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GE Energy Systems

Config Pro 4.1x


Tutorial & Exercises

Document Number :
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SWM0017
4.10
3
30-Jan-2002
General, Full Release

NOTICE OF
COPYRIGHT &
PROPRIETARY
RIGHTS

2002, General Electric Canada Inc. All rights reserved.


The contents of this manual are the property of General Electric Canada Inc. No
part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
except as permitted in written license agreement with General Electric Canada Inc.
General Electric Canada Inc. has made every reasonable attempt to ensure the
completeness and accuracy of this document. However, the information contained in
this manual is subject to change without notice, and does not represent a
commitment on the part of General Electric Canada Inc.
Any attached hardware schematics and technical descriptions, or software listings
that disclose source code, are for information purposes only. Reproduction in whole
or in part to create working hardware or software for other than General Electric
Canada Inc. products is strictly prohibited, except as permitted by written license
agreement with General Electric Canada Inc.

TRADEMARK
NOTICES

WESDAC is a registered trademark of General Electric Company, General Electric


Canada Inc. and/or GE Harris Energy Control Systems Canada, Inc. All other
brand and product names mentioned in this document are trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective companies.

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GE Energy Services

Modification Record
VERSION

REVISION

DATE

INITIALS

COMMENT

Config Pro Tutorial


1.00

4 Oct. 1999

RFN

Created

4.10

4 Jan. 2000

RFN

Reformatted document to current GE Harris Energy


Control Systems Canada, Inc. standards
Added new updates to address Config Pro 4.1
release

Config Pro Lab Exercises


1.00

10/4/1999

RFN

Created

4.10

21/12/1999

RFN

Reformatted document to current GE Harris Energy


Control Systems Canada, Inc. standards
Upgraded to include V4.1 and LogicLinx related
information

Combined Tutorial & Exercises Document


4.10

07-Nov-2000

RFN

Tutorial and Lab documents merged into one


document.
Updated to reflect small changes to Config Pro to
V4.12

30-Jan-2002

RFN

Reformatted document to current GE Energy


Services standards
Updated to include release feature (eg.) of Config
Pro V4.16/4.17

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GE Energy Services

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Tutorial & Exercises

GE Energy Services

Table of Contents

About This Document


Scope and Objectives .......................................................................................................................x
Purpose of This Tutorial..................................................................................................................xi
Part A:

Introduction to Config Pro 4

Chapter 1:
Config Pro Overview
The Role of Config Pro 4 .............................................................................................................11
Chapter 2:

Installation of Config Pro 4

Section 1: About Installing Config Pro 4 .........................................................................................22


What You Should Know ..............................................................................................................22
CD ROM Distribution..................................................................................................................24
What Gets Installed? ....................................................................................................................26
Exercise 1:
Installation of Config Pro ...........................................................................................28
Installing the Database Engine.....................................................................................................29
Installing Config Pro ..................................................................................................................213
Chapter 3:

Customizing Config Pro 4

Section 1: Make it Your Own Tool ..................................................................................................32


Tailoring the Program ..................................................................................................................32
Exercise 2:
Customization of Config Pro ......................................................................................36
Defining Config Pro Preferences .................................................................................................36
Customize Display .....................................................................................................................310
Part B:

Using Config Pro 4

Chapter 4:

Config Pro Projects

Section 1: The iSCS Project .............................................................................................................42


Objectives.....................................................................................................................................42
The iSCS Project ..........................................................................................................................43
Exercise 3:
Creating a New iSCS Project......................................................................................44
Creating a New Project ................................................................................................................44
Serial or LAN-Based Project?......................................................................................................46
Define the Properties for a LAN-based iSCS Project ..................................................................47
Chapter 5:

Application Definition Files

Section 1: Applications & Firmware................................................................................................52


Objectives.....................................................................................................................................52
The Firmware Concept.................................................................................................................53
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Exercise 4:
Installing Application Definition Files .......................................................................54
Installing the Application Definitions ..........................................................................................54
Section 2: Creating the Firmware for a Device................................................................................57
Exercise 5:
Creating Device Firmware..........................................................................................58
Creating the Firmware..................................................................................................................58
Part C:

Device Configuration

Chapter 6:

Working With Devices

Section 1: Your First Device ........................................................................................................63


Objectives.....................................................................................................................................63
Creating a New Device ................................................................................................................64
Exercise 6:
Creating a Device........................................................................................................65
About This Exercise.....................................................................................................................65
Channel #1: Create a D20 ...........................................................................................................66
Properties of a D20 Device ..........................................................................................................68
Channel #2: Create a D25 .........................................................................................................610
Properties of a D25 Device ........................................................................................................612
Channel #3: Create a D200 .......................................................................................................617
Properties of a D200 Device ......................................................................................................619
D200 Properties -- Multi-Node ..................................................................................................621
D200 Properties -- LAN Settings ...............................................................................................622
Section 2: Configuration File Operations.......................................................................................624
Installing and Copying Configurations ......................................................................................624
Exercise 7:
Importing Configurations .........................................................................................626
About This Exercise...................................................................................................................626
Copy Project or Device? ............................................................................................................627
Install Project from CD-ROM....................................................................................................628
Using Config Pro 4 Copy Project/Device Menus ......................................................................630
Section 3: Archiving and Releasing ...............................................................................................632
Archiving Projects and Devices .................................................................................................632
Exercise 8:
Archiving and Un-archiving .....................................................................................633
Archiving and Restoring Projects and Devices..........................................................................633
Releasing Projects ......................................................................................................................635
Exercise 9:
Chapter 7:

Releasing a Project....................................................................................................637
Device Configuration

Section 1: Types of Applications .....................................................................................................73


Background ..................................................................................................................................73
The System Point Database..........................................................................................................74
Application Indexing....................................................................................................................76
The Sequence of Configuration....................................................................................................77
Configuring the First DCA:..........................................................................................................78

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Exercise 10: Configuring an IEDs Local I/O .................................................................................79


Part A: Configuring the D.20 Peripheral Link DCA...................................................................79
Defining Peripherals...................................................................................................................711
Part B: Configuring the Plant I/O DCA ....................................................................................713
Section 2: Heart of the System.......................................................................................................717
The System Point Database........................................................................................................717
Exercise 11: Configuring The System Point Database..................................................................718
Configuring B008 Options .........................................................................................................718
Other System Point Database Options .......................................................................................720
Configuring WESMAINT II+ ....................................................................................................721
Section 3: Configuring a Data Collection Application ..................................................................722
Configuring a Typical DCA.......................................................................................................722
Section 4: Configuring Data Translation Applications ..................................................................723
Background ................................................................................................................................723
Data Translation Applications: The Watchdog ..........................................................................724
Data Translation Applications: The Analog Reference .............................................................725
Section 5: Configuring Data Processing Applications ...................................................................726
Background of DPAs .................................................................................................................726
Data Processing Applications: The LRU ..................................................................................728
DPA Configuration Sequence ....................................................................................................730
Chapter 8:

Configuring Layered Protocol Applications

Section 1: Configuring Layered Protocols: Serial............................................................................82


Serial Communication Applications ............................................................................................82
Section 2: iSCS & Layered Protocol Communications....................................................................84
iSCS - Internet Protocols over Ethernet .......................................................................................84
Ethernet and IP Addressing..........................................................................................................87
Chapter 9:
Configuring TELNET
Remote Maintenance Access .......................................................................................................91
Chapter 10:
Configuring for Redundancy
About Redundant IEDs ..............................................................................................................102
The Redundant Monitor/Failover Applications .........................................................................104
Appendix A:

Converting Configurations

Section 1: About Converting Projects............................................................................................. A-2


Background ................................................................................................................................. A-2
The Conversion Utility................................................................................................................ A-3
Exercise 12: Project Conversion..................................................................................................... A-4
Exercises ..................................................................................................................................... A-4

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About This Document


Overview
Introduction

This tutorial has been developed for individuals that are either:
taking a full program of iSCS product hardware and configuration training, or,
are already familiar with existing GE Energy Services products, and wish to
upgrade their knowledge of configuring iSCS products.

In This Chapter

This chapter contains the following topics


Topic

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Scope and Objectives

Purpose of This Tutorial

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Scope and Objectives


Scope

The information and exercises contained in this Tutorial document are designed to
aid a prospective user in becoming familiar with the concepts and features of the
Config Pro 4 configuration system.
While students will create and test an actual configuration program, this document
does not attempt to provide the detailed information required to configure any
specific software applications.
The focus of this manual is to introduce the theory and concepts of configuring an
iSCS device

Objectives

After completing this Tutorial, the student will be able to:


Install Config Pro 4 software
Recognize the significance of the software components that make up the Config
Pro 4 System
Identify and install application definition files into PC
Define Project and Device properties for iSCS systems
Create a sample configuration for a GE Energy Services iSCS device
Compile and debug configurations
Download and test configuration files

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Purpose of This Tutorial


Introduction

This document is designed to be an aid to assist a student in creating a simple


configuration for an iSCS D20, D200 or D25 system.
Exercises are included to provide "hands-on" experience using configuration tables
and the Config Pro 4 CD-ROM utilities.

Who Should Use


This Guide

This document is intended for users who desire training to become familiar with
Config Pro 4, and become capable of installing, configuring, and maintaining their
iSCS systems.

Appendices

An appendix is included providing information to assist in the conversion of


configuration files created using an earlier configuration program to the current
version of Config Pro.

Exercises

Exercises accompany some of the sections of this tutorial.


Upon completion of all the exercises, the reader will be able to configure a simple
working iSCS D20, 200 or D25 system

Help and
Additional
Documentation

The following documents will help in understanding the context of the Config Pro 4
configuration system:
iSCS LAN Users Guide SWM0008
D25 Plant I/O Subsystem Configuration Guide P097-OCG.DOC
Configuration Guides and Functional Specifications for iSCS Device
Applications

Document Style
and Convention
Rules

This manual uses the Systeme International (SI) and the Microsoft Manual of Style as
a basis for styles and conventions.

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Part A:
Introduction to Config Pro 4
Overview
Introduction

This first part of the tutorial is designed to introduce the Config Pro 4 configuration
system to a new user, and provide procedures to assist in the installation of the
program onto a Windows-based PC.

In This Part

This part contains the following chapters:


Topic

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Config Pro Overview

11

Installation of Config Pro 4

21

Customizing Config Pro 4

31

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Chapter 1: Config Pro Overview


The Role of Config Pro 4
Introduction

This Chapter will introduce the new user to Config Pro 4.


During this chapter, we will discuss Config Pros:
Role in GE Energy Services systems
Operating environment
Features and Advantages.

Purpose

The main purpose of Config Pro is to allow you to define a GE Energy Services
IED's operating characteristics. This will include:
Hardware components
Communications parameters
Software applications
Quantity and types of data in the IEDs database

After Defining

Once the configuration process is complete you are required to generate (or compile)
the file to be downloaded to your IED.
Part of the process of generating a file is an error checking routine where Config Pro
checks for logical configuration errors.
If any are found, the compilation process is stopped until the errors are fixed.

Go On-Line

The next function provided by Config Pro is the integrated VT100 terminal emulator,
which is used to access the IEDs maintenance facilities:
WESMAINT II+
System Monitor
PROMAINT
In particular, the WESMAINT interface is used by the operator to download the
configuration file into the NVRAM of the IEDs processor.

