplus and
should be disposed of after
rezoning to GRZ.

55-59 Englishs
Road,
Goornong

LDRZ, DPO4

PUZ6 (Local
Government)
Delete DPO4
Apply EAO

Public land.

Ward Street,
Goornong

LDRZ
DPO4

PPRZ
Delete DPO4

Council land. LRDZ not


appropriate.

1 Barrack
Street,
Heathcote

LDRZ,
ESO3,
BMO

Rezone to PCRZ

Public-owned
(DELWP).

Delete DPO4

DPO4 not applicable on


public land zone.

82-84 Rennie
Street, Huntly

C2Z/LDRZ,
DPO4,
ESO1
(Part),
LSIO
(Part)

Rezone the whole


site to LDRZ.
No change to the
overlays

Mapping error.

DPO4,
SLO1,

PAGE 19

zoned

land

Planning for Growth - Reports

Property
Address

20

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Current Zones /
Overlays

Proposed

40-56 Marong
Road, Ironbark

PPRZ/GRZ/
PUZ7,
HO26,
HO27, HO492

Rezone the whole


site to PPRZ.
No change to
overlays.

Public land (COGB).


PUZ7
and
GRZ
appropriate.

218 Don Street,


Ironbark

PPRZ/GRZ

Rezone to GRZ

Private land in two zones


with existing residential use.
PPRZ not appropriate.

155 Kangaroo
Gully Road,
Kangaroo Flat

PCRZ/LDRZ

Rezone the whole


site to PCRZ.

Parkland (regional park)


erroneously zoned LDRZ.

39-47 Muir
Street,
Kangaroo Flat

LDRZ,
SLO1

Rezone to PCRZ

Public
land
(DELWP).
LDRZ not appropriate.

Delete DPO4

DPO4 not applicable


public zone land.

Rezone to LDRZ

Private land with existing


residential use Proposed
zone and overlays are
consistent with adjoining
residential sites.

39 Golden Gully
Road,
Kangaroo Flat

PCRZ

2 Short Street
Kangaroo Flat

PUZ4
HO704

DPO4,

Apply DPO4 and


SLO1

Reasons

not

to

Rezone to GRZ

Private land with existing


residential use.

Delete HO704

HO704 applies to the


adjoining Railway Station
Complex only and has
erroneously been applied to
this private residence.

12 Carpenter
Street,
Kangaroo Flat

PPRZ / GRZ

Rezone to GRZ

Private land in two zones


with existing residential use.
PPRZ not required.

14 Carpenter
Street,
Kangaroo Flat

PPRZ /GRZ

Rezone the whole


site to GRZ.

Private land in two zones


with existing residential use.
PPRZ not required.

266
High
Street,
Kangaroo Flat

GRZ /PPRZ

Rezone the whole


site to GRZ.

Private land in two zones


with
existing
private
residences.
PPRZ
not
required

Morrison Street,
Kangaroo Flat

PPRZ, DPO4

Delete
DPO4
(Density
Management
Areas)

DPO4
(Density
Management Areas) not
applicable to public land.

1-25 Poulston
Street, Long
Gully

GRZ

Rezone to PCRZ

Public land owned


DELWP.
GRZ
appropriate.

PAGE 20

by
not

Planning for Growth - Reports

Property
Address

Current Zones /
Overlays

21

Proposed

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Reasons

59-69 Anderson
Street, Long
Gully

GRZ

Rezone to PCRZ

Public land owned by Parks


Victoria.
GRZ
not
appropriate.

721 Calder
Alternative
Highway,
Lockwood
South

FZ, HO531

Rezone to PPRZ
HO531

Public land being used as a


cricket oval.
FZ not
appropriate.

47 Gold
Associates
Road, Maiden
Gully

IN3Z/SUZ4

Rezone the whole


site
to
SUZ4
(Private Sport and
Recreation
Facilities, Marong
Raceway Go-Kart
Track).

Public land being used as a


recreation facility.

2A Hannans
Road,
Mandurang
South

PPRZ/LDRZ
DPO4

Rezone the whole


site to PCRZ

Parkland erroneously zoned


LDRZ.

Delete DPO4

DPO4 not applicable on


PPRZ zoned land

Latham Street,
North Bendigo

LDRZ

Rezone to PCRZ

Public-owned land.

Delete DPO4

DPO4 not applicable


public zone land.

106 Prouses
Road, North
Bendigo

LDRZ,
DPO4,
SLO1, VPO2

Rezone to PCRZ.

Public-owned
land
(DELWP) and the proposed
new zone is consistent with
adjoining public land.

Delete DPO4.

DPO4 not applicable


public zone land.

to

to

208A
Holdsworth
Road, North
Bendigo

GRZ/PPRZ

Rezone the whole


site to PPRZ.

Public land (DELWP). GRZ


not appropriate.

48 Caledonia
Street, North
Bendigo

C1Z

Rezone to GRZ

Private
land
with
established residential use.

50 Caledonia
Street, North
Bendigo

C1Z

Rezone to GRZ

Private
land
with
established residential use.
Owners have requested the
zone be corrected to GRZ.

2 Degille Street,
North Bendigo

GRZ
/LDRZ,
DPO4, VPO2

Rezone the whole


site to GRZ.

Land in two zones with most


of the site in GRZ. LDRZ
not required.

PAGE 21

Planning for Growth - Reports

Property
Address

22

Current Zones /
Overlays

Proposed

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Reasons

Delete DPO4
(Density
Management
Areas)
VPO2 to remain.

DPO4
(Density
Management Areas)
not
applicable to GRZ

Delete HO587

Incorrect HO applied. HO30


(the Precinct HO) to be
applied.

33 Carpenter
Street, Quarry
Hill

GRZ, HO587

35 Carpenter
Street, Quarry
Hill

GRZ, HO587

37 Carpenter
Street, Quarry
Hill

GRZ, HO587

39 Carpenter
Street, Quarry
Hill

GRZ, HO587

41 Carpenter
Street, Quarry
Hill

GRZ, HO587

49 Miller Street,
Quarry Hill

GRZ, HO600

31 Franklin
Street, Sailors
Gully

GRZ/PCRZ

Rezone the whole


site to PCRZ.

Public land.

35-37 Chelsea
Boulevard,
Strathdale

GRZ

Rezone to PPRZ

Public land.
required.

169
Spring
Gully
Road,
Spring Gully

PPRZ/C1Z,
ESO1 and LSIO
(both in part)

Rezone the whole


site to C1Z
No change to
overlays.

Private land in two zones


with existing commercial
use. PPRZ not appropriate.

35 Union
Street, West
Bendigo

PPRZ

Rezone to GRZ

Private land with existing


residential use. PPRZ not
required.

51 Bayliss
Road,
Woodvale

FZ, HO852

Delete the HO on
part of the site.

The heritage significance is


limited to part of the site
only therefore the extent of
the HO should be reduced.

6 Wattle Drive
Spring Gully

GRZ,
ESO

Rezone to PPRZ

At the request of City


Property Department as
Council is the owner.

29 McClelland
Drive,
Eaglehawk

GRZ, BMO

Rezone to PPRZ

At the request of City


Property Department as
Council is the owner.

Apply HO30
Delete HO587
Apply HO30
Delete HO587
Apply HO30
Delete HO587
Apply HO30
Delete HO587
Apply HO30
Delete HO600
Apply HO30

BMO,

PAGE 22

Incorrect HO applied. HO30


(the Precinct HO) to be
applied.
Incorrect HO applied. HO30
(the Precinct HO) to be
applied.
Incorrect HO applied. HO30
(the Precinct HO) to be
applied.
Incorrect HO applied. HO30
(the Precinct HO) to be
applied.
Incorrect HO applied. HO30
(the Precinct HO) to be
applied.

GRZ

not

Planning for Growth - Reports

23

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Social, Economic and Environmental Impacts


The proposed corrections to the zones, overlays or to the text of the Planning Scheme
will have no significant adverse social, economic or environmental effects. The proposed
zone corrections will be of social and economic benefit as unnecessary and
inappropriate development controls will be removed from the affected land to facilitate
their existing uses and future development. There will also be environmental benefit
because the Amendment will ensure that the properties are covered with the correct
overlay and only to the extent required.
The explanatory report gives further details on the social, economic and environmental
effects of the Amendment.
Strategic Justification Planning Context
The Amendment is supported by the following clauses in the Greater Bendigo Planning
Scheme:
State Planning Policy Framework
Clause 11.03 Open space management
The objective of this clause is to provide for the long term management of public open
space. The Amendment supports the objective of this policy by rezoning public land
used as public open space to Public Park and Recreation Zone.
Clause 13.03 Use of contaminated and potentially contaminated land
The objective of this clause is to ensure that potentially contaminated land is suitable for
its intended future use and development, and that contaminated land is used safely. Due
consideration has been given so no property currently known as being potentially
contaminated will be rezoned to a zone which will allow a sensitive use.
Clause 15.03 Heritage Conservation
The objective of this clause is to ensure the conservation of places of heritage
significance. The Amendment supports the objective of this policy by amending the
Schedule to the Heritage Overlay, by accurately mapping a number of properties of
heritage significance and by applying the correct heritage overlay to various properties.
Clause 16.01 Housing (Residential Development)
The objective of this clause is to promote a housing market that meets community needs.
The Amendment supports the objective of this policy by rezoning land which is currently
being used for residential purposes but which is inhibited from further development
because it is not appropriately zoned.

PAGE 23

Planning for Growth - Reports

24

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Clause 17.01 Commercial (Business)


The objective of this clause is to encourage development which meets the communitys
needs for retail, entertainment, office and other commercial services and provides net
community benefit in relation to accessibility, efficient infrastructure use and the
aggregation and sustainability of commercial facilities.
Four of the properties affected by this Amendment are currently being used for
commercial purposes but are not in the correct zone for historic reasons or due to
mapping errors. The Amendment corrects this by rezoning the subject properties to
either Commercial 1 Zone or to Commercial 2 Zone to facilitate their existing use and
further development.
Clause 19.02-2 Education facilities
The objective of this clause is to assist the integration of education facilities with local
and regional communities. This clause is relevant to this Amendment because the
proposed corrections also affect two properties with existing educational uses. The
amendment will rezone these properties to Public Use Zone 2 (Education) to reflect their
existing uses and future development.
Clause 19.03-2 Water supply, sewerage and drainage
The objective of this clause is to plan for the provision of water supply, sewerage and
drainage services that efficiently and effectively meet State and community needs and
protect the environment. The amendment corrects a mapping error on a site used by
Coliban Water to ensure the zone reflects the current use of the site.
Local Planning Policy Framework
Clause 21.07 Economic Development
This amendment is consistent with this clause as it will ensure that land being used for
commercial purposes is appropriately zoned for the business uses.
Clause 21.08-1 Environment (Heritage)
The objective of this clause is to protect and enhance the municipalitys built heritage for
future generations. The amendment is consistent with this clause as it ensures places of
heritage significance are correctly mapped in the Planning Scheme.
Clause 22.01 Development at the urban-forest interface Policy
The objective of this policy is to ensure residential development protects and maintains
the environmental values of adjoining forested areas surrounding Bendigo.
The amendment deletes the Development Plan Overlay Schedule 4 (Density
Management) from a number of publicly owned sites because they are not zoned for
residential development. Similarly, it applies the Overlay to a number of properties
consistent with surrounding properties where the Overlay is applied.

PAGE 24

Planning for Growth - Reports

25

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Clause 22.06 Heritage Policy


The main objective of this policy is to ensure that Greater Bendigos heritage assets are
maintained and protected. The amendment corrects a number of mapping errors for the
heritage overlay to ensure that buildings or places of heritage significance are
appropriately protected and maintained.
Consultation/Communication
All land owners and occupiers have been notified of the Amendment and of the proposed
changes to their respective properties. Although not all affected land owners yet
provided a response to the City, it is not anticipated any of them would raise any major
issue because of the nature of the amendment.
The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning have submitted preliminary
comments and they are agreeable to the proposed changes to the zoning of their land.
As the amendment will be put on public exhibition after it has been authorised, the
affected land owners will have another opportunity to submit their concerns to the City to
be addressed and resolved.
The documents will be publicly exhibited for a minimum of a month, as required under
the Planning and Environment Act 1987. The City must give notice of Amendments to all
owners and occupiers who may be materially affected by an Amendment, together with
prescribed Ministers and public authorities. The Amendment will also be exhibited in the
Government Gazette, the Bendigo Advertiser Newspaper and the McIvor Times.
Conclusion
The Amendment seeks to correct minor errors in the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme
to make it work more efficiently. If it proceeds to the exhibition stage, the City does not
anticipate it will receive major concerns or submissions from the land owners or
occupiers that the amendment affects.
It is recommended that Council seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to
prepare and exhibit the Amendment.
Options
Council has the option of:
Supporting the Amendment proposal and making a request to the Minister for
Planning to authorise preparation and exhibition of the Amendment.
Requesting further information. The Amendment application documentation is not
sufficiently comprehensive for a request to the Minster at this time and would require
considerable financial investment to address all issues.
Refusing to request authorisation.

PAGE 25

Planning for Growth - Reports

26

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Resource Implications
The City is responsible for payment of statutory fees and costs incurred in the processing
of the Amendment. This may include a panel hearing process if the Amendment has
unresolved submissions following exhibition but this is highly unlikely.
Officer time will also be required to prepare the Amendment documentation for
exhibition, manage the process and liaise with the Minister for Planning. If the Minister
agrees to authorise Council to prepare the Amendment, there will be a statutory fee
payable of $798 for ministerial approval. We could, however, ask for a fee waiver
because this amendment is to correct errors in the Planning Scheme and some of these
corrections were refused in Amendment C210.
There will be minimal effect on the future resources of the responsible authority as permit
activity will have a negligible net change. It is rather expected that some activities will no
longer require a planning permit as they will be in the correct zone.
Attachments
Explanatory Report
Maps
RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1.

Request the Minister for Planning to authorise Council to prepare Amendment


C212 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.

2.

When Authorised by the Minister, exhibit Amendment C212 to the Greater


Bendigo Planning Scheme giving notification as required for the minimum
statutory exhibition period of one month.

3.

Request the Minister for Planning to waive approval fees as the amendment is
fixing errors in the Planning Scheme as he has refused to correct some of them
previously in C210.

PAGE 26

Planning for Growth - Reports

2.2

27

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

376-378 HIGH STREET GOLDEN SQUARE - PARTIAL DEMOLITION


OF EXISTING DWELLINGS, DEMOLITION OF TWO CARPORTS AND
CONSTRUCTION OF A 22 UNIT MOTEL, CAR PARKING
REDUCTION, ADVERTISING SIGNAGE AND CREATION OF A
VEHICULAR ACCESS TO A CATEGORY ROAD ZONE 1

Document Information
Author

Chris Duckett, Planning Coordinator

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Application details:

Partial demolition of existing dwellings, demolition of two car


ports and construction of a 22 unit motel, car parking
reduction, advertising signage and creation of a vehicular
access to a Category Road Zone 1

Application No:

DC/157/2014

Applicant:

Filkel Pty Ltd

Land:

376-378 High Street GOLDEN SQUARE

Zoning:

General Residential Zone

Overlays:

Neighbourhood Character Overlay 1

No. of objections:

Key considerations:

The purpose of this report is to clarify Councils resolution of


27 May 2015 to approve Notice of Decision to Grant a
Planning Permit for the development with regard to
forthcoming VCAT Hearing.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2014)
Planning for Growth
Adaptability for change and population growth through good design and careful
planning of infrastructure and facilities.
Diverse, affordable and sustainable, housing choices.
Productivity
Fostering business and industry growth.
Sustainability
Distinctive natural setting and buildings are celebrated and conserved.

PAGE 27

Planning for Growth - Reports

28

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Report
Background Information
When the application was reported to Council in May, officers recommended refusal of a
planning permit on the following two grounds:
1. The proposal would be detrimental to neighbourhood character and is a poor urban
design response to the site context thereby contrary to clauses 15, 21.02-4, 22.08,
22.15, 32.08, 43.05, 52.06-8 and 55 of the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.
2. The proposed development has not been designed to make an efficient use of solar
energy contrary to clause 55 of the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.
At the request of Council an alternate motion was drafted with conditions that would
enable Council to approve a development that was in compliance with the Planning
Scheme. The alternate motion included the following conditions:
Condition 1 (bullet point 2) - The retention of the large eucalyptus tree at 376 High
Street.
Condition 6 - Prior to commencement of the development the Developer must
prepare and implement a Tree Management Plan conforming to Australian Standard
AS4970-2009 Protection of trees on development sites.
Council moved an alternate motion to approve a Notice of Decision (NOD) to grant a
planning permit in line with the drafted conditions, excluding condition 6. The alternate
motion was passed by Council.
A Notice of Decision to grant a planning permit was issued to the applicant and objector
on 29 May 2015. A planning permit was subsequently approved on 24 June 2015.
In July 2015 the applicant contacted Cr. Chapman expressing concern that the permit
issued required the tree to be retained and that he had submitted an appeal against the
condition to the Victorian and Civil Administrative Tribunal (VCAT). Cr. Chapman
requested that the matter be considered again by Council.
The applicant has also appealed against conditional requirements for an increased
setback to the rear boundary and existing dwelling.
VCAT Notice of Decision process
When a permit application is made, Council can decide to refuse the permit, or grant the
permit immediately, if there are no objections.
If there are objections and Council decides to grant the permit, a NOD is sent to all
concerned parties, including objectors. The NOD signals Councils decision to grant the
permit and identifies the conditions to be included on it.

PAGE 28

Planning for Growth - Reports

29

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

VCAT Conditions Review process


Within 60 days of the permit or NOD an applicant may seek a review of any of the
conditions imposed on the permit. An objector to the original permit application can
choose to become a party to the conditions review.
In this case the applicant lodged an appeal against conditions and notified all parties.
The objector has registered as a party to the conditions appeal and will rely on the
grounds in the attachment to this report.
A hearing date for the proceeding has been set for 24 February 2016.
A compulsory conference has also been set prior to the hearing for 4 January 2016. A
compulsory conference is a confidential meeting at which parties, with the assistance of
a Tribunal member, can explore options to reach an agreed settlement on all or some of
the matters at issue in a proceeding.
Intent of Council
A review of the Phoenix FM broadcast of the Council meeting has confirmed that
Councils intent was to approve a development without a requirement to retain the tree.
However, the alternate motion that was passed included conditional requirements that
the tree be retained.
Council is unable to amend the planning permit to reflect their intention as the permit has
been issued. Furthermore, conditions are under review at VCAT and there is a third party
objector to that review. It is important to note that the objector made their decision not to
challenge the decision to grant a planning permit on the basis of the proposed conditions
which included the retention of the tree.
However Council is able to take a position at VCAT that it does not require the retention
of the tree. The objector can, if they choose, make their own submissions on the tree
removal issue at the compulsory conference.
Conclusion
Notwithstanding officers view that the tree should be retained, in light of Councils prior
intent to allow the removal of the tree it is recommended that Council take a position to
VCAT that it consents with the applicants request to have condition 1 (bullet point 2)
removed.
Attachments
Copy of original Council report and minutes
Copy of permit applicants grounds of appeal
Copy of objectors grounds of appeal

PAGE 29

Planning for Growth - Reports

30

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to notify the Victorian and Civil
Administrative Tribunal, the permit applicant and objector that it does not intend to
contest the removal of condition 1 (bullet point 2).

PAGE 30

Planning for Growth - Reports

2.3

31

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

21-25 CURTIN STREET, FLORA HILL 3550 - 7 LOT SUBDIVISION

Document Information
Author

Chris Duckett, Co-ordinator Land Use

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Application details:

7 Lot subdivision

Application No:

DS/503/2015

Applicant:

Terraco

Land:

21-25 Curtin Street, FLORA HILL 3550

Zoning:

General Residential Zone

No. of objections:

17 (from 15 properties)

Consultation
meeting:

A consultation meeting was held on 17 September 2015 attended


by objectors, the applicant and Crs Cox, Leach, Campbell and
Lyons.

Key considerations:

The principle of residential development in this location.


Whether the proposed subdivision is an appropriate outcome
which respects neighbourhood character.

Conclusion:

The site is in a good location to provide new housing in terms of


accessibility to employment opportunities, leisure and shopping
facilities and public transport. The proposal will have the positive
effect of providing additional, much needed housing in an urban
area, whilst preserving neighbourhood character.
It is recommended that Council issue a Notice of Decision to
Grant a Planning Permit.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2015-2016 Update)
Planning for Growth
Housing options provide broader choice in order to meet current and future
community expectations and needs.
Productivity
Council fosters business and industry growth.

PAGE 31

Planning for Growth - Reports

32

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Sustainability
The built and natural qualities that make Greater Bendigo an attractive and appealing
place are valued and conserved.
Background Information
The application site was the subject of a planning application (DSD/928/2013) for a
subdivision and development for 15 dwellings which was refused by the Victorian Civil
and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) following an appeal by the applicant against a failure
to determine the application within the statutory timeframe. The application attracted 87
objections and Council had resolved not to support the application at VCAT.
In summary, the Tribunal affirmed Councils resolution, concluding that there would be no
impediment to a multi-lot subdivision and development on the site. However, the layout
of the proposed subdivision and the number and size of lots had limited opportunities to
construct dwellings which would be an acceptable response to the site context or built
form outcomes sought by neighbourhood character policy.
The decision is considered in detail in the Planning Assessment section of this report.
Report
Subject Site and Surrounds
The site is a relatively regular shaped allotment located on the corner of Curtin and
Houlihan Streets with frontages to both streets of around 70m. The site has an area of
3,165m2. The site has a diagonal cross fall of around 3-4 metres from east to west.
There are a number of native trees on or close to the boundary of the site. A bus stop
served by the number 11 bus route is located directly in front of the site on Curtin Street.
There is currently a single storey building on the site which dates from circa 1940 and
has been used for forestry purposes connected to the Regional Forest Commission.
There is evidence to suggest that the site itself has been used for forestry purposes
since 1911.
The surrounding land uses are wholly residential and the site is within the area covered
by the Flora Hill Residential Character Policy which describes the neighbourhood as
follows:
"This is an area of post war housing, in which consistency of front and side setbacks
within streetscapes is important. Roof shapes are also important as they dominate
streetscapes and provide a consistent theme. Front fences are either absent or original
and therefore low in height, creating an open feel to the streetscape. Mature trees in
reserves or private gardens often dominate the skyline.

PAGE 32

Planning for Growth - Reports

33

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectors properties marked with a star, (3 properties
outside scope of map).

Figure 2: Aerial photograph

PAGE 33

Planning for Growth - Reports

34

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Proposal
The proposal is to subdivide the land into seven lots. Three lots would have direct
frontage to Curtin Street, one lot would be a battle axe lot with access from Curtin Street,
two lots would have frontage to Houlihan Street and one lot would be on the corner with
frontages to both streets. The lots are in the range of 418 to 562 square metres with lot
frontages in the range of 15m to 19m.
The subdivision layout has been designed to retain the trees on the site. It is likely that a
number of small street trees may need to be removed from the nature strip in the future
to accommodate driveways to the dwellings.

Figure 3: Subdivision plan

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme


The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal:
State Planning Policy Framework

11.02 Urban growth


11.05 Regional development
11.12 Loddon Mallee South regional growth
15.01 Urban environment
15.02 Sustainable environment
16.01 Medium density housing
PAGE 34

Planning for Growth - Reports

35

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Municipal Strategic Statement


21.05 Settlement
21.06 Housing
Local Planning Policies
22.14 Flora Hill Residential Character Policy
Other Provisions
32.08 General Residential Zone
56 Residential Subdivision
65 Decision Guidelines
Consultation/Communication
Referrals
The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal:
Referral

Comment

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification
The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and
nearby owners and occupiers, as well as all objectors to the previous proposal.
As a result of advertising, 17 objections were received. In summary the grounds of
objection are:
Inadequate subdivision site and context description.
Inadequate information in terms of building envelopes, street and side setbacks and
crossovers.
Subdivision should conform with neighbourhood character.
Subdivision plan is poor and an access from Houlihan Street would be better for
vehicle movement away from the corner of Curtin Street and Houlihan Street. (An
alternative sketch plan was submitted by an objector showing this).
Vehicles need to park on their block not on the street.
Concern about what is proposed to be built.
PAGE 35

Planning for Growth - Reports

36

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Concerns about infrastructure.


Impact on street trees.
The objections are considered in the assessment below.
Planning Assessment
Is an increase in residential density appropriate in this location?
Clause 11.05-4 Regional planning strategies and principles has the objective of
developing regions and settlements which have a strong identity, are prosperous and are
environmentally sustainable.
Of relevance to this application is the strategy to promote liveable regional settlements
and healthy communities by improving the availability of a diverse range of affordable
accommodation, including social housing, in locations with good access to transport,
commercial facilities and community services.
Clause 11.12 Loddon Mallee South regional growth includes strategies which promote
Bendigo as a regional city which seek to facilitate increased residential densities for
underutilised sites and land in Bendigo.
Clause 16.01 Residential development has objectives which promote a diverse range of
housing that meets community needs in locations that offer good access to services and
transport and that is both water and energy efficient. The importance of energy and
resource efficiency is also referenced in Clause 15.02 Sustainable development.
The City's Settlement and Housing policies within the Municipal Strategic Statement
(MSS) are supported by a residential development strategy which advocates for urban
consolidation in the form of high quality, medium density in-fill housing.
The land is zoned General Residential and lies within the Urban Growth Boundary. The
proposal meets the overarching objectives of housing policies within the State Planning
Policy Framework (SPPF) and the Residential Development Strategy as it would provide
for urban consolidation in an area which has good access to local services and facilities.
The Residential Strategy highlights key inner urban locations such as the CBD, railway
station, hospital and university precincts as Core Development Areas where an increase
in residential density is appropriate.
The site is not within the indicative boundary of the university precinct as mapped in the
Residential Strategy. However it is within walking distance of the university and can
readily be considered as part of the precinct.
In emerging policy, a review of the Residential Strategy has been completed, adopted by
Council and been a considerable way through a Planning Scheme Amendment process
with the next stage being the publication of the Planning Panel report. A key component
of the new Residential Strategy is to implement the concept of 10 minute
neighbourhoods around activity centres. This emphasises the importance of an increase
in residential density around the university and the activity centre of Strathdale in
facilitating 10 minute neighbourhoods.
PAGE 36

Planning for Growth - Reports

37

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

In the decision on the previous proposal, VCAT had this to say about the site in relation
to policy:
From a policy point of view there can be no question that a 15-lot subdivision and
construction of 15 dwellings on the review site is consistent with State and local
policy. It is obvious that any redevelopment of this site for more than one dwelling
will positively contribute to achieving broad state and local planning policy
objectives concerning urban consolidation and more efficient use of land and
services.
Such development would also be consistent with local policy which seeks to
achieve a greater proportion of higher density development (30%) compared to
the historic ratio of around 10% for semi-detached housing.
The Tribunal went onto say that:
The question is not whether the site can support a multi lot subdivision and
multiple dwellings, but whether what is proposed is acceptable when assessed
against site context and the specific provisions for this neighbourhood.
So whilst there is broad agreement that the location is appropriate for some form of
medium density, infill development, the key issue in this matter is whether the proposal
meets the identified neighbourhood character of the area. This is discussed further
below.
Is the subdivision layout an appropriate response to the site context and neighbourhood
character?
Neighbourhood character is referenced as an important consideration throughout the
Planning Scheme including Clauses 15.01 Urban Environment, 16.01 Residential
Development, 21.06 Housing, 32.08 General Residential Zone and 56 Residential
Subdivision.
Clause 56.03-5 Neighbourhood character objective states that:
The objective of this clause is to design subdivisions that respond to neighbourhood
character.
The standards are that subdivision should:
Respect the existing neighbourhood character or achieve a preferred neighbourhood
character consistent with any relevant neighbourhood character objective, policy or
statement set out in this scheme.
Respond to and integrate with the surrounding urban environment.
Protect significant vegetation and site features.
In relation to this clause, the Flora Hill Precinct 4 Residential Character Policy is of
particular relevance. The policy seeks a future character that is to be achieved by a
series of objectives and design responses including such matters as: maintaining garden
settings, respecting dominant building height, front setbacks and dwelling spacing.