After
Verification

Once the operation of the IED has been verified, another feature of Config Pro, the
Report Generator, creates system documentation reports including:
Wiring Lists
Hardware and Software Configurations
Project and Device data
Continued on next page

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The Role of Config Pro 4, Continued


More Features of
Config Pro 4

The following table lists some of the features of Config Pro 4.

Feature

Description

Windows Based
Configuration System

Config Pro 4 is a true 32-bit program that can use


Industry Standard MS Windows 95, 98 and NT 4.0
operating systems.

Download
Configurations to
Device

Transfers configuration files from your PC to the


NVRAM of an IED, via serial direct, serial dialup and
IP LAN network connections.

Upload Configurations
from Device

Recovers the running configuration of any IED into


Config Pro where you can edit it, or archive it for future
use.

Verify Configuration
Download

A downloaded configuration can be checked for data


errors, before placing the IED into service.

Convert Configurations

Configurations created in earlier versions of


configuration systems can be converted to Config Pro 4
format.
This includes configurations recovered by:
Uploading Configurations from an existing running
system
Locating an earlier Config Pro 2, 3 or, Config
System 1 *.SHX files

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Chapter 2: Installation of Config Pro 4


Overview
Introduction

This Chapter will first determine the computer platform requirements necessary to
properly support the Config Pro 4 configuration system.
As the system capabilities will largely depend on the host PCs speed, power and
available resources, we will identify those factors before starting to install our
software components.
In addition, during this chapter we will outline the process of installation of the
Config Pro 4, followed by an exercise where we will actually perform the
installation, and verify its operation.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics:


Topic

See Page

Section 1: About Installing Config Pro 4


What You Should Know

22

CD ROM Distribution

24

What Gets Installed?

26

Exercise 1: Installation of Config Pro

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Overview

28

Installing the Database Engine

29

Installing Config Pro

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Section 1:

About Installing Config Pro 4

What You Should Know


System
Requirements

While the adage of Bigger is Better usually is true in any computer system, the
following will outline the minimum desired specifications that the PC platform
should have.
Specification

Comments

Pentium Processor
with 64 Mb of
RAM

The lack of memory resources will be most apparent during


startup and during display updates.

CD-ROM Drive

The CD-ROM is required to install the program.

NOTE:

This will be aggravated in systems with a large number of


data points.
If Config Pro 4 is installed onto Windows NT Operating
System, a minimum of 128 Mb is suggested.

It is possible to create installation diskettes from the CD for those


PCs without a CD drive

Keyboard and
Two-Button
Mouse

Apart from user defined hotkeys for specific functions; all


operator movement is performed using a two-button mouse,
or equivalent.

40 Mb Hard Drive
space

User documentation can also be installed to your hard disk,


requiring extra space.
The hard drive speed and capacity will have obvious
performance implications to the system.

External massstorage device


(Optional)

The addition of a mass storage device like a tape drive will


allow the backup of files enabling a quick restore in the event
of a failure.
It can also provide a place where logged data can be archived.

3.5 inch diskette


drive

A removable disk can be used to


copy files to another Config Pro PC
export or install application definition files.

RS-232 Comm.
Port

The serial port provides a channel that can be used to


communicate with the serial WESMAINT maintenance
interface of the IED.
Continued on next page

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What You Should Know, Continued


System Requirements (continued)
Specification

Comments

Ethernet LAN card Required only if the Config Pro 4 PC will be used in a system
that will use TELNET and/or virtual connections over an
Ethernet network, using TCP/IP.
The Config Pro 4 PC may also be used as a PowerLink GUI,
and it may use the same Ethernet interface for DNP 3.0 over
UDP/IP or TCP/IP communication
Printer

If the Config Pro system will be generating reports, or other


text outputs, a printer will be required.
Any printer supported by the Window operating system will
work, but a laser printer is preferable.

Note

Config Pro 4 has been tested and operates reliably on PCs running:
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows NT4, up to Service Pack 6
Windows 2000
Note:

!! WARNING:

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Config Pro 4 running on Windows NT4 Service Pack 4 has exhibited some
erratic problems. Service Pack 4 is not recommended for use as a platform
for Config Pro 4.

Config Pro 4 will not run on MS Windows 3.X as it is a true 32-bit application.
Config Pro 3 (no longer distributed or supported) is the last version to support 16 bit
operation.

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CD ROM Distribution
Introduction

Version 4 of Config Pro is distributed only in CD ROM format.

On CD ROM

With the introduction of CD distribution, GE Energy Services is now including


several items, previously supplied in either hard copy form or on diskette.
A Config Pro 4 disk will contain:
Borland Database Engine
Application Definition Library
The Config Pro Help system
Adobe Acrobat document reader
On-line documentation, in PDF format
A demonstration version of the LogicLinx Editor, and utilities
TFTP and BootP utilities, for iSCS LAN applications

The Borland
Engine

Config Pro is in reality a database program that uses the Borland Database Engine as
the database manager.
You will actually manipulate database records, known as application definition files,
in order to define the features and capabilities of an IED.
The first step in the installation of Config Pro is to install and setup the Borland
Engine.

Application
Definitions

The GE Energy Services software-engineering group is constantly in the process of


adding to and modifying the extensive library of Application Definitions that Config
Pro users need to configure their systems.
At the end of each workday, this library is compiled and archived.
Any CDs that are created will contain the entire application definition library that
was archived the previous day.

Config Pro 4
Help System

Optionally, you may install the Help files to the target PC.

Help System
Includes:

Additional Help Topics are included to assist in the definition of the operating
characteristics of the:
B003 D.20 Peripheral Link, for D10, 20, or 200s
P097 Plant I/O Subsystem, for the D25
LogicLinx Editor

These files provide context-sensitive assistance to users that require hints in using
the Config Pro program itself.

Note:

At this time the help system does not include any application specific help,
with the exception of those listed above
Continued on next page
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CD ROM Distribution, Continued


CD May include:

Device Configurations, if the CD has been created for a specific project.


LogicLinx Editor system, either
a demo version, or
a full licensed version
PowerLink files
Application Configuration Guides and Functional Specifications for the
customers specific project software set.
Site-specific documentation as defined in a project specification.

Note:

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Any on-line documents will be in Adobe Acrobat format (*.PDF)

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What Gets Installed?


Introduction

Three primary directories are created during the installation of the Config Pro 4
system.
The default directory names are listed below:
C:\IDAPI32
C:\CFGPRO4
C:\PROJECTS

C:\IDAPI32

This is the default directory name that is created when the Borland Database Engine
is installed.

NOTE:

This directory (or another custom directory) and database engine might already exist
on a PC if another Borland product had been previously installed.
Note:

C:\CFGPRO4

Check compatibility of the new engine with the other product, before
overwriting.

This default directory and path will be created during installation of the Config Pro
system.
C:\ HARDDISK
CFGPRO4

appldef

Application Definitions

bin32

Config Pro Extended

Cpro

feature files

bitmaps

ICON Bitmap files

help32

Help files

database

Config Pro Setup files

Template

*.txt files for point


Descriptions

This structure will contain all files relating to operation of the Config Pro
program
Continued on next page

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What Gets Installed?, Continued


C:\PROJECTS

This directory will contain, by default, all project and device configuration subdirectories and files created by the programs user

C:\HARDDISK
PROJECTS
PROJECT_NAME
DEVICE

Groups of Related SCS Equipment


Single Device Config Directory
A003
A026
B003
B008
B097

Individual Application
sub-directories
containing user-defined
data defining the
operation of specific
applications or devices

B014

Additional subdirectories may be present under the Device subdirectory if the Config
Pro 4 Properties have been defined to combine LogicLinx files with Device files.

NOTE:

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You can change both the CFGPRO4 and PROJECTS directory names to suit
your specific requirements.
Unlike previous versions of Config Pro, you can create these directories
anywhere, on any hard drive or server, and not necessarily as a root subdirectory
as shown above.
The IDAPI32 directory can also be renamed, or the installation can be directed to
an existing directory, if another Borland product has been previously installed.

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Exercise 1: Installation of Config Pro


Overview
Background

Exercises

Config Pro 4 uses the Borland Database Engine to manipulate the various
configuration files.
When installing Config Pro 4 onto a PC, an item will be added to the Windows
Start Menu.
The Borland Database Engine can be installed onto a stand-alone workstation or
onto a network server.

The installation of the Config Pro 4 program for the first time involves two distinct
steps:
Install and configure the Borland Database Engine
Install Config Pro 4
Once installed, the program can be tailored to individual requirements. This
procedure is outlined it the section: Chapter 3: Customizing Config Pro 4

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Installing the Database Engine


Background

The Borland Database Engine is installed separately from Config Pro 4, and must be
installed first.

Database
Installation
Procedure

Follow these steps to install the Borland Database Engine

Step

Action

Insert Config Pro 4 CD-ROM into PCs drive.


Wait for a few seconds for the installation window shown below to
pop up.
If it does not automatically start, use the Start menu or Explorer to
run HSETUP.EXE from the CD.
Results: The Dialog Box below should appear:

NOTE:

You may notice that tabs for Config Pro V2 and/or V3 are also
included in the Setup Launcher.
These versions of Config Pro are included only for convenience,
and will not be discussed in this Tutorial.
Select: Borland Engine Installation

After the Setup Launcher Window appears, Verify that the Config Pro
4 tab is highlighted.

Click the Borland Database Engine V5.01 button.


Continued on next page

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Installing the Database Engine, Continued


Database Installation Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

When the Welcome box appears, click Next


Results: This new dialog box should appear.

Click the Browse button to verify that the destination directory for the
Borland Database Engine is correct.
The default directory of C:\IDAPI32 should be suitable for most
installations.

NOTE:
6

If possible, these program files should be installed to a local drive


for maximum performance.

Click the Advanced button


Results: The following dialog box should appear:
Continued on next page

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Installing the Database Engine, Continued


Database Installation Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

Click the Browse button to verify that the Configuration File Directory
is in the same directory chosen in Step 5.

Note:

The default BDE Configuration filename of IDAPI.CFG


should not be changed.

Click Ok to return to the main installation dialog box.

Click Next
The installation will now start, as indicated by a display similar to this
one:

Results: When the installation is complete, the following Set Network


Directory box will appear.
Continued on next page

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Installing the Database Engine, Continued


Database Installation Procedure (continued)
Step

Action
Set Network Directory

!
10

It is VERY important to follow the next step carefully.


Failure to do so may result in erratic operation, and in some cases,
crashing of the Config Pro 4 program.
Click the two Browse buttons to select the locations for the access
control files

NOTE:
11

If you are installing the Config Pro 4 system to a stand-alone PC, set
both directories to C:\temp.
If you are running Config Pro 4 on a network, even if the PC is only
occasionally LAN-attached, the first option should be a network
directory.
All PCs sharing configuration files on a LAN must use the same
network directory.

Click Next and then Finish to complete the installation of the Borland
Database Engine.

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Installing Config Pro


Reminder:

The Borland Database Engine must be installed AND configured before installing
Config Pro 4.

Config Pro
Installation
Procedure

Use the following procedure to install Config Pro 4

Step

Action

Return to the Config Pro 4 installation dialog box shown in the Borland
Database Engine installation procedure.

Click the Config Pro 4.15 button, and click Next when the Welcome
dialog appears

Results: The following dialog box will appear


3

Click the Browse button to select an existing destination directory, or


use this opportunity to create a new directory, and click Next.