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The Tribunal was critical of the previous proposal, particularly with what the Tribunal
thought was an application that largely ignored the policy. Of particular concern was:
Continuous attached form to both streets with only one small break between
Dwellings 5 and 6,
Small street setbacks of as little as 3 metres,
Near verticality of the two storey walls and lack of articulation,
The use of tandem parking with front entrances off those spaces,
The lack of space for planting new trees to replace those that have and are to be
removed.
With regard to the above points it is important to note unlike the previous application,
assessment of this proposal is confined to whether the proposed subdivision layout is
appropriate and Council has only a limited ability to influence the matters listed above as
future dwellings on the site will be subject to building regulations only.
However, ResCode Clause 56 Subdivision does require consideration as to whether the
layout would enable a built form that respects neighbourhood character. Lot areas and
widths are an important consideration in whether this can be achieved.
Although lots proposed are smaller than is characteristic in the area, the following points
are of note from an analysis of the area:
Existing lot sizes are generally larger than those proposed.
4 lots in the nearby area have a lot size smaller than those proposed.
Two of these smaller lots (39 Jeffrey Avenue) adjoin the site and two further smaller
lots have been approved adjoining the site at 8 Houlihan Street.
Lot widths in the area are generally in the range of 15-19m as is proposed in this
subdivision.
The two lots approved at 8 Houlihan Street have 8.5m frontages, significantly less
than proposed in this subdivision.
As documented above, there is a requirement to make efficient use of urban infill sites,
which supports lots of the size proposed. Whilst many lots in the area are significantly
larger than proposed here, it is unrealistic to expect that future subdivision should follow
this pattern of development. Indeed the Tribunal confirmed as much in the previous
decision when it stated:
My refusal of this application does not mean that I reject more intensive
subdivision and development on the review site. I do not agree with any
suggestions that the review site should be subdivided into lots of a size
approximating those that already exist in the area or that attached two storey
dwellings are so foreign to existing neighbourhood character that they should be
refused. State and local policies and the locational attributes of the site
unambiguously point to a more intensive and more efficient use of this large, very
well serviced site. As is so often the case, it is question of intensity and whether a
proposal has exceeded a threshold to a point which makes it unacceptable. In
this application I have concluded that the intensity needs to be scaled back.

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Although Council has minimal control over what will get built on the site, one area which
it has an ability to influence is the siting of future dwellings. The question is whether or
not there is a need to control the siting.
Clause 56 ResCode has a lot area and building envelope objective which seeks to
provide lots with areas and dimensions that enable, amongst other matters, the
appropriate siting and construction of a dwelling.
The standards of relevance to this application are as follows:
Lots of between 300 square metres and 500 square metres should:
Contain a building envelope and be able to contain a rectangle measuring 10 metres
by 15 metres.
A building envelope may specify or incorporate any relevant siting and design
requirement. Any requirement should meet the relevant standards of Clause 54,
unless:
The objectives of the relevant standards are met, and
The building envelope is shown as a restriction on a plan of subdivision registered
under the Subdivision Act 1988, or is specified as a covenant in an agreement under
Section 173 of the Act.
Whilst the standard above states that building envelopes should be provided, this is not a
mandatory requirement and is only one way of meeting the objective. A view could be
taken that if the 10 metres x 15 metres rectangle can be fitted on the site there is no
need or reason to impose a building envelope restriction as matters of siting and
character can be assessed by the appointed building surveyor at the building permit
stage. It is only the corner lot that is unable to contain the rectangle.
It is the view of local residents that building envelopes should have been provided on the
plans and should be imposed as a restriction on any approved subdivision. Of particular
concern is that when dwellings are built, front setbacks may not be in keeping with
neighbourhood character.
Building envelopes should not be imposed without good reason so the question here
must be: are the lots so constrained that any dwellings built on the blocks would have an
adverse impact on character? As discussed above, lot areas and widths are appropriate
in the area, indeed local residents have not raised this or the number of lots as a major
concern.
In terms of front setbacks, the minimum setbacks that would be required by ResCode
under the Building Regulations are determined by existing setbacks on adjoining blocks.
If the adjoining blocks are vacant then the minimum setback requirement is 4m.
Setbacks can be varied at the discretion of the Municipal Building Surveyor or Building
Appeals Board.

The applicant has provided an aerial photography review of the front setbacks of 16
dwellings opposite and adjacent to the site which show that:
8 setbacks are in the range of 3.5- 4.9m
5 setbacks are in the range of 5.0- 5.9m
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3 setbacks are in the range of 6.0-7.6m


Whilst this data cannot be relied upon with any certainty it does give an indication that
there is considerable variety in the front setbacks in the area.
Officers are of the view that the worst case scenario of a 4m setback would not be fatal
to the application in terms of neighbourhood character. It should be noted that the nature
strips adjoining the site are in the order of 7.5m so any dwelling would be setback a
minimum of 11.5m from the kerb.
Imposing a large street setback restriction on the lots could have other impacts such as
reducing the size of the rear gardens of the dwellings or reducing the area of space able
to be developed at ground floor level. This in turn could encourage two storey
development of the lots.
At the consultation meeting there was a lot of discussion around the options for imposing
building envelopes or front setback restrictions. The applicant does not see the need for
such restrictions as they strongly believe that the Building Regulations provide an
adequate mechanism of control.
As with front setbacks, side setbacks would also be determined according to ResCode
requirements under the Building Regulations. As discussed above the lots are not so
constrained that there should be building envelope restrictions to control side setbacks.
In summary, the proposal is an acceptable design response to the site and compared to
the previous proposal this is a development that aligns more closely with community
expectations for the site. This is apparent, as 70 people who objected to the previous
proposal have not objected to this proposal.
As with all subdivision proposals there is an element of the unknown in terms of the built
form that will be on the site. As front setbacks are a major concern of residents an
alternative option to imposing building envelopes is to require a minimum setback
restriction on the subdivision plan. Council is able to impose this requirement by
condition if they feel a need to respond to the objectors concerns.
Access and parking
Some residents have concerns about the access arrangements to the blocks and believe
that there are better ways the subdivision layout could be designed. There are multiple
ways that this block could be subdivided and it is quite possible that the design could be
improved. However, the Planning Scheme seeks acceptable outcomes as opposed to
ideal outcomes.
The proposed layout is certainly acceptable from an access perspective. The previous
application would have had more than twice the number of access points and the
Tribunal, whilst noting that reversing out was not ideal, concluded that this was not a
reason to refuse the application.
It is a requirement under the Building Regulations that any future dwelling on the lots will
be required to be provided with two car parking spaces.

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Infrastructure provision
Concerns have been raised about stormwater, drainage and sewerage provision.
However the Citys drainage engineer and Coliban Water have raised no concerns in this
regard. The Tribunal also made this point on the previous proposal for a far more
intensive development.
Impact on trees/vegetation
Residents have concerns over the potential loss of street trees. The Citys arborist has
reviewed the proposal in the context of existing street trees and has raised no concerns
as the species are not significant. Indeed there is an opportunity to improve the
streetscape with more appropriate planting which has been included as a condition of the
planning permit.
Of more significance are two trees located on the site which are worthy of retention and
therefore restrictions are proposed to ensure their retention. The applicant is satisfied
that the trees be retained as long as there is scope for their future removal in the event
that they become a hazard because of falling limbs. This is a reasonable request and
can be factored into a permit condition.
Does the proposal comply with other requirements of ResCode Clause 56 Residential
Subdivision?
The purpose of Clause 56 Residential Subdivision includes the need to create liveable
and sustainable neighbourhoods and urban places with character and identity and to
achieve residential subdivision outcomes that appropriately respond to the site and its
context.
It is a requirement of Clause 56 that a development must meet all of the objectives of the
clause and should also meet all of the standards. All objectives have been assessed
and have been met. One standard not covered elsewhere in this report which requires a
variation is considered below:
C7 Lot diversity and distribution
The relevant objectives are to achieve housing densities that support compact and
walkable neighbourhoods and the efficient provision of public transport services and to
provide a range of lot sizes to suit a variety of dwelling and household types.
The standard in this clause that requires a variation is as follows:
A range and mix of lot sizes should be provided including lots suitable for the
development of:
Single dwellings.
Two dwellings or more.
Higher density housing.
Residential buildings and Retirement villages.
The lot sizes proposed will inevitably limit the dwelling types that can be built on the lot to
single, family sized dwellings. A more appropriate response may have been to provide
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the opportunity for variety in dwelling types, such as one or two bedroom units.
However, the applicant has chosen to seek to meet community expectations for the site
which is understandable and on balance an acceptable approach when balanced against
this standard.
Public Open Space Contribution
The table below considers the need for a public open space contribution as a result of
the subdivision, having regard to the criteria set out in the Subdivision Act 1988.
Public Open Space Criterion

Officer Response

(a)

The existing and proposed use or There is an existing three bedroom


development of the land.
dwelling on the land. A net gain of six
dwellings would be constructed giving a
possible total of approximately 27
bedrooms on the land. The subdivision will
therefore result in increased development
for residential purposes.

(b)

Any likelihood that existing open


space will be more intensively
used after than before the
subdivision.

The subdivision will result in an increase in


population, which will mean that existing
open space will be used more intensively
after the subdivision. This increase in
population will add pressure on existing
public open space. The proposed lots will
have dwellings attractive to families but
are likely to have only a small amount of
POS. There will therefore be an increased
reliance on public open space for
residents recreational needs.

(c)

Any existing or likely population


density in the area of the
subdivision and the effect of the
subdivision on this.

The neighbourhood in which the subject


land is located is a conventional, suburban
residential area of single dwellings on lots.
In-fill development of this type is a key
component of the City's residential
strategy. A recent audit of the Council's
residential strategy found that nearly 80%
of subdivision applications approved were
for four lots of less, contributing more than
30% of the net lots created each year
since 2004.

(d)

Whether there are existing places


of public resort or recreation in the
neighbourhood of the subdivision,
and the adequacy of these.

There are two playgrounds at Curtin Street


and Leigh Avenue which are within
walking distance of the subject land
approximately
100m
and
300m,
respectively.

(e)

How much of the land in the No public open space will be provided on
subdivision is likely to be used for site and the lots are likely to have limited
places of resort and recreation for private open space for suitable recreation.

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Public Open Space Criterion

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Officer Response

lot owners.
(f)

Any policies of the Council Council has an adopted Open Space


concerning the provision of places Strategy.
of public resort and recreation.

It can be concluded that as a result of this assessment the subdivision will result in an
increase in the use of nearby existing public open space and that it is therefore
reasonable to seek the maximum amount allowable under the Subdivision Act which is
5% of the value of the land. A condition will be imposed on a planning permit granted to
this effect.
Conclusion
This subdivision seeks to provide modest housing growth within the area whilst aiming to
be respectful of neighbourhood character.
Balancing increased densities with neighbourhood character is not an uncommon
challenge and one which will inevitably become more commonplace and arguably
unavoidable as the City seeks to achieve a sustainable increase in densities in urban
areas to meet population growth.
Local residents do have some valid concerns over the potential impacts of the proposal
including on existing neighbourhood character.
However, any impacts need to be weighed against the need to maximise the use of
existing urban land such as this site. In this instance it is concluded that the applicant
has addressed the shortfalls of the previous proposal and Council should support the
proposal.
Options
Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may
resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit.
Attachments
Objections
VCAT Decision from prior application
RECOMMENDATION
Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo
City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for a 7 lot subdivision
at 21-25 Curtin Street, FLORA HILL 3550, subject to the following conditions:
1.

AMENDED PLANS
Before the plan of subdivision is certified amended plans to the satisfaction of

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2.

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the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible


authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then form part of the
permit. The plans must be generally in accordance with the plans submitted with
the application but modified to show:
(a) A survey of existing vegetation on site to determine the location of the trees
required to be retained in accordance with condition 6.
(b) The plan of subdivision must show the following:
i. Nominated vehicle crossovers/driveways for the lots affected by, and
located to avoid conflicting with, the requirements of condition 6.
ii. A vegetation removal restriction in accordance with condition 6.
LAYOUT PLANS
The subdivision, as shown on the endorsed plans, must not be altered without
the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

3.

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE CONTRIBUTION


Before the statement of compliance is issued the applicant or owner must pay to
the responsible authority a sum equivalent to 5% of the site value of all the land
in the subdivision.

4.

VEHICLE CROSSOVERS AND DRIVEWAYS


Before the statement of compliance is issued for the subdivision, the vehicle
crossovers and driveways approved under condition 1 (b) must be constructed
to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

5.

TREE PROTECTION MEASURES


Prior to commencement of development the following tree protection measures
must be undertaken to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.
(a) All trees to be retained on site must be provided with protection; as per
AS4970-2009 Protection of trees on development sites. Evidence of the
protection measures must be provided to the responsible authority prior to
commencement of work.

6.

VEGETATION REMOVAL RESTRICTION


The plan of subdivision must include a vegetation removal restriction on those
relevant lots 2, 3 and 5 in accordance with the endorsed plan. The restriction
must document that no vegetation is to be removed as shown on the endorsed
plan without the written consent of the responsible authority.

7.

STREET TREES
Any street trees removal required for vehicle crossovers for the lots must be
approved by the Citys Parks and Natural Reserves Unit. The trees must be
replaced with approved species and installed to a specification to the
satisfaction of the responsible authority.

8.

DETAILED DRAINAGE
Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act
1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to
and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be
endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to
scale with dimensions. The plans must include:
(a) Direction of stormwater run-off.
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(b) A point of discharge for each lot.


(c) Independent drainage for each lot.
9.

STORMWATER DETENTION
Prior to the issue of a statement of compliance, the owner or applicant must
provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in
accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible
authority.
Allowable discharge: Q10 = 18 l/s

10.

STORMWATER QUALITY
Before the use or development is commenced, the owner or applicant must
provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the Best Practice
Environmental Guidelines storm water quality (Victoria Stormwater Committee
1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the
responsible authority.

11.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT ON-SITE DETENTION AND/OR TREATMENT


SYSTEM
Prior to the issue of statement of compliance, the applicant/owner must enter
into an Agreement under section 173 of the Planning and Environment Act
1987. Such Agreement must covenant that:
(a) The owner will maintain each water quality or detention system and not
modify without prior written approval from the responsible authority.
(b) The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to
inspect the system at mutually agreed times.
(c) The Owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and
maintenance of the detention system .

12.

CONSTRUCTION OF WORKS
Road works, drainage and other civil works must be constructed in accordance
with the Infrastructure Design Manual and plans and specifications approved by
the responsible authority and must include:
(a) Underground drainage.

13.

PUBLIC ASSETS
Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the
responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public
infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb and channel,
footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the
property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development.
Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post
construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of
the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure
caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit.

14.

CONSENT FOR WORK ON ROAD RESERVES


The applicant must comply with:
(a) The Road Management Act 2004.
(b) Road Management (Works and Infrastructure) Regulations 2005.
(c) Road Management (General) Regulations 2005.
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with respect to any requirements to notify the Coordinating Authority and/or


seek consent from the Coordinating Authority to undertake works (as defined
in the Act) in, over or under the road reserve. The responsible authority in the
inclusion of this condition on this planning permit is not deemed to have been
notified of, or to have given consent to undertake any works within the road
reserve as proposed in this permit.
15.

COLIBAN WATER
(a) The owner is required to provide reticulated water and sewerage services to
each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in
accordance with our specifications.
(b) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed,
are to be protected by an easement in favour of Coliban Region Water
Corporation.
(c) A compliance certificate must be provided for the cut and seal of existing
services during the demolition of the existing property. In the event the
water meter is cut and sealed this must be returned to Coliban Water.

16.

POWERCOR
(a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act
1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with section
8 of that Act.
(b) The applicant shall: Provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision
in accordance with Powercors requirements and standards, including the
extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply
system, as required by Powercor
(c) The applicant shall: Where buildings or other installations exist on the land
to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be
brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by
the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. The applicant shall arrange
compliance through a Registered Electrical Contractor and provide to
Powercor Australia Ltd a completed Electrical Safety Certificate in
accordance with Electricity Safe Victorias Electrical Safety System.
(d) The applicant shall: Provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version
of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any
amendments which have been required.
(e) Any building must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity
Safety (Installations) Regulations.
(f) Any construction work must comply with Energy Safe Victorias No Go
Zone rules.

17.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS
The owner of the land must enter into an agreement with:
(a) A telecommunications network or service provider for the provision of
telecommunication services to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in
accordance with the providers requirements and relevant legislation at the
time.
(b) A suitably qualified person for the provision of fibre ready
telecommunication facilities to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in
accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the
Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can
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demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband


Network will not be provided by optical fibre.
Before the issue of a Statement of Compliance for any stage of the subdivision
under the Subdivision Act 1988, the owner of the land must provide written
confirmation from:
(a) A telecommunications network or service provider that all lots are
connected to or are ready for connection to telecommunications services in
accordance with the providers requirements and relevant legislation at the
time.
(b) A suitably qualified person that fibre ready telecommunication facilities have
been provided in accordance with any industry specifications or any
standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority,
unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the
National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre.
18.

AUSNET SERVICES (GAS)


The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to AusNet
Services (Gas) in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

19.

EXPIRY OF THE PERMIT


(a) The plan of subdivision is not certified within two years from the date of this
permit; or
(b) The subdivision is not completed within five years from the date of
certification of the plan of subdivision.
The responsible authority may extend the time for certification of the plan if a
request is made in writing before the permit expires or within six months
afterwards.

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COMMERCIAL LAND AND ACTIVITY CENTRE STRATEGY

Document Information
Author

Philip DeAraugo, Activity Centres Place Manager

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
This report provides a summary of the submissions lodged to the draft Commercial Land
and Activity Centre Strategy, outlines the revisions that have been made as a result, and
recommends that Council adopt the final Commercial Land and Activity Centre Strategy
and commence the Planning Scheme Amendment process to embed the key findings of
the strategy into the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Strategy 2.2 Council manages the planning and development of the City through the
preparation of major strategies and effective amendments to the planning scheme.
Action 2.2.1 Complete and implement the following major strategies through planning
scheme amendments: Commercial Land and Activity Centre Strategy.
Strategy Reference:
The current Commercial Land Strategy was adopted by Council on 17 August 2004. It
included floorspace projections through until 2021 and has been used to guide
commercial development, primarily in our suburban activity centres, over the past
decade. This strategy will replace it.
Regional Strategic Plan Reference:
The Loddon Mallee South Regional Growth Plan is an initiative of the Regional Strategic
Plan and includes actions that support the growth of Bendigo as a regional city and major
employment and services hub.
Background Information
Specialist economics firm SGS Economics and Planning were appointed on 10
September 2014 to assist the Strategy Unit in developing a new Commercial Land and
Activity Centre Strategy (CLACS). The new strategy is intended to replace the
Commercial Land Strategy adopted by Council in 2004. That strategy has guided a
significant amount of commercial development and contributed to the structure planning
process in our city centre and suburban areas over the past decade. The new strategy is
expected to perform a similar role over the next 15 years or so.
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The development of the new CLACS was overseen by a Steering Committee consisting
of three Councillors, a representative of the Urban Development Institute of Australia, a
representative of the Bendigo Traders Association and relevant City of Greater Bendigo
staff. The primary purpose of the new strategy is to provide updated commercial
floorspace projections that align with the latest population projections, retailing trends
and research, and to integrate the relevant directions of recently adopted strategies such
as the Greater Bendigo Residential Strategy, Economic Development Strategy and
Connecting Greater Bendigo: Integrated Transport and Land Use Strategy (ITLUS).
The draft of the new strategy was released for a period of community comment between
25 March and 6 May 2015. Copies of the draft were sent to stakeholders and briefings
were held with several business groups. As a result six submissions have been
received; two of which elaborated on their submission in front of a panel made up of
members of the steering committee. The submissions have now been reviewed and
changes made to the draft strategy. This report details the submissions and changes
and presents a final strategy for adoption.
Previous Council Decision Date:
25 March 2015 Council resolved to release the draft strategy for a period of six weeks
to allow the community to comment on the report.
Report
The CLACS has been prepared to provide policy, planning and investment direction for
the Citys urban and rural activity centres over the next 15 years. It incorporates the
latest population and demographic data available and integrated adopted policy
directions from the Greater Bendigo Residential Strategy (where people are going to live)
and ITLUS (how people are going to get to the things they need).
Two of the major outputs of the CLACS are an updated Activity Centre Hierarchy and
projections for the demand for new commercial floorspace. Both of these are critical to
the future planning of each centre and will be carried forward to the relevant sections of
the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. The Hierarchy informs us of the role, function
and basic composition of the centres at each level of the hierarchy, while the floorspace
projections are used to inform detailed structure planning and urban design frameworks,
investment decisions and planning permit applications. This strategy will assist the
private sector to deliver on the type and scale of development that is viable, creates
healthy competition while also contributing to the efficient functioning of the activity
centre hierarchy.
Some of the key findings of the CLACS include the demand for around another
150,000sqm of commercial floorspace across the Bendigo City Centre by the year 2031.
This is equivalent to around 10 city blocks worth of single storey development. This is a
significant amount of new floorspace and it is driven in a large part by the growth in
professional services, most notably the Health Care and Social Assistance sector.

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These are not necessarily doctors and nurses, but they are jobs that support the
operation of the new Bendigo Hospital and our growing regional population. Many of
these jobs do not need to be in the hospital precinct, and their location will be influenced
by where their staff and customers want to be which in short is in a highly accessible
and diverse area with high levels of amenity. These workers will want to be in the city
centre where they can pop out for a coffee and do some quick shopping on their lunch
break or on their way home after work. Furthermore, this 10 blocks worth of
development is likely to be delivered through many small scale mixed use developments
of three to five storeys rather than in a few large developments. For example,
development such as the one under construction at 111 Mitchell Street will add around
1,150sqm of commercial floorspace with apartments above. The approved development
at 23 Wills Street will add 2,200sqm of commercial floorspace with apartments above,
and the proposal for the former Poyser Motors site in High Street, if approved, will add
2,500sqm of commercial floorspace and 14 apartments. To ensure these and other
developments are built it is necessary to improve the way we connect the investment and
development sector with the emerging business sector. An action of CLACS relates to
working in partnership with groups such as the Bendigo Business Council to make these
connections, possibly through the development of an easily updatable investment
prospectus.
Another of the key findings relates to the future demand for supermarket floorspace,
particularly on the north western side of the Bendigo urban area (the arc including
Huntly, Epsom, Eaglehawk and Maiden Gully). In order to maximise the benefits of the
investment that will be made with new supermarket floorspace, the strategy recommends
that it anchor planned activity centres so that they also develop to include additional
small scale retailing and services required to service the growth of these areas. In
summary, the strategy wants the supermarket floorspace to be located as close to the
middle of their catchments as possible to maximise the benefits to the local community.
This will assist in delivering on the 10-minute neighbourhood concept of the Greater
Bendigo Residential Strategy and ITLUS, where daily convenience shopping and
services are only a short distance from home. The alternative is to provide the
floorspace on the way into central Bendigo, so that people could shop on the way to or
from work. In that situation the creation of 10-minute neighbourhoods in places such as
Maiden Gully would be stifled as there is not enough of an attraction, or anchor, to bring
in the amount of people needed to encourage small businesses growth.
Priority/Importance:
An up to date Commercial Land and Activity Centre Strategy is critical to making
informed decisions around new commercial investment within Greater Bendigo. It is also
important that the new strategy has a high level of support from the community and those
that are likely to be making the investment decisions that will lead to employment growth
across the municipality. It is therefore considered a priority that the strategy be adopted
and the Planning Scheme Amendment process commenced.
Options/Alternatives:
The Council has the option of adopting the strategy as presented, requiring further
changes to be made before adopting, or not adopting the strategy. Council also has the
option of requesting, or not, the Minister for Planning to authorise the preparation of an
amendment to the Planning Scheme to implement the key findings of the strategy.
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Timelines:
Should the strategy be adopted and it is resolved to commence the Planning Scheme
Amendment process, it is likely to be another 12-18 months before the changes were
finalised to the Planning Scheme.
Progress:
The project commenced in September 2014, when SGS Economics and Planning were
appointed to undertake the detailed technical analysis. SGS finished their work earlier in
2015 and the Strategy Unit has taken the project through the draft phase and has now
revised the draft document in response to submissions. The Planning Scheme
Amendment phase is a separate process and is critical to giving the document legal
standing.
Risk Analysis:
There are very few risks associated with the completion of the project. SGS Economics
and Planning are leaders in the field of urban economics, which means that the data that
they have contributed to the final document is sound and is expected to stand up to any
challenges. Key stakeholders have also contributed to the development of the strategy,
which further reduces the risk that the project does not meet the needs or expectations of
the development sector or the community. In saying that however, it is likely that one of
the submitters could challenge the recommendations of the strategy and push for
changes. As their argument is not supported by the strategy, should they want to pursue
their argument then they will have the opportunity to make a submission to the Planning
Scheme Amendment when it is exhibited.
A greater risk comes in not completing the project and the development sector and
community not having the guidance on where investment needs to be directed in the
future. In this instance it is likely that greater costs would be incurred in the planning and
review phases of new developments as the planning system does not provide enough
information as to the scale, mix and composition of our centres. In a worst case scenario
it could lead to an oversized development being approved and developed in an area that
compromises the Activity Centre Hierarchy and the investment in existing businesses
and jobs, beyond what could be considered healthy competition. In this situation the City
would not be meeting its requirements relating to planning for the future growth of our
city.
Finally, being a piece of strategic work, there will be further opportunities for Council and
the community to review the strategy and its recommendations prior to the Minister for
Planning approving any changes to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.
Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation:
Internal consultation has been limited to business units involved in the Steering
Committee such as Strategy, Tourism, Economic Development and Planning.

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External Consultation:
To ensure that the project meets the needs of the various, and often competing interest
of different stakeholders, the Steering Committee included representatives from the
Bendigo Traders Association and the Urban Development Institute of Australia. The
development of the draft strategy was informed by consultation with a number of
commercial developers, businesses, real estate agents, tourism agencies and business
development specialists.
The draft strategy was also released to the broader community to test its assumptions
and recommendations between 25 March and 6 May 2015. Six submissions were
received. Submitters 3 and 4 also took the opportunity to elaborate on their submissions
in front of a Panel made up of Steering Committee members on 22 and 26 June 2015
respectively. A summary of the submissions and the recommended response is
provided in the table below:
Submitter 1: Tom Fidler
Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Supports the draft Strategy

Noted

Commented that the general ease in


explaining what is a complicated issue
has been well done and supportive of
Councils directions relating to inner city
housing.

Noted

Commented on the importance of the


arts and cultural sector to the overall
health of the city centre.

Noted

Submitter 2: Sweett Group on behalf of MG Estates P/L*


* Steering Committee member Damian Tangey declared a conflict of interest with this property
and submission. The remaining Steering Committee members considered this submission.

Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Seeks minor changes to the Bendigo


Population Forecast Plan on page 7 to
update the Urban Growth Boundary as
approved by Amendment C190.

Accepted. The map has been updated to


reflect the revised Urban Growth
Boundary.

Supports the designation of a future


Neighbourhood Activity Centre at Forest
Edge estate, however has requested that
it have a generic name to allow for the
potential renaming of the estate.

Accepted. The designation of the


Neighbourhood Activity Centre is the
critical factor and the name will emerge
as the location develops.

Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

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Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Does not support the draft Strategy and


believes it should have been redrafted
prior to being released for community
comment.

Noted. The release of the draft for a


period of community comment was
intended to encourage comments from
interested residents.

Concerned that there is limited direct


correlation, linkage and alignment with
other strategies.

Accepted in part. The draft strategy has


been informed by the Connecting Greater
Bendigo consultants report, Greater
Bendigo Residential Strategy and
Economic Development Strategy. To
avoid repetition much of the background
and context has been left in the
background papers. Linkages and
alignment to these strategies have been
strengthened as a result of this feedback.

Concerned with the Cultural Shopping


focus for the City Centre due to the small
percentage (4%) that tourism contributes
to Greater Bendigos GDP and total
workforce (4.5%).

Retail precincts need to provide a point of


difference and build on their strengths.
Cultural retailing is one of very few types
of retailing that is seeing growth and the
Bendigo City Centre is very well
positioned to leverage off this
opportunity. This is not to say that all
retailing needs to have a cultural tourism
focus, as much of the existing retail offer
supports our resident population.
Regardless, the exposure that cultural
tourism has means that we can market
Greater Bendigo into places that we
wouldnt normally be able to.

Concerned that the activity centre


hierarchy does not align with the
community hubs concept in the Greater
Bendigo Residential Strategy.

Accepted. As mentioned above, there is


a close relationship between this
document and the Greater Bendigo
Residential Strategy. Clearer linkages
have now been made.

Concerned that we have a contradiction


between developing the Bendigo City
Centre while also promoting 10 minute
neighbourhoods.