Continued on next page

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Installing Config Pro, Continued


Config Pro Installation Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

Select components, as checked on example below.

Do Not omit any of the first three utilities, unless system resources
are limited.
Do Not select the ProLogic Editor unless you have obtained the
proper authorization codes from GE Energy Services.

Click Next.
5

Select a program group from the list, or use this opportunity to create a
new program group, and click Next.

Click Next two more times, and then click Finish.

After the installation completes, restart the computer, if prompted

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Chapter 3: Customizing Config Pro 4


Overview
Introduction

This Chapter provides background information and procedures for tailoring Config
Pro 4 to your own tastes and preferences.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics:


Topic

See Page

Section 1: Make it Your Own Tool


Tailoring the Program

32

Exercise 2: Customization of Config Pro

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Defining Config Pro Preferences

36

Customize Display

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Section 1:

Make it Your Own Tool

Tailoring the Program


Introduction

Config Pro 4 has been developed with features allowing you to tailor the program
your own specific requirements.
These features for customization can be broken into two logical groups
Features that define the look-and-feel of Config Pro, but have only minimal
effect on the configuration process.
Options that define how the program operates, and the environment that it
operates in.

Look-and-feel of
Config Pro 4

The basic look of Config Pro 4 is determined primarily by the Windows Control
Panel Display settings.
Characteristics such as:
Color of desktop and menu bars
Font type and size
Running in normal or maximized window
are setup outside of the Config Pro 4 program.

View Menu

Within the Config Pro 4 environment, you have a choice of enabling or disabling
several of the tool bars and windows, as desired.

Continued on next page

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Tailoring the Program, Continued


Operational
Options

User definable options that affect the day-to-day operation of the program are setup
in the Preferences dialog box.

Preferences General

Part

Function

Backup

Select if you want Config Pro to create a backup copy of the


application tables before you edit them.
If you select this option, it makes the Save option in the
Edit menu (or the Save button on the toolbar) available.
If you clear this option, editing the application tables is
done "live". This means that Config Pro saves all changes
as they happen.

Confirmation

If you are concerned about accidentally closing or exiting


windows, you can check the Prompt options, as desired.
Continued on next page

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Tailoring the Program, Continued


Preferences Directories

Part

Function

System

Here you can select the directory where application definition


files are stored.
While it can be a local or a shared network directory,
performance will be considerably enhanced if the
directory is on a local drive.

Network Control

If you run Config Pro on a network, set the Borland Database


Engine Control Directory to a shared network directory.

NOTE:

If the files are shared by other users, the


network path should be the same for all
installations of Config Pro 4

If you are running Config Pro on a stand-alone workstation,


NET DIR should be a local hard drive, preferably c:\temp.
LogicLinx

Defaults

This option allows for the selection of where LogicLinx files


are located, relative to the Config Pro directories

Define modem selection and auto-dial parameters used when the Config Pro 4 PC
wishes to establish a dialup connection to an IEDs maintenance port
Continued on next page

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Config Pro 4.1x


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GE Energy Services

Tailoring the Program, Continued


Communications

Part

Function

Terminal: Hot
Keys

Used to define tools to speed connect and log on.

Terminal: Display

Buttons to define the display color and font used when on-line
.with the IED

LAN

Fields for defining Ethernet LAN A and/or LAN B interface


IP addresses, if used.

PPP Boost

Enables a utility designed to reduce setup negotiation time for


dialup PPP links. (Windows NT 4 only)

Reports

Part

Wiring
Termination Tags
Printer Setup

General
Full Release

Function

Specify up to 3 optional wiring termination tags to add to the


wiring list report and system point termination information.

User can select any available printer, locally attached or LAN connected, as an
output device for the report generator.

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Exercise 2: Customization of Config Pro


Defining Config Pro Preferences
Background

Before installing any of the other Config Pro 4 software components, use this
opportunity to tailor the presentation to your own unique tastes.
There are three areas of Config Pro 4 that may require customization:
Define the Preferences
Select the Printer that will be used as an output for reports.
Choose a selection of Bars to simplify navigation of windows

Customizing
Preferences

Follow this procedure to customize the Preferences.


Step

Action

Click the Windows Start button, select the Program Group where you
installed Config Pro 4.

Click the Config Pro 4 item to start the program

Select Preferences from the File menu.

Preferences: General

Select Create Backup Tables if you desire more security in case of PC


crash.
Note:

Checking slows performance slightly

Select Confirmation options for added security


Continued on next page

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Defining Config Pro Preferences, Continued


Customizing Preferences (continued)
Step

Action
Preferences: Directories

Verify that the Config Pro tab is active.

Type in path where Application Definition Files will be found


Note:

Type or select the paths for the network control directories for both
stand-alone and shared network access
Note:

Files can be either on a local drive, or a shared network drive.


The path shown above is typical for local installations.

these fields provide another way to define Borland Database


Engine control directories.

Do Not Click the LogicLinx tab, unless you are a licensed LogicLinx
user.
Parameters configured here will have no effect if the LogicLinx Editor
is not installed.
Defaults

NOTE:

Define dialup modem parameters Only if this Config Pro PC will


be communicating with devices via dial-up modems.
These settings will become the default parameters for modem
communication with all devices created on this PC.
Continued on next page

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Defining Config Pro Preferences, Continued


Customizing Preferences (continued)
Step

Action
Preferences: Communications Terminal

10

Choose the modem type that is used on this PC.


If the exact type is not listed, choose a similar one, and use the
Advanced button to tailor the parameters.

11

Adjust the Retry Options to your requirements, Only if you are using
auto-dial on this PC.

12

Click the Communications tab. This dialog box should appear.

13

The F2 Hot Key field shows the default WESMAINT login script. Type
(or edit) any of the 4 Hot Keys if your IEDs have different login scripts.

14

Adjust any of the Display properties to suit your tastes.


Select font and colors for WESMAINT display.
Note:

The size and font chosen will affect the size of the Terminal
window when it is open.
Preferences: Communications LAN

15

Type the IP addresses of the Ethernet interface(s) of the Config Pro 4


PC, if needed.
Preferences: Communications PPP Boost

16

Select to reduce setup negotiation time for PPP links on Windows NT4
only.
Note:
If PC is running Windows 95, 98 or 2000 Do Not select.
Continued on next page

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Defining Config Pro Preferences, Continued


Customizing Preferences (continued)
Step

17

Action

Type Wiring Termination Tags labels to be included in Wiring List


report generated by the Report Generator.
Printer Selection

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18

Click Print Setup from File menu.

19

Select and setup printer for report generation and file printing

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Customize Display
General

Config Pro 4 has a selection of menu bars and windows that can be enabled or
disabled:
Speed Bar
Tool Bar
Title Bar
Navigator Bar
Status Bar
Output Window

Procedure

Click View from the Menu Bar to drop down the list of options shown below.

Speed Bar
Functions

Enables/Disables button bar below the Windows Menu Bar.


Buttons include:
New Project
Open Project
Generate
Convert
Terminal Emulator
Previous Message
Next Message
Go to Error/Warning, and
Reports
Continued on next page

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Customize Display, Continued


Tool Bar
Functions

Enables/Disables button bar below Speed Bar.


Button functions vary dependant on window displayed below.
Always displays the Close Window button

Title Bar
Functions

Enables/Disables a display bar below the Tool Bar


Displays the Device and Project directory path

Navigator Bar
Functions

Enables/Disables vertical window on left of main window.


Tabs allow easy movement between active windows.
Window is re-sizable.

Status Bar

Enables/Disables information display bar at bottom of screen.

Output Window

Enables/Disables re-sizeable window at bottom of screen.


Displays logged information i.e.: generate/convert operations.
Window will re-enable itself whenever any action requiring a log display is
performed.
Once open, the window can be disabled simply by right-clicking inside the
window, and clicking Close

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Part B:
Using Config Pro 4
Overview
Introduction

Before using Config Pro 4 for the first time, it is necessary for you to understand a
few concepts that are the foundation of the configuration process.

In This Part

This part contains the following chapters:


Topic

General
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See Page

Chapter 4: Config Pro Projects

41

Chapter 5: Application Definition Files

51

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Chapter 4: Config Pro Projects


Overview
Introduction

This Chapter explores the Config Pro Project. Topics include information about
how the project concept evolved, and how it is used in iSCS network configuration.
Once the concept is understood, the following section guides you through the steps
of creating a new Project with Config Pro 4.

In This Chapter

This chapter contains the following topics:


Topic

See Page

Section 1: The iSCS Project


Objectives

42

The iSCS Project

43

Exercise 3: Creating a New iSCS Project

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Creating a New Project

44

Serial or LAN-Based Project?

46

Define the Properties for a LAN-based iSCS Project

47

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Section 1:

The iSCS Project

Objectives
Introduction

During this chapter, we will introduce:


The Config Pro 4 Project
The iSCS LAN configuration concepts

The Project
Designation

The Project name itself originates as an alphanumeric catalogue number used to


identify an equipment order.
Typically, equipment that is ordered as one project would share a common hardware
and/or software platform.

The Project,
and Technical
Services

GE Energy Services maintains records of all projects sold for many years.
GE Energy Services Technical Services uses the Project identifier to help speed up
support for customers who request assistance.
By providing this code when calling for technical inquiries, you can expect much
faster response than if a service representative has to perform an extensive search,
researching what hardware or software is in use.

The Config Pro


Project

General
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In versions 1 and 2 of Config Pro, the Project name was simply used to identify a
sub-directory where configuration files for that equipment were created and stored
on a PCs hard disk.

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The iSCS Project


Introduction

Until the introduction of the iSCS concept, the Config Pro Project was of little
significance, except as an identifier as discussed before.
Now, the Project has taken on a new role.
It is now a name given to a group, or subnetwork, of IEDs that are interconnected
and communicating over an Ethernet LAN using the IP network protocols.

Creating an iSCS
Project

A necessary step in creating an iSCS Project is to identify the network devices that
are not configured by Config Pro 4, but will be a part of the iSCS system.
This would include:
PowerLink or other LAN-connected master stations
third party IEDs with IP LAN interfaces.
Once they are included in the Project Properties, a click of a single icon will create
the "Hosts" table for all project IEDs.

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Exercise 3: Creating a New iSCS Project


Creating a New Project
Overview

The first step in creating a configuration for one or more IEDs is to create a Project.
If the project is to contain IEDs communicating over an Ethernet LAN, using IP
protocols, then there are several extra steps required:
Create a new Project
Define the Project Properties for an iSCS.
This section outlines a procedure for creating a new Project. Refer to Section 1: The
iSCS Project for background information on projects.

Procedure:
Creating a New
Project

Hint:

All Speed Bar functions are duplicated in the Menu Bar drop-down lists.

Step

Action

Click the New Project button on the Speed Bar


Results: A dialog box similar to the following should appear.
2

Verify that the Drive chosen is correct for your system.

Type (or select) a name and path into the Directory field to create a
Project directory, and click the Select button.
Results: A dialog like the one in the next step will open.

NOTE:

Any directory path and name can be used for a project, but it is
recommended that it be kept simple, easy to locate, and intuitive.
Continued on next page

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Creating a New Project, Continued


Procedure: Creating a New Project (continued)
Step

Action
Define the Project Name

Type a project name into the Name field.

Note:

General
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Remember that this will create a new directory on the


destination drive, so only valid characters will be accepted.

If desired, type information into other (optional) fields.

Is this a Serial or LAN-based project?


If Serial, go to Step 7
If LAN-based, do not click OK, and go directly to next procedure

Click OK
Wait while the Project directory is created.
When complete, the project name should appear in the Navigator
Bar, if it is enabled

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Serial or LAN-Based Project?


Background

If this project is going to contain IEDs that communicate with only serial modems or
connections, then entering information into the other fields and tabs is optional.
Information in these fields and tabs (except the LAN tab) is not part of the
configuration files for IEDs.
It is only provided as helpful data that can become part of a Config Pro 4 generated
report.

Before Starting

If the iSCS devices in this project are to be installed onto an existing LAN, consult
your network manager for the necessary information.
Even if the system will be on an isolated network, it is recommended that a detailed
plan be created before proceeding with the configuration of the Local Area Network
and Internet Protocol parameters.

If project is NOT a LAN-based project, DO NOT modify any fields in the LAN
section.

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Define the Properties for a LAN-based iSCS Project


LAN Project
Config.
Procedure

Follow these steps if the project is LAN-based.

Step

Action
LAN General Tab

Click the LAN tab on the Project Properties dialog box.


2

Select the LAN Based Project check box.

Results: Once checked, the other options and fields will become
enabled.
3

Choose the number of LAN segments to be used in the network

Select the TFTP Preferences Prompt before committing. checkbox, if


desired

Click the Segments tab, when ready.


Segments Tab

Select the LAN Enabled option (only) for the LANs that will be used.

Continued on next page

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Define the Properties for a LAN-based iSCS Project, Continued


LAN Project Config. Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

NOTES:

Config Pro 4 will not allow the LAN A and LAN B addresses to
be the same.
Dual LAN iSCS systems must use two independent LAN
segments.

Type the Subnet Mask that is appropriate for the subnet(s).

If either or both of the LANs have a Default Gateway, type in the


addresses of the gateways.
If the project is on an isolated LAN segment, the Default Gateway
can be left all zeros.

If there are multiple segments, repeat steps 6 to 9 for each segment.

10

Select the BootP Server Tab, when ready.


LAN BootP Server Tab

11

Is the BootP facility to be used in this system?


If yes, go to Step 13
If no, leave all fields clear, and go to Step 14

12

Type (or select) the path/file name where configuration file is stored.
Continued on next page

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Define the Properties for a LAN-based iSCS Project, Continued


LAN Project Config. Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

13

Select the Automatically Update. checkbox if this feature is desired.


Clicking the check box instructs Config Pro to automatically update
the BootP Server after generating an iSCS LAN configuration.
Note:

The Update Now button is provided for manual operation, if


the automatic update feature is not checked.

14

Select the LAN Hosts Tab when complete.

15

This dialog box is provided for use if the iSCS network devices will be
communicating (via LAN) with any devices that are not configured with
Config Pro 4, such as a PowerLink master station.

Click the Add button, if there are any such devices.

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16

Type the IP Host Names and addresses of these devices.

17

Click Ok when Project Properties configuration is complete

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Chapter 5: Application Definition Files


Overview
Introduction

This Chapter begins the process of readying the Config Pro 4 program for the
creation of a configuration that accurately defines the characteristics of operating
software of one or more GE Energy Services products.

In This Chapter

This chapter contains the following topics:


Topic

See Page

Section 1: Applications & Firmware


Objectives

52

The Firmware Concept

53

Exercise 4: Installing Application Definition Files


Installing the Application Definitions

54

Section 2: Creating the Firmware for a Device


Overview

57

Exercise 5: Creating Device Firmware


Creating the Firmware

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Section 1:

Applications & Firmware

Objectives
Introduction

During this chapter, we will introduce:


GE Energy Services Application Identifiers
The Firmware concept
Installing the Application Definition files for a device configuration
Defining the Firmware

Application
Identifiers

As software applications for the GE Energy Services products have been developed
over the past years, they have been assigned an arbitrary alphanumeric code.
The code assigned to the application has no significance in itself, except that it may
be some indication as to the order in which they were created.
When you use Config Pro, you will see the application codes throughout the
program, and the documentation guides for related applications.

Config Pro
Application
Definitions

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The main use in these codes as it relates to a Config Pro user is that:
they can help you find appropriate sections of the configuration guides that relate
to a specific application definition table
they will help you identify the significance of error messages that are generated:
By Config Pro during compiling
During run time in the WESMAINT Error Log.

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The Firmware Concept


Introduction

All of the GE Energy Services iSCS products share the capability of being optioned
with a selection of software applications to provide a wide range of features and
protocol support.
When you request an iSCS system, a list of software is created by system engineers
identifying the features and functionality that will be required for the system to
perform in its designated role.
Once identified, the various software modules are assembled and compiled into a
binary file. This file is then used to program the EPROM set or Flash ROM, referred
to as Firmware, that will be installed into the IEDs main processor module(s).

Config Pro
Firmware

The features of many of the software applications included in the IEDs Firmware
will require custom configuration before they can be used.
To do this, you must load corresponding Application Definition Files for each
application in the IEDs firmware.
These tables provide a template for you to manipulate the features of the applications
in the IED Firmware.

Before
Configuring

You must assemble a complete list of all of the applications, and their versions,
which are present in your IEDs firmware.
You can then use this list as a guide to install the specific Application Definitions
onto your Config Pro PCs hard disk

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Exercise 4: Installing Application Definition Files


Installing the Application Definitions
Background

In preparing the Config Pro 4 system for creating an actual IED configuration, you
must import Application Definition Files that match the applications that are
installed in the project devices firmware.

Which
Applications?

How do you know which applications to import? There are two ways find out:
Contact a GE Energy Services representative to obtain a copy of a list of
applications for the specific project you are working on.
Using the IEDs WESMAINT II+ monitor facility, request a list of all the
Firmwares applications and their versions.
With this information in hand, you can begin importing the applications.

Before Starting

Application Definition Files do not have to be installed onto a PCs own hard disk,
if a network server is available. They can be installed into any drive or directory that
is available to Config Pro 4.
Refer to Exercise 2: to define the location of the definition files.

NOTE:

Having the Application Definition files installed onto your PCs local drive will
result in noticeably faster performance.

File Installation

Follow this procedure to install the Application Definition files.


Step

Action

Locate the Application Definitions Installation Utility, either from:


the Config Pro 4 menu bar, Tools, Application Installer, or
from the CD-ROM installation utility

Continued on next page

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Installing the Application Definitions, Continued


File Installation (continued)
Step

Action

Select Install a number of Application Definitions YOU Select from


the options.

Click Next.

Type (or select) the path and directory of the PCs CD-ROM drive.

Below this field, the Definitions Found text string will have a Yes
beside it if the path is valid.
5

Click Next.
Select Applications

Select both the Appl ID and Version for all applications required from
the Available Applications list at the top of the dialog box, using the
information obtained at the beginning of this exercise.

Continued on next page

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Installing the Application Definitions, Continued


File Installation (continued)
Step

Action

Click the Select button to move the application to the lower Selected
Applications box.

Repeat Steps 6 and 7 until all applications in your firmware list are
selected.

Click Next when all applications are selected.


Select Destination Directory

10

Type (or select) the destination directory for the copied applications.
A typical path would be:
C:\projects\appldef

NOTE:

If this directory does not exist yet, type the path into the field to
create it.

11

Click Next when ready.


Results: When the transfer is complete, a pop-up window will show all
of the application definitions that were successfully installed.

12

Click Finish to complete the procedure.

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Section 2:

Creating the Firmware for a Device

Overview
Introduction

Once the application definition files are loaded onto the PC, these select files must be
then linked into a form that will, in turn, be associated with one or more IED
configurations.

Pre-configured

In many cases, GE Energy Services does this process of creating a Firmware for a
projects IEDs when a sample configuration is created during project engineering.
In this situation, the customer will simply copy this sample configuration into their
PC and proceed with their process of tailoring the applications to their system.

Build from
Scratch

When building a Firmware from scratch, you must select from applications already
installed on your PC, a collection that will be used on a particular processor.

!! Important:

Applications selected when creating the Firmware for the Config Pro project Must
match exactly the applications, and their versions, loaded into the processors
EPROM set or Flash Memory.

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Exercise 5: Creating Device Firmware


Creating the Firmware
Background

Using the same applications list that was used in the previous exercise, the task for
this exercise is for you to create a Firmware for one or more IEDs.

Firmware
Definition
Procedure:

Now that the Application Definitions are installed into the Config Pro 4 directories,
we have to link the applications into a form that can be assigned to a device
configuration.
Step

Action

Verify that the new project, created in Exercise 3: is open.


2

Click Device from the Menu Bar, and click on Firmware.


The Firmware option can also be selected by clicking the Firmware
icon on the Tool Bar
Results: This dialog will open:

Click New at the lower left corner of the Firmware Library dialog box
Results: This new dialog will open:

Continued on next page

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Creating the Firmware, Continued


Firmware Definition Procedure: (continued)
Step

Action

Type a name for the Firmware into the Name field.


Note:
It is a good idea to use the GE Energy Services code for the
firmware that was assigned during project engineering. An
example of such a code would be SAB0123.00 for a D20
device.
Using these codes may assist future service inquiries.

Click the Applications tab, when ready


Results: This dialog will open:

Select all of the applications (using the Select button), one at a time, that
are required for this device from the Available Applications section of
the dialog box.

!
7

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Be careful to select the correct versions of the applications, if there is


more than one listed in the Version section on the right
After re-checking all selected applications, click OK twice to close the
dialog boxes, and to complete the exercise.

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Part C: Device Configuration


Overview
Introduction

The chapters of this part of the tutorial take you through the steps of creating a
device, and then explaining how the various applications work together in a device.
Armed with this background information, you can then proceed to configure some of
the common types of applications used in a variety of devices and systems.

In This Part

This part contains the following chapters:


Topic

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See Page

Chapter 6: Working With Devices

61

Chapter 7: Device Configuration

71

Chapter 8: Configuring Layered Protocol Applications

81

Chapter 9: Configuring TELNET

91

Chapter 10: Configuring for Redundancy

101

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Chapter 6: Working With Devices


Overview
Introduction

This Chapter introduces you to the first steps in creating a new device from
scratch, making a set of files that are ready to be edited into an actual configuration.
Also included are the steps you would use to import a configuration into your Config
Pro PC from another drive.

In This Chapter

This chapter contains the following topics


Topic

See Page

Section 1: Your First Device


Objectives

63

Creating a New Device

64

Exercise 6: Creating a Device


About This Exercise

65

Channel #1: Create a D20

66

Properties of a D20 Device

68

Channel #2: Create a D25

610

Properties of a D25 Device

612

Channel #3: Create a D200

617

Properties of a D200 Device

619

D200 Properties -- Multi-Node

621

D200 Properties -- LAN Settings

622

Section 2: Configuration File Operations


Installing and Copying Configurations

624

Exercise 7: Importing Configurations


About This Exercise

626

Copy Project or Device?