The City Centre sits at the top of the


activity centre hierarchy and performs a
regional role. It is home to higher order
retail that relies on a large number of
visitors and it will continue to develop as
a place for new office development and
emerging creative industries and
professional services. Such businesses
rely on having good accessibility, high
levels of amenity and opportunities to
collaborate with other businesses. The

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Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


10-minute neighbourhood concept is
based around the need for daily and
convenience goods and services to be
within close distance to support their
residential communities. Supermarket
shopping, primary schools, medical
centres and small scale professional
services such as accountants are
examples of services and businesses
that rely on much smaller catchments
than the City Centre. It is not a case of
either/or, we need different scale centres
to perform different but complementary
roles.

Questions why there is no provision for


large regional shopping centres at
Huntly, Marong and Strathfieldsaye given
population projections.

The analysis is based on population


growth and spending patterns across a
range of sectors. Population growth will
not be large enough to support large
regional shopping centres in the areas
suggested and therefore the private
sector would not develop them. In the
longer term (beyond 2031) there is likely
to be stronger demand for additional
floorspace, however it is problematic to
try to plan for this now as the retail sector
is evolving rapidly to take account of new
forms of technology. Commercial
development is a balancing act too
much, shops are empty, rents decrease
and it is not viable to develop too little
and rents increase and it becomes
financially feasible to create new
floorspace.

Questions what part of the strategy


addresses the rejuvenation of the
Hargreaves Street and Pall Mall
shopping precinct.

The focus of the much of the Citys


strategic work is to get more people
visiting, working and living in the city
centre. This strategy identifies the
projected demand for floorspace and the
sectors that will drive that demand. More
people working and living in the city
centre will drive the demand for
additional retail floorspace. Some of this
will be absorbed by vacant or
underperforming floorspace (such as
unused upper levels) already in the city
centre, while new floorspace will be
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Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


created as property economics change
and it becomes viable to redevelop sites.
Businesses in the Hargreaves Mall and
Pall Mall will evolve to meet the needs of
their customers and the demographic
that is using an area. More people living
and working in the area will contribute to
this as different services are needed to
meet their needs.

Questions what part of the strategy


identifies the sites or locations of
potential new centres and what land will
be set aside to accommodate the
thousands of square metres of new
floorspace required.

This strategy does not identify sites to be


set aside for future development. The
research is used to inform the structure
planning, or urban design framework
processes, which is where the broad
parameters are set out to guide private
sector investment decisions. In saying
this however, the focus is on facilitating
development within existing and planned
activity centres, most of which are
underdeveloped and have the capacity to
accommodate much more development.
The focus is on consolidating
development rather than planning for
them to expand and encroach into
residential or industrial areas. This is a
fundamental component of creating
compact and walkable communities.

Questions the details of the Strategic


Objectives and Strategic Initiatives.

The Strategic Directions included in the


Strategy provide readers with a general
understanding of the future directions
that various components of our activity
centres are heading. They are used to
guide decision making.

Comments that the document fails to


show how Council performance against
the strategies can be measured.

The actions included in the


Implementation Plan can be easily
tracked for progress. The research
embedded in the document is to inform
the private sector, who are the ones who
ultimately deliver on the strategic
directions of the Council for the benefit of
the community.

Asks how the strategy is different to what


occurs at present and what parts aim to
be proactive rather than reactive.

The Strategy provides updated research


that is aligned with population growth and
Councils strategic directions relating to

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Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


our activity centres. Strategic land use
planning is constantly evolving and is
designed to manage change over time. It
is both proactive, in that it identifies future
demand in different locations and
updates our activity centre hierarchy, and
reactive in that the research is used to
respond to private sector proposals.

Asks what the activity centres will


comprise of and how will these align with
the community hubs concept.

The table in the Activity Centre Hierarchy


section of the report details the role and
function of the different levels of the
hierarchy. Each centre will be different
and respond to the needs of its
respective community. There is no need
to prescribe the uses in each centre, and
in fact the planning system does not
allow for this, rather a range of uses are
allowed under different zone controls. It
is the scale of the activity centres that is
most important as this impacts on how
different centres complement one
another.

Asks why the Economic Development


Unit are only referred to from action 16,
and why this issue (commercial land)
was not addressed as part of the
Economic Development Strategy.

The strategy integrates and reinforces


the strategic directions of a number of
different strategies, however the prime
responsibility for its development and
delivery, from a planning perspective, sits
with the Strategy Unit of the City. The
actual delivery of commercial
development will be driven by the private
sector. The Citys role is to undertake
the research, integrate the different
strategic directions and set the planning
framework for the benefit of the broader
community to enable this to occur.

Recommends that the document be


redrafted to better align with other
strategies.

Accepted. As mentioned previously, this


document is aligned with other strategies
of Council. A redrafting to better reflect
the linkages has been done.

Recommends that we provide for large


regional shopping centres to the west,
north and east of Bendigo to meet the
needs of a population of 200,000 plus.

The planning horizon for this document is


2031. Beyond this timeframe it becomes
more difficult to determine what the
composition of the community will be.
However more importantly, beyond this

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Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


timeframe it becomes very difficult to
know what the make-up of the economy
will be like. The retail sector particularly
has been changing at a rapid rate and
current trends are for a decrease in floor
area for many retail sub sectors.
Regardless, the activity centre hierarchy
is based around the need for the city
centre to remain as the most dominant
mixed use centre within Greater Bendigo
that is of a scale where it can leverage
benefits from being the most accessible
location and providing agglomeration
benefits for professional services and
creative industries. Kangaroo Flat and
Kangaroo Flat South (centred on Lansell
Square) is the next biggest centre and
has a regional retailing catchment and is
proposed to continue in this role. The
catchments of the areas mentioned by
the submitter are not large enough to
support additional regional scale
shopping centres. It is not likely that they
would be delivered even if the land was
made available, and we would need to be
mindful of the impact that they would
have on the rest of the hierarchy as they
would draw trade away from existing
centres such as the city centre where
there is significant existing investment in
buildings, businesses and jobs. This is
not to say that the outer centres wont
grow however, as they are expected to
evolve over time to increase the mix of
services offered. The reality is that they
will need to focus on meeting their
residential catchments needs first and
foremost, and this means that most will
be anchored by food retailing.

Recommends that we identify the exact


sites for future commercial land for the
various centres to accommodate the
required growth.

Much of the growth will be


accommodated on existing zoned
commercial land or in accordance with an
existing structure plan or proposed
structure plan or urban design
framework. There needs to be a focus
on ensuring that our centres remain

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Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


relatively compact and that you can walk
between many different businesses. In
most cases we will see underutilised
sites redeveloped and incorporate a
number of different uses. In most cases
the future floorspace will be made up of
lots of small scale developments, rather
than big developments like stand-alone
shopping centres. The strategy provides
the research relating to the demand for
new floorspace, but it leaves it up to the
competitive private sector to best work
out how to deliver it within the planning
framework that the City provides.

Recommends that we restate the


strategic objectives and strategic
initiatives so that the wording complies
with the LGPRG and that each initiative
sets out a measurable performance.

The Local Government Performance


Reporting Framework (LGPRF) is an
annual reporting framework which
requires councils to report on 70
mandatory performance indicators in
their annual report. As this is a strategic
document where the bulk of the delivery
is done by the private sector it does not
form part of the LGPRF.

Recommends that we provide details of


the progress of any initiatives or actions
already commenced or completed by the
City Futures Directorate (and any other
Directorate).

This detail is not included in a strategic


document. Progress of implementation is
reported to Council and the community
through other means.

Recommends that we provide details of


the composition of activity centres and
how they align with community hubs.

Activity centres and community hubs are


essentially the same thing. The role and
function of each level of activity centre is
included within the report. Each centre is
different, and will continue to evolve to
respond to the needs of its respective
community.

Recommends that we provide for cultural


shopping in regional centres such as
Elmore, Axedale, Heathcote, Goornong,
Redesdale and Raywood (such as
antiques, local museums and historical
centres, craft and food markets, etc.).

Similar to above, each centre has and


will continue to evolve to meet the needs
of its respective community and
catchment. Local government does not
have the ability to dictate the type of
shops that set up in specific centres,
however there is scope to support
community uses where and when it is
appropriate. Heathcote is a good

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Submitter 3: Colin Burns


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


example where the private sector has
identified a niche market and several
businesses have opened that support
cultural shopping, in this instance related
to the local wine industry.

Submitter 4: ERM on behalf of Coles Group Property Developments


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Seeks changes to the draft strategy to


identify the undersupply of supermarket
floorspace and the capacity for Ironbark
to support a full line supermarket within
the retail hierarchy.

Noted, but not supported. The research


that has been completed does not
support the need for a full line
supermarket in Ironbark. It does identify
that there will be a need for additional
supermarket floorspace in the west and
north of urban Bendigo, however the
strategy is based on the need for
additional floorspace to be provided
closer to the locations where the demand
is generated, that being Maiden Gully
and Eaglehawk. This would enable the
investment in new supermarket
floorspace to support specialty retail and
services growth needed to meet the
needs of their respective communities. A
full line supermarket in Ironbark would
stifle investment and development in
these centres and limit their ability to
become 10-minute neighbourhoods.

ERM have undertaken significant work


on behalf of Coles in respect to
establishing a new Coles store at
Ironbark. They believe that the strategy
lacks sufficient discussion around the
potential renewal opportunities of
Ironbark and their analysis indicates that
there is a clear need at present for the
development of a full line supermarket to
service residents of the northern and
western suburbs of Bendigo.

ERM have undertaken a significant


amount of work in an attempt to justify a
rezoning of the land to enable a large
scale supermarket to be established on
their preferred site. While their research
may indicate that the catchment is large
enough to support a large supermarket at
Ironbark, it would have a significant
impact on the establishment and
expansion of centres at Maiden Gully,
Eaglehawk and also Marong. These are
the sorts of issues that the strategy is
trying to balance. There is no
disagreement that there is a need for
investment and renewal in Ironbark, but
the analysis suggests that a smaller

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Submitter 4: ERM on behalf of Coles Group Property Developments


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


supermarket (up to 1,800sqm) would
support its residential catchment and
drive local visitation, which is likely to
make further small scale investment
possible. The former foundry site (Coles
preferred site) presents some additional
challenges for redevelopment due to its
history and contamination; sensitive
residential interfaces; local roads and
laneways at the rear that are not suited to
high levels of traffic; and a challenging
interface with the highway.

ERM do not believe that a supermarket in


Ironbark will have a significant
detrimental effect on surrounding retail
centres, and that development will be
possible in other centres once their
respective populations reach threshold
levels.

As noted above, the strategy is taking a


holistic and coordinated approach to the
activity centre hierarchy and looking to
facilitate the right amount of development
in locations that will best service their
communities. Given that supermarkets
are the anchor that drive visitation in our
activity centres, their establishment in the
early phase of development is critical to
their success. A large scale supermarket
at Ironbark would be designed to capture
customers on their way to and from
central Bendigo, which would
compromise the development of Maiden
Gully, Eaglehawk and Marong.

Recommend that the draft strategy


should be updated to recognise the
comprehensive work undertaken in
investigating potential investment
opportunities in Ironbark; that the
recommendations should elaborate on
the need for rejuvenation and investment
in Ironbark; that there is capacity for
Ironbark to support a supermarket; that
an action be included to investigate
opportunities for a supermarket in
Ironbark through the exhibition and
rezoning of the former Foundry site; and
that the action relating to the completion
of an Urban Design Framework be
amended to include actions that seek to
attract key retail anchors to the centre to
encourage its renewal.

The work undertaken by ERM indicates


that there is capacity to support a
supermarket in this area to service the
catchments of Maiden Gully and
Eaglehawk. This approach is
inconsistent with the strategic directions
in the Residential Strategy and
Connecting Greater Bendigo reports,
where the focus needs to be on
facilitating access to food closer to home.
The comment relating to the need to
facilitate investment in Ironbark through
the Urban Design Framework is
accepted, however this does not extend
to the inclusion of a large scale
supermarket.

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Submitter 5: Urbis on behalf of Bill and Margaret Cameron


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Seeks changes to the draft strategy to


amend actions that relate to 2 Club Court
in Strathfieldsaye.

Noted

Urbis argue that the action to rezone the


land at 2 Club Court to a residential zone
is premature given the history of the site
(documented in the Panel report for
Amendment C137) and the need to
undertake an Urban Design Framework
for Strathfieldsaye to identify how future
commercial floorspace will be
accommodated.

This site has been investigated in the


past as noted in the submission. It is
interesting to note that the site was
earmarked for a supermarket
development recently, however it is no
longer going ahead due to the
Kennington Village development
capturing much of the trade that was
expected. In order to encourage
development on this site it has been
discussed with the landowners that a
residential zoning that encourages higher
densities might be a more acceptable
zoning.

Recommend that the Urban Design


Framework be completed prior to
considering a rezoning of 2 Club Court.

Accepted. It is agreed that the Urban


Design Framework needs to be done
prior to progressing a rezoning. This
piece of work will identify how the town
centre develops and how it can
accommodate the amount of floorspace
predicted. This was one of the missing
pieces of strategic work that the panel
reviewing amendment C137 commented
on. The actions have been modified to
ensure it is clear that an Urban Design
Framework will be completed prior to
considering a rezoning. The Urban
Design Framework is scheduled for later
in the 2015/16 financial year.

Submitter 6: Centrum on behalf of Southern Cross Austereo


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Seeks changes to the draft strategy to


include the Chum Street / St John of God
Hospital precinct as an emerging
specialist activity centre, to include an
action to investigate and rezone the SCA
site to a more appropriate zone, and
include a statement that supports a
broader range of uses in existing
buildings in the interim.

Accepted. There is a need to consider


the zoning of this site and the allowable
uses to ensure that it can transition to
uses that make more efficient use of the
site and existing buildings. The site is
not an easy one and careful
consideration of contamination,
vegetation, proximity to communications
towers, topography, etc. all need further

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Submitter 6: Centrum on behalf of Southern Cross Austereo


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation


investigation. It is appropriate to
consider this cluster of activities, centred
on the St John of God Hospital and
Chum Street as a specialist activity
centre.

As can be seen in the table above, the submissions that have been received have been
very useful in enabling the strategy to be revised and finalised. There are of course
some submissions that have not been supported, but overall there has been little
objection to the bulk of the strategy and its directions. Should any submitter still believe
that the strategy should be changed, they will have the opportunity to argue their case as
part of the Planning Scheme Amendment process when the strategy is proposed to
become a reference document and key components of it transferred to parts of the
Municipal Strategic Statement.
Resource Implications
Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year:
Costs associated with finalising the document are included in the Strategy Units budget.
It is estimated that approximately $4,000 will be required for desktop publishing and
printing. Amendment costs are expected to be minimal, given it is only the preparation
and exhibition of the amendment that is likely to occur in the current financial year. An
allocation for a Panel will need to be made for the 2016/15 financial year.
Previous Council Support:
A budget allocation of $60,000 was made in the 2014/15 financial year to prepare the
CLACS. Of that only $49,213 was used, which was paid to SGS Economics and
Planning to undertake the specialist research needed to complete the strategy.
Projected costs for future financial years:
A budget allocation will need to be made to complete the Planning Scheme Amendment
and to actions such as completing Urban Design Frameworks. Such projects are core
work for the Strategy Unit and allocations are made each year based on the adopted
work program.
The Panel costs will include a provision for SGS Economics and Planning to prepare an
expert witness statement and present at the Panel if required.

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Conclusion
The Commercial Land and Activity Centre Strategy is an important piece of strategic
work that will guide planning and investment decision making in our activity centres over
the next 15 years. It has been prepared to assist in the implementation of the objectives
of the Greater Bendigo Residential Strategy, Economic Development Strategy and the
Connecting Greater Bendigo ITLUS. The strategy has been informed by the latest
available technical and specialist data combined with a consultative process with key
stakeholders. Its adoption and inclusion in the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme will be
an important tool in achieving Councils vision of Greater Bendigo working together to be
Australias most liveable regional city.
Attachments
1.

Commercial Land and Activity Centre Strategy October 2015

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1.

Adopt the Commercial Land and Activity Centre Strategy October 2015.

2.

Request the Minister for Planning to authorise Council to prepare Amendment C224
to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.

3.

When Authorised by the Minister, exhibit Amendment C224 to the Greater Bendigo
Planning Scheme giving notification as required for the minimum statutory
exhibition period of one month.

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ROSALIND PARK RECREATION RESERVE PRECINCT MASTER


PLAN AND MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

Document Information
Author

Mark Stubbs, Senior Strategic Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
To describe the preferred interim governance model for overseeing the implementation
of the Rosalind Park Recreation Reserve Precinct Master Plan and Management
Framework.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Theme 2: Liveability
Strategy 2.3: Open space and recreation facilities are well designed, extensively used
and well maintained.
Action 2.3.3 Complete the Rosalind Park Master Plan.
www.bendigo.vic.gov.au/rosalindpark
Background Information
The preparation of the Rosalind Park Recreation Reserve Precinct Master Plan and
Management Framework during 2013-14 identified that, historically, the park precinct
had been allowed to change and evolve in the absence of consistent governance to
ensure that the changes fit well with, or did not compromise, a long term plan.
Accordingly, the writing of the 2014 Master Plan included both a recommended
management structure and a high priority (0-5 year) action to investigate management
structure options. When the final Master Plan was presented to Council at its 17
December 2014 meeting for consideration for adoption, the accompanying report also
recommended the management model be further investigated as part of the forthcoming
Public Space Plan (Open Space Strategy) so that the model may be considered more
holistically across all the City's major parks, with the potential to achieve a more efficient
and integrated governance arrangement.

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Whilst the Master Plan was adopted by Council, the resolution also included a direction
for investigations to be undertaken into interim options for a management structure to
oversee the implementation of the Master Plan.
Previous Council Decision Dates:
The Master Plan was adopted by Council at its meeting of 17 December 2014.
Report
Present Arrangements
The Greater Bendigo City Council is the Committee of Management (CoM) for the
Rosalind Park Recreation Reserve and so, as is the convention, its management falls
within the day-to-day operations of different and specialist parts of the City of Greater
Bendigo. Reporting to Council by the relevant service unit occurs from time to time;
usually in relation to a particular issue or proposal. These arrangements, despite certain
advantages, have meant that, unlike other CoM structures, there are not regular
meetings of a dedicated group of people (Council or otherwise) to provide strategic
oversight.
In early 2014, the initiative was taken by relevant service units to collaborate in a
reframing and clarification of respective roles and responsibilities, not solely related to
Rosalind Park, but for all of the citys open spaces. The division of responsibilities has
been clarified and the conditions where coordination is required established. In
summary, Public Space Design is responsible for public open space design, Parks and
Natural Reserves is responsible for the maintenance of public open spaces, Active and
Healthy Communities are responsible for managing the use and user groups and
Building Services is responsible for the management and maintenance of all buildings
and structures within open spaces. Where there are overlapping interests on an issue,
the relevant teams collaborate to agree on a solution. These arrangements are now
being actively implemented.
An Existing Benchmark
The City of Greater Bendigo initiated new governance arrangements for the Bendigo
Livestock Exchange with the establishment of a Reference Group to provide a forum for
relevant stakeholders to collaborate in raising, discussing and resolving strategic issues
related to the facility, its operation and its place in the context of activity and change in
the wider industry.
Important characteristics of the Reference Group to note are:
Scope: Advisory function only, with a focus on strategic issues and cross-disciplinary
sharing and collaboration. It is not a forum for detailed operational matters, nor is it a
decision-making body.
Membership: Wide-ranging internal and external representation, including stock agents,
drovers, transporters association, farmers / primary producers, the meat processing
industry, animal welfare, and internally the Director Presentation & Assets, Manager
Works, Livestock Exchange Manager and Maintenance Supervisor.

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Operation: Chaired by a Councillor; meetings held quarterly.


Reporting: Minutes distributed to participants. Annual reporting to Council (however this
could be more frequent if required).
In most respects, this model is consistent with the recommendation provided in the
Master Plan for the Rosalind Park Precinct, and is therefore considered to offer a
reasonable precedent for application on an interim basis.
Recommended Interim Governance Structure
Following is a summary of the governance structure recommended to be put into place
until such time as options for an alternative, longer-term structure have been investigated
and considered.
Scope:

The group should have an advisory function only, with a focus on


strategic issues and cross-disciplinary sharing and collaboration.
Detailed operational and management must be addressed through
the appropriate business unit/s of the organisation.

Membership:

Preferably be limited to a maximum of 10 representatives for


efficiency, including:
Three staff members, nominally chosen from the following business
units of the organisation:
Active & Healthy Communities
Building & Property
Engineering & Public Space
Parks & Natural Reserves
Strategy
Five community-based representatives, preferably selected via an
Expression of Interest process, or alternatively by direct invitation.
Representatives should demonstrate a general, rather than specific,
interest in Rosalind Park, as well as the capacity to consider issues
strategically and impartially. Consideration should be given to
including both local and regional or Melbourne-based representation.
Two Councillors, with one Councillor to be the Chair (nominated by
Council).

Operation:

Meetings to be held on at least a quarterly basis and chaired by the


Councillor.

Reporting:

Formal reporting to Council on bi-annual basis. Circulation of


meeting minutes to all Councillors.

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Next Steps
Further internal discussion and coordination is needed to resolve several issues which
include:
1. Drafting the terms of reference;
2. Determining the internal membership of the group;
3. Determining the preferred process by which external membership should be sought
(e.g. by direct invitation, by expression of interest); and,
4. Assigning responsibility for the administrative and convening functions to a service
unit.
A representative from Council must also be nominated to fulfil the role of Chair and to
provide a direct line of communication back to Council as the Committee of
Management.
The scheduled timing of a first meeting of the Group should be subject to ensuring that
there are sufficient and appropriate issues to provide an ongoing agenda for discussion.
At present there is only limited activity related either directly or indirectly to the
implementation of the Master Plan. The two main examples are technical investigations
(water quality, depth contouring, water source verification, etc.) related to the former
Municipal Baths, following Councils budget allocation for this work, and an application to
the Department of Justices Public Infrastructure Grant for works to improve public safety
in the laneway that links Barnard Street to Gaol Road (running alongside the former
Municipal Baths), including lighting, vegetation removal, artwork and fencing upgrades.
Resource Implications
Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year: Nil
Projected costs for future financial years: Support for the governance structure as
proposed will require contribution of officer time on a recurring basis for administration,
preparation and meeting attendance.
Conclusion
The Rosalind Park Recreation Reserve Precinct is one of the Citys most significant and
complex public space assets.
New governance arrangements are needed to
strategically manage change within the Park Precinct, consistent with the recentlyadopted Master Plan. The setting up of a Reference Group combining various specialist
skills from within the City of Greater Bendigo with the knowledge and interest of
community-based participants is considered to be a suitable response for interim, until
such time as an alternative approach is identified as part of the forthcoming Public Space
Plan.

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RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve:
1. To establish a Reference Group for the purpose of providing strategic governance for
the Rosalind Park Recreation Reserve Precinct and that a further report
recommending the appointment of community members be presented to Council.
2. To adopt the Interim Governance Structure as contained in this report.
3. To initiate an expression of interest or direct invitation process to attract community
representatives to the Reference Group.
4. To nominate Councillors Williams & Cox to the Reference Group, with Cr Williams to
be the Chair.
5. To investigate, as part of the forthcoming Public Space Plan, options for a
governance model which could be applied to the Citys public spaces.

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BENDIGO BOTANIC GARDENS CAST IRON CONSERVATORY

Document Information
Author

Aaron Lindsay, Co-ordinator Public Space Design


Gemma Fennell, Bendigo Botanic Gardens Development Officer

Responsible
Director

Darren Fuzzard, Director Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose
This report provides further information on the cast iron conservatory and recommends it
be retained for future reconstruction at the Bendigo Botanic Gardens, White Hills.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2015-2016 Update):
Theme: 2

Planning for Growth

Action 2.1.3

Progress the development of the Botanic Gardens.

Theme: 3

Presentation and Vibrancy

Strategy 3.1

Greater Bendigo has attractive and accessible parks,


public spaces and streetscapes that are widely used, and
enable people to be healthy and active.

Theme: 5

Sustainability

Strategy 5.2

The history, unique heritage, streetscapes and buildings of


Greater Bendigo are conserved, restored, celebrated and
managed wisely for the long term.

Background Information
At their Ordinary Meeting on 24 August 2015 Council considered a report on the Cast
Iron Collection and resolved to retain the cast iron conservatory until an additional report
on the conservatory is presented to Council.

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History of the conservatory


The conservatory in question is owned outright by the City of Greater Bendigo (CoGB).
The conservatory is distinct from the Cast Iron Collection that is owned by the National
Trust. The conservatory was removed from the Cast Iron Collection and gifted to CoGB
by the National Trust in 2001. The White Hills Botanic Gardens was mutually deemed
the most appropriate home for the conservatory. It was the conclusion of the National
Trust that a regional botanic garden be the best owner for the conservatory, since neither
of its past owners - Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne (RBGM) or Royal Melbourne Zoo
(RMZ) - wanted it. There was no timeframe associated with the National Trusts
decision.
The timeline of the conservatory building:
1877-8 Design for conservatory commissioned by RBGM modelled on the Great Palm
House at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew (London).
1880s Part of the designed conservatory constructed at RBGM, being the palm house
wing (the other parts were never built).
1941 Palm House dismantled from RBGM after having fallen into a state of disrepair.
1940s Building erected at the RMZ and appropriated as an animal enclosure or aviary.
1970 Building dismantled and parts kept in storage at Werribee Zoo.
1975 Remaining parts of the building gifted from the RMZ to the National Trust but
remain in storage at Werribee Zoo.
2000 National Trust deaccession the conservatory, with a regional Victorian botanic
garden deemed the most suitable home (after the RBGM and RMZ).
2001 Conservatory parts gifted to the CoGB for White Hills Botanic Gardens (kept in
storage at the Adam Street Depot).
2010 Reconstruction of the conservatory included in the Bendigo Botanic Gardens
Master Plan as a long-term action.
Report
Suitability to the Bendigo Botanic Gardens
Gazetted in 1857, the Bendigo Botanic Gardens is Bendigos oldest public garden and is
listed on the Victorian Heritage Register for its historic, aesthetic, social and scientific
cultural significance to the State of Victoria and people of Bendigo.
The Bendigo Botanic Garden is an integral part of a network of over twenty Victorian
regional botanic gardens developed between 1849 and 1886. This extraordinary
collection, unique to Victoria, and possibly unrivalled anywhere in the world, represented
an outstanding confidence in the future of the newly proclaimed colony of Victoria,
demonstrated a belief in the intellectual and economic ascendency of Melbourne and
was financially assisted, in part, by the gold rushes (Lee Andrews & Associates Heritage
Consulting, 2007).

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In a letter of support to CoGB in 2013, the Director of Royal Botanic Gardens


Cranbourne stated The Bendigo Botanic Gardens has the privilege of being one of the
oldest botanic gardens in Australia. Commenced as a result of the wealth established in
Victoria during the era of the goldfields, the Gardens were an expression of cultural
ambition and civic pride. The remnant structure of the garden is still intact, and it is one
of the regions hidden jewels. It is a site of social and horticultural significance within
Victoria.
The State Significant (heritage-listed) Bendigo Botanic Gardens is an appropriate home
for the conservatory. Reconstruction of the conservatory in the Gardens will honour the
structures connection to Victorian botanic gardens and its horticultural intent, is suited to
19th century heritage interpretation, and will allow the Conservatory to be once again
enjoyed by the public free of charge.
Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master Plan, 2010 & White Hills Botanic Gardens
Heritage Significance Assessment and Strategy, 2007
To continue the legacy of those before them, in 2010 Council adopted the Bendigo
Botanic Gardens Master Plan to guide the Gardens ongoing development. The vision
statement in the master plan is Bendigo Botanic Gardens White Hills, a garden that
respects the past, appreciates the present and embraces the future which reflects the
master plan's respect for the Gardens heritage.
The parts of the master plan that relate to the conservation of the existing 19th century
garden were guided by the recommendations in the White Hills Botanic Gardens
Heritage Significance Assessment and Strategy, 2007 by Lee Andrews and Associates.
The Assessment and Strategy lists actions to conserve the Gardens heritage including
Construct a display conservatory (Priority 4: Actions to enhance and extend the
Gardens cultural significance). This action is based on:

Evidence of a conservatory in the Gardens that was lost in the 19th century.

Evidence of numerous attempts to reinstate a conservatory in the Gardens


throughout the 20th century.

The conclusion that the loss of early conservatory buildings jeopardises the
Gardens cultural significance.

As recommended in the Heritage Significance Assessment and Strategy, and consistent


with the National Trust's vision, the Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master Plan includes
reconstruction of the cast iron conservatory that was once a feature of the Royal Botanic
Gardens Melbourne (5.2.11 Cast Iron Conservatory), in the heritage-listed garden.
The Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master Plan is acknowledged by two national design
awards for planning:
1. National Landscape Architecture Award for Planning, 2012, Australian Institute of
Landscape Architects (AILA).
2. National Recognition of Excellence, Planning Award, 2011, Parks and Leisure
Australia (PLA).