627

Install Project from CD-ROM

628

Using Config Pro 4 Copy Project/Device Menus

630
Continued on next page

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Creating the Firmware, Continued


In This Chapter (continued)
Topic

See Page

Section 3: Archiving and Releasing


Archiving Projects and Devices

632

Exercise 8: Archiving and Un-archiving


Archiving and Restoring Projects and Devices

633

Exercise 9: Releasing a Project


Releasing Projects

635

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Section 1:

Your First Device

Objectives
Introduction

As mentioned in earlier chapters, device configurations may be already available to


you to use as a template, or you may have to create one yourself as a continuation of
the process outlined in previous chapters.
This document will first outline the general procedure you can use to create a new
device.
Once you have created the device, the remaining procedures will be the same
whether you are working with a copy of an existing configuration, or if you are
creating a new device configuration.

Topics:

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Topics for this section will include:


Creating a new Device Configuration. Three distinct device types will be
discussed in independent Channels:
Channel #1: Create a D20, serial communications, non-redundant
Channel #2: Create a D25, LAN based communications
Channel #3: Create a D200, LAN Based, and redundant
Installing Configurations from CD or another drive

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Creating a New Device


Introduction

A new device can be created at any time once you have a Project and suitable device
firmware defined.
It should be pointed out that most customers of GE Energy Services would not
perform the process of actually creating a new device very often.
It is more common to create a new device by cloning an existing or sample
device configuration.

New Device

If you have been following the steps in the previous chapters, the process of creating
a new device starts by:
clicking the New Device icon
selecting New from the Device menu on the top of the Config Pro project
window.
The Exercises in this chapter outline procedures for creating three different types of
device.

The Template

In reality, once you have successfully created a device configuration, or have been
provided a sample configuration by GE Energy Services, subsequent
configurations will begin as a copy of the first or sample configuration files.
Once copied, simple editing techniques can be used to tailor that new device
configuration into one suitable for a new IED.

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Exercise 6: Creating a Device


About This Exercise
Background

The process of creating a New Device has two steps:


Create the New Device
Specify the Properties of the device

What Type of
Device?

The type of device that is being created dictates the properties options that are
available to you as the programmer.
As examples:
D10s and D25s do not have any redundancy features.
D20s have redundancy options, but do not have multiple nodes (processors).
CPMs and SAMs have only serial communications, and no local I/O capability.
Simply selecting the appropriate icon for your new device will determine what will
appear in the menus and dialogs while configuring.

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Channel #1: Create a D20


Background

This Exercise procedure assumes that a suitable Firmware has been created for this
type of device.
The D20 will be a non-redundant, serial communication IED.
The more advanced topics will be discussed in the D200 and D25 procedures.

New D20
Procedure

Follow this procedure to create a D20 device.


Step

HINT:

Open the Project window, where you wish to create the D20 device

From the row of Device icons at the top of the main project window,
click the D20 icon once.

Position the cursor over the main window, approximately where you
would like to position the device icon.

A new device can


also be created by:
1.

right-clicking
the main
window, and
selecting the
device type

2.

Click Device
from the Menu
bar, and then
select New. A
device type can
then be selected.

Action

Click the left mouse button once.


Results: The following dialog box will appear.

Continued on next page

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Channel #1: Create a D20, Continued


New D20 Procedure (continued)
Step

Action
General Tab

Type in a unique name for the device into the Name field.
Note:

Do not check Redundant or LAN Based for this part of the


Exercise.

Click the Icon Select button to choose an appropriate icon for this
device.
Note:
The choice of icon has no effect on the device configuration, it
is only used as a graphic representation for the device while
using Config Pro.
The icon can be changed at any time after the device
configuration starts with no effect on the task.

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Properties of a D20 Device


Background

This part of the exercise will identify the options under each of the tabs in the Device
Properties dialog box.

D20 Properties
Configuration
Procedure

Before proceeding, read this section through to identify the information you will
require to properly fill in the various data fields.

Step

Action
Processor Tab

Click the Select button to choose the exact processor type that is used in
the D20.

Results: Once selected, the Part Number field will reflect your choice.

!
2

Selecting the wrong processor from the list may result in a mismatch in
the actual memory on the processor card and the memory model
defined in the configuration file. This may result in a device failure after
the configuration is loaded into the device.
Click the Firmware tab
Results: The dialog should look like the one below.

Continued on next page

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Properties of a D20 Device, Continued


D20 Properties Configuration Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

Click the Select button to display the available firmware definitions.

Select the one that matches the D20s applications


Results: Once selected, the Name field will reflect your choice.

NOTE:

D20s always use firmware to define the software applications


installed. i.e., the Use Firmware Type should always be checked.

Click the Memory Model tab

Verify that the default Derive from Processor Card option is selected.
VME Cards Tab

Do not select any options in this section.


NVRAM Storage Tab

New Icon

Do not select or change any options in this section.

Click OK to complete the creation of the new D20.


Results: Config Pro 4 will display a graphic showing the progression of
the creation process.

When complete, the Device icon will appear on the main window.
The new device is now ready for configuring.

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Channel #2: Create a D25


Background

This Exercise procedure assumes that a suitable Firmware has been created for this
type of device.

New D25
Procedure

The D25 will be a non-redundant, LAN-based serial communication IED.


Step

Action
New Device

Open the Project window, where you wish to create the D25 device.

Click the D25 icon (once) from the row of Device icons at the top of the
main project window

Position the cursor over the main window, approximately where you
would like to position the D25 device icon, and click the left mouse
button once.
Results: This dialog box will appear.

Type a unique name for the device into the Name field.
Continued on next page

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Channel #2: Create a D25, Continued


New D25 Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

Click the Icon Select button to choose an icon for this device.
Note:
The choice of icon has no effect on the device configuration, it
is only used as a graphic representation for the device while
using Config Pro.
The icon can be changed at any time after the device
configuration starts with no effect on the task.

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Select LAN Based Device

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Properties of a D25 Device


General

This part of the exercise will identify the options under each of the tabs in the Device
Properties dialog box.

Procedure: D25
Device Properties

Before proceeding, read this section through to identify the information you will
require to properly fill in the various data fields.
Step

Action
Hardware Part Number Tab

Using the part number label on the rear of the D25 as a reference, select
the four options highlighted on the left side of the dialog box.

Note:

For this exercise, select one of the Ethernet XCOM options


Hardware Memory Tab

When initially defining a D25 device, the default memory parameters


will be satisfactory.

Note:

When the device has been configured, the generation of the


downloadable file may result in a warning that there is not
enough Base System Area, and it will have to be increased.
Continued on next page

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Properties of a D25 Device, Continued


Procedure: D25 Device Properties (continued)
Step

Action
Hardware Serial I/O Tab

Select the interface characteristics for each of the four serial ports.

Note:

The XCOM ports are masked to indicate that this D25 does not
have a Serial XCOM card installed.
Processor Firmware Tab

Click the Select button to display the available firmware definitions.


Select the one that matches this D25s applications

Results: Once selected, the Name field will reflect your choice.
Continued on next page

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Properties of a D25 Device, Continued


Procedure: D25 Device Properties (continued)
Step

Action

NOTE:

D25s typically use firmware to define the software applications


installed into their Flash memory. i.e., the Use Firmware Type should
be checked for a new D25.
In the future, it may be possible to add or remove single applications
from the Flash memory of a D25. By breaking the link to the
firmware we can also add or remove application definition files from a
single Config Pro 4 device.
Processor Memory Model Tab

Verify that the default Derive from D25 Hardware Setting option is
selected.

Processor Code Image Tab

Leave Code Image field blank, for this exercise..


LAN Settings General Tab

Select Not Used for the BootP Settings for this exercise.
Continued on next page

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Properties of a D25 Device, Continued


Procedure: D25 Device Properties (continued)
Step

Action

Select one or both Connected to LAN options, as appropriate for


your system. Do not select both unless you have dual LANs available.

Note:

Do not alter the Host Name Override field


LAN Settings LAN Specific Tab

Type a valid Host Address for one or both LAN interfaces.

Note:

It is not necessary to fill in the Ethernet Address unless the


BootP feature is to be configured.
Continued on next page

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Properties of a D25 Device, Continued


Procedure: D25 Device Properties (continued)
Step

Action
LAN Settings Services Tab

10

Edit the Service Name(s) and Port Number(s) as required for your
system.

Note:
The values shown in this example dialog are the defaults that
will be seen when a new D25 configuration is created.
More recent versions of DNP 3.0 applications, as well as IEC 104 and
UCA RFC 1006 protocols will assume default values for these fields if
they are left entirely blank. The Service fields should be cleared for
most systems.
For these new applications, filling in these fields should not be required,
unless the D25 is to be integrated into an existing iSCS LAN that is
using different Port Numbers
Refer to: the iSCS Users Guide - SWM0008 for more information
about services and port numbers.
NVRAM Storage (May not be present in older units)

New Icon

11

Verify that the Storage Regions option is set to 0

12

Click OK to complete the creation of the new D25.


Results: Config Pro 4 will display a graph showing the progression of
the creation process.

When complete, the Device icon will appear on the main window.
The new device is now ready for configuring.

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Channel #3: Create a D200


Background

This Exercise procedure assumes that suitable Firmware have been created for this
type of device.
The D200 will be a 2-node, redundant, LAN and serial communication data
concentrator.

New D200
Procedure

The following steps outline the procedure for creating a redundant, LAN-based D200
device.
Step

Action

Open the Project window, where you wish to create the D200 device

Click the D200 icon (once) in the row of Device icons at the top of the
main project window

Position the cursor over the main window, approximately where you
would like to position the D200 device icon.
General Tab

Click the left mouse button once.


Results: This dialog box will appear.

Continued on next page

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Channel #3: Create a D200, Continued


New D200 Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

Enter a unique name for the device into the Name field.

Click the Icon Select button to choose an appropriate icon for this
device.
Note:
The choice of icon has no effect on the device configuration, it
is only used as a graphic representation for the device while
using Config Pro.
The icon can be changed at any time after the device
configuration starts with no effect on the task.

Select Redundant Device

Select Multiprocessor Device

Select LAN Based Device


Note:
Do not click OK at this time. The next procedure will
continue from this point.

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Properties of a D200 Device


Background

This part of the exercise will identify the options under each of the tabs in the Device
Properties dialog box.

Configuring
D200 Properties
Procedure

Before proceeding, read this section through to identify the information you will
require to properly fill in the various data fields.
Note:

This procedure continues from where the previous procedure left off.

Step

Action
Processor 1 General Tab

Click the Select button

Note:
2

The 1 tab at the lower-left of the dialog box will have a green
check mark. All enabled processors will have this same mark.

Using the part number labels on the D20 M processor cards as a


reference, select the part number of first processor used in the D200, and
click OK
Processor 1 Firmware Tab

Select the Firmware tab

Continued on next page

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Properties of a D200 Device, Continued


Configuring D200 Properties Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

Verify that the Use Firmware Type option is checked.

Select the Select button.

Select the firmware for the first node of the D200


Processor 1 Memory Model Tab

Verify that the Derive From Processor Card option is checked.

Click the General tab.


Note:
Do not click OK at this time. The next procedure will
continue from this point.

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D200 Properties -- Multi-Node


Background

Each processor (node) of a D200 is defined in the same way as the first.
Some D200s have the same firmware for all nodes, while some have different
firmware for each node. Check the labels on the EPROMs installed in each
processor card before proceeding.
Step

Action
Processor 2

Click the 2 tab at the bottom of the dialog box

Click the Enabled checkbox

Click the Select button

Using the part number label on the second D20 M processor card, select
the second processor used in the D200.
Note:

It is usually the same type as the first node, but be sure of the
part number.

Click Ok.
Processor 2 Firmware Tab

Click the Firmware tab

Verify that the Use Firmware Type option is checked.