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The citation for the 2012 AILA Award reads this body of work is an extremely
comprehensive assessment of all the layers that contribute to a public park. The
resultant master plan responsively and responsibly interprets these layers and
formulates them into a vision that will celebrate the past, appreciate the present and
embrace the future. The depth of understanding and commitment to the gardens is
clearly shown in the end result: a document that will result in a lasting legacy for the
community, the region and in fact, botanical gardens and arboreta nation-wide.
Future reconstruction of the conservatory
Prior to the Council Meeting of 26 August 2015, the feasibility of CoGB erecting the
conservatory was challenged, given that not all the original pieces remain. The master
plan acknowledges that the conservatory is currently in parts and is incomplete and this
is factored into the master plan, including the cost of reconstruction (detailed later in this
report).
There are two methods that could be used to reconstruct the conservatory given the
parts remaining. Both methods are acceptable according to Australias best-practice
guidelines for managing heritage places (Australia ICOMOS Burra Charter 2013):
1. Reproduction of the original structure as per photo evidence, by replicating existing
pieces as required.
2. A contemporary design that incorporates, showcases and interprets the remaining
old pieces, e.g. exhibiting the partial, remnant structure within the new building
design.
Neither of the above methods requires a complete set of pieces and the cost difference
of the two methods is negligible. The estimated 30% of the original pieces of the
conservatory that remain is not a barrier to the conservatorys reconstruction.
On the contrary, method two (above) is, if anything, an exciting design opportunity to be
creative and display the heritage parts within the context of the Gardens (and Bendigos)
fascinating past and exciting, promising future.
Priority/Importance:
Importance
The cast iron conservatory that originated in the RBGM in the 19 th century, and is owned
by CoGB is highly important to implementation of the Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master
Plan.
Priority
Both the Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master Plan and the Heritage Significance
Assessment and Strategy recognise that reconstruction of a conservatory within the
Gardens is a long term priority.
The master plan sets the expectation that the conservatory will be the last component of
the plan to be implemented, essentially completing the project. It is important that this
long term priority is not lost sight of.
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Reconstruction of the conservatory at the Bendigo Botanic Gardens will be dependent on


funding becoming available and is expected to involve external funds. Possible future
funding partners include the Victorian Government, the philanthropic sector, and the tobe established Bendigo Botanic Gardens Foundation that is devised in the master plan.
No commencement date has been assigned to the conservatory project at this stage.
However, completion of the Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master Plan, including the
reconstruction of the conservatory, is planned to be achieved by 2035.
Storage and preservation of the conservatory parts
The conservatory parts consist of a series of cast iron structural parts (columns and
trusses) and decorative parts (friezes), as well as bluestone plinths. The parts are
currently stored outdoors at the Adams Street Depot in a fenced and locked area.
New advice regarding the appropriate storage and preservation of the cast iron elements
was sought from Billmans Foundry, Castlemaine in October 2015. Billmans advised that
generally, standard actions to preserve cast iron are sandblasting, priming and storage in
a dry area. However, having inspected photographs of the cast iron conservatory parts,
Billmans advised that in this case it would be best to wait until the parts are to be reused
before sandblasting. The rust on the parts is severe as a result of them being kept
outdoors, in poor condition, for many decades. Billmans advised that the parts are
unlikely to degrade much more in the next fifteen years even if the parts continue to be
stored outdoors.
Despite Billmans saying it is not required; CoGB has investigated whether the parts
could be moved to a dry location. The conservatory parts can be relocated to Reservoir
Road shed in Kennington in the near future. The shed is owned by CoGB and currently
houses the Vahland Drinking Fountain parts and the Graeme Robertson Cast Iron
Collection. The Vahland Drinking Fountain is to be relocated to the Adams Street Depot
before Christmas and the Cast Iron Collection is to be returned to the National Trust
(likely next calendar year), which will enable the conservatory to take their place indoors
in the shed.
Consultation/Communication:
Friends of Bendigo Botanic Gardens
The Friends have provided a letter of the support regarding Heritage Conservatory for
Bendigo Botanic Gardens which is provided as an attachment to this report. Importantly
the Friends state that they support the recommendation to retain the stored components
for reconstruction of the conservatory in the Heritage portion of the Gardens; that
Bendigo residents are very fortunate to have the opportunity to incorporate this National
Trust gift into the gardens; and that The Friends Group would be willing to cooperate in
seeking additional support via grants etc. to facilitate this outcome.

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The National Trust


The National Trust have given written support for the reconstruction of the conservatory
at the Bendigo Botanic Gardens, both when the building was gifted to CoGB in 2001 and
again in liaison with the Public Space Design unit (formerly Landscape and Open Space
Planning) in 2010.
Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Zoo
CoGB has consulted RBGM and RMZ (past owners of the conservatory) on several
occasions since the building was gifted to CoGB in 2001. Both organisations have been
helpful and supportive of CoGB's efforts to collect information about the conservatorys
history, and neither has expressed interest in re-acquiring the structure. Royal Botanic
Gardens Victoria has given CoGB written support for retention of the conservatory for the
Bendigo Botanic Gardens which is provided as an attachment to this report.
Heritage Advisory Committee
At the Heritage Advisory Committee (HAC) meeting that took place on 16 July 2015, the
group voted to return the Cast Iron Collection and conservatory to the National Trust.
However, written correspondence between CoGB and HAC in 2010 confirms their
previous support of the conservatory being reserved for the Bendigo Botanic Gardens. A
follow up meeting with HAC is required for CoGB to present the significance of the
conservatory to the Gardens.
Resource Implications:
Cost of retaining the conservatory (short term)
The immediate resource implications of retaining the conservatory remnants (currently
stored at the Adam Street Depot) are negligible. If the conservatory is to be relocated
indoors to the Reservoir Road shed, the cost of the move will be accommodated in the
existing operational budget (Works and Parks Unit staff and vehicles).
Cost of reconstructing the conservatory (longterm)
In the Council Forum that took place on 12 August 2015, Council asked about the cost
associated with reconstructing the conservatory.
Given the uniqueness of the project, the actual price to reconstruct the conservatory will
be realised when detailed design for the building is commissioned. However, the project
is a part of the Bendigo Botanic Garden Master Plan and this document provides a
conservative allowance of $2,500,000-$3,000,000 to reconstruct the cast iron
conservatory to the current building code and for contemporary use. The allowance is
based on square-meter-rates to construct a comparable new building.
The master plan also acknowledges that as a regionally significant project, the plan is not
expected to be fully funded by Council and that external investment is required.

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The conservatory reconstruction project is likely to be a strong candidate for heritage


conservation grants from the Victorian Government; and/or funding from the
philanthropic sector and yet-to-be established Bendigo Botanic Gardens Foundation.
Conclusion
The 19th century, State listed Bendigo Botanic Gardens is a historically, culturally and
socially appropriate home for the state significant, 19th century botanic gardens
conservatory. Display and interpretation of the conservatory remnants in the Bendigo
Botanic Gardens White Hills will maintain the link between the horticultural structure and
the extraordinary collection of Victorian botanic gardens established between 1849 and
1886.
The National Trust concluded that the Gardens was an appropriate home for the
conservatory when they deaccessioned it from the Cast Iron Collection and gifted it
outright to CoGB. Furthermore, the cast iron conservatory is included in the adopted
Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master Plan, 2010, and the conservatory remnants are highly
important to the implementation of the widely consulted upon plan.
Reconstruction of the conservatory is a long-term priority and the future cost of
reconstructing it is recognised in the adopted master plan. A long-term approach needs
to be taken to achieve the inspired vision for the future Bendigo Botanic Gardens and
external funding is expected to help realise this vision.
The current state of the conservatory (being in parts and incomplete) is not a barrier to it
being appropriately displayed and interpreted according to Australias best-practice
heritage conservation guidelines (Burra Charter).
A follow up meeting with the Heritage Advisory Committee is required for CoGB to
present the significance of the conservatory to the Bendigo Botanic Gardens for the
groups information.
There is little-to-no costs associated with the storage of the conservatory parts at the
Adam Street Depot in the short term. The current storage conditions are adequate and
storage indoors in the Reservoir Road shed will be possible in the near future.
Attachments
1. Letter of Support regarding Heritage Conservatory for Bendigo Botanic Gardens,
Friends of Bendigo Botanic Gardens, 2015.
2. Letter from Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, 2015.
3. Letter to Bendigo Council conservatory, Lee Andrews & Associates Heritage
Consulting, 2015.
4. Letter regarding Retention of Heritage Conservatory Bendigo Botanic Gardens,
Botanic Gardens Australia New Zealand, 2015.
5. Executive Summary, White Hills Botanic Gardens, Bendigo, Heritage Significance
Assessment and Strategy, 2007.

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6. Memorandum regarding Cast iron glasshouse originally from Royal Melbourne


Botanic Gardens, National Trust, 14 February, 2000.

RECOMMENDATION
That Greater Bendigo City Council, having considered the heritage significance of the
cast iron conservatory and the Bendigo Botanic Gardens Master Plan, resolve to:
1. Retain the conservatory parts for implementation of the Bendigo Botanic Gardens
Master Plan, 2010 (5.2.11 Cast Iron Conservatory).
2. Acknowledge that CoGB officers will present the significance of the conservatory to
the Bendigo Botanic Gardens to the Heritage Advisory Committee meeting to be held
on 18 February 2016.
3. Acknowledge that CoGB officers will relocate the conservatory parts to the Reservoir
Road shed in Kennington when space becomes available.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

3.

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PRESENTATION AND VIBRANCY

3.1

MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELLBEING PLAN ANNUAL


REVIEW

Document Information
Author

Lindy Wilson, Social Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
To inform Council of the progress to achieve the objectives and actions of the Greater
Bendigo Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2013-2017 (MPHWP).
Policy Context
Conducting an annual review of the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan is a
statutory requirement of councils under the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008.
Section 26 (4) of the Act states that: A Council must review its municipal public health
and wellbeing plan annually and if appropriate amend the plan.
The Local Government Act 1989 states the primary objective of Local Government is to
endeavour to achieve the best outcome for the local community, having regard to the
long term and cumulative effects of decisions. To this end local councils need to have
regard to the social, economic and environmental viability and sustainability of the local
area and the overall quality of life and wellbeing of the people in the local community.
Council Plan Reference:
Council Plan 2013-2017 (updated 2015/2016)
Theme 3 Presentation and Vibrancy
Strategy 3.1 Greater Bendigo has attractive and accessible parks, public places
and streetscapes that are widely used, and enable people to be healthy and active.
Strategy 3.5 People are supported to learn about and make decisions that enable
them to be safe and the healthiest they can be.

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Background Information
The Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 requires Local Government to prepare a
Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan (MPHWP) every four years. Each Council
has a responsibility to protect, improve and promote public health and wellbeing within
their municipality. The MPHWP is a strategic plan that sits alongside and integrates with
the Council Plan and the Greater Bendigo Municipal Strategic Statement (within the
Planning Scheme), as well as other integrated health promotion plans of community
health providers.
Previous Council Decision Dates:
September 2012 Council endorsed a program of community engagement for the
development of the new MPHWP.
March 2013 Council considered the progress in achieving the actions in the Health and
Wellbeing Plan 2009-2013.
September 2013 Council resolved to endorse the draft MPHWP 2013-2017 and The
Wellbeing Charter for the purpose of inviting community comment.
October 2013 Council adopted the final MPHWP and signed Wellbeing Charter.
November 2014 Council endorsed the report on the first year annual review of the
MPH&WP
Report
Conducting an annual review of the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan is a
statutory requirement of councils under the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008.
Section 26 (4) of the Act states that: "A Council must review its municipal public health
and wellbeing plan annually and if appropriate amend the plan".
The legislation does not prescribe what a review might entail, however Section 25 (5)
states: "despite subsection (2)(c), a Council is not required to provide for the involvement
of people in the local community when reviewing or amending a municipal health and
wellbeing plan under subsection (4)".
To ensure that actions remain the best way for Council to invest in health and wellbeing,
the review means making sure that the actions identified under the Plan are being
implemented satisfactorily.
The annual review provides the opportunity for Council to identify and follow up actions
that have not started or that need refinement; to reduce or conclude actions that might no
longer be necessary and to commence new activities in response to newly identified
needs. This will ensure that the Plan actions are delivered and relevant over its four year
life.
The review will also serve other purposes such as: reporting and celebrating
achievement; informing other relevant plans and policies; strengthening networks and
partnerships; and influencing resource allocation.
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MPHWP Annual Review


In 2014 the Council adopted a new vision for Greater Bendigo: Working together to be
Australia's the most liveable regional city. The Council Plan now includes a series of
liveability indicators which embrace health and wellbeing.
The City is undertaking actions that deliver health and wellbeing in a wide number and
range of ways.
Reporting on the progress of implementation of adopted strategies and plans is an
important component of the monitoring and evaluation of Citys activities and
achievements.
The Strategy Unit developed the Plan and monitors its implementation.
The
implementation of actions, however, falls across a range of units across the organisation.
The attached report has been taken directly from the City's reporting software, Interplan,
with minimal editing and formatting. It must be noted that due to the change in reporting
software in 2014, earlier comments made on the Plans actions have not been rolled over
to the new software.
Actions completed or underway in the second year are:

Implementation of the Staff Get Up and Go health and wellbeing program.


'Take a Stand' domestic violence prevention program has delivered its final session.
Staff health check has been completed.
Health and Safety Representative have attended training in health and safety.
Bullying and harassment policies updated.
Staff recognised through random acts of recognition, Staff Poppethead Awards and
years of service ceremonies.
Community Care workers have undertaken Stroke awareness training refresher
planned for 2015.
Positive Ageing, Heritage and Youth Advisory Groups contribute to strategic planning.
Extensive community engagement has been undertaken with rural communities to:
develop the Rural Communities Strategy and ongoing work on Community Plans.
Council's forecast community profile demographics has been updated to include 2036
figures, the Active Living Census completed and third Wellbeing Survey will be
undertaken in October, 2015.
There are numerous opportunities for participation in diverse arts and cultural
programs and activities.
Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan development commenced.
Reconciliation Project Officer has been appointment to develop a Reconciliation
Action Plan.
Working with newly arrived migrants in partnership with Bendigo Community Health
Migrant Settlement Team on workshops and an exhibition in Dudley House.
The Capital presents a morning music program for seniors, continually looking for
opportunities to ensure venues and events are accessible to all members of the
community and investigating the possibility of delivering a theatre festival for primary
students in 2017.
Greater Bendigo Human Right Charter adopted by Council
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Opportunities for physical activities undertaken such as Play in your Park, TeamUp
physical activity connection tool, Game Plan series, Be a Trailblazer, Lets Walk
Eaglehawk social marketing campaign, Ride for Dad, Funloong Fun Day, free bike
parking at events, Heathcote Community Games, standing meeting tables, City of
Greater Bendigo Bike Fleet and the development of Active Travel Healthy Kids Guide
for schools.
Accessible information provided on programs such as Active April, Walk the Block,
Walk to School, Ride2School, Ride2Work etc.
New legislation for smoking bans around outdoor areas and within entrances to
certain public buildings and schools. Funding has been received to undertake
compliance/proactive action.
Enforced legislation about cigarette sales to minors, point of sales advertising and
smoke free venues.
Planning for an Aquatic Centre at Kangaroo Flat.
Epsom/Huntly Recreation Reserve development completed.
Aquatic Play Park opened at Long Gully.
The Healthy Together Bendigo program achievements include the Active Living
Census, Healthy Food Connect Food Security Report, Healthy Supermarkets
research project commenced, 65 childrens services and 53 workplaces undertaking
the Achievements Program, Healthy Communities community grants category,
Connect with Cooking course, creation of Golden Plate Awards Healthy Choices
category, Bendigo Business Excellence Awards Healthy Workplace and delivery of
Jamies Ministry of Food cooking course.
Mental Health The City participated in a sector development group called Mental AZ, which is auspiced by Bendigo Loddon Primary Care Partnership. Other activities
include: Be Brave, speak up event, promotion of the R U OK campaign and
exploration of partnership opportunities with the HALT Program.
The implementation of actions of the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan is
undertaken annually.
Council has recently adopted the Community Access and Inclusion Plan to meet its
obligations under the Disability Act.
A Community Safety Strategy has been developed.
Both the Residential Development Strategy and Connecting Bendigo Integrated Land
Use and Transport Plan with a strong focus on health, has been adopted by Council
and work has commenced on the Housing Strategy.
Workshop offered bi-annually to assist community groups with seeking grants.
Childhood immunisation rates continue to be above Victorian rates.
The Municipal Early Years Plan is nearing completion.
The Director of Community Wellbeing is the Citys representative in the First Quarter
Governance Group.
The Aged and Disability Services review was completed in 2013 - all services were
reviewed and recommendations implemented.
Council supported the establishment of the Marong Community Hub at the former
Marong Pre-School.
Checking and changing of smoke detector batteries is embedded into the
assessment and safety check conducted for HACC clients.
Bendigo Regional Food Alliance has been established and is currently identifying key
projects.
Economic Development Strategy being implemented.

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The redevelopment of the Bendigo Library has resulted in a significant increase in


usage of the internet terminals within the library.
The development of The Capital Community Connect brand provides a social media
presence connecting The Capital with the community.
Plans and education programs developed and delivered for emergency management
planning and preparedness.
Food safety and infectious disease prevention monitoring and education is carried
out.
Priority/Importance:
Local government is mandated under the Public Health and Wellbeing Act to prepare a
MPHWP aligned to the Councils reporting cycle and to monitor and review the
implementation of the Plan every year.
Timelines:
The MPHWP was adopted by Council in October 2013 and as legislation requires that
the MPHWP is monitored and reviewed every year of its implementation, 12 months from
its adoption, it is now timely to consider its review.
Risk Analysis:
Local government plays an important role in the health and wellbeing of the community.
Legislation requires Council to have a MPHWP and to monitor and review its
implementation annually. By not completing the annual review Council could be in
breach of its statutory obligations under the Public Health and Wellbeing Act.
Consultation/Communication
Extensive community consultation was undertaken for the development of the MPHWP.
Throughout the implementation phase, certain actions will require community
consultation, the level and extent of consultation will vary according to each action.
Resource Implications
In actioning the MPHWP, the City will continue to play an important role. Some actions
will and have required resource allocation through the annual budget process.
Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year: Nil
Previous Council Support: $15,000 to prepare MPHWP (adopted in Oct 2013)
Projected costs for future financial years: In 2016/2017 a budget will be required to
develop a new Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan.
Conclusion
The MPHWP is in its second year of implementation. As outlined in this report, the
progress to date has been substantial with some key actions completed or underway.

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This reinforces the role local government plays in the health and wellbeing of the
community.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to endorse the report on the review of the
MPHWP in accordance with legislative requirements.

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POSITIVE AGEING STRATEGY 2011-2015 COMPLETION REPORT

Document Information
Author

Lindy Wilson, Social Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
To report to Council on the actions undertaken as part of the Positive Ageing Strategy
2011-2014, and advise that the Plan has come to the end of its life.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Council Plan 2013-2017 (Updated 2015/2016)
Theme 3 Presentation and Vibrancy
Strategic Objective Greater Bendigo is a child friendly city where people report
improved health and wellbeing and they can feel safe.
Background Information
Council adopted the Positive Ageing Strategy at its Ordinary Meeting on 9 February
2011. Since that time actions in the Plan have been implemented.
The City developed the Positive Ageing Strategy to clearly outline to the community,
stakeholders and other government departments and agencies its multifaceted role in
facilitating a high quality of life for older people. This involves planning, direct service and
facility provision, partnerships and collaboration with local and regional service providers,
and advocacy to other tiers of government to address current and emerging needs of
older people.
The City can contribute to Positive Ageing through its roles:
As a regulator of public health;
As a planner, designer and regulator of the built environment (public and private
realm)
As a provider of community facilities, public amenities and community;
As a provider of support services;
As a partner in community building; and
As a leader and advocate for resources to support the growing community of Greater
Bendigo.

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In addition to the direct service provision of HACC, the City of Greater Bendigo has a
range of other functions that directly and indirectly have a positive impact on the
wellbeing of older adults such as statutory planning, design of public space and arts and
cultural events. An integrated approach to planning meant that the Strategy included the
roles and functions that Council has in contributing to positive ageing.
The Positive Ageing Advisory Group which comprised of older people, representatives
from the City and service providers delivered extensive and positive contributions to the
development of the Positive Ageing Strategy.
In adopting the Positive Ageing Strategy a recommendation to continue the Positive
Ageing Advisory Group was endorsed and that this group's role would be to:
Oversee the implementation of the Positive Ageing Strategy;
Provide information and strategic advice to the City of Greater Bendigo on matters
affecting the needs, interests and wellbeing of older people within the Municipality;
Act as a point of referral for the exchange of information and views between
community and the City of Greater Bendigo on issues of interest of older people.
The City has supported and managed this group since February 2011. The group has
provided valuable and critical input into the Councils strategic planning. Currently the
Positive Ageing Strategy is at the end of its life and a decision is yet to be made on the
development of the new plan. So the Positive Ageing Advisory Group is now in
recession pending a review of the role and function of the group.
Previous Council Decision Dates:
16 December, 2009 resolved to develop a Positive Ageing Strategy
10 November, 2010 draft Positive Ageing Strategy
9 February 2011 Positive Ageing Strategy adopted by Council
Report
The concept of getting older is changing; not only do the demographics show that the
proportion of the population over 55 years of age is increasing, they also have very
different expectations, social needs, political perspective and lifestyles than previous
generations. The ageing population is a consequence of many things such as low
fertility, increased longevity, medical breakthroughs and better management of
previously fatal chronic diseases. People are enjoying better health, allowing them to
work longer, enjoy their retirement, participate in, and contribute to the community.
Older people come from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. The health and support
needs of a 65 year old are often very different from an 85 year old person. This diversity
in age, health, social and economic backgrounds means that older people have a wide
range of and varying levels of health and wellbeing requirements to be addressed in this
Strategy. The local impact of the forecast growth in the number of older people is likely to
result in a rise in demand for aged and community care services and increased use of
local infrastructure such as community and cultural facilities, footpaths, trails and public
spaces. It is important that Council plan for and respond to the needs of older people.

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The Positive Ageing Strategy (2011-2014) clearly articulated to the community,


stakeholders and to other government agencies and departments, the range and scope
of actions that were required to address the diverse needs of older people in the
municipality. Positive Ageing, to enhance the quality of life as people age, is the guiding
approach for this strategy.
Community consultation for this strategy indicated that health and library services, the
range of organisations and social life were all good features about ageing in Greater
Bendigo. Five interconnected areas or themes were prioritised from the community
consultations. A range of key needs and key actions were developed using the
community consultation to address these desired futures.
Reporting on the progress of implementation of adopted strategies and plans is an
important component of the monitoring and evaluation of Citys activities and
achievements.
The Strategy Unit developed the Plan and monitors its implementation.
The
implementation of actions, however, falls across a range of units across the organisation.
The attached report has been taken directly from the City's reporting software, Interplan
with minimal editing and formatting. It must be noted that due to the change in reporting
software in 2014, earlier comments made on the Plans actions have not been rolled over
to the new software.
Key achievements from Positive Ageing Strategy 2011-2014 are:
Social Connections
Older people will have a sense of belonging and safety because they are socially
connected to their community, friends and neighbours.
o Places to meet
o Aged and Disability Service Review
o Neighbourhood Party Guide
o Volunteering Opportunities
o Events and Activities promoted
o Information that facilitates access.
o Events and Activities promoted
o Zoom Newsletter (14 Issues)
o Accessible Website
o Aged and Disability Services Guide (available)
o A range of regular and local opportunities for social interaction.
o Senior Festival annually
o Brochure printed and available on Support and accommodation for Elderly
Residents in Greater Bendigo.
o Opportunities for intergenerational interaction.
o Intergenerational Programs delivers at Planned Activity Group

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Healthy Mind and Body


Older people will have the environment, facilities, services and programs that enable and
encourage them to maintain healthy bodies and minds.
o Access to health checks and screenings.
o CoGB Staff are offered Health Assessments.
o CoGB provides other health programs and information to staff, such as Gym
membership.
o Fitness programs.
o Walking Groups, strength training programs are available via Community Health
and have been integrated into the PAG activities.
o Adult play equipment has been installed at Heathcote.
o Activities and programs that stimulate the mind.
o Library redevelopment.
o Age and Disabilities Services network facilitated by CoGB meets quarterly.
o Age and Disability Services Guide is available.
Housing
Older people will have access to affordable and appropriate housing and will be
supported in their accommodation choices.
o Diverse range of affordable housing.
o Housing Needs Analysis has been prepared
o Residential Development Strategy has considered PAAG submission
o Currently Housing Strategy is being developed.
o All housing developments meet universal design principles.
o The building code of Australia sets out uniform set of technical provisions for the
designing and construction of buildings.
o Alternative housing options for older people.
o The Positive Ageing Advisory Group has been actively providing input into key
strategic documents such as the Residential Development Strategy and actions
in the Positive Ageing Strategy and recommendations from this group will be
included in the Housing Strategy.
o Information on housing options for older people.
o Produced brochure on Support and accommodation for Elderly Residents in
Greater Bendigo.
o Advocate for Housing submission to the residential Strategy
o Received presentation on Housing
Physical Environment
Older people will be able to access and feel safe in public spaces that encourage
visitation and social interaction.
o Public amenities accord with universal design principles.
o Actions in place to undertake the development of a checklist.
o Work will soon commence on the Public Space Strategy
o Outdoor spaces are safe and friendly.
o This will be further considered in the development of the Public Space Strategy.
o Good pedestrian access.
o The Community Access and Inclusion Plan Provides actions to ensure CoGB
facilities and events meet legislative requirements.
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o
o

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Council allocation of an additional $1m for pathways.


CoGB will continue to create supportive pedestrian environments for older
people.

Transport
Older people will have access to suitable and flexible transport to enable them to lead
active and fulfilled lives.
o Information on all available transport options.
o Public Transport Vic is currently reviewing Bendigo Bus routes and timetabling.
o Extra Train services to Melbourne has just been announced
o Travellers Aid is available at Southern Cross
o Access Maps are available
o Scooter recharge and safety information is available
o Parking in Bendigo a handy guide provides details on disabled parking.
o Access to the new Hospital has been considered in the Hospital Structure Plan.
o Flexible community based transport.
o Getting around Portal was launched in April 2014.
o Public transport that meets changing local needs.
o The CoGB Integrated Land Use and Transport Plan due to be released in
September.
Progress:
The current Positive Ageing Strategy has reached the end of its life; discussions with the
Positive Ageing Advisory Group, Councillors, Community Partnerships and Strategy will
continue, to clarify the future role of the Positive Ageing Advisory Group and also identify
if there is a need for a new plan to be developed in the next financial year.
Risk Analysis:
The City plays an important role in promoting positive and active ageing in the
municipality. If the Plan was not implemented, there would be a high risk of not achieving
this. Also if resources are not allocated to actions within the Plan, there is a risk of
actions not being implemented to their full extent or in some cases, not at all.
Consultation/Communication
Certain actions within the Positive Ageing Strategy required community consultation.
The level and extent of consultation depended on the action.
Resource Implications
In actioning the Positive Ageing Strategy, the City played many and varied roles. Some
actions required resource allocation through the annual budget process.

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Conclusion
The Positive Ageing Strategy has now come to the end of its life. The implementation of
the Plan has been substantial with many key actions completed. Further work and
possible development of a new plan will be considered in early 2016, at this time a report
will be presented to Council for consideration.
Attachments
1.

The City of Greater Bendigo Positive Ageing Strategy Progress Report 2015.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1.
Endorse the Positive Ageing Strategy Actions that have been implemented over the
life of the plan.
2.
Acknowledge that the Strategy has come to the end of its life and is now completed.
3.
Acknowledge the great work and time volunteered by the members of the Positive
Ageing Advisory Group and to thank them publicly for their time, contribution and
support to the City over the past four and half years.
4.
Maintain support for positive ageing and work with the existing committee members
to review the terms of reference for the Positive Ageing Advisory Group, with the
intention to re-establish the group in 2016.