Click the Select button.

Click the Firmware for the second node of the D200


Processor 2 Memory Model Tab

10

Verify that the Derive From Processor Card option is checked.

11

Click the Global Memory tab.


Processor 2 Global Memory Tab

12

Do not change any defaults in this dialog box


Processor 2 VME Cards Tab

13

Do not select any options in this dialog box


Repeat for Each Processor

14

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Repeat steps 1 through 13 for all processor cards in the D200.

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D200 Properties -- LAN Settings


D200 LAN
Properties
Config.
Procedure

Follow this procedure to configure the D200s LAN properties.

Step

Action
LAN Settings General Tab

Select BootP Settings Not Used for this exercise.

Select one or both Connected to LAN options, as appropriate.

Do not alter the Host Name Override field (leave clear)

Select the LAN Segment that this D200 is connected to.


LAN Settings LAN Specific Tab

Type a valid Host Address for one or both LAN interfaces.

Note:

It is not necessary to fill in the Ethernet Address unless the


BootP feature is to be configured
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D200 Properties -- LAN Settings, Continued


D200 LAN Properties Config. Procedure (continued)
Step

Action
LAN Settings Services Tab

Type the Service Name(s) and Port Number(s) as shown below.

Note:

The values shown in this example dialog are the defaults that
will be seen when a new D200 configuration is created.
More recent versions of DNP 3.0 applications, as well as IEC
104 and UCA RFC 1006 protocols will assume default
values for these fields if they are left entirely blank. The
Service fields should be cleared for most systems.
For these new applications, filling in these fields should not be
required, unless the D200 is to be integrated into an existing
iSCS LAN that is using different Port Numbers

Refer to: the iSCS Users Guide - SWM0008 for more information
about services and port numbers.
7

Click OK when completed.


NVRAM Storage Tab

New Icon

Verify that the Storage Regions option is set to 0

Click OK to complete the creation of the new D200.


Results: Config Pro 4 will display a graph showing the progression of
the creation process.

When complete, the D200 Device icon will appear on the main window.
The new device is now ready for configuring.

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Section 2:

Configuration File Operations

Installing and Copying Configurations


Introduction

When a configuration sample is available, it is usually desirable to create a copy of


that sample, and then edit it as required for a new IED.
If the Config Pro 4 CD-ROM was supplied as part of a complete order, it will
probably include one or more sample configuration projects.

Sample
Configurations

The degree to which the configurations on the CD are developed varies, dependant
on how much engineering development was contracted to GE Energy Services when
the project order was placed.
As a minimum, the sample will be a simple device configuration, designed to
verify the correct operation of the hardware and software components that are
integrated into this IED.
This sample configuration will probably require major modification before it
can be commissioned into service.
If contracted, GE Energy Services may have supplied a sample configuration
that is fully programmed with virtually every option and parameter of a specific
IED.
This sample will not require any modification or editing before
commissioning.

Background

The first part of the Exercise outlines the procedure for installing the project
configuration that has been provided on the CD-ROM.
Once you have created an operational configuration, it may be desirable to archive it
to some other drive.
That drive may be any type that can be written to, including hard disk, floppy disk,
network server or virtual disk drive.
Once copied, it can be made available to any other Config Pro 4 user that is
authorized to use it as a template for future configurations.

Copying

The Config Pro 4 Copy Project or Copy Device facilities can copy projects or device
information from any disk drive and directory to any other disk drive and directory.
The second procedure outlined in the following Exercise can be used to import
configurations into the Config Pro 4 PC, or can be used to export configurations to a
destination drive such as a network server, or a floppy disk.
Continued on next page

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Installing and Copying Configurations, Continued


Which Procedure
to Use?

The procedure for copying an entire Project, or for copying a single Device
configuration is essentially the same.
Deciding which to do in a particular situation depends on several things:
Copying a Project will copy all device configurations in the Project.
Copying a Device is often used to create a new Device that is part of an existing
Project.
Copying a single Device is quicker, and takes up less space on a disk. This is
usually preferred when copying to floppy disk.
Project directories may contain additional project data or information files that
are not used by Config Pro. Copying a Device avoids copying these extra files.

NOTE:

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If the Project is an iSCS (IP- Ethernet LAN) system, copying a Device will not copy
the Project LAN Properties to the destination.

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Exercise 7: Importing Configurations


About This Exercise
Background

There are two main techniques for installing existing configurations from another
source:
Use the CD-ROM installation utility to copy a project or device from the CD.
Use Config Pro 4s Copy Project or Copy Device features.

NOTE:

The utility provided on the CD is only available if there is an actual project included
on the CD.

If the button for installing Device Configurations is grayed-out, this indicates that
the CD has no configuration files on it.
If the CD you are using shows that there are no configuration files available, you will
have to use the steps outlined in the following section of this exercise to install
configuration files.

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Copy Project or Device?


The Choice

You are given the choice of installing either:


an entire Project or
a single Device.
.

Note:

Install Project

This utility is restricted to only copy projects or devices that are present on
the source CD-ROM disk, and they have to be located in the WESDATA
directory.

The Install Project option will copy All project and device related files in the
selected project.
Project properties, including iSCS LAN parameters will also be copied.
If there are any other files in the source project directories, they will be copied as
well.
Some examples of these files may be:
EPROM binary image files
text files
associated configuration information for GE Energy Services products like Darts
or SCDs

Install Device

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Install Device will copy only the selected device, as well as any other files in the
Device directory.
No other files will be copied from the project directory
The destination project can be a newly created one or an existing project.

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Install Project from CD-ROM


Install Project
Procedure

The Copy Project option is shown here. The Copy Device procedure is very
similar.
Step

Action
Select Project:

Select the Project check box, and click Next


Results: A dialog box similar to this one will appear.

If there is more than one project on the CD, select the project you wish
to copy.

Click Next.
Results: This dialog box will appear:

Select Destination:

Type (or Select) the drive and directory you wish to copy the
configuration to.
Continued on next page

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Install Project from CD-ROM, Continued


Install Project Procedure (continued)
Step

Action

Select (or type a new project name) the destination Project

Click Finish when done..

Results: A graphic like the one above will show the progress of the
copying
When complete, the utility will close automatically.

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Using Config Pro 4 Copy Project/Device Menus


Background

For this part of the exercise, copying a Device will be used as an example.

NOTES:

Install Device
Procedure:

Config Pro 4 can not copy an open project or device.


Be sure to close all configuration windows before copying projects and
devices.
If there are other files in the source Project directory when copying Projects, it
will copy these as well. Some examples may be:
EPROM binary image files
text files
associated configuration information for GE Energy Services products like
Darts and SCDs.

Follow this procedure to copy a device.

Step

Action

Click the Open Project button from the Speed Bar

Select the source drive and directory, in the Current Project


Directory field, where the devices project is stored.

If there is more than one Project in this directory, select the required
project and click OK.

Select the icon for the Device that you wish to copy.
Note:
Do Not open the device.

Click the Copy Device button on the Tool Bar. A dialog box similar to
the one below will appear.

Continued on next page

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Using Config Pro 4 Copy Project/Device Menus, Continued


Install Device Procedure: (continued)
Step

Action
Destination

About Copying

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Type information into, or select the Project Directory where the


destination project is, or will be, located..

Select the Project and Page where you want the device copied.
Any drive, path, Project name or Device name can be used, as long
as it is on a drive with read/write capability or rights.
If desired, a new destination directory can be created here as well

Click OK when ready.

The copy process will now start.


Depending on processor and disk drive speed, and the size of the configuration
files, the transfer time will vary from a few seconds to several minutes.
If the destination is a floppy disk, and the configuration files combined are
greater in size than the capacity of one diskette, you will be prompted for
multiple disks.

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Section 3:

Archiving and Releasing

Archiving Projects and Devices


About Archiving

Config Pro 4 has incorporated a feature where individual devices, or entire projects,
can be archived to a select drive.
The target drive can be a local disk, a removable disk or tape drive, or a network
drive.

Why Archive?

The archive utility combines all of the project of or device files and subdirectories
into one compressed file.
This smaller single file is much easier to manage and store than the many
component files and subdirectories.
Moving a single file from one computer to another is much easier and faster
than moving multiple files.
An archived configuration can be sent through the Internet more readily than
a collection of many files. GE Energy Services recommends this technique
to customers when they send configuration files in for testing or
troubleshooting.
In most cases, device configurations and small projects can be archived to a
single floppy disk.
The archiving process can combine and compress into a single file all that may
be stored in a project directory structure, including EPROM code files,
documentation etc.

Archive Format

Config Pro uses standard ZIP compression algorithms to reduce the size of the
archived projects or devices.

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Exercise 8: Archiving and Un-archiving


Archiving and Restoring Projects and Devices
Background

Before any archiving operations can be performed, all open configuration windows
and dialogs must be closed.
Configuration files do not need to be generated before archiving.
The procedure for archiving projects or devices is very similar, an Archive Device
procedure will be used as an example.

Procedure:
Archiving a
Device

The following procedure shows the steps in archiving a Device to a directory.

Step

Action

Select and open the Project where the Device you wish to archive is
located.
Why?
The Device menus will not be available if the Project is not
open.

Select the Device icon that you wish to archive

Click Device | Archive | Save from the menu bar, or


Right-click the device icon and select Archive | Save
Results: A dialog box similar to this will open.

Type or select a Save To directory, and click OK.


Results: The archiving process will start, and all dialogs will close
when completed.
Continued on next page

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Archiving and Restoring Projects and Devices, Continued


Procedure:

These steps give an example of a Restore procedure:


Step

Action

Select and open the Project where you wish to restore the archived the
Device configuration files.
Why?
The Device menus will not be available if the Project is not
open.

Click Device | Archive | Restore from the menu bar, or


Right-click anywhere on the project page and select Archive | Restore
Results: A dialog box similar to this will open.

If not already displayed, type or search for the path and name of the
Source Device ZIP (archive) File you wish to restore.

Type or select the Restore To Project Directory.

Select or type a new Project Name where you wish to restore the
device.

10

Type a unique Device Name for the restored device.


Note:
You cannot copy-over an existing device configuration. A
new device name must be used or an error message will occur.

11

Click OK.
Results: The restore process will start, and all dialogs will close, and a
new device icon will appear when completed.

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Releasing Projects
About Releasing
Projects

Introduced with Config Pro Version 4.16, the Project Release feature is designed to
provide a way to "lock" projects so that they, and the device configurations contained
in the project, cannot be edited or modified in any way. In fact, Config Pro will not
allow a released project (or any devices within that project) to be deleted.

Only projects that have been created using Config Pro 4.16 or higher can be released.

Note

If you wish to release an existing project (created using a version of Config Pro prior
to V4.16) you can either:
Copy the entire project into a new project folder, or
Create a new project, in a new project folder, and copy all devices from the
original project to the new project.
You must create a new folder for projects that you wish to release. The database files
that are in a project folder created by earlier versions of Config Pro do not support
release, and will not be overwritten by a newer version.