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VIOLENCE PREVENTION PLAN 2012-2015 COMPLETION REPORT

Document Information
Author

Erin Smith, Social Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
To report to Council on the actions undertaken as part of the Violence Prevention Plan
2012-2015, and advise that the Plan has come to the end of its life.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Council Plan 2013-2017 (Updated 2015/2016)
Theme 3 Presentation and Vibrancy
Strategic Objective Greater Bendigo is a child friendly city where people report
improved health and wellbeing and they can feel safe.
Background Information
Council adopted the Violence Prevention Plan at its Ordinary Meeting on 15 August
2012. Since that time actions in the Plan have been implemented.
The Greater Bendigo City Councils policy position on violence prevention is that:
"Greater Bendigo City Council understands violence in any form is a serious and
preventable health issue for the Greater Bendigo community and does not condone the
use of violence in any form towards any member of the community.
Working in partnership with the community and key service providers, we can create a
municipality that is gender equitable, respectful and inclusive. We can do this as a role
model and by raising community awareness, providing information, creating inclusive
community settings, and fostering respectful attitudes and relationships."
Previous Council Decision Dates:
15 August 2012 Violence Prevention Plan adopted by Council
14 November 2012 Position statement signed by Council
29 May 2013 Progress report to Council
10 September 2014 Progress report to Council

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Report
The Violence Prevention Plan is the Citys commitment to not condone, commit or
remain silent about any form of violence in our community. The Plan is based on two
objectives:
Objective 1:
The City of Greater Bendigo will develop a range of strategies in partnership with other
organisations, networks and community members designed to increase awareness and
community endorsement to prevent violence, and assist those affected by violence to
find the services they require. This is an outward looking objective designed to increase
community knowledge and capacity to prevent violence.
Objective 2:
The City of Greater Bendigo will be a role model in the adoption of organisational
strategies to reduce the risk of violence in the community and which increase staff
awareness of services available to provide direct assistance for those affected. This is
an inward looking objective designed to increase the competency of City of Greater
Bendigo staff to prevent, recognise and manage violence against others appropriately.
The action plan for the Violence Prevention Plan includes three key prevention
strategies:
1. Changing attitudes and behaviours;
2. Fostering organisations, communities and cultures that are gender equitable and nonviolent; and
3. Promoting respectful and gender equitable relationships between men and women,
boys and girls.
Reporting on the progress of implementation of adopted strategies and plans is an
important component of the monitoring and evaluation of Citys activities and
achievements.
The Strategy Unit developed the Plan and monitors its implementation.
The
implementation of actions, however, falls across a range of units across the organisation.
The attached report has been taken directly from the City's reporting software, Interplan
with minimal editing and formatting. It must be noted that due to the change in reporting
software in 2014, earlier comments made on the Plans actions have not been rolled over
to the new software.
Key achievements from Violence Prevention Plan 2012-2015 are:
The Citys Enterprise Agreement contains provisions relating to the support available
for staff experiencing domestic violence; this reflects the Citys commitment to
endorse the Prevention of Domestic Violence policy
The Achieving respect and gender equality in Greater Bendigo position statement
adopted and signed by Council as part of their ongoing commitment to not condone
any form of violence in the community and their want for the community to be gender
equitable, respectful and inclusive
Preventing violence against women and children in the community is a priority focus
area in the Community Safety Strategy 2013-2016
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Maternal and Child Health nurses and key contact officers for staff were trained about
how to handle disclosures of family violence and to provide them with information
about referring clients to the correct agencies
Pocket sized brochures which provide contact details for family violence services
were distributed throughout the municipality including public toilets and maternal and
child health centres
A high proportion of staff undertook the Take a Stand training; 364 staff attended
the first session and 188 staff attended the follow on sessions two and three
There is also considerable work happening in the area of family violence within the
municipality that is not driven by the City. One example includes a Regional Plan being
developed by Womens Health Loddon Mallee.
Progress:
With the current Violence Prevention Plan approaching the end of its life, a new plan is
currently being developed. The new plan will have a greater focus on gender equity and
respectful relationships due to its direct link to family violence. Areas that will be explored
further include:
Concentrating on primary prevention
Ensuring our own organisation is equitable and respectful
Investigating the need for a gender analysis on services
Risk Analysis:
The City plays an important role in promoting a respectful and gender equitable
community. If the Plan is not implemented, there is a high risk of not achieving this. Also
if resources are not allocated to actions within the Plan, there is a risk of actions not
being implemented to their full extent or in some cases, not at all.
Consultation/Communication
Certain actions within the Violence Prevention Plan required community consultation.
The level and extent of consultation depended on the action.
Resource Implications
In actioning the Violence Prevention Plan, the City played many and varied roles. Some
actions required resource allocation through the annual budget process.
Conclusion
The Violence Prevention Plan has come to the end of its life. The implementation of the
Plan has been substantial with many key actions completed. This reinstates the Citys
commitment to violence prevention in the community. Work will shortly commence on the
development of a new plan.

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Attachments
1.

The City of Greater Bendigo Violence Prevention Plan Progress Report 2015.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to endorse the Violence Prevention Plan
Actions that have been implemented over the past three years.

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PRODUCTIVITY

4.1

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY: 2014-2020


(IMPLEMENTATION UPDATE)

Document Information
Author and
Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos, Director City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide Council and the community with a bullet point
summary regarding progressive implementation of Councils Economic Development
Strategy. Council will recall that it agreed to receive such updates every six months.
Policy Context
Council Plan - Action item 2.5.5: Develop Economic Development Strategy
Background Information
The Economic Development Strategy provides direction and promotion of the many and
varied initiatives considered most necessary to be implemented by and for the Greater
Bendigo community to ensure continued growth, vibrancy and diversification of our
economy for the next decade and beyond.
Responsibility for implementation of these priority initiatives is spread across Greater
Bendigo's public, private and community business sectors and across the organisation
where relevant to the City of Greater Bendigo itself.
The Strategy has been drafted to encourage and promote City of Greater Bendigo,
Victorian and Australian Government, private and community sector investment into a
series of priority actions that when combined will generate real "game changing"
outcomes for our region.
The Strategy indicated that it will remain "broad in focus and pointed towards 2020, but
will have associated with it detailed Implementation Action Plans considered and
endorsed by Council every two years for the next six years (Economic Development
Strategy 2014-2020 p.14)". To ensure that the Strategy is dynamic and responsive
rather than wait every two years, various plans and initiatives that require Council input
will be brought to Council as and when required throughout every year. Resourcing of
various plans and actions will be considered each year as part of budget processes.
Many plans and initiatives are of an operational nature and staff will progress the
initiatives with relevant stakeholders.

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The majority of identified initiatives identified in the strategy are likely to be implemented
by other levels of government, the private sector, not-for-profit and broader community
sectors, as well as in many instances a combination of sectors, rather than the City of
Greater Bendigo itself. The City's job in largest part is to be a consistent and
professional advocate and enabler of local government and community effort.
Strategy Implementation - Progress Update
It is considered that good progress is being made to date. Particular notable recent
initiatives / matters of recent progress include the following:
Announcement by the Australian Government of the $1.5 billion Hawkei

manufacture and maintenance contract to Thales Australias Bendigo operation - a


most significant economic boost for our regional economy
The announcement of La Trobe Universitys Bendigo Campus Master Plan and
commencement of its staged implementation
Announcement of a major expansion and modernisation to Parmalats manufacturing
operations in Bendigo
Good progression with the new Bendigo Hospital development
Commencement and good progression with the major expansion of St John of God
Private Hospital
Progression of the Planning Scheme Amendment Panel for the proposed Marong
Business Park (note: progressing to Planning Panel Stage in November this year)
Announcement by NBN Co. that the rollout of high speed fibre telecommunication
connections will commence in Bendigo late next year
Securing of matching Federal and State Government funds for the expansion of
Bendigo Airport ($5 million from all three levels of government now secured) and
receipt of all necessary planning permit approvals
Securing of funds ($300,000) from the Victorian Government to support the Citys
Career Horizons student-industry connection program
Announcement by Radius Disability Services of the establishment of their
headquarters and facilities in Mitchell Street in the Bendigo CBD

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Adoption of Councils Rural/Intensive Industries/Farming Strategy and associated


Planning Scheme Amendment processes to help implement the Strategy
Commencement of an ongoing program of high-level Business Roundtable Forums
for Councillors and Executive with representatives of Greater Bendigos business
community (two already held)
Promotion and staging of the inaugural Bendigo Small Business Festival 2015
incorporating 27 public events attended by over 1,000 people
Promotion and staging of the inaugural Bendigo Jobs and Careers Expo
Adoption of Councils 2015/16 budget which includes support for a range of Economic
Development Strategy initiatives and indirectly associated projects
Council decision made to proceed with the planned and permit-approved Greater
Bendigo Indoor Aquatic and Wellbeing Centre in Kangaroo Flat and confirmation of
$15 million in Victorian Government funding support
Completion of and commenced operations for the 1,000-seat Ulumbarra Theatre
Securing of funding support for the major expansion of Bendigo Stadium and receipt
of planning permit approval
Council approved package of increased funding and program support for the
reinvigoration of the Bendigo Trust and commenced implementation of the Trust
Boards business turnaround plan
Commencement of several privately-funded Council supported and permit-approved
inner-city residential developments (e.g. View Street and Mitchell Street Apartments)
Announcement of La Trobe Universitys Workforce Integrated Learning student
placement program in association with the City of Greater Bendigo (resulting in
industry placement for some 100 additional students each year)
Announcement of La Trobe Universitys multi-disciplinary Engineering Degree
Program (long demanded by local industry)

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Completion and staged opening of the Victorian and Australian Government funded
Regional Rail Project in Western Melbourne
Release of the new Victorian Governments Regional Growth Fund and Regional
Jobs Fund (designed to support local economic development initiatives)
Release of designs for the Victorian and Australian Government funded major
Ravenswood Interchange a major infrastructure project for our region
Announcement of Victorian Government support for the Bendigo Metro Rail Study
Project
Completion of Stage One of the Marist Brothers College in Maiden Gully
Completion of the latest major stage of the expansion of Girton Grammar School
Bendigo
Continued attraction, retention and development of a year-round program of major
events for Greater Bendigo (many and varied)
Recent announcement by the City and the Victorian Government of the first in a
series of new major international art exhibitions at and by Bendigo Art Gallery
Announcement by the Victorian Government of the establishment of a dedicated
Tech School in Bendigo one of ten across Victoria
Announcement by the City of Greater Bendigo of the formal commencement of
construction tender processes for over $62 million of works across three major
projects Bendigo Airport, Aquatic Centre and Bendigo Stadium.
All of these initiatives are referenced and supported in Councils Economic Development
Strategy.
RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council note the progress being made with respect to the
implementation of the Economic Development Strategy: 2014 - 2020 and request its next
strategy implementation update be presented to Council in March next year.

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BENDIGO TRAMWAYS STUDY AND STRATEGIC PLAN

Document Information
Author and
Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to brief Council on the preparation of a study/strategic plan
recently completed for and by the Bendigo Trust into its future tourism tram operations in
Bendigo.
A copy of the full study report has been circulated separately to Councillors. The study
was a collaborative undertaking between several entities and was in largest part funded
by the Victorian Government.
The study considered issues relating to possible commuter service viability, extension
and direction of existing track and potential marketing opportunities that exist with
additional infrastructure and operational budget capability.
The study and key recommendations have been concluded after analysis and
consideration among stakeholders to identify and help resolve current issues and
limitations. The key findings identify that the business case for a commuter service and
any extension of track is not able to be justified at this time due to costs, current and
future road usage, budget feasibility and non-alignment with the primary tourism purpose
of the Trusts tram services.
There is however strong merit in infrastructure investment being progressively made to
support and revitalise the Tramways through current roadway traffic conflict resolutions
and through at least two additional tram stops being built in the near future at key tourism
attraction locations. This will provide the impetus for the Tramways to be the glue that
links together a range of other tourism and cultural attractions in central Bendigo.
Additionally, the study findings identify some marketing opportunities that exist for the
Tramways in timetable scheduling, themed event trams and product innovation, which
are also aligned to wider tourism efforts in creating a more unique point of difference to
enhance Bendigos overall tourism appeal.
Policy Context
Council Plan
3.3 Greater Bendigo is a community that values its heritage and supports arts and
cultural experience

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3.3.2 Promote heritage values and learning opportunities in partnership with


relevant heritage organisations.
Economic Development Strategy - Liveability (section):
Support the reinvigoration of the Bendigo Trust to not only ensure the preservation of
important Bendigo heritage assets (e.g. Tramways, Central Deborah Mine and Chinese
Joss House), but importantly also to ensure that the organisations operations more
strongly contribute to Bendigos diversifying tourism industry and appeal, and to be better
integrated into the overall marketing of Bendigo as a major visitor destination.
Report
Background
Bendigo has had trams since 1890, however in 1972 all but 4.2km of track was removed
to make way for alternative forms of transport. The remaining 4.2km of track has since
been used to operate a heritage tramway tourist attraction. The Bendigo Tramways is
governed by the Bendigo Trust on behalf of the City of Greater Bendigo. In the forty
years since the removal of the original track, the urban population has more than
doubled and Bendigo has also developed significantly as a tourist destination.
Road traffic has greatly increased along the tramline and continues to grow, which has
led to a greater number of traffic conflicts and delays to the service, particularly where
the single track tramline shares with turning vehicular traffic in both directions.
The tramway is being maintained and the fleet of trams is much improved from its
original condition in 1972, however there is a need to address existing infrastructure
issues and limitations placed on the service offer by the current track route.
In 2014, urban planners and tourism advisors Urban Enterprise in collaboration with
engineering consultancy Cardno were commissioned to undertake a strategic
investigation into the Bendigo Tramways in order to identify a strategic plan for the
current and future tramways operations. The overall study sought a review of
opportunities to address and enhance operational and infrastructure matters related to
the current role as a historic tourism service, while also identifying potential for additional
stops and track extensions within the context of the current tourism role. In addition, the
study presents an opportunity to consider the potential for the service and infrastructure
network to be broadened to include a public transport/commuter role in the future.
Bendigo Tramways
The current Tramways route runs 4.2km (8.4km total journey) from Central Deborah
Gold Mine to the Bendigo Joss House temple, providing a link between some of
Bendigos central city tourist attractions.
Trams typically operate hourly between 10am to 4pm each day, however a more
frequent service is run on peak/school holiday periods, typically between 20-30 minutes.

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The track is predominantly single track, with sections of double track along Pall Mall and
two passing loops. The existence of predominantly single track creates conflicts between
cars and trams where the track shares the right turn lane in both directions.
Talking Tram Tour is the primary product of the Tramways, with secondary product
including the 976 restaurant tram and the tram depot and workshop tour.
The Talking Tram Tour tickets are priced at $17.50 for adults, $16 for concession and
$11 for children and $51 for a family. Tickets are available that include entry/tours to
other Bendigo Trust attractions, through Bendigo Experience Pass tickets. Packages
are also available at times in conjunction with Bendigo Art Gallery.
Tramways visitation has remained relatively stagnant from 2002/03 to 2011/12 (includes
tours and specials), averaging approximately 43,400 patrons per year. Patronage
generally peaks in January, with the lowest visitation typically occurring in February,
August, May and June.
ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Unique and Iconic
The Bendigo heritage trams provide a unique point of difference for Bendigo as a
regional tourist destination and complement the cultural and heritage tourism offer of
Bendigo. No other regional destination in Australia can offer the same authentic heritage
tram experience within the layer of the broader cultural heritage experience of Bendigo
itself. The heritage trams are critical to this point of difference. Using the W-Class trams
to provide the Talking Tram Tour significantly affects the Bendigo Tramways point of
difference. It also poses an issue in terms of value for money, given the Melbourne City
Circle tram is a free service. The W-Class trams should therefore be utilised to generate
revenue via alternative avenues.
The heritage trams are a relative icon of Bendigo and their status arguably should be
elevated. The Tramways will however need to increase market awareness, improve the
value proposition as well as linking more effectively with the broader heritage, arts and
culture product and branding of Bendigo to increase its iconic status.
The current product offer of the Bendigo Tramways is arguably outdated and requires reinvigoration to appeal to various market segments and to respond to increasing visitor
demand for high quality tourism experiences and to increase the value for money of the
product offer.
Stagnant patronage
The Tramways patronage has been stagnant for the past ten years, averaging
approximately 43,400 per year. The stagnant patronage levels places increasing
pressure on the Tramways revenue and profitability. The Tramways have offset this
through increasing revenue from contract maintenance, repairs and restorations. It is
essential that Tramways patronage increases in order to ensure the long term viability
and sustainability of the Tramways operations.

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Opportunity Cost
It is critical that the Tramways remain as a financially sustainable tourism product in
Bendigo. If the Tramways operations ceased, there would be a significant economic
opportunity cost for Bendigo and Victoria including a loss of visitors currently
experiencing the Tramways product, loss of a key heritage tourist attraction and loss of
the synergies between the Tramways and other heritage attractions; loss of a key
regional tourism point of difference and loss of branding and marketing potential; loss of
direct jobs involved in the Tramways and flow on effects in the local economy; loss of
skills, unique to operating, repairing, maintaining and restoring heritage trams; loss of
tourism jobs as a result of reduced in-region expenditure; and loss of opportunities for
volunteers currently associated with the Tramways.
Traffic Conflicts
The existence of predominantly single track creates traffic conflicts between trams and
vehicles. These are primarily created through the existence of right hand turn lanes on
tram tracks. These traffic conflicts can cause lengthy delays to the trams and create
safety issues, significantly affecting the service delivery. This reflects poorly on the
experience for visitors. This issue is only likely to compound with inevitable increasing
traffic volumes in Bendigo.
These traffic conflicts should be addressed through infrastructure changed that facilitate
safe passage for trams and road users and increase the uninhibited operation of the
Tramways.
Diversifying the Product
There are currently 23 vintage trams in the fleet plus one custom fit restaurant tram. The
Talking Tram tour is the primary product offer of the Tramways, which has remained
relatively unchanged over the years. The Talking Tram tour is tailored to each heritage
tram but essentially the remaining commentary is the same for all trams. The Tramways
is therefore not capitalising on extracting value from various market segments and
groups. The lack of diversity in product offer and experiences may be deterring
patronage and repeat visitation.
The current Tramways tourism experience is in need of reinvigorating in terms of
providing new and innovative experiences which cater to a variety of market segments
and audiences. Potential market segments could include school groups (primary and
secondary), families, retirees, corporates, tram enthusiasts and international visitors.
PRODUCT ENHANCEMENT STRATEGIES
1. Extension of the Tramways Narrative
There is opportunity for the Tramways to build upon and extend the Tramways narrative.
This would involve telling a variety of different stories which cater to different market
segments. Potential narratives could include:

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The cultural heritage of Bendigo;


The history of the Tramways in Bendigo from operators, drivers and original users;
Appealing to the family market by providing experiences and narratives that more
actively engage the interest of children;
The tourist attractions of Bendigo with detailed commentary of their history and
significance to Bendigo; and
An international visitor options which provides various tours in different languages.
2. Update Materials and Equipment
The quality of the product is dependent on the quality of materials and equipment being
utilised. Inaudible or poor sound quality can drastically affect the quality of the
experience for visitors. It is important that equipment is always functioning to a high
standard. There are current problems in this regard.
There is also opportunity to use different forms of media to deliver the product. This
could include the utilisation of digital media.
3. Push Notifications on Mobile Devices
The Bendigo Tramways is investigating the feasibility of utilising beacon technology to be
incorporated into the tour to promote Bendigo and its attractions and businesses directly
to visitors mobile devices. This would add considerable value to the tour product and
add value to Bendigos tourism and retail businesses. It would also encourage visitors to
hop on hop off and explore the citys other tourism attractions and retail precincts.
4. On Sell the Depot Tours
The importance of the Tramways Depot and Workshop tours should not be
underestimated to the overall Tramways experience. The Tramways depot and workshop
tour provides an authentic heritage tram depot/workshop experience that is
complementary to the Tramways tours.
This is where visitors can get a first-hand account of the work which goes into restoring
and running a fleet of heritage trams. On selling the depot and workshop tours to visitors
would create a wholly integrated experience, which would represent good value for
money.
5. Increase the Range of Themed Trams
There is an opportunity to increase the number of themed trams. Currently there are a
few themed trams including the Jimmy Possum Tram, the Yarn Bombed tram, the Art
Series Schaller Studio tram and the Restaurant Tram. Increasing the range of themed
trams would extend the product offer and appeal to different market segments.

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Coincide with Festivals and Events Themed trams could coincide with major festivals
and events. Festival themes trams may include Bendigo Easter Festival, Chinese New
Year, Blues and Roots Festival, Fashion Festivals, National Sheep and Wool Show, New
Moon Festival and other cultural festivals.
The Trams could be utilised to promote festivals and or event in the weeks leading up
and during the festival/event. Theming trams to particular events should be done in
collaboration with the organisers of the event to create mutually beneficial partnerships.
Coincide with Major Exhibitions and Shows There is also an opportunity to provide
themed trams which coincide with major exhibitions at Bendigo Art Gallery and major
shows at The Capital and Ulumbarra Theatre. These trams would also create awareness
of the exhibition to visitors and contribute to the overall visitor experience. This would
contribute to the marketability of the exhibition/show and create a greater market
presence within Bendigo. This would also enable a greater opportunity for package deals
associated with major exhibitions and shows.
These trams could operate in much the same was at the Art Trams currently do in
Melbourne.
Guided tours There is opportunity to introduce a guided tour to the Tramways product
and it is understood that Bendigo Tramways is considering the possibility of at least one
daily guided tour. This would provide a more personalised and authentic tour for visitors.
The guided tour could be operated on a trial basis to gauge visitor satisfaction in
comparison to the current Talking Tram tour.
Night Trams There is potential for a night tour to showcase Bendigo at night. This could
be in the form of a ghost tour to appeal to the family market and / or one that serves
drinks and canapes to appeal to a singles and couples market (run at twilight).
Food & Wine Trams - There is an opportunity to introduce year round themed trams
which appeal to food and wine visitors. This could include Trams which provide a tour
with local craft beer /cider and/or wine and local produce. This Tram would appeal to
visitor markets as well as local Bendigo residents.
The Bendigo Craft Beer and Cider Festival and Oktoberfest in Bendigo are two key
events in during which a local craft beer themed tram could operate. This would also help
increase awareness of the event.
Outsourcing the operation to private operators may generate revenue for the Tramways
while ensuring the operation of the product is undertaken by hospitality business with the
appropriate experience and resources.
6. Increase the range of Special Events Trams
There is opportunity to introduce a greater range of special event trams that can appeal
to different users.

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The corporate market could be captured by providing a tour service for business function
delegates. This type of tour would provide a value add to the function, providing
delegates with the opportunity to socialise and network. The tour would also provide
corporate visitors with an easy way to explore Bendigo, particularly if time is a constraint.
A party tram would need to offer more than a standard tour. These tours would need to
value add by including catering, provision for music, adequate seating, appropriate
lighting and decoration.
7. Link to existing Walking Packages
The Tramways tour could link to existing walking tour packages provided at the Bendigo
VIC. These tours are free, however they provide a value add to visitors who would like to
explore the city by foot from various Tramways stops.
8. Increase the Number of Stops
There is opportunity to add stops to the current Tramways route to better service
Bendigos tourism and commercial precincts. New stops would also increase the value
proposition of the tour.
New stops would generate greater exposure to visitors of tourism attractions and
businesses along the current tram route. Coupled with an increase in frequency, the hop
on hop off nature of the tour would be more viable and flexible. A greater number of
stops is likely to increase visitor dispersal along the tram route and likely to leverage
greater expenditure by visitors at local businesses and attractions. Additional stops on
the current Tramways route may include for instance:
1. Sacred Heart Cathedral and future Aspire Precinct
The Sacred Heart Cathedral is a major tourist feature in Bendigo and is a focal point
across the inner Bendigo area. The planned development of the Aspire Precinct,
fronting High Street will provide a gateway to the precinct and to Sacred Heart Cathedral.
This presents a unique opportunity to provide a tram stop that aligns with the Sacred
Heart Cathedral.
Presently, the closest stop to the Cathedral is located on Pall Mall, north of Mitchell
Street. This stop is well outside a reasonable 400m walkable radius and mitigates
against Tramways patrons including the Sacred Heart Cathedral within the tour.
2. Golden Dragon Museum (Mundy Street intersection with Pall Mall)
The Golden Dragon Museum is currently not serviced by a Tramways stop. The nearest
stop is located on Pall Mall at the juncture of Mitchell and View Street, which is not within
a reasonable 400m walkable catchment of the museum.
There is opportunity to locate a new stop outside the recently completed taxi rank and
toilet facility at the juncture of Pall Mall and Mundy / Bridge Street. The inclusion of a stop
here would service the Golden Dragon Museum, provide greater access to areas of the
CBD and Rosalind Park and provide greater viability for the hop on hop off service.
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Given the location of the recently established taxi rank, at the juncture of Pall Mall and
Bridge Street, a new tram stop could provide the opportunity for a signalised pedestrian
crossing to the taxi rank. The inclusion of a signalised pedestrian crossing would
increase the safety of pedestrians wanting to access the taxi rank or the public toilets.
Anecdotally, students from Bendigo Senior Secondary College also cross the road at this
point to access shops during lunch time and after school hours. A tram stop and
integrated pedestrian crossing at this location would therefore be of benefit to the
Bendigo community as well as Tramways patrons.
A new tram stop at this location would also better service the Conservatory Gardens in
Rosalind Park and to some extent the recent development of the Ulumbarra Theatre.
9. Track Duplication
The opportunity exists to implement a duplicated track along the current tram route:
Traffic Conflict Resolution
Many of the tram/traffic conflicts arise due to the provision of single tram track. The
introduction of duplicated track would resolve these issues, particularly relating to
conflicts which arise due to right hand turn lanes located on tram tracks.
Increased Frequency of Service
The introduction of duplicated track would remove the existing restriction on frequency of
tram services. This is particularly important between Myrtle Street and Mitchell Street
where the current track allows for a maximum of a 20 minute service frequency.
Duplicated track would provide an even greater level of achievable service frequency.
Full duplication of track would facilitate services of at least 10 minutes. This would also
facilitate a greater ability to promote the trams as a hop on hop off service.
Traffic Flow and Safety
Duplicated track would facilitate greater flow of traffic and tram movement which would
increase road safety for all users. Duplicated track would also provide certainty to all
road users about the relationship between trams and vehicles. Currently the provision of
some single track, some double track and some passing loops creates an ambiguous
situation for road users, promotes uncertainty for road users and can lead to poor
decision making by road users.
Product Enhancement
The provision of duplicated track would enhance the current tramways product through
the ability to increase the frequency of service, the ability to extend the track to other
tourism destinations and through creating a more reliable, safe and smooth journey for
passengers.

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Future Public Transport Provision


Duplicated track could facilitate a greater shift toward the provision of light rail public
transport in Bendigo in the longer term given much of the track infrastructure will already
be in place. It is considered that a reliable, efficient public transport service could not
operate on a predominantly single track, particularly when not operating on a loop route.
10. Extend the Tram Route
Extending the Tram route to take in more of Bendigos attractions and provide a longer
journey would significantly increase the value proposition of the Tramways and open up
opportunities for greater product enhancements and packages.
11. Increase the Frequency of Service
Proposed infrastructure works will facilitate an increase in the frequency of the tram
service. Increasing the frequency of service would facilitate a greater utilisation of the
hop-on hop-off service and provide greater value for money for the current service.
Currently, trams run every hour and every half hour during school holidays. The
frequency of service could be adjusted depending on variable demand (i.e. peak season,
low season) and trialled to measure the benefits / costs.
Running trams every 15-20 minutes would increase the attractiveness of the Tramways
as a hop-on hop-off service and contribute to the recognition of the Trams as being a
part of Bendigos historical and current urban fabric.
Funding the increased service operation could be achieved through greater visitation as
a result of the increased service. A future possibility is for a reduction in ticket price to be
explored which may result in the Tramways appealing to a broader market and resulting
in increased sales and ridership.
PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES
Preliminary cost estimates for various concept options to resolve current tram and
roadway traffic conflicts and new tram stops are provided in the table below:
The works have been grouped into a general order of priority within the context of the
current tourism role and its operational issues. Accordingly works resolving the conflict
between tram movement and right turn lanes and priority new stops are given the highest
priority.
Full track duplication will have significant benefits but the cost of works is high. It is
recommended that full track duplication should be considered in the context of the
implementation of the ITLUS recommendations for High Street / Pall Mall.
PUBLIC TRANSPORT POTENTIAL
The current operation of the Bendigo Tramways is not suited to providing a public
transport service. Public transport would need to be provided by a modern light rail
system.

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The introduction of a light rail service generally requires a population of at least 150,000
to 200,000 people. Bendigos population will not reach 150,000 for another 20 years.
A full public transport Light Rail service in Bendigo is very unlikely to be viable for at least
15 to 20 years. However the successful continuation of the existing heritage service
preserves the opportunity to consider the introduction of a Light Rail public transportation
service in the long term future.
ECONOMIC VALUE
It is considered that the Tramways has the potential to increase its visitation by more
than 40,000 visitors annually. Increase in visitation however is reliant on the
implementation of the high priority infrastructure projects (primarily new tram stops and
major traffic conflict resolutions) to facilitate improvement of the product to meet current
market demands.
It is estimated that 35,000 extra visitor nights could be achieved in the region as a result
of extended stay, equating additional direct in region expenditure of $5.2 million per
annum and indirect expenditure of $3.3 million, a total of more than $8.5 million.
The year-round operation of a 20 minute service frequency would result in the creation of
four ongoing jobs directly at the Tramways and an additional 80 or so jobs in Bendigo
due to increased visitor expenditure.
Implementation of key priority infrastructure projects, including conflict resolutions and
new tram stops would result in the creation of an estimated 52 jobs (equivalent full time)
during the design and construction phases.
Infrastructure Project

Note

Cost Estimate

Priority

Sacred Heart Cathedral


Precinct New Tram Stop

New Tram stop and traffic conflict


resolutions between Wattle Street and
Short Street

$1,310,000

High

Golden Dragon / Taxi Rank


Tram Stop (Mundy St Tram
Stop)

New tram stop and signalised pedestrian


crossing

$1,530,000

High

Myrtle St / Don St/ Vine St

Localised duplication of track to resolve


traffic conflict

$800,000

High

Chapel St / McCrae St

Localised duplication of track to resolve


traffic conflict

$790,000

High

Midland Hwy passing


loop

Realignment of through lanes to avoid


tram tracks and resolve traffic conflict

$640,000

High

Sub Total

$5,070,000

Deborah Gold Mine / Violet


St

Signalised movement of trams in the out


of Goldmine to avoid traffic conflicts

$230,000

Medium

McCrae St / Tramways Ave

Signalised movement of trams in and out


of Depot to avoid traffic conflicts

$860,000

Medium

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Midland Hwy / Nolan St

Traffic lane and tram track separation to


avoid conflicts

$220,000

Medium

Nolan St / Bridge St

Signalised tram movement and passing


loop clear of traffic

$560,000

Medium

Joss House / Finn St

Signalised tram movement from Joss


House terminus

$470,000

Medium

Bridge St / Weeroona Ave

Warning system for tram crossing

$370,000

Medium

Sub Total

$2,710,000

Track Duplication (Option


1)

Cost for track duplication from Myrtle


Street and Mundy Street to Chapel Street
retaining existing track. Cost is additional
to other works.

$2,900,000

Medium

Track Duplication (Option


2)

Full track duplication relacing existing


track from Myrtle Street to Mitchell Street
and Mundy Street to Chapel Street

$7,800,000

Medium

AN INTEGRATED APPROACH
The necessary infrastructure improvements and the product enhancement strategies are
fundamentally linked. The Tramways as a tourism product cannot move forward without
building the infrastructure to enable the implementation of strategies that will ensure the
long term sustainability and growth of its operations.
As it currently stands tram patronage, has remained relatively stagnant for ten years. In
order to increase patronage, the Tramways must respond to increasing visitor demand
for high quality, innovative, authentic tourism experiences, otherwise they run the risk of
falling to the wayside. It is essential that the Tramways implement key infrastructure
initiatives in order for this to happen.
The long term sustainability of the Tramways is not only important to itself but it is also
fundamentally important to Bendigo as a tourist destination and a diversified economy.
The Tramways is an iconic feature of Bendigo and a key component of its heritage and
cultural fabric.
Ensuring its sustainable operation is a key to the marketing of Bendigo as a heritage and
cultural destination, attracting visitation, providing a point of difference to other regional
cities and towns and attracting population growth to a diversified and fascinating city.
The Tramways should be a product for the locals as much as it is a product for tourists.
Facilitating local buy-in and community support of an authentic tourism product will
ensure the long term sustainability of the Tramways.
The Tramways iconic status should be elevated within the Bendigo tourism context.
However, this can only be achieved through implementing infrastructure and product
enhancement strategies that make it a world class tourism experience, driving increased
patronage both from visitors and from local residents.

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IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
The table below provides an indicative implementation plan for strategies and
infrastructure projects for the Tramways. The plan includes a summary of the strategy,
actions to be taken to implement the strategy / infrastructure project, a delivery timeframe
and priority funding support from the Victorian and/or Australian Governments will be
important in this regard.
INDICATIVE STRATEGIES
Strategy
1. The Tramways Iconic
Status
2. The W Class Trams

3. A diversified product

4. Value for money

(a) Increase the


frequency of
service

(b) Extension of the


existing
tramways
narrative

Summary
Utilise heritage trams as
point of difference for
Bendigo and enhance
iconic status
Utilise W-Class trams
for alternative uses to
core product offer e.g.
special event trams,
advertising space,
charters
Diversify product offer
to appeal to different
market segments

Increase the value


proposition of the
Tramways experience;
as set out below.

Increase the frequency


of service to a 20
minute service to
promote a hop-on hopoff service. Additional
tram stops and traffic
conflict resolutions are
critical to an increase in
service frequency.
Development of
different narratives to
appeal to various
market segments.

(c) Update materials


and equipment

Ensure materials and


equipment is
functioning to a high
standard. Explore
alternative modes of
narrative delivery.

(d) Utilise push


notifications on
mobile devices

Utilise beacon
technology for push
notifications on mobile
devices.

Action
Only use heritage trams
for the heritage tourism

Timeframe
Immediate

Priority
High

Explore feasible
alternatives for use of WClass trams. Seek
expressions of interest
from potential operators.

0-1 year

High

Explore product changes


that appeal to different
markets e.g. school
groups, families, tram
enthusiasts, international
visitors
Explore options to
improve the product offer
to increase the value
proposition including
various product
enhancement strategies
Investigate increase in
service frequency,
particularly to coincide
with implementation of
infrastructure
recommendations.

0-3 years

High

0-3 years

High

0-3 years

High

Explore opportunities for


the development of new
narratives which appeal
to different markets

0-1 year

High

Perform regular reviews


of materials and
equipment. Investigate
alternatives to narrative
delivery (the Tramways is
currently trialling a mobile
application)
Investigate feasibility of
using Beacon technology
to deliver localised
information to visitors.

0-2 years

High

0-2 years

High

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(e) Increase the


range of themed
trams

Align with festivals and


events; align with
exhibition and shows,
guided tour, night tram
(ghost tram), food and
wine.

(f)

Increase the range of


special event trams to
appeal to different
users.

Increase the
range of special
event trams

5.

113

(g) Link to existing


walking
packages offered
from the VIC

Link Tramways product


with walking tours from
VIC

Extend the Tram


Route

Investigate options to
extend the tram route to
better service Bendigos
tourist attraction and
increase the value
proposition of the
product

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Liaise with Bendigo


Tourism, Bendigo Art
Gallery, The Capital,
event organisers, and the
City of Greater Bendigo
on including new themed
trams which align with
events, shows, festivals
and exhibitions.
Explore options to
outsource W-Class trams
to external operators for
special event trams e.g.
Rosalind Park walking
tour.
Liaise with Bendigo
Tourism, VIC staff and
any walking tour
operators on options to
link tram stops with
walking tours e.g.
Rosalind Park walking
tour.
Explore options for tram
route extensions.
Investigate potential of
Rosalind Park tram route
extension to leverage off
implementation of
Rosalind Park Master
Plan

0-3 years

High

0-3 years

High

0-3 years

Medium

10-20 years

Low

INDICATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS


Infrastructure improvements

Priority

1. Establish a new stop ay the Sacred Heart Cathedral / Aspire Precinct

Delivery /
Timeframe
0-2 years

2. Establish a new stop at Golden Dragon Museum / Mundy St

0-3 years

High

3. Intersections
a. Myrtle St / Don St / Vine St
b. Chapel St / McCrae St

0-3 years

High

4. Midland Highway Passing Loop

0-3 years

High

3-5 years
5. Other infrastructure Improvement Projects
a. Deborah Gold Mine / Violet St -signalised movement for trams
b. McCrae St / Tramways Ave signalised movement for trams
c. Midland Hwy / Nolan St traffic / tram separation
d. Nolan St / Bridge St Signalised tram movement / passing loop separation
e. Joss House / Finn St Signalised tram movement
f. Bridge St / Weeroona Ave tram approach warning system
10-20 years

6. Full track duplication

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High

Medium

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General Actioning of Infrastructure Projects


1. Liaise with key stakeholders and proponents regarding potential funding and/or

support for a new stop/infrastructure projects (particularly VicRoads).


2. Seek funding for the detailed engineering design of select infrastructure projects.
Design consideration should be given to the potential for a passing loop and/or future
track duplication and pedestrian crossings where appropriate. The design study may
require an update of traffic modelling in the vicinity to obtain more detailed traffic
movement in the area. The design study may require an update of the tourism,
operational and economic benefits and a detailed estimate of project cost.
3. The engineering design should have regard to the potential for full track duplication in
the future.
4. Liaise with and obtain the support of VicRoads, City of Greater Bendigo and any
other relevant stakeholders regarding the outcomes of the design study.
5. Seek funding for construction and any associated works.
External Consultation:
The Bendigo Tramways Study and Strategic Plan was prepared by Urban Enterprise for
the Bendigo Trust and finalised in May 2015. The Study Steering Committee comprised:
Ian Hart CEO Bendigo Trust
Jos Duivenvoorden Bendigo Tramways Manager
Mal Kersting - VicRoads
Stan Liacos CoGB
Katherine Wrzesinski CoGB (in association with colleague Phil DeAraugo)
Gillian Sawyer Regional Development Victoria
In early 2015, public comment was sought by the Bendigo Trust in response to a draft
paper released and approximately 30 comments were received and generally accounted
for and incorporated into the final report.
Resource Implications
The study cost $99,000 funded from the contributions of the Victorian Government (RDV)
of $80,000 and the Bendigo Trust of $19,000 (drawn from Councils annual contribution
to the Trust.)

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The preparation of the plan provides an opportunity for the Bendigo Trust, in association
with the City, to seek collaborative funding support over the next few years for priority
infrastructure investments from the Australian and/or Victorian Governments and
philanthropic contributors where possible with the opportunity for Council to prudently
and efficiently provide supportive matching funding by leveraging its existing annual ongoing financial contributions and infrastructure support to the Bendigo Trust.
Conclusion
The Bendigo Tramways are an iconic feature on the Central Bendigo landscape and of
Bendigos tourism appeal.
The financial sustainability and tourism appeal of the tramways is however showing
some recent signs of decline.
The recently prepared Bendigo Tramways Study and Strategic Plan provides a wellconsidered basis upon which to hopefully refresh and reignite the tramways place in
Bendigo civic life and its contribution to Bendigos growing tourism industry.
Desirable initiatives in this regard include:
Product and customer technology upgrades
Resolution of several frustrating, costly and safety-threatening tram-road traffic
conflicts; and
Maximising the cross-dependency synergies between the Trusts Tramway and
Central Deborah Tourism Mine operations to enhance tourism appeal and the
financial sustainability of the Bendigo Trust.
It is recommended that Council endorse the Tramways Plan as a sound basis upon
which to hopefully leverage Victorian and/or Australian Government and community
support to help implement the plan over forthcoming years.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council commend the Bendigo Trust on the preparation of
the Bendigo Tramways Study and Strategic Plan and agree to work collaboratively with it
in an effort to attract Victorian and/or Australian Government funding and community
support to implement priority components of the plan over forthcoming years.

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ANNUAL SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS - CAPITAL VENUES AND


EVENTS 2014/15

Document Information
Author

David Lloyd Manager, Capital Venues and Events


Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide Council and the community with an overview of
recent achievements by Capital Venues and Events and an outline of key management
and policy pursuits currently guiding the operation of the significant Council-owned and
operated facilities for which the team is responsible.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
3.3

Greater Bendigo is a community that values its heritage, arts


facilities and major events and supports arts and cultural
experiences
3.3.4

Ensure the ongoing profile and diversity of performing arts


and entertainment events across the municipality

Background
Capital Venues and Events is Councils business unit that operates a year-round suite of
venue facilities including:
The Capital Theatre
The Banquet Room
The Bendigo Bank Theatre
The Old Fire Station Drama and Dance Studio
Dudley House
Ulumbarra Theatre and associated venues
Bendigo Town Hall.
The facilities are available and used for a wide range of arts and entertainment,
productions, functions, receptions, conferences, workshops, meetings, exhibitions,
displays and other events.
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The team at Capital Venues and Events also produce, promote and deliver events
including the Bendigo Writers Festival, various theatre productions and special functions
on behalf of the City.
Capital Venues and Events comprises an FTE staff composition of approximately 11 staff
and a pool of casual technicians that support client events and functions at varying
commercial or community charge-out rates.
Capital Venues and Events also manages and supports over 100 venue or event based
volunteers.
Key Achievements in 2014/15
Successful transfer of the Bendigo Exhibition Centre from City of Greater Bendigo
management to Bendigo Agricultural Show Society (Showgrounds) management in
accordance with a long-held legal agreement;
Successful opening and commenced operations of Ulumbarra Theatre in association
with our Major Projects Unit and BSSC;
Successful attraction of up to $1,000,000 in Ulumbarra Theatre centred donations,
sponsorships and alliances in association with the Director, City Futures;
Significant 18% increase in the number of performances and events held in The
Capital and Ulumbarra Theatre (combined) compared to the previous year;

Significant 37% increase in the number of tickets sold for events held at Capital
Venues and Events facilities compared to last year;

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Significant 37% increase in non-performance events attendance at Capital Venues


and Events facilities compared to last year;

Significant 37% increase in combined total attendances at Capital Venues and


Events facilities compared to last year; and

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Staged the third successful annual Bendigo Writers Festival in association with La
Trobe University and other event partners.
Ulumbarra Theatre open and operating!
The official opening and commenced operations of Ulumbarra Theatre should be
acknowledged as a major triumph for Council and the Greater Bendigo community. The
Theatre is off to a flying start. It is being praised and applauded far and wide and has
given Bendigo another unique quality feature to boast regionally and nationally.
The Ulumbarra show presented by composer David Bridie and various indigenous
artists specially commissioned for the opening night of Ulumbarra Theatre was
breathtaking as the vast majority of attendees would likely testify. We are currently
working with the artists involved and the Victorian Government to potentially see the
triumphant return of the opening show for wider public enjoyment and celebration.
Ned The Musical
It is rare in Australia to see new locally-produced, Australian-centred theatre musicals
commissioned and produced. In another leap of innovation and courage faith by the
Capital Venues and Events team, Ned The Musical was locally commissioned and
presented across a week-long season of impressive audience numbers, reactions and
national media reviews. Few if any other regional cities in Australia can boast having
done something similar. We are now working with the shows writers and creative team
to see if we can successfully adapt and sell the production on for wider national touring.
Accounting for tickets revenue, sponsorships and private philanthropic donations, the
commissioning of Ned - The Musical was marginally short of being cost-neutral for the
City another significant achievement by the Capital Venues and Events team in
association with Tourism Unit and Major Events Unit colleagues.

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Resource Implications
The net operating result for the team at Capital Events and Venues for 2014/15 was
$1,889,281.
This was a reasonable increase compared to recent years (refer table below) however it
needs to be considered in the context of:
The inclusion of an entirely new major regional venue attraction (Ulumbarra Theatre)
into the teams suite of Council-owned facilities with minimal additional resources;
A range of special one-off opening-phase set-up costs for Ulumbarra Theatre;
The likely retrieval of some of this budget over-run from the Ulumbarra Theatre
construction project at the eventual conclusion of the project and financial
reconciliation and disbursement of project costs among the various project funding
partners.

The Capital Venues & Events 5 Year Comparison- Net Cost


Expenditure
$2,000,000

$1,889,281

$1,800,000
$1,600,000
$1,400,000

$1,279,520

$1,319,650

$ Dollars

$1,200,000

$1,312,591

$1,256,065

$1,089,433

$1,000,000
$800,000
$600,000
$400,000
$200,000
$0
2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Year

Current or emerging challenges


An unrelenting heavy workload across all Capital Venues and Events facilities,
particularly Ulumbarra Theatre and The Capital;
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Frustrating technical and production limitations until such time as the Ulumbarra
Theatre complex is fully commissioned; and
The continued challenge of developing and maintaining existing audiences for the
Performing Arts in an increasingly dynamic competitive environment.

Management Policy and Directions


Key management principles and policy pursuits currently influencing our operations
include:
A forthcoming internal restructure of the business unit designed to help accommodate
its significantly expanded and changed scale and nature and need to manage staff
stress levels;
Seeking continued growth in attendances, revenue streams and sponsorships;
Utilising the specialist venue management, ticketing and technical skills of the units
staff across other key Council-owned properties;
Continued development and implementation of an integrated venue management,
ticketing and financial system;
Continuing to work closely with Bendigo Art Gallery and Bendigo Tourism through
specialised ticketing services for major exhibitions and special major events;
Positioning The Capital and Ulumbarra Theatre as premier performing arts centres in
regional Australia through strong occupancy levels, innovative programming and
national promotion;
A continued focus on implementing intelligent database marketing systems;
Continued development of a positive team culture among staff and expanding our
base of volunteers; and
Adhering to strong customer-focus principles.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge the performance of the
management, staff and numerous volunteers within its Capital Venues and Events
business unit and their significant on-going contribution to our regional community and
economy.

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ANNUAL SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS - BENDIGO ART GALLERY


2014/15

Document Information
Authors

Karen Quinlan Director, Bendigo Art Gallery


Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide Council and the community with a summary of
recent operations and achievements at Bendigo Art Gallery and an outline of key
management and policy pursuits guiding the operation and future development of this
important Council-owned and operated cultural and tourism facility.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
3.3

Presentation and Vibrancy

Greater Bendigo is a community that values its heritage, arts


facilities and major events and supports arts and cultural experiences
3.3.3 Continue to offer world class exhibitions at the Bendigo Art Gallery

Background
Bendigo Art Gallery is owned and operated by the City of Greater Bendigo. Its
foundations were established in 1887 and its art collection is one of national
significance.
Historically, the Gallery was operated by a separate company with its own Board
of Management until 1995 when an agreement was established for the City of
Greater Bendigo to take over operations as part of a collaborative split of
responsibilities with the company.
The primary role of the Art Gallerys Board is to oversee the acquisition of artwork
and to prudently manage its bequests and investments for the benefit of the
Gallery and Bendigo generally. In addition, the Bendigo Art Gallery Foundation
was established in 2008 for the purpose of the Board fund-raising to assist with
the purchase of art and selectively contributing to various aspects of the Gallerys
operation and development in line with the objectives of the Foundation.

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Economic Impact Studies commissioned for Bendigo Art Gallery in recent years
have consistently concluded that the net economic contribution of the Gallery to
our regional economy typically exceeds about $18 million each year.
There are seven full-time staff, eight part-time staff and as required casuals
employed at Bendigo Art Gallery. Casual staff are often employed during major
exhibitions on short term tenure. In addition there are more than 100 volunteers
helping operate the Gallery - their contribution is incredibly valuable and
appreciated.
Key Achievements in 2014/15
Together with consistently displaying major elements aspects of its permanent
collection, Bendigo Art Gallery delivered nine temporary exhibitions across its
two venues (Bendigo Art Gallery and Post Office Gallery) which were generally
popular and drew steady visitation. The relatively new building extension and
new underground collection store has provided staff with much greater
opportunities and efficiencies to provide greater access to the permanent
collection than what was possible in the past.
Attendances were higher than the previous year rising from approximately
130,000 in 2013/14 to approximately 145,000 in 2014/15;

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The Education and Public Programs delivered by the Gallery were a highlight
for the financial year once again. Bookings, functions and hire of the Gallery
was very much back on track from the previous (building/construction) year
with better access to spaces and less restricted hours for the gallery caf; and
Bendigo Art Gallery and the Post Office Gallery offered a diverse range of
artistic programs throughout the 2013/14 financial year exhibitions included:
The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece
From the British Museum, London 2 August - 9 November 2014
Undressed: 350 years of underwear in Fashion
From the Victoria and Albert Museum, London 19 July 26 October 2014
Crime and punishment: a history of Bendigo's law and order
22 August - 30 November 2014
Ben Quilty
12 December 1 March 2015
Going Solo Program - The Artificial Kingdom: Carolyn Dew
December 2014 February 2015
Paul Guest Drawing Prize 2014
15 November 26 January 2015
Bendigo enlists: the First World War 1914 - 18
11 December 2014 - 21 June 2015
Remain in Light: Photography from the MCA Collections
21 February 19 April 2015
Imagining Ned
28 March -28 June 2015
General Comments
In terms of the growth of the Bendigo Art Gallery art collection in 2014/15,
artworks valued at over $150,000 were acquired by the Gallery Board through
purchases from its major bequests and gifts particularly from donors under the
Federal Governments Cultural Gifts Program. This represents a significant
contribution to the Greater Bendigo community. At the point of acquisition,
these artworks are transferred by the Board to the ownership of the City of
Greater Bendigo;
The Board also contributed $250,000 towards our operating budget through
their fundraising efforts to support our major exhibitions program;
The Gallery has increased and now maintains a paid-up membership of 1,427
persons and 66 education school members;

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Over 100 volunteers assisted the Gallery and Post Office Gallery throughout
the year; and
Media and publicity was sustained and regular listings and references to
exhibitions were evident in The Age, The Herald Sun, The Australian, on
television and radio and various tourism publications. Key events which
attracted national press included the two international exhibitions - The Body
Beautiful in Ancient Greece and Undressed: 350 years of underwear from the
V & A collections.
The Bendigo Art Gallery operated seven days a week for the first part of the
financial year but from March 2015 moved to a six day per week operation which
will the reviewed in the coming months. The reason behind this was to provide
extra time for cleaning and maintenance for the newly expanded spaces and also
because the Gallery is generally quiet on Mondays relative to being relatively busy
later in the week and weekends.
Bendigo Art Gallery 2014/15 budgeted operational net cost was $1,754,418. Its
end of financial year net cost result however was $1,852,887. Expenditure
totalled $4,010,628 whilst income totalled $2,157,741.

It is important to note that reasonable fluctuations in net cost can and do occur
each year depending on the scale, nature and timing of exhibitions, associated
costs, grant and sponsorships, ticket revenues and tourism fluctuations.
In the last ten years, Bendigo Art Gallery has operated under budget on seven
occasions, and over budget on three occasions.

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Future Challenges and Directions


The challenge remains for Bendigo Art Gallery to maintain its strong national
profile. Regional galleries across Australia are endeavouring to emulate
Bendigos success. Whilst on the surface this is flattering, it is nonetheless very
challenging in the face of unrelenting competition.
Some of the key management principles and policy pursuits underpinning the
current operations and future planning for Bendigo Art Gallery include:
There are several major exhibitions currently in the planning pipeline and these
will be progressively announced over the next year. The Victorian Government
continues to demonstrate a strong commitment to support and collaborate with
many of these exhibitions;
Continue to offer a diverse and varied program that showcases exhibitions of
national and international significance;
Maintain our profile of the Gallery nationally and internationally by creating an
iconic destination and visitor experience;
Continue to build upon the permanent collection with a particular focus on
contemporary visual art; and
Continue to develop a stronger education and academic sector partnership
with La Trobe University.
RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge the performance of the
management, staff and numerous volunteers of Bendigo Art Gallery for the 2014/15 year
and the gallerys significant on-going social, promotional, cultural and economic
contribution to our region.

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ANNUAL SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS: BENDIGO AIRPORT 2014/15

Document Information
Authors

Phil Hansen Manager, Bendigo Airport


Rachel Lee Manager, Major Projects
Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the operation of Bendigo Airport for
the 2014/15 financial year.
Policy Context
2.1

To maintain the unique character of Greater Bendigo, Council delivers major


projects that accommodate the growing population and diversifies the economy
2.1.4 Progress the expansion and upgrade of the Bendigo Regional Airport

Background
Bendigo Airport is managed by the City of Greater Bendigo and is located four kilometres
north-east of the Bendigo City Centre.
The airport was constructed in 1970 and the main runway asphalt sealed in 1976, initially
designed largely for recreational aircraft users only.
The airport is now a modestly sized regional airport providing the following services:
Victorian Government Air Ambulance Regional Base
Victorian Government Regional Base for Fire Emergency Activities (seasonal)
Charter aircraft
Flying training
Private aircraft operations (recreational and business)
There are currently 36 tenants with over 60 aircraft based at the airport amounting to an
estimated 30,000 aircraft movements per annum.

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The City of Greater Bendigo employs an in-house Airport Manager to monitor, plan and
administer the operation of the airport. In this role, the manager is supported by a range
of colleagues that provide support through the provision of maintenance services,
management oversight, safety inspections etc.
Major Achievements for 2014/15
Major initiatives and achievements for the last financial year include:
Successful funding submission for the long-awaited redevelopment and expansion of
Bendigo Airport (Stage 2) i.e. $15 million attracted now from all three levels of
government ($5 million each) a major coup;
Receipt of statutory planning approval for the redevelopment project after some four
years of complex work;
Attraction of $966,000 funding support from the Victorian Governments Office of
Living Victoria for a Whole of Water Cycle Management Showcase Project nearly
complete;
Management of all site leases successfully transferred to the Major Projects Unit
(which includes Airport Management) from our Building and Property Unit enabling
the airport to assume accountability for its operation;
Continued annual increase in the number of constructed aircraft hangar/facilities at
the airport refer below;

Continued increase in the rental/lease income stream generated from site leases;

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Note: Various Emergency Services facilities (Victorian Government) at the Airport do not
pay rent
A decrease in the annual net cost of operating the airport.

The 2014/15 net cost of $205,603 comprised expenditure of $313,102 less income of
$107,499. This was marginally below the budgeted figure of $209,665.

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Current or Emerging Challenges


Current of emerging challenges include:
Maintaining current operations (with substandard failing infrastructure) until the new
runway is developed;
Managing the process of preparing the airport from a Registered Airport with the
Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) to a Certified Airport with the CAA in readiness for
higher-order Regular Public Transport (RPT) operations post new runway
construction;
Finalisation of stringent planning and environmental approvals necessary for Stage
Two construction works to commence;
Finalisation of an Aircraft Parking Policy needed to manage increasing operations at
the airport;
Attracting the necessary finance to enable the development of the proposed Business
Park (Stage 3) in the near future;
Continued attraction of new investment at the airport including new tenants, new
hangars, new businesses etc.; and
Delivering a substantial major project of approximately $15 million in scale a major
undertaking for the organisations Major Projects Team.

Water Recycling Project


Works are currently progressing on a showcase project at Bendigo Airport that
incorporates best practice stormwater management by capturing, treating and recycling
some 110 hectares of water drainage run-off.
This will give the airport the ability to improve local amenity through irrigated landscaping
and returning higher quality water to downstream communities to the north of the
airport.
Harvested stormwater will be used at the airport for gardens and toilet flushing,
substantially reducing potable water use. This project also mitigates urban flooding,
significantly reducing peak flows during and after storms.
The project is being overseen by the City which has received $966,985 support from the
Victorian Government for the project.

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RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge the continuously improving
operations, professionalism and increased investment levels attracted to Bendigo Airport
in recent years and the functions the facility performs in our regional economy and
community.

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ANNUAL SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS - BENDIGO AND


HEATHCOTE TOURISM VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRES 2014/15

Document Information
Authors

Nicole Pretty Visitor Services Manager


Kathryn Mackenzie Manager, Tourism

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide Council and the community with a summary of
recent achievements at the Bendigo and Heathcote Visitor Centres and an outline of key
management policy pursuits currently guiding the operation and on-going development of
these important Council-owned and operated facilities.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Strategic objective 3.4
3.4

Greater Bendigo is a drawcard for visitors.

The reputation, profile and attraction of Greater Bendigo and the region are further
enhanced through effective promotion.
3.4.1 Develop and implement a range of new strategies that will highlight
Bendigos potential to benefit from digital tourism opportunities.

Background Information
The City of Greater Bendigo operates two quality visitor information centres the
Bendigo Visitor Centre and the Heathcote Visitor Centre. Both are highly regarded
community facilities operated by our Tourism Unit with a small group of staff and over
100 volunteers.
Report
Key Achievements Bendigo Visitor Centre (BVC) in 2014/15
An estimated 114,000 visitors using our visitor centre and associated special visitor
booths in 2014/15 which represents another solid annual increase;

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Sustained total gross sales generated by the Centre (i.e. accommodation bookings,
retail sales, ticketing etc.);

Created a new corporate gift range for the Uniquely Bendigo outlet in the Centre,
which has proven popular for delegate and speaker gifts. Working with local wine,
food and packaging suppliers to offer more uniquely Bendigo products.