!
Important

How to Tell if a
Project is
Released:

Config Pro versions prior to 4.16 will not recognize the "released" state of a project,
and therefore, can still edit a released project. Released configurations that have
been edited by these older versions of Config Pro will remain in the released state,
with no indication of changes having been made.
For this reason, it is highly recommended that administrators upgrade or delete all
prior installations of Config Pro under their control.
Config Pro displays the released state of a project in several ways:
The project name in the Navigator Bar will be suffixed with [Released].
The workspace is white, instead of the default gray, when a released project is
open.
Configuration tables only open in read-only mode, shown by the dark green
color of the table fields.
Some menu bar buttons are not displayed.
Application drop-down lists are shortened to show only display and reporting
functions.
Attempting to use illegal operations will result in this display:

Continued on next page


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Releasing Projects, Continued


What is Not
Locked:

When a project is released, the following menu items are still available:
Archive | Save
Communications | Terminal Emulator
| Communication Options
| Configuration Upload
| Configuration Download
| Configuration Switchover
| Code Download
Point Descriptions| Export.
For device belonging to a released iSCS project, the Device Properties | LAN
page allows the editing of:
the MAC (or Ethernet) Address field.
Also, the Project Properties | LAN settings page allows the editing of:
the Configuration file name, and
the BootP Server IP addresses. (Only the host portion of the BootP Server IP
addresses can be modified.)
Note:

These last two items are required to support changes to a BootP server
setup.

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Exercise 9: Releasing a Project

Note

Prerequisites

Once the release button is clicked, a project cannot be un-released.


Be sure to verify all configuration parameters of the project and its devices before
releasing.
All devices in a project must be generated before the following release procedure
can be performed.
Any attempt to release a project that contains devices that have not been generated
will result in this error message:

Procedure:

The following procedure shows the steps to release a project.


Step

Action

Click Project | Project Properties from the Menu Bar.

Navigate to the Project folder, and select the project that you wish to
release.
Results: A dialog similar to the one below will open.

Click the Release button at the lower-left of the dialog.

Results: You will be reminded that you will not be able to edit the
project or devices after releasing.
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Click Yes to acknowledge the warning.


Results: The project is now released.

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Chapter 7: Device Configuration


Overview
Introduction

This Chapter is and introduction to the configuration process, and discusses the
concepts of each stage:
Types of applications
The System Point Database concept
Point Types
Application Indexing
The Logical Sequence of configuration:
Configuring the D25 Plant I/O or the D.20 Link DCA
Configuring other DCAs
Configuring the Watchdog and Analog Reference DTAs
Configuring a typical DPA
Configuring WESMAINT II+

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics:


Topic

See Page

Section 1: Types of Applications


Background

73

The System Point Database

74

Application Indexing

76

The Sequence of Configuration

77

Configuring the First DCA:

78

Exercise 10: Configuring an IEDs Local I/O


Part A: Configuring the D.20 Peripheral Link DCA

79

Defining Peripherals

711

Part B: Configuring the Plant I/O DCA

713

Section 2: Heart of the System


The System Point Database

717
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Releasing Projects, Continued


In this chapter (continued)
Topic

See Page

Exercise 11: Configuring The System Point Database


Configuring B008 Options

718

Other System Point Database Options

720

Configuring WESMAINT II+

721

Section 3: Configuring a Data Collection Application


Configuring a Typical DCA

722

Section 4: Configuring Data Translation Applications


Background

723

Data Translation Applications: The Watchdog

724

Data Translation Applications: The Analog Reference

725

Section 5: Configuring Data Processing Applications


Background of DPAs

726

Data Processing Applications: The LRU

728

DPA Configuration Sequence

730

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Section 1:

Types of Applications

Background
3 Main Types

Almost all applications fall into one of the following three types:
DCA or Data Collection Application
DTA or Data Translation Application
DPA or Data Processing Application

The DCA

The DCA is responsible for collecting data from an external source, i.e., a peripheral
module or attached IED, or a separate application like the D25s Plant I/O, and
mapping it to the System Point Database for storage.

The DTA

By combining elements of the DPA and DCA, the DTA can copy existing data from
the System Point Database, process it, and output new system points back into the
Database.
The data points created by DTAs are often called Pseudo points, as they are not
physical data points.

The DPA

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The DPA takes copies of any available data in the System Point Database, and
processes it into format compatible with a Master Station protocol.

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The System Point Database


Introduction

The heart of the IEDs system, the System Point Database, stores all data that is
collected or forwarded by all of the applications previously discussed.
The control and management of the database is performed by WIN, an acronym for
WESDAC Interface Node.
This database manager, WIN, can be thought of as a librarian that controls the input
of any data to the database, and the copying of the data that is requested by other
applications.

An important
point

A Master Station interrogating a data concentrator through a DPA will only be able
to access the most current data that is in the System Point Database of the data
concentrator.
The Master will not be able to interrogate directly any IED attached to the data
concentrator.
The following diagram shows the basic communication process between DCAs,
WIN and DPAs.

Master/Host
Requests
from
Master

RTU
Response
Report Data Events
to WIN

Data Events

WIN

DPA
Requests

Receive DCA
Requests

DCA

Poll, Output
Requests

Data
Response

Devices

The Number of
Applications

There is no theoretical limit to the number of DPAs, DTAs and DCAs, which can
interface WIN, in a particular IED.
The practical limit is the performance load on the IEDs processor and memory.
Continued on next page

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The System Point Database, Continued


Data Point Types

The GE Energy Services product family divides the System Point Database into six
main sections, referred to in software documentation as WESDAC 1 to 6.
The First 5
Five of these sections are designated for the five primary data types,

WESDAC 1

- Digital Inputs

WESDAC 2

- Digital Outputs

WESDAC 3

- Counters

WESDAC 4

- Analog Inputs

WESDAC 5

- Analog Outputs
The 6th

The sixth section is used to define the number of IEDs communicating with the data
concentrator through DCAs.

WESDAC 6
Other Data
Types

- Devices

There are many different synonyms for the five data types, as well as a variety of
ways that data points are generated.
The following table shows some of these variations.
Regardless of what the data is called or derived from, it fits into one of the five
WESDAC types.

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Digital Inputs

Digital Outputs

Counters

Analog Inputs

Analog
Outputs

Status

Trip/Close

Accumulators

Voltage

Voltage

MCD

Raise/Lower

Free-running

Current

Current

2-Bit

Latched

Frozen

Unipolar

Unipolar

BCD

Pulsed

Form A, B, C

Bipolar

Bipolar

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Application Indexing
Introduction

The sequence of the data points in the System Point Database is determined by two
things:
The order that the DCA and DTA applications are placed in the software system
of the IED. This referred to as the Index of the application.
The order that the data is in as it arrives from the device or application that
created it.

Changing
Indexes

Config Pro 4 has a feature not available in Versions 1 and 2 of Config Pro:
You can change the Index of the DCAs and DTAs in the system.
This allows much greater control over the sequence of data in the System Point
Database than previously possible.

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The Sequence of Configuration


Introduction

Because of the database structure of the Config Pro configuration system,


configuration tables for an application will often require that other configuration
tables be configured first. This applies to:
tables within applications
configuration tables in one application that must be completed before tables in
another application can be defined.
Using the following sequence will simplify your configuration process:
Stage

Description

All Data Collection Applications (DCAs) should be configured first.


Local I/O DCAs, like the D.20 link or Plant I/O, can be done first.
Before other DCAs can be configured, the System Point Database
has to be set up.

All Data Translation Applications (DTAs) should be configured second.


Virtually all DTAs will use data already in the System Point
Database as inputs to the tasks they perform.
This requires that they be configured after the DCAs have been
completed.
the System Point Database has to be set up to add any output points
created by the DTAs.
In some cases a DTA configuration may have to be completed after the
DPAs are configured, but most of the setup can be completed now.

All Data Processing Applications (DPAs) should be configured third.


In general, once the DCAs and DTAs have been configured, the size
and mapping of the System Point Database is firmly defined.
The data points can now be mapped from the database to the DPA(s)
to be forwarded to the Master Station(s).

Configuring of applications such as:


Some System Point Database options.
WESMAINT II+.
Data links.
can be done at any time, but are often left to the end of the configuration
process.

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Configuring the First DCA:


Introduction

Planning

D20 and D200 systems usually will have the D.20 DCA application included in
their Firmware. If the application is enabled, it will probably be the first one that
is configured.
All D25 systems will have the Plant I/O application in their flash memory, and in
virtually all cases, will be enabled. Like the D.20 application, it will be the first
application configured.

The D.20 and Plant I/O applications do not require that the System Point Database be
setup, preparing for the data points that will be added to the database.
There is some planning required before configuration can begin.
This is a sample of the type of information that will be required:

D.20 Link
Planning

Plant I/O
Planning

How many peripheral modules will be used in this D20/200, and what types are
they?
What types of termination boards will they use, and what are the input options
for AC and DC analog modules?
What input or output types will be used? I.e., Form A or C status inputs or
counters, Trip/Close or Pulse controls, etc.
What point descriptions will data points have?
Which termination options will be used?
If the AC option is installed, what is the feeder configuration?
What are the nominal voltage and current values of the feeder(s)?
What are the correction factors for the CT and PT input transformers?
What input or output types will be used? I.e., Form A or C status inputs or
counters, Trip/Close or Pulse controls, etc.
What point descriptions will be assigned to each data point?

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Exercise 10:

Configuring an IEDs Local I/O

Part A: Configuring the D.20 Peripheral Link DCA


Exercises

In this exercise, we will demonstrate the procedure to:


Open the D.20 Peripheral Link DCA
Add new peripherals to the D.20 Link
Define the options for the new peripherals.

Procedure:

This procedure begins with the target Project already open.


Step

Action

Open the target D10, D20 or D200 device by double-clicking on its icon

Click the Data Collection Applications tab.

Double-click the D.20 Peripheral Link icon to open the application

Once open, the following window will appear on the desktop:

Continued on next page

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Part A: Configuring the D.20 Peripheral Link DCA, Continued


Configuration
Rules:

Always start defining modules from the first available (lowest numbered)
position.
Do not leave undefined module positions in a sequence of modules.

Note:
Suggestion:

Breaking either of these rules will result in an error when generating the
configuration.

Define the D.20 Link module sequence in the same order as the actual modules are
installed in the D10/20/200s racks.
The addresses assigned to the modules in Config Pro must be set into jumpers on the
termination card for each of the modules.
Because the jumpers are not visible when the peripherals are installed and running, it
is difficult for service technicians to determine which hardware module relates to
which icon on the Config Pro display, if the modules are not installed in the same
sequence.

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Defining Peripherals
Peripheral
Definition
Procedure:

Follow this procedure to define peripheral modules for a D20 or D200.


Note:
this procedure is a continuation of the previous procedure.
Step

Action

Double-click the first gray box, at the top-left of the window.


Note:
It should have Peripheral 1 underneath it.

When the dialog box below opens, select the desired module type from
the list.

Click Ok
Options

From the dialog box that appears, select and enter any necessary
parameters for the module type you have selected.

Note:

The figure above is specific to the D20 A peripheral type.


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Defining Peripherals, Continued


Peripheral Definition Procedure: (continued)
Step
HINT:

NOTES:

Options and tabs will vary depending on the module type selected, and
version of the D.20 Link (B003) application in use in the D10/20/200.

Peripheral modules
can be moved to a
new location on the
D.20 link by simply
dragging and
dropping their icons
with the mouse

Press F1 at any time to view the Help screens that are available to assist
the programmer.
An Adobe Acrobat document, B003 Configuration Guide, is available on
the CD-ROM as a reference as well.
9
10

Complete?

Action

Click OK when done.


Repeat Steps 5 to 9 for as many modules as required to complete the
D.20 Link configuration

New icons will now be on the desktop, each one representing a new peripheral
module.
Configuration parameters for these modules can be altered at any time by doubleclicking their icon.
Right-clicking the icon will provide a selection of options for:
Deleting the module
Moving the module to a new location
Copying the module, to create a duplicate
Changing the module to a different type
Defining advanced communication parameters for the D.20 Link itself

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Part B: Configuring the Plant I/O DCA


Plant I/O
Configuration
Procedure:

In this exercise, we will demonstrate the procedure to:


Open the P097 Plant I/O DCA
Define the modules types that are installed in the D25
Define the options for the DCA
Note:

This procedure begins with the target Project already open.

Step

Action

Open the target D25 IED by double-clicking on its icon

Click the Data Collection Applications tab

Double-click the Plant I/O Subsystem icon to open the application

The window shown below will appear, showing three icons.

DC Part Number and Configuration

Double-click the DC Configuration icon.


Results: A window similar to the one below will open.
Continued on next page

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Part B: Configuring the Plant I/O DCA, Continued


Plant I/O Configuration Procedure: (continued)
Step

Action

Using the selection fields on the left, select the module types that are
installed in the D25.

Note:

This information may be available by simply reading the Part


Number label on the rear of the D25 enclosure.

Click the other tabs at the top of this dialog box to define the DC I/O
parameters.
Refer to the Config Pro 4 Help system for details of the specific
parameters

Click OK when ready.


AC Part Number and Configuration

Double-click the AC Configuration icon.


Results: The General window below will be displayed

Continued on next page

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Part B: Configuring the Plant I/O DCA, Continued


Plant I/O Configuration Procedure: (continued)
Step

10

Action

Select the CT and PT options that are installed in the D25, using the
selection fields on the left.
Note:

This information may be available by simply reading the Part


Number label on the rear of the D25 enclosure.

11

Click the Circuit tab


Note:
The circuit configuration dialog shown will depend on the
version of the Plant I/O application running in this D25

12

Using options in these dialogs, select:


Circuit configuration
nominal voltages and currents for the feeders
correction factors for the CTs and PTs

13

Click the other tabs at the top of this dialog box to define the AC I/O
parameters.
Refer to: The Config Pro 4 Help system for configuration details

14

Click OK when ready.


DCA Configuration

15

Double-click the DCA Configuration icon.


Results: The window below will be displayed

Continued on next page

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Part B: Configuring the Plant I/O DCA, Continued


Plant I/O Configuration Procedure: (continued)
Step

16

Action

These dialog boxes allow for the customization of the pseudo point
descriptions generated by the Plant I/O application.
The Advanced tab opens a dialog where diagnostic and failure response
parameters can be defined.
Note:

Most of the options in this section can be left as default values


for typical systems.

17

Click the other tabs at the top of this dialog box to define the DCA
pseudo point parameters.
Refer to: the Config Pro 4 Help system for a more detailed description
of parameters specific to the Plant I/O version running in this
D25.

18

Click OK when ready.

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Section 2:

Heart of the System

The System Point Database


Virtually all other DCA and DTA applications will require that the programmer
assign space in the System Point Database for all of the points generated by those
applications.
In order to define the number of data points required for a specific application, you
will have to create a detailed plan outlining:
Number of sources of data
Number of data points of each type from each source
Number of pseudo data points created by the DCA or DTA (if any), which will
be in addition to points collected.
Point descriptions for all points
Configuration
Options

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In addition to defining the quantity of points required for an application, and the
descriptions of those points, the System Point Database configuration tables provide
several important system features:
Indexes of DCA and DTA applications can be changed
Point descriptor length can be limited to a set length
This can be used to limit the amount of memory assigned for storage of the
descriptions in the devices memory.
Point descriptors can be imported and exported from/to other device
configurations, or word processors
Type of memory used to store point data can be selected, depending on whether
you wish to retain data if system power fails.
Optimize NVRAM usage by restricting or including information from the
downloadable file
Define a control lockout feature
Set the diagnostic message level

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Exercise 11: Configuring The System Point Database


Configuring B008 Options
Background

In this exercise, we will demonstrate the procedure to:


Open the B008-1 System Point Database
Adjust the indexes for the enabled DCAs and DTAs in the system
Define the options for the System Point Database

Procedure for
Changing
Indexes:

This procedure begins with the target Project already open.

Step

Action

Open the target device by double-clicking its icon

Click the System Point Database Applications tab.

Double-click the System Point Database icon to open the application


Results: below is an example of a D25 dialog box.

Indexing Applications

If it is determined that the applications listed are not in the desired


sequence, follow these steps to change the order:
Select the application that you would like to move up or down in the list.
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Configuring B008 Options, Continued


Procedure for Changing Indexes: (continued)
Step

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Action

Click the Move button near the bottom-right corner of the dialog box.
Results: The following window will appear, highlighting the selected
application.

Click the up or down arrow at the top-right of the box to move the
application up or down the list.

Click OK when ready.

Repeat steps 4 through 7, as required, until all applications are in the


desired order.

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Other System Point Database Options


DCA/DTA
System Points
Button

The Points button near the bottom of the DCA/DTA List dialog is used to open a
dialog box where the number of database points required by an application can be
defined.
In most cases, this step must be performed before any configuration of a DCA or
DTA application can be started

Points
Descriptors

In the System Points dialog box, the Descriptors button provides another dialog box
where the labels assigned to an applications database points can be defined.
Several tools have been added to help in the editing of the point descriptors:
Copy
Paste
Export descriptors as a text file
Import text files to the database

Advanced
Options

Click the Advanced tab to display a window similar to the one below.

Optimize
NVRAM

Many of the options in this dialog are designed to allow for the optimization of the
NVRAM of the IED.
Reducing the maximum size of the Point Descriptors will use less memory
Excluding the Point Descriptors and/or the Wiring Termination Tags from the
downloadable file completely will use even less NVRAM

Save Points on
Power Fail

Selecting one or more of the five data types to be Saved on Power Fail will direct
those points to be stored in NVRAM, where their states are protected in the event of
a power failure.

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Configuring WESMAINT II+


The configuration of the WESMAINT II+ maintenance utility can be completed at
any time during the configuration process.
Although its set up will not have any direct affect on the performance of the IED, it
does provide customization tools for its many useful features that service staff can
use while installing and maintaining the system.
Main Tables

Most of the current versions of WESMAINT II+, B014 have these five tables:
Table

Function

Welcome Message

Used to create a banner display that appears when logging


in to WESMAINT II+

User Configuration

Table is used to create user-specific security and display


characteristics

Port Configuration

Defines one or more communication interfaces, serial or


LAN, for WESMAINT II+ use

Modem Dial Strings

Used only if dialup access to WESMAINT II+ is required

Buffer Configuration Defines the size of log buffers, and the type of memory used
for each log
Variations of B014 may include these tables:

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Options Table

Used to define a control locking feature

Daylight Savings
Time table

Used to switch an IEDs local time automatically when


Daylight Savings Time is in effect. Only used when a
satellite Universal Time Code receiver is connected

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Section 3:

Configuring a Data Collection Application

Configuring a Typical DCA


Introduction

While there are many Data Collection Applications in GE Energy Services library
of applications, a typical DCA will have tables for defining:
Quantity and type of IEDs to collect data from.
Quantity and types of data to be collected from each IED.
Communications parameters required to interface IED(s)
Data collection techniques and parameters

Variations

The actual nature of the tables used to define some of the above parameters can vary
widely. For example:
some DCAs are designed to collect data from only specific models of a
manufacturer's product line.
In this case, you will simply select the correct model number of the IED,
automatically defining the correct quantity of data points.
Other DCAs, such as the DNP 3.0 DCA, IEC 104 and UCA DCAs are defined in
a more open format.
In this case, you will define each point of data separately, and the number of
points is not controlled by any specific product definition. i.e., you create
the data point lists as required.
These layered protocols may have a variety of Data Link options that are
separated from the DCA configuration tables as independent applications.
Note:

Configuration
Guides

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Chapter 8: Configuring provides configuration examples of this type of


application.

Refer to Application and Data Link Configuration Guides for details on any
configuration specifics.

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Section 4:

Configuring Data Translation


Applications

Background
Introduction

There are many Data Translation Applications available, which vary widely in
function and complexity:
One of the simpler DTAs simply combines several select status points to create a
summed or and-ed status point.
At the other end of the spectrum is LogicLinx, where you can create softlogic
algorithms using a wide variety of input and output data points, combined with
timers and logical expressions to perform automated tasks.

Configuration
Rules

Regardless of the DTA type or complexity, the same rules apply to these applications
as to the DCAs:
You must configure the System Point Database to assign the database point
space required before any configuration of a DTA can begin.

Common DTAs

Most D10/20 or D200 firmware sets include at least two DTAs:


the Communication Watchdog DTA, and
the Analog Reference DTA.
The majority of new integrations will include:
the Calculator DTA, and
the ProLogic Executor, or

LogicLinx

Because of their complexity, these last three have had training programs designed
specifically for them, and will not be discussed here.
The first two will be explored here as examples.

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Data Translation Applications: The Watchdog


The A026 Watchdog DTA is available in two different versions:
A026 is commonly used in simpler non-redundant systems.
A026-1 is only available for use with an IED using the CCU Base System.
Because all iSCS systems use CCU Base, we will only discuss the A026-1 variation
here.
Functions

Both types of Watchdog DTA are designed to monitor the on/off-line status of
peripheral modules and/or remote IEDs communicating with the device, and toggle a
pseudo status point to reflect the communication state.
The new variation, A026-1 adds several enhancements not found in its predecessor:
It identifies either individual or groups of Devices to be monitored as on or offline
Provides an "And" or "Or" function to monitor Redundant links
can be configured so either link failure will trigger an alarm, or both links
must fail to trigger an alarm
Adds 5 pre-defined pseudo status points to the System Point Database that
reflect the status of redundant CCUs and their inter-communication
Can monitor the On/Off-line state separately from the communication status.
A control module can be communicating properly, but have its local/remote
switch set to local (off-line).

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Data Translation Applications: The Analog Reference


Another commonly used Data Translation Application, the A035 Analog Reference
DTA, had been developed to allow the D2x family of products to properly emulate
one of many other types of RTUs.

Background

In many existing non-GE Energy Services Master RTU systems, their RTUs had
some form of analog reference module or component used to guarantee the accuracy
of the RTUs measured analog values. In turn, many Master Stations had the facility
to request the values of the analog references in these RTUs.
The Master could use this reference information to verify the proper operational state
of the analog-to-digital converter components of the RTU. In some cases, the
information could be used by the master to correct reported analogs, by monitoring
the drift of the references.
Unfortunately, not all RTU manufacturers agreed on the values used as references.
In order to address the wide variation of references used, the Analog Reference
DTA, A035 application was developed to allow you to create one or more sets of
pseudo analog reference points in software, rather than try to create a hardware
solution for all possible situations.

How it Works

The A035 application has been designed to monitor the state of the reference
good/bad flag bit associated with selected analog input data points.
When the application sees that all points in a defined range of points have good
flag bits, a normal reference value will be reported to the system database, and
ultimately, to the Master station.
If any flag bit in the range of points reports a bad reference, the application will
switch the reported value to a quantity far enough from the good value to signal
the Master that there is a reference error, and to stop processing the associated
analogs.

Important