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Created a new Bendigo destination range of giftware and souvenirs utilising local
suppliers for design and manufacture. Incorporating a range of Bendigo Tourism
members and non-traditional tourism suppliers offering collaboration and new
income streams for all stakeholders;

Our volunteer programs were reviewed and continued to be benchmarked highly


against national standards;

Continued to diversify the volunteer team with specialised roles to exceed visitor
expectations including the introduction of a new Volunteer Tour Guide Team and a
larger Special Events Team to address the visitor servicing needs that accompany
large Bendigo Art Gallery exhibitions and other Bendigo major events in Greater
Bendigo;

In collaboration with local Food Fossickers group, developed a walking tour named
Food Fossicking Tours Bendigo. Engaged and trained a team of local community
members as volunteer tour guides. Incorporated local providores, creating an
engaging, unique taste experience whilst offering a new commercial stream for the
industry and visitor centre;

Developed a new community ticketing service that meets a market need for onlineonly ticket sales. Offering a previously untapped income stream and ability to
enhance the visitor experience by coordinating all of their needs in one contact;
Supported a local festival and restaurant to develop a new Bendigo product,
Bendigo Blues Tram & Underground Banquet, in conjunction with Melbourne Food &
Wine Festival - sold out first event;

$2,080,000 in gross sales from face-to-face, telephone or on-line bookings, with


more than $1,800,000 directly injected into the local tourism accommodation,
attraction, tour operators, artists and producers;
85 volunteers from the local community were engaged providing a significant service
to Council and the community;
More than 16,000 telephone calls into the centre originating from 51% local, 24%
Melbourne, 19% other Victoria and 5% interstate. More than 11,000 outgoing calls to
operators and visitors totalling 27,000-plus in total telephone calls;

Supported emerging artists in a professional environment that offers commerciality


to encourage them to continue to pursue their craft. Developed a recognisable
Living Art Space brand and attracted 23,260 locals and visitors to the four
exhibitions held throughout the year;

Volunteer Ambassadors continued to meet specific train services into Bendigo,


attended over 16 major events delivering visitor information, and regularly serviced
over 80 local retail, attraction and tour tourism members across central Bendigo with
key brochures and updates.

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Key Achievements Heathcote Visitor Centre (BVC) in 2014/15 include:


Became an accredited V/Line ticket sales agent, providing a much needed local

service. A computerised ticket machine has been installed providing a streamlined


and professional service and offering an additional income stream;

Development of a Volunteer Ambassador team that provides a regular service to


Heathcote Tourism and Development members delivering maps and brochures;

A 14% increase in the number of visitors using the Centre in the past 12 months;

A significant 64% increase in gross retail sales handled in the Centre.

Volunteer Ambassadors providing regular service to Heathcote Tourism and


Development members delivering maps, brochures and Official Visitor Guides;

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Hosted Heathcote visit by then Deputy Premier Peter Ryan where the official

community

announcement

of

natural

gas

for

Heathcote

was

made;

Professional development of retail merchandising, overall store layout, internal

signage and product development has contributed to increased souvenir and gift
sales;
Successfully audited as part of City of Greater Bendigo recertification for Australian

Safety Standard AS4801.


Provided a ticketing service for local events such as the Spanish El Rocio Festival.
Offering a free ticketing service for the Engine Room productions in Heathcote in
conjunction
with
Capital
Venues
and
Events;
Temporary visitor booth at the Heathcote Wine & Food Festival, promoting
Heathcote to increase yield, length of stay and encourage return visitation;
New LED lighting was installed in the Centre improving environmental sustainability
and reduced energy costs;
Continued Recreational Vehicle (RV) Friendly Town accreditation, which assists with

marketing Heathcote to RV visitors;

Engaged 22 local community volunteers that have contributed over 6,000 hours of
invaluable service for the year;

Heathcote Visitor Centre served visitors from 1,441 phone calls received;

Conducted volunteer monthly meetings and regular familiarisation trips to local


attractions, wineries and accommodation operators. Specialised training provided
on Wine Tourism tailored to the Heathcote region to increase volunteer wine
knowledge;

Ongoing collaboration with Bendigo Visitor Centre Accommodation Booking Service


to provide accommodation options at times when Bendigo accommodation is at
capacity;

Improved winery display to showcase the Heathcote Region Cellar Doors with
opening hours ;

Continued support to the Heathcote Tourism and Development Group.

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Resources Bendigo and Heathcote Visitor Centres


Council contributed $707,087 (net cost) to the operation of the Bendigo and Heathcote
Visitor Centres.
Councils contribution enables an operation that is seven days a week 364 days a year;
running numerous visitor and community service programs; resourcing over 100
volunteers; and the encouragement of many tens of thousands of visitors to consider or
increase their purchase of accommodation, attraction and tour bookings.
To support the operation of the Bendigo Visitor Centre and its programs, seven FTE staff
are employed to administer the Bendigo Visitor Centre and cover a seven days a week
roster, which is further supported by 85 volunteers.
Heathcote has one FTE staff
member, with 25 volunteers. Casual staff are also used from time-to-time in the Bendigo
centre to help manage peak workloads, annual leave periods, special events etc.
Income 2014/15

($)

Accom. bookings/special event ticketing / commissions


Merchandise sales

157,297
308,735
$466,032

Expenditure 2014/15

($)

Visitor Services wages/salaries (includes on costs)


Bendigo and Heathcote operational expenses
Total internal charges

659,289
401,446
172,384
1,173,119

Net Cost

$707,087

The 2014/15 financial year net cost result of $707,087 reflects the extensive visitor
servicing programs which engage over 100 volunteers across both the Bendigo and
Heathcote Visitor Centres who assist in delivering positive and personalised experiences
for visitors and locals. This reflects an increase of only 1.82% for the year.
In 2013/14, the net cost of operating both Visitor Centres was $694,382.
In 2012/13, the net cost of operating the two Visitor Centres was $769,523. In 2011/12,
the net cost was $736,233.
The Visitor Centre staff and volunteers continue to serve well in maximising revenue
streams and serve high number of customers/visitors, whilst at the same time
keepingannual net cost increases well below inflation levels.

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Current or emerging challenges for both the Bendigo and Heathcote Visitor
Centres
Encouraging more local tourism operators to bundle their accommodation with a
range of experiences and work co-operatively with the Marketing and Visitor Services
teams to build economic yield;
Encouraging operators to better understand the commission structures and integrate
these into their tariffs to ensure consistency of pricing across all online platforms;
Remain technologically ahead of external online competitors to ensure our systems
meet consumer expectations;
National Volunteering sector trends suggesting on-going regular volunteer
commitments are reducing in favour of more once off volunteering (e.g. events and
campaigns) this trend is beginning to impact adversely on our operations, efficiency
and service delivery;
Engaging through social media to improve our service delivery and engage new
(younger audiences) through the various visitor experiences offered at the Visitor
Centre;
Preparing and educating our local tourism industry accommodation sector around
tourism travel trends, servicing niche sectors such as cycling and how to diversify
their product to suit visitor expectation;
Responding to ever-increasing visitor expectations;
Demonstrating the value and importance of both Centres to their respective local
communities and local tourism industry and what it delivers to our regional economy;
Current or emerging challenges specifically for the Heathcote Centre include:
Demonstrating the purpose of the Heathcote Visitor Centre to the local community
and tourism industry and the value it delivers to the local and regional economy;

Attracting and retaining quality skilled volunteers;

Maintaining quality service levels across 7 day a week service delivery with limited
staff supervision;

Lack of Free Wifi in Heathcote;

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Increasing need for accurate walking/cycling track brochures across the region;

Management and Policy Directions Bendigo Visitor Centre


Some key management principles and policy pursuits underpinning our current
operations and planning include:
Maximising commercial opportunities whilst still offering a traditional and professional
approach to personalised customer service;
Increasing local community patronage of the Centre through the Post Office Gallery
and Living Arts Space and retail concept store, Uniquely Bendigo. (note: our high
extent of VFR - Visitors of Family and Friends market approx 45% of total visitors to
Bendigo);
Embracing technology to deliver value added visitor experiences through the Bendigo
Visitor Centre, prior to arrival, during and after visitors have returned home;
Customer focussed delivery our Visitor Centre programs and operations are
responding to increased visitor needs and expectations off site from the centre;
Consistent need to recruit, retain and train a base of passionate volunteers to
respond to a range of visitor servicing requirements, offering a broader range of roles
to engage new audiences;
Maximising opportunities with major events to leverage greater economic yield to the
region;
Maintaining a closer working relationship with our tourism industry members to better
assist the development of the tourism industry across the region; and
Actively supporting other Visitor Information Centres in the wider region (outside
Greater Bendigo).
Management and Policy Directions Heathcote Visitor Centre
Continue to support Heathcote Tourism and Development in the delivery of

membership benefits through Heathcote Visitor Centre and the implementation of


Tourism Action Plan;
Encourage operators to fully utilise social media platforms;
Provide specialised training to volunteers in delivering quality customer service in line

with the changing expectations of consumers;

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Continue

to expand
accommodation;

140

volunteer

knowledge

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

of

local

attractions,

retail

and

Demonstrate the key brand strengths of the region in the Visitor Centre;
Establish an updated suite of brochures for the Heathcote region;
Continue to source new local suppliers of retail stock to sell in the Visitor Centre;

Heathcote and Bendigo Visitor Centres working more co-operatively on a range of


initiatives such as website, regional promotions, volunteer policies and
merchandising;
Customer focussed delivery our Visitor Centre programs and operations are
responding to increased community and visitor needs and expectations;
Embracing technology to deliver value added visitor experiences through the
Heathcote Visitor Centre;
Continuing to build on retail opportunities to better showcase and sell locally made
arts, crafts and produce and introducing an exclusive retail range at the Heathcote
Visitor Centre for locals and visitors to enjoy;

Continue to provide volunteer training and familiarisation opportunities to enable


skills and knowledge to be enhanced; and

Maintaining a closer working relationship with our tourism industry members to


better assist the development of the tourism industry.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge the performance of the
management, staff and over 100 volunteers in the provision of service and outcomes of
the Bendigo and Heathcote Information Visitor Centres in the 2014/15 financial year and
applaud their on-going significant contribution to our regional community and economy.

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ANNUAL SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS - MAJOR EVENTS UNIT


2014/15

Document Information
Authors

Terry Karamaloudis Manager, Major Events


Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide Council and the community with a summary of
recent work and achievements by our Major Events Unit and an outline of key directions
and challenges currently influencing the teams work.
Policy Context
3.3 Greater Bendigo is a community that values its heritage, arts facilities and major
events and supports arts and cultural experiences.
3.3.2 Attract, retain and develop Major Events that deliver substantial
economic, promotional and social benefits for Greater Bendigo
Background
Our Major Events Unit comprises 7.6 staff (EFT) with their mission being to develop,
attract, deliver or help deliver and retain major and community based events within
Greater Bendigo. The objective of doing so is to foster economic development, promote
Greater Bendigo and engender local civic pride and a positive community spirit.
Key Achievements in 2014/15

Supported 91 major events (see attached list) which represents yet another major
annual increase;

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An estimated local economic impact of these events of $23,942,000;

Source: REMPLAN Model (Compelling Economics)

An event participation of 143,660 people (note: does not include spectators and
supporting crews);

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Note: It is important to stress that this is not an exhaustive list and account of
substantiative events in Greater Bendigo. It is only an account of events that to varying
degrees enjoy involvement from the Major Events Unit. It does not include events
delivered by Bendigo Art Gallery; Capital Venues and Events; numerous community
groups and other organisations (private, public and not-for-profit) across Greater
Bendigo; and the Bendigo Easter Festival.
The work of the Unit mainly focusses on:

Events attraction and retention


Events sponsorship
Events support and advice
Events delivery and management (in a few instances)

The Unit is performing well in the fulfilment of its mission.


Resource Implications
The Units budgeted operational net cost in 2014/15 was $ 1,724,998 (revenue of
$321,209 and expenditure of $2,046,196).
The end of financial year actual net cost was $1,804,849 (revenue of $212,682 and
expenditure of $2,071,531).
This compares with figures of $ 1,568,012 (budget) and $1,461,894 (actual) respectively
for the previous 2013/14 financial year.
Comparisons with earlier years are not practical given that the Unit was previously
disaggregated across the organisation prior to 2013.

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Policy Directions and Challenges


Pertinent matters currently influencing the work of the Unit:

A heavy emphasis (bias) on supporting events that generate local economic gain
and/or profile for Greater Bendigo;
Minimisation of cost to the community;
Attraction of financial support, revenue streams and sponsorships; and
Efficient and supportive event management and support.

On-going challenges for the Unit include:

Stiff competition from other places in Victoria and at times Australia


The increasing transfer of costs from event logistic providers (including in-house
providers);
Difficulties in attracting and sustaining some corporate sponsorships given the
constraints of operating within a public sector environment;
Escalating hire fees from venues and facilities that we do not directly control; and
A heavy workload for staff for most of the year.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge the performance of the
management, staff and volunteers of the Major Events Unit and their contribution to the
economic, promotional and community wellbeing of Greater Bendigo.

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EVENT NAME
AARCMAC 1/10 Electric On Road Victorian Titles

Groovin the Moo

Acquired Brain Injury Conference

Heathcote Food & Wine Festival

AFL NAB Cup Challenge

IPAA Regional Summit

Agribusiness Conference

ITTF Oceania Cup

All Things Bendigo

ITTF Oceania Para Championships

Alpaca Show & Sale

Jayco Herald Sun Tour

Australian Country Cricket Championships

Jetts Adventure Race

Australian Futsal Association National School Championships

Mad Hatters Picnic

Australian Goldfields Open

Midwifery Conference

Australian Poll Dorset Championships

Mothers Day Classic

Australian Sheep & Wool Show

Municipal Workers Association

Baseball Victoria Premier League Round

National Beef Show

Baseball Victoria U12 State Winter Championships

National Galleries Summit

Basketball Victoria Country Club Championships

Native Plants Seminar

Basketball Victoria Country U12 Championships


Basketball Victoria Country U16, 18 & 20 Div 3&4
Championships
Bendigo Bank Fun Run

Netball International Test Match Aust v England

Bendigo Bank Winter JT & AMT

PGA Bendigo Pro Am

Bendigo Beer Festival

PGA Legends Pro A (Heathcote)

Bendigo Blues & Roots Festival

R&B Hobbies Bendigo Classic

Bendigo Boys FC

Rod, Stock & Custom

Bendigo Craft Beer & Cider Festival

Rotary 9810

Bendigo District Cycling Club Christmas Carnival

Rotary 9820

Bendigo Fashion Festival

Rural Health Awards

Bendigo Hawks Aquatic Swim Meet

School Sport Australia 12&U Soccer Championships

Bendigo Heritage Uncorked

Scots Day Out

Bendigo International Madison

Skate Victoria Roller Derby

Bendigo On The Hop

Special Olympics Victoria State Games

Bendigo Record, Comic & Toy Fair

Sport in Regional Australia Conference

Bendigo Spirit

TedX

Bendigo Writers Festival

Tennis Australia Silver AMT event

Bendigos Longest Lunch

Chrysler MidState Mopars

Tennis Victoria Platinum AMT


Tennis Victoria U12-18 Association Regional
Challenge
Tre-X Australian Cross Triathlon Championships
Vic Association of Photographic Societies
Conference
Vic Teachers Games

CWA State Conference

VicSport CEO Conference

Cycling Victoria Schools BMX Finals

Victorian Club Team Road Championships

Cycling Victoria Schools Mountain Bike Finals

Volleyball Victoria Country Championships

Cycling Victoria Schools Road Finals

VRA Queens & Symes Prize

Darts Victoria Open

Water Industry Operators Conference

Drill Dancing Australia National Championships

Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon

Festival of Light

WM Loud Pro Tour Womens Challenger events 1

Fire Brigades Championships

WM Loud Pro Tour Womens Challenger events 2

Goldfields Regional Training Camp

WNBL Spring Shield

Oktoberfest
Paramedicine Conference

Birdsville Reunion Races


Blokes Biggest Lunch
Bowls Victoria State Champions Week

Gridiron Victorian VicBowl

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BENDIGO SMALL BUSINESS FESTIVAL 2015

Document Information
Authors

Peter Jeffery, Business Development Manager (EDU)


Brian Gould, Manager - Economic Development

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos, Director - City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide Council with a summary of the recent Bendigo
Small Business Festival held in association with the Victorian Government sponsored
Victorian Small Business Festival.
Policy Context
Council Plan References:
4.1 Council fosters business and industry growth.
4.2.2 Foster new industry and business initiatives through business, agricultural and
industry events.
Economic Development Strategy Reference:
5.3 Business Support and Investment Attraction.
Background Information
The Victorian Small Business Festival is a State Government initiative that promotes a
series of independently run events, workshops and seminars across Victoria offering a
range of support avenues for small business during the month of August each year. This
year was the first time that the Citys Economic Development Unit (EDU) had formally
partnered with State Festival officers to assist with the programs delivery. The
responsibility of a Festival Partner is to identify and coordinate local individuals or entities
who wish to host appropriate events, workshops or seminars and to then promote these
events to their local business community.
This report aims to outline the generally successful approach adopted by the Citys EDU
as a Festival Partner this year and to highlight some pertinent outcomes for the
information of Councillors and the community.

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Report
Background
A review of last years Small Business Festival provided by the Victorian Government
identified some strong trends that were taken into consideration when preparing for this
years program. It was identified that the most preferred communication method for small
business was digital correspondence i.e. facebook, email etc., influencing the EDUs
approach towards a local marketing campaign this year. Other important considerations
included events run at convenient times for business owners and a variety of event
topics focused on stimulating new customers. It was also identified that the average
festival attendee was typically female, between 30 - 59 years of age, passionate about
their business and typically working 50+ hours per week.
The EDU started developing this years festival program by identifying appropriate hosts
to deliver local events, initially attracting 41 expressions of interest. Twenty seven (27)
events were selected considering their ability to inform small business owners,
managers, staff or someone considering starting or growing a small business, including
four events that had already planned by the Victorian Government.
See attached list of events (summary only).
A local marketing plan focused on driving facebook followers to the Bendigo Small
Business Festival page which was primarily achieved by carefully selecting and
promoting engaging content albeit with a small budget. Event bookings were available
from the Victorian Governments festival website which linked with a range of digital
marketing as well as traditional media tools.
The events
The unveiling of a special Faces of Small Business outdoor installation at the Bendigo
Railway Station by Small Business Victoria and the Mayor marked the launch of the 2015
Bendigo Small Business Festival on 30 July. The Citys Economic Development Unit
coordinated the launch and delivered a further three events for the festival that provided
attendees with practical business development advice including:
1. What makes Bendigo retail customers tick
2. How to get and keep great customers and;
3. Six steps to grow your business.
To complement these topics, the Citys Tourism Unit presented three retail focused
events comprising two workshops and a feature presentation from the Australian
Retailers Association.
Other events covered a variety of topics including on-line marketing, retail advice,
juggling work/life balance, social media and networking. The festival concluded on 27
August with a presentation from Naomi Simson, founder of Red Balloon and judge on
Network Ten TV show The Shark Tank attended by over 150 people.

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Outcomes and feedback


The outcomes and feedback from the festival met expectations and in some cases well
exceeded them - 202 social media posts developed to promote the Bendigo Festival
reached approximately 200,000 individuals. Facebook activity peaked at the start of
August and accumulated 4,955 counts of engagement (when someone opens or
responds to a message). Newspaper advertising consisted of a full page advertisement
and a quarter page event listing in both the Bendigo Advertiser and Bendigo Weekly
newspapers complimented by a variety of editorial interviews and articles.
The number of page followers attracted on social media was one of the EDUs primary
goals set at the start of the promotional campaign. Total followers reached 1,270,
exceeding initially set targets. Another goal of the Bendigo Small Business Festival was
to attract over 600 attendees to all events held in Bendigo during August. In the end,
over 1,000 people attended, which we consider a very good result.

Victorian Government survey results (available upon request) have recently been
provided to the City and indicate attendee satisfaction levels above the Victoria wide
average. The quality of local events, in particular the calibre of presenters, rated well
above the average across the State too.
Conclusion
This years marketing efforts for the Bendigo Small Business Festival successfully
engaged the business communitys awareness of the 27 events conducted throughout
August. This communication also helped raise awareness of Councils commitment to
support the local small business community. Our mission is to build on the initial success
and momentum and develop the festival concept further next year and beyond.
In terms of resource implications, the EDU received $15,000 in funding from the Victorian
Government to support the initiative.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge and commend the conduct of the
2015 Bendigo Small Business Festival and encourage it to take place on an annual
basis.

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149

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5.

150

SUSTAINABILITY

Nil.

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6.

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LEADERSHIP AND GOOD GOVERNANCE

6.1

CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ANNUAL REPORT 2014/2015

Document Information
Author

Dr Lyn Talbot, Corporate and Community Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide the opportunity for Council to consider the City of
Greater Bendigo 2014/2015 Annual Report.
Policy Context
This City of Greater Bendigo Annual Report covers the period from 1 July 2014 to 30
June 2015. Preparation of an Annual Report is a requirement of the Victorian Local
Government Act 1989 but it also provides an opportunity to communicate internally and
externally, with staff, community, government and industry stakeholders regarding the
roles, functions and achievements of the City of Greater Bendigo in the preceding year.
Sections 131 and 133 of the Local Government Act states that a Council must prepare
an annual report for each financial year that includes:
Report of Operations of the Council
Audited Performance Statement
Audited Financial Statement
These three documents have been combined to form the new-format City of Greater
Bendigo Annual Report for 2014/2015.
Background Information
In the 2014/2015 year Local Government Victoria implemented a series of changes that
set out the specific content requirements for the Annual Report that will enable
comparison on a large number of standard content items between all councils in Victoria
and ensure each council meets or exceeds Victorian Government (VAGO) audit
requirements. The changes include reporting on the Local Government Performance
Reporting Framework (LGPRF) indicators for the first time. Best Practice Guides using
standard reporting formats have been developed to guide councils during the process of
change.
The Report of Operations of the Council contains the following;
A statement of progress in relation to major initiatives;

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A description of Councils operations;


Results against prescribed LGPRF service performance indicators;
Results of the LGPRF Governance and Management Checklist;
A review of performance against the Council Plan actions;
Services funded in the budget and members /sectors of the community who receive
these services;
Major capital expenditure, changes and achievements;
Results against the City of Greater Bendigo Strategic Indicators; and
Other material relevant to Council activities and community interest.
The Audited Performance Statement contains:
A description of the municipal district;
Results against LGPRF prescribed service performance outcome indicators and
measures;
Results against LGPRF prescribed financial performance indicators and measures;
An explanation of any material variations between results (where available, because
these are transitional reports in a new format);
Results against LGPRF prescribed sustainable capacity indicators and measures.
Audited Financial Statement
This statement meets new LGV format requirements, but is similar in content to the
Financial Statement that been a standard component of the Annual Report.
Report
The Annual Report highlights the major achievements of the 2014/2015 year, but also
has a focus on telling the story of the City's operations throughout the year. It reports to
Greater Bendigo residents and the wider community what has been done in order to
meet Strategic Objectives, strategies and actions that were set down in the Council Plan
for the year.
The Annual Report also documents evidence of performance against the State
Government Community Satisfaction Scorecard and the Liveability Indicators (Strategic
Indicators) that have been set out in the Council Plan for the same period. It celebrates
the achievements and successes and explains why some things have not been
achieved.
Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation:
Cross-organisational collaboration has supported the development of the Annual Report.
Regular data collection, as part of the LGPRF reporting requirements, has provided the
core content.
The detail for the various written sections has largely been sourced from existing
documents already made available to the public, such as press releases and quarterly
Council Plan reports to Council.
The Communications Unit has sourced the relevant photos from its repository.
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Senior staff members have had the opportunity to review the content relevant to their
area and to make recommendations for any necessary changes.
The LGV Best Practice Guides have been used as the basis for the format and content
of the entire document.
Members of the Audit Committee had the opportunity to review the draft Financial
Statements, the draft Standard Statements and the draft Performance Statement for the
2014/2015 financial year for submission to the Auditor General.
The Performance Statement has been certified by the Principal Accounting Officer, Chief
Executive Office and 2 Councillors (at Audit Committee) before this council meeting.
Following recommendation by the Audit Committee, these statements have been
incorporated into this draft of the Annual Report for consideration by Council at the
Regular Meeting on November 4 2015.
External Communication:
Following adoption by Council and preparation of the final formatted document, residents
will be informed by public notice of the Annual Report's preparation and availability for
inspection.
This year there will be a public presentation of the highlights of the year, and a summary
will be made available to the public via the print media and a video presentation. Copies
of the Annual Report will be available via the City's web page and a hard copy or
electronic copy will be available to interested organisations and members of the public on
request.
Priority/Importance:
To meet legislative requirements the Annual Report, including audited financial
statements and reports against LGPRF indicators and outcomes, must be completed and
supplied to the Minister for Local Government within three months after the end of the
financial year reported on.
It was anticipated that the Annual Report would be considered by Council at their regular
meeting on September 16 2015. However, after this meeting had to be abandoned due
to disruption from the public gallery, Council sought an extension of one month to the
submission date from the Minister for Local Government, which was subsequently
granted.
Resource Implications
Printing and layout of the Annual Report and relevant advertising are provided for in the
2014/2015 Council budget.

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Conclusion
The City of Greater Bendigo 2014/2015 Annual Report has been prepared and is
submitted according to the requirements of the Local Government Act 1989, and within
the altered timeframe approved by the Minister for Local Government.
Attachments
Annual Report 2014/2015

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge that the City of Greater Bendigo
2014/2015 Annual Report has been formally considered.

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COUNCILLOR CONDUCT PANEL DECISION

Document Information
Author/
Responsible
Officer

Peter Davies, Manager Executive Services

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to table the Report of the Councillor Conduct Panel.
Policy Context
Council demonstrates leadership in its decision to meet future needs and challenges.
Background Information
An application for a Councillor Conduct Panel was made under Sections 81B(1)(c),
81B(2) and 81B(3) of the Local Government Act.
Hearings were undertaken by the Conduct Panel in accordance with 81H and 81I of the
Local Government Act on 3 June 2015 and 9 October 2015.
.
The decision of the Panel was received by the Registrar and the parties to the Panel
Hearings on 27 October 2015.
In accordance with Section 81M(2), the decision must be tabled at the next Ordinary
Meeting of Council and recorded in the Minutes of that meeting.
In accordance with Section 81M(1) of the Local Government Act, the Conduct Panel
must give a copy of the decision to:
(a)
(b)
(c)

the Council;
the parties to the matter;
the Minister.

If there is a finding of misconduct against a Councillor, the Panel may:


(a)
(b)
(c)

Reprimand that Councillor; or


direct the Councillor to make an apology in a form or manner determined by the
Panel; or
direct the Councillor to take of leave of absence for a period specified by the Panel,
not exceeding two (2) months, commencing on a date specified by the Panel.

If a Councillor is required to take leave of absence, the Councillor:

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(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

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May continue to be a Councillor, but must not perform the duties or functions of a
Councillor during the period of leave;
remains entitled to receive a Councillor allowance, unless the Act otherwise
provides;
is not entitled to be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses, during the period of
leave;
must return all Council equipment and materials to the Council for the period of
leave, if the Council requires.

Report
The copy of the Conduct Panel Decision is being given to Council by way of tabling the
report before this meeting of Council. A copy of the Decision has been made available
for each Councillor to read.
At the conclusion of the Panel process, the Conduct Panel Registrar must seal the
records of the Panel and provide them to the Chief Executive Officer. The records have
been provided to the CEO in a sealed container.
Resource Implications
Council is required to meet the cost of the Councillor Conduct Panel and the cost of the
Panel Members time and expenses. The full cost is not known at this stage. The fee for
the Conduct Panel Chair is $850.00 per day and the Governance Member, $750.00 per
day.
Conclusion
The Council has no options other than to table the decision and make a record in the
Minutes to this effect, as this is a requirement of the Local Government Act under
Section 81M(2).

PROCEDURAL MOTION
That Council acknowledge the tabling of the Decision of the Councillor Conduct Panel
dated 25 October 2015 and that the tabling of the Decision be recorded in the Minutes of
the Meeting.

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6.3

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COUNCIL MEETING DATES 2015/2016

Document Information
Author

Peter Davies Manager Executive Services

Responsible
Officer

Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to put forward proposed Council Meeting dates for 2016 (to
12 October 2016) and amend the remainder Council Meeting dates for 2015.
Policy Context
Council demonstrates leadership in its decision to meet future needs and challenges.
Report
It is proposed that the following Ordinary Council Meeting dates for 2016 (to 12 October
2016) be adopted. The dates are based on a three-week cycle (except for June which
will be on a two-week cycle).
It is further proposed to amend the remainder of the Council Meeting dates for November
and December 2015, to be based on a three-week cycle.
2016
20 January
10 February
2 March
23 March
13 April
4 May
25 May
15 June
29 June
20 July
10 August
31 August
21 September
12 October

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2015
25 November (previously scheduled for 18 November)
16 December (no meeting on 2 December)

RECOMMENDATION
That the Ordinary Meeting of Council dates for 2016 (to 12 October 2016) and the
amended meetings for November and December 2015, as outlined in this report be
confirmed and advertised.

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AUDIT COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON'S ANNUAL REPORT 2014/15

Document Information
Author/
Responsible
Director

Kerryn Ellis, Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose
To present the Audit Committee Chairperson's 2014/15 Annual Report to Council, as per
the Audit Charter.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2015/16 Update):
Theme: 1

Leadership and good governance

Strategic Objective: 1

Council demonstrates leadership in its decisions to meet


future needs and challenges

Strategy 1.1

Good governance principles are used to guide strategic


decision-making

Report
The membership of the Audit Committee comprises: Ken Belfrage (Chair), independent
members Graham Bastian and Kate Scarce and Crs Campbell and Lyons.
Clause 12 of the Audit Committee Charter requires that, prior to 30 September each
year, the Chairperson shall report to Council a summary of the activities and
achievements of the Committee during the financial year.
The Audit Committee Chairperson presented the attached report to the Council Forum
on 23 September, 2015.
Attachments
1. Audit Committee Chairpersons Annual Report

RECOMMENDATION
That Council acknowledge the work of the Audit Committee.

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Attachment 1
Annual Report from the Audit Committee Chairperson
The Audit Committee is a formally appointed Advisory Committee of Council and is responsible
to that body. The Committee's role is to report to Council and provide appropriate advice and
recommendations relevant to its charter in order to facilitate decision making by Council. The
Audit Committee plays a key role in assisting Council to fulfil its governance and overseeing
responsibilities in relation to financial reporting, internal control, risk management system,
ethical accountability and the internal audit function.
The main objectives of the Audit Committee are to assist the Councillors, Management and Staff
by providing independent appraisals of:
internal control systems;
the arrangements in place to safeguard assets and resources;
the efficiency and cost effectiveness of the use of assets and resources;
compliance with legislative requirements and Council's policies and procedures;
the integrity of information;
organisational effectiveness in terms of program efficiency and economy against the
Corporate Plan;
the effectiveness of the internal and external audit functions and the communication
between the external auditor, internal audit, management and the Council; and
to provide timely advice to Council on any matters which may be referred to it by Council.
The Audit Committee consists of five members, comprised as follows:
Three independent representatives
Two Councillors
The members of the committee are: Ken Belfrage (Chair), Graham Bastian and Kate Scarce as
independent members together with Councillors Rod Campbell and Barry Lyons.
The independent members serve a 3 year term on a rotating basis. The Audit Charter requires
that all reappointments following each independent members second term must be publicly
advertised. Ken Belfrage will complete his second term in October 2015 and accordingly
nominations for this position have been advertised.
During the past 12 months, the Audit Committee held 5 meetings. The key focus of the
Committee is to oversee the conduct of External Audit and Internal Audit, recommend the
approval of the Annual Financial Statements to Council, and review the management of risks for
Council. The Audit Committee also reviewed the relevant local government and sector wide
VAGO reports for applicability to City of Greater Bendigo.
During the year under review, Internal Audit services continued to be provided by HLB Mann
Judd following an extension of their contract through to 30 June 2015.
The Internal Audit program undertaken by HLB Mann Judd in 2014/15 included the following:
Prioritisation of Civil Infrastructure Construction Projects (incl. whether the project reflects
Councils principles/priorities)

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Management and review of completed contracts


IT Governance and Performance
Performance against COGBs Carbon Management Plan
Management of Mobile Devices

The recommendations made by the Internal Auditors, and adopted by the Committee, are then
transferred to management for implementation. The Internal Auditors undertake an annual
audit to assess which recommendations have been completed.
There are currently 2 high risk and 33 medium risk items that are outstanding from the audit
recommendations. Officers are monitoring these items and including actions in their work
programs, when budget and staffing allocations enable completion.
Key improvements/changes made in response to recommendations made by the auditors in the
2014/15 program include:
Improved Quality Assurance process for the prioritisation of civil infrastructure projects.
Updated contract management manual and training relating to contract management.
Development of an IT Strategy, including the appointment of an IT Steering Committee.
Management of Mobile Devices identified some gaps in the registering of devices and
security configurations to be addressed.
Review of Outstanding Audit Recommendations Improved recording, tracking and reporting of action items for implementing Council
resolutions.
Review of Payroll has resulted in improved reporting and management processes for
employees with excessive leave balances and overtime hours.
Based on the conclusion of the contract term the Internal Audit Services tender was advertised
on 18 April, 2015. Crowe Horwath was awarded the Internal Audit contract for the next 3 years.
Crowe Horwath is currently assisting with the development of the Internal Audit program for
2016 and future years. The program is not to be limited to financial matters but extends to
organisational performance, efficiency and effectiveness.
A function of the Audit Committee includes oversight of the External Audit activity. During the
year the Committee is provided with the Audit Plan together with Interim Audit Management
Letter. At year end the Committee meets with the External Auditor to review the Annual
Financial Statements, the Closing Audit Report and the Final Management Letter.
During the year the Committee holds a meeting with both the External and Internal Auditors
without management being present in order to obtain assurance from the Auditors that they
received acceptable responses from their enquiries, their function was not impeded by
management and to provide an opportunity for the Auditors to provide feedback to the
Committee. No matters have been raised from the last meeting that was held.
I am pleased to report that the Committee has met its objectives during the past year.
Ken Belfrage, Chair
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INDEPENDENT REVIEW PROGRESS REPORT NOVEMBER 2015

Document Information
Author

Peter Hargreaves, Project Coordinator, Independent Review


Implementation

Responsible Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer


Officer

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the Independent Review
Implementation.
Policy Context
Council demonstrates good governance and leadership.
Council Plan Reference: 5.1.1 Consider the recommendations of the Independent
Review 2013 and implement the agreed actions.
Independent Review: Recommendation 1 Implementation and communication
Background Information
Council has delivered on its commitment to independently review the City of Greater
Bendigo to see what improvements can be made to its operations. In June 2013 Aurecon
delivered its final report including 69 recommendations for Council to consider.
Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s):
On 21 August 2013 Council resolved to adopt in principle the 69 recommendations and
that a Committee of all Councillors supported by the Chief Executive officer and Manager
Executive Services be established as the Independent Review Implementation
Committee.
Council reviewed progress with implementation of the review at its Ordinary Meetings on
22 January, 5 March, 16 April, 21 May, 9 July, 20 August, 1 October, 12 November and
17 December 2014 and on 21 January, 4 March, 25 March, 15 April, 27 May, 24 June
and 5 August 2015.
Summary of progress
Implementation of the Review recommendations has been underway since August 2013.
The number of completed recommendations stands at 55. This includes eight of those
nominated by Councillors as their top 10 priorities.
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Work is progressing on 14 recommendations yet to be acknowledged by Council as


completed. Recommendation 67 (Councillor Mentoring) is recommended for completion
in this report.

Recommendations still in progress


1Implementation/communication
10Performance management
11Consolidation of Council offices
23 & 24Closing the loop on customer enquiries and
complaints
27Asset management plans
29Training in use of community engagement toolkit and
guidelines
37Develop community engagement toolkit
46-Community engagement officer resource
47RAP/Cultural Diversity Strategy
56Councillors research officer
57Review policies and training relating to bullying and
harassment
67Councillor mentoring
69Asset management system

Status
In progress
In progress
Under consideration
In progress
Advanced
Under consideration
In progress
Under consideration
In progress
Under consideration
In progress
Recommended for
completion
In progress

Report
Completed actions
Council acknowledges a recommendation is completed when either:

all associated actions have been completed, or


where the work is ongoing, when Council is satisfied all initial actions have been
completed and there is a framework in place to ensure future work is undertaken
and completed in a structured manner, or
where the recommendation has been addressed and Council has responded in a
different way that better aligns with Councils objectives.

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Recommendation 67 Councillor Mentoring


Develop and facilitate a formal mentoring program for newly elected Councillors that
will provide them with guidance from experienced Councillors in Bendigo and/or other
Councils across the state.
Action
In its final report Aurecon envisaged this recommendation would result in a formal or
structured framework to provide support for new Councillors as they transitioned into
their new role, post- election.
Report
This recommendation has been discussed several times at Councillor Forums and
Governance meetings.
The general feedback from Councillors has been that whilst a formal mentoring
program was not considered necessary for the current Councillors a program should
be developed in readiness to offer to Councillors following the 2016 Council
Elections.
Inquiries since have focussed on presenting Council with options for a framework
post the 2016 elections.
As a result of inquiries two options put to the CoGB are worthy of by the incoming
Council following the 2016 elections. They are as follows:
Leadership Victoria
Over 25 years Leadership Victoria (LV) has worked to better understand the key
attributes essential to exceptional leadership and to use this knowledge to develop
skilled and energised leaders in
LV also trains business and community leaders to act as mentors for the benefit of
the broader community. LV has a pool of several hundred trained mentors including
existing and former Councillors and senior local government officers including CEOs
and Directors. Part of the agreement in undertaking leadership and mentor training
with LV is that graduates will give back to the community by offering themselves as
mentors.
LV has offered to develop a purpose designed Councillor mentoring program for
Greater Bendigo City Council.
Councillors wishing to avail themselves of the program would be matched with a
trained LV mentor. The matching process would be vigorous and detailed in order to
properly identify the skills and skills gaps and needs of the individual Councillor with
an appropriate mentor who can meet those needs.

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The LV offer recognises that the mentoring needs of the Councillor will evolve over
time and whilst a strong local government may be required of the mentor early in the
Councillors term or experience the need will evolve over time to include a broader
range of skills and knowledge.
Key points of the offer: It is envisaged that a Councillor and mentor would meet approximately once a
month.
The selection of a suitable list of mentors and the matching of a Councillor with an
appropriate mentor would be managed by LV and would be arms distance and
independent of CoGB and Council.
There would be no charge for the mentoring service to an individual Councillor as
the service fulfils the commitment LV graduates make when undertaking the
leadership and mentor training. There would be a service fee, expected to amount
to several hundred dollars for the matching process.
Victorian Local Governance Association
The Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA) works to build the role of
councils and focusses on what needs to be done to support the work of councils and
communities so together they can build strong, inclusive and resilient neighbourhoods
and townships.
Leadership is a primary focus of the VLGA, particularly how to develop and support
the key leadership attributes required of Councillors in an increasingly complex and
demanding local government setting.
The VLGA has offered to develop a Councillor Support Program specifically for
Greater Bendigo City Council. It would be coordinated by the VLGA Councillor
Development Officer who would act as mentor to Councillor(s).
The Officer is a former Councillor and Mayor of the City of Monash, an Honorary
Justice, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and has a number of
community leadership roles including as chairman and patron of a number of
community organisations.
Key points of the offer:
Councillors wish to access the program would be entitled to four face-to-face
sessions per annum with the VLGA Officer and unlimited email and telephone
access.
Councillors wishing to access the Support Program would contact the VLGA direct
rather than through the CoGB, ensuring the scheme is at arms distance from
Council.
An initial familiarisation meeting would be arranged where the Councillor and
VLGA Officer would discuss and agree on goals and aspirations for the contact.

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VLGA has quoted a cost of $2750 for the first 12 months.


In summary the preparation of two options for Councillor Mentoring for consideration
by the incoming 2016 Council completes the actions associated with this
recommendation.
Notable Progress
Progress is noted on the following recommendations:

Recommendation 10 Performance Management


Implement a performance management:
-Framework
-Change management plan; and
-an information technology software system
which is capable of facilitating performance management for all levels of the
organisation (CoGB, Directorate, Business Unit and individuals).
Action
Work continues on this recommendation.
As previously advised the new Personnel Evaluation System (PES) has been
developed and implemented by the City. This system provides a more accurate
method for tracking performance against a set of pre-determined performance
measures for individuals, business units and directorates.
New processes have been put in place for managing underperformance and for
recognising and rewarding good performance. The new system is being rolled out
during 2015-16 starting with the new individual Performance and Development Plan
for the CEO which was completed in September 2015.
Directors performance plans will be finalised this month.
The planned timetable for the rollout of the PES to all staff is as follows:-

Date

Action

August 2015

Directors 2014/15 plans reviewed and 2015/16 plans


created
Organisation Support Managers and EA 2015/16 plans
completed in PES
All other Managers 2015/16 plans completed in PES
Performance Appraisal training
Developing KPIs training
How to Use PES training

10-21 August
September

PAGE 166

No. of
Employee
Plans
(excl casuals)
5
5
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Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Date

Action

October to
December

Pilots for non-management (number in brackets represents


number of plans to be created)
City Futures: Tourism (16), Capital Venues and
Events (13), Economic Development (7), Major
Projects (3),
Community Wellbeing: Community Partnerships
(26), Customer Support (22), Community Services
(Manager plus Systems and Support Team (6),
Maternal and Child Health (5))
Organisation Support: People and Performance
(22), Rating and Valuation Services (15), Contracts
and Project Coordination (5), Information
Management (15)
Planning and Development: Statutory Planning (24),
Building and Property (24), Strategy (12)
Presentation and Assets: Waste (43), Sustainable
Environment (9), Engineering and Public Space (32)
Executive Services (12)

Executive Assistants (7)

January 2016
February/March

No. of
Employee
Plans
(excl casuals)

Review of pilots, adjustment to procedure, notification of


next groups and timeframes for rollout
Stage 2 of rollout
City Futures: Major Events (9), Bendigo Art Gallery
(11)
Community Wellbeing: Active and Healthy
Communities (13), Community Services (277)
Organisation Support: Finance (14)
Planning and Development: Environmental Health
and Local Laws (21), Parking and Animal Control (75)
Presentation and Assets: Works (77), Parks and
Natural Reserves (56)

319
employees
with a 6 to 9
month plan in
place and
ready for
review in July
2016

0
553
employees
with a 3 to 5
month plan in
place which
can be
updated to
reflect
achievements
to date and
ready for a
review in July
2016

Recommendations 23 and 24 Closing the loop


Adopt and implement an organisation-wide policy and procedure for closing the loop
on customer enquiries and complaints
Develop and mandate a consistent process for logging and tracking enquiries and
complaints received in Pathway
Action

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Recent progress by the Closing the Loop team includes:is continuing to work on initiatives to ensure an improved response to customer
enquiries and complaints.
Initiatives include:

The Customer Request System Satisfaction Survey 2015 has been completed.
This survey was forwarded to more than 3,000 members of the public who
contacted the customer service centre over 2014. The survey had a 21%
response rate which is considered a solid, statistically valid sample. The key
findings were:
Overall satisfaction level was quite high and a slightly improvement on the
corresponding 2010 survey with a slight improvement,
Electronic logging of requests is significantly increasing,
Customers generally report a positive experience in logging their requests
irrespective of what method they used,
As in 2010 most dissatisfaction reported occurs as a result of events following the
lodging of the request, and relates mostly to timeliness and completion (closing
the loop).
New quarterly reporting arrangements which place greater CEO scrutiny on staff
performance in closing the loop are nearing finalisation.
Calling cards have now been introduced for most work areas to better inform
customers when an officer has visited and why.
Customer Service Training has been scoped and a provider is being sourced
A draft staff training DVD on customer service which emphasises the importance
of closing the loop has been received for consideration.
The six month trial of Webchat, which started in June, continues. Webchat allows
the public to communicate with the CoGB on-line and in real time. As of So far
there have been 563 webchats. Public feedback has been overwhelmingly
positive.
Recommendation 42 Planning & the Public

Consider opportunities to improve the relationship between the planning team and
public/applicants. This may include educating the community on the planning process
and timelines so as to manage community expectations.
Council signed off on actions associated with this recommendation in May 2014. It
was indicated at the time, the Statutory Planning Unit would be seeking to identify
further opportunities for improvements.
The following service improvements were completed in recent months:

The Planning Register on the City website has been revised and is now updated
in 'real time'. Previously it was only updated weekly.

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A new service has also been added that allows the community to view plans and
other
documents for planning applications that have been advertised. These
documents will remain on the web until a decision is made.
These online services can be found by following this link:
https://www.bendigo.vic.gov.au/Services/Planning

Recommendation 47 Reconciliation and Cultural Diversity


Develop a Reconciliation Action Plan and Cultural Diversity Strategy during the 201314 financial year.
Action
Councillors will recall that In August Crs Fyffe, Weragoda, Williams were nominated
as members of the multicultural round table which is the community reference group
for the Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan (CDIP). Crs Campbell, Lyons and Ruffell
were nominated as members of the Reconciliation Action Plan RAP community
reference group.
As the RAP is an organisational plan, Councillors were interested in having a broader
community leadership approach to reconciliation. As a consequence a Reconciliation
Governance Group will be led by the Mayor and involve representatives of the
registered Aboriginal parties in the municipality, i.e., Taungurung Clans Aboriginal
Corporation and Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation.
An informal community lunch was held on Monday 10 August to provide information
about the RAP and start the process of dialogue with the local Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander (ATSI) community. There was strong interest and over 20 people
attended. The discussion and feedback was positive and very constructive, including
substantial interest from ATSI community members in becoming members of the
Community Reference Group. At the time of writing the first Community Reference
meeting were planned to be held in October/November 2015.
The project brief and the literature review for the CDIP have been completed and the
internal working group established. The community reference group / multicultural
round table is being established and there is strong interest from leaders across
different community sectors, including incorporating graduates from the New and
Emerging Leadership Program. At the time of writing the first Community Reference
Group workshop were planned to be held in October/November 2015.
Both plans are expected to be completed by June 2016.

Recommendation 57 Bullying, Discrimination and Harassment Prevention


Review CoGBs policies and training relating to bullying, discrimination and
harassment prevention and how individual training needs are assessed and align to
performance and development goals.

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Action
As previously reported the CoGBs Bullying Prevention Policy and Discrimination and
Harassment Policy (previously Respecting Each Other in the Workplace Policy) have
been reviewed and updated in response to the recommendation.
As a result of this work, the City has recently completed Workplace Responsibilities
training where all employees were invited to attend. The training included identifying
bullying and harassment, how to manage this behaviour and who to ask for help if
you experience or witness the behaviour.
A total of 578 or 56% of employees had undertaken the training by 3 September.
Further sessions have been scheduled for November 2015 to cater for employees
who were on leave or otherwise unable to attend the first round of training.
In the second phase of implementation of this recommendation the City is revising
how it assesses training needs across the workforce to ensure employees who need
to undertake training in bullying and harassment prevention can be easily identified.
As previously reported, specific policies for Councillors are being prepared.

Recommendation 69 Asset Management System


Investigate the implementation of a new Asset Management System.
Action
This work has been folded into a comprehensive review of the organisations
information systems and will be completed by June 2016.

Resource Implications
There are no resource issues arising directly from this report. Where recommendations
have resource implications, steps are in place to ensure that any proposed new capital or
operating expenditure arising from the recommendations is considered in the budget
process.
Conclusion
The number of completed recommendations stands at 56; progress has been made on
nearly all recommendations.

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RECOMMENDATION
That Greater Bendigo City Council:
a) Acknowledge the completion of Recommendation 67 (Councillor Mentoring) and
progress with Recommendations 10 (Performance Management), 23 & 24
(Closing the Loop), 47 (Reconciliation and Cultural Diversity), 57 (Bullying,
Discrimination and Harassment Prevention) and 69 (Asset Management System);
and
b) Inform the community of this progress.

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RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES

Document Information
Author

Peter Davies, Manager Executive Services

Responsible
Officer

Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide the record of any assembly of Councillors, which
has been held since the last Council Meeting, so that it can be recorded in the Minutes of
the formal Council Meeting.
Policy Context
Strong leadership to meet future needs and challenges; effective community
engagement.
Background Information
The Local Government Act provides a definition of an assembly of Councillors where
conflicts of interest must be disclosed.
A meeting will be an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be
the subject of a Council decision, or, the exercise of a Council delegation and the
meeting is:
1.
2.

A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors (5) and a
member of Council staff; or
an advisory committee of the Council where one or more Councillors are present.

The requirement for reporting provides increased transparency and the opportunity for
Councillors to check the record, particularly the declarations of conflict of interest.

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Report
Meeting Information
Meeting
Consultation meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
21 September 2015
Matters discussed Planning application DS/938/2013
713 McIvor Highway, JUNORTOUN 3551
The staged subdivision of the land into 18 lots

Councillors

Staff/
Community
Representatives

Attendees/Apologies
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Mark Weragoda
Stephen Wainwright
Applicant
Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
Councillor/officer left
No.
meeting
Nil
Meeting Information
Meeting
Consultation meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
17 September 2015
Matters discussed Planning application DS/503/2015
21-25 Curtin Street, FLORA HILL 3550
7 Lot subdivision

Councillors

Staff/
Community
Representatives

Attendees/Apologies
Cr Peter Cox
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Rod Campbell
Chris Duckett
Applicant
Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
Councillor/officer left
No.
meeting
Nil

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Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Meeting Information
Meeting
Consultation meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
24 September 2015
Matters discussed Planning application DS/596/2015
6A Conboy Court, ASCOT 3551
Subdivide land into 2 lots

Councillors
Staff/
Community
Representatives

Attendees/Apologies
Cr Peter Cox
Liz Commadeur
Applicant
Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
Councillor/officer left
No.
meeting
Nil

Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Councillors
Staff/
Community
Representatives

Meeting Information
Consultation meeting
18 August 2015
Planning application DR/424/2015
16 Burn Street, GOLDEN SQUARE 3555
Demolition of existing dwelling and construction of a new
dwelling
Attendees/Apologies
Cr Barry Lyons
Simon Francis
Applicant
Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
Councillor/officer left
No.
meeting
Nil

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Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Meeting Information
Meeting
Councillors' Forum
Name/Type
Meeting Date
23 September 2015
Matters discussed 1. Section 89 Confidential Report
2. Response to the Save the Kangaroo Flat Leisure Centre
3. Annual report to Council by Chair of the Audit Committee
4. Presentation on renewal and new infrastructure works
Program
5. Township Structure Plans
6. Developer Contribution Plan
7. Fire Services Levy
8. Update on mosque development application to
the Supreme Court
9. Flying fox (bat) numbers at Rosalind Park
10. Use of drones
11. Bendigo Maubisse Friendship Committee
12. Long Gully Splash Park
13. Coles Car Park
14. Bendigo and Eaglehawk Golf Clubs
15. Procurement Policy
16. Annual Report
17. Municipal Early Years
18. Greater Bendigo Regional Food Hub
19. Review of the meeting
Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Peter Cox
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Cr Mark Weragoda
Cr James Williams
Apology:
Cr Elise Chapman
Staff/
Mr Craig Niemann
Community
Ms Pauline Gordon
Representatives
Mr Darren Fuzzard
Mr Stan Liacos
Ms Prue Mansfield
Mr Ross Douglas
Mr Andrew Lyons
Mrs Alison Campbell
Apology:
Mr Peter Davies
Conflict of Interest disclosures
Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
1.
Cr Peter Cox
PAGE 175

Councillor/officer left
meeting
No

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Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Meeting Information
Meeting
Bendigo Easter Festival Reference Group
Name/Type
Meeting Date
24 September 2015
Matters discussed 1. Memorandum of Understanding
2. Outline of Roles and Responsibilities
3. 2016 Budget
4. Festival Entertainment Program
Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Rod Fyffe
Staff/
Mr Terry Karamaloudis
Community
Mrs Lyn Brown/
Representatives
Mr Ken Deveraux
Mr David Wright
Mrs Helen Yorston
Ms Debbie Henderson
Mr Gary Frank
Mr Barry McDowell
Apology:
Mr Rory Somerville
Conflict of Interest disclosures
Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
Nil

Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Councillor/officer left
meeting

Meeting Information
Councillors' Forum
30 September 2015
1. Presentation on VicRoads on proposed upgrade of
Napier Street
2. Planning matters and review of Draft Ordinary agenda
3. Hargreaves Street car park
4. Water security for Bendigo
5. Save Lake Eppalock
6. Lighting of the Regions Project
7. Tannery Lane bridge
8. Presentation by Goulburn Murray Water
9. Hopley matter
10. Kangaroo Flat Leisure Centre
11. Councillor requests
12. Concern about droughts
13. Review of the Local Government Act
14. Bendigo Spirit
15. Media campaign on mosque facts
16. Arrangements for next Council Meeting
17. Presentation by Bendigo Maubisse Friendship Committee

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Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

18. Art exhibitions


19. Confidentiality
20. Groundwater

Councillors

Staff/
Community
Representatives

Attendees/Apologies
Cr Peter Cox
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Cr Mark Weragoda
Cr James Williams
Apology:
Cr Elise Chapman
Mr Craig Niemann
Ms Pauline Gordon
Mr Darren Fuzzard
Mr Stan Liacos
Ms Prue Mansfield
Mr Ross Douglas
Mr Peter Davies
Mrs Alison Campbell

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
Councillor/officer left
No.
meeting
Nil

Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Councillors

Meeting Information
Sustainable Environment Advisory Committee
6 October 2015
1. Draft Environment Policy
2. Mine dewatering
3. August and September Environment Strategy Forums
4. Community Grants - Round 1
5. Solar on the Library
6. Environmental Activities Report
7. Shared pathways and open space
8. Urban Development Institute of Australia
9. Draft Food Security Strategy
10. Adapting to Change Project

Attendees/Apologies
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr James Williams
Apology:
Cr Mark Weragoda

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Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

Staff/
Community
Representatives

178

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

Mr Ross Douglas
Ms Robyn Major
Mr Anthony Sheean
Mr Samuel Swain/
Ms Kathryn Stanislawski
Mr Lucas Hodgens
Ms Jenny Shields
Mr Paull Dullard
Ms Pamela Beattie
Mr Geoff Caine
Apologies:
M/S Chris Weir
Mr James Shaddick
Mr Colin Smith
Mr Jeff Cummins

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
Councillor/officer left
No.
meeting
Nil

RECOMMENDATION
That Council endorse the record of assemblies of Councillors as outlined in this report.

PAGE 178

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Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

CONTRACTS AWARDED UNDER DELEGATION

Document Information
Author

Leeanne Taig, Contract Support Administrator, Contract & Project


Coordination Unit

Responsible
Director

Darren Fuzzard, Interim Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide information on contracts recently awarded under
delegation.
Policy Context
Delivery of programs, projects and services that respond to community needs.
Report

Contract No

Project

Successful Contractor

Value
(GST Excl)

Delegated
Officer

Date Signed

Capital Contracts
CT000208

Bendigo Town Hall


External Repairs

Gerard k house

295,609.21

P Mansfield

01 October
2015

CT000170

Guys Hill Road,


Strathfieldsaye
Drainage Construction

Nasi Pty Ltd

526,954.99

C Niemann

01 October
2015

Cale Australia Pty Ltd


TMA Group

Schedule of
Rates

P Mansfield

09 October
2015

Ticket Machine Purchase


CT000220

Current annual Council Budget for the goods/services contracted via this schedule of rates is
$140,000.00
CT000192

High Street and Calder


Highway Intersection
Upgrade, Marong

Avard Civil Pty Ltd

213,550.00

D Fuzzard

14 May 2015

Reporting of CT000192 was accidently left off the 27 May 2015 Council meeting report and is included now to ensure completeness
of reporting.

Service Contracts

CT000213

Part A Alarm Response,


Patrol & Guards
Part B Provision of
Security Technical Services
and Advise

North State Security

Schedule
of Rates

P Mansfield

14 October
2015

Current annual Council Budget for the goods/services contracted via this schedule of rates is
$120,000.00

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Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

RECOMMENDATION
That the contracts awarded under delegation, as outlined in this report, be acknowledged
by Council.

PAGE 180

181

7.

Ordinary Meeting - 04 November 2015

URGENT BUSINESS

Nil.
8.

NOTICES OF MOTION

Nil.
9.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

10.

MAYOR'S REPORT

11.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

12.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

12.1

Confidential Report in accordance with Section 89(2)(e) of the Local


Government Act 1989, relating to a proposed development.

RECOMMENDATION
That the meeting be closed to the public to consider a report in accordance with Section
89(2)(e) of the Local Government 1989, as amended, relating to a proposed
development.

PAGE 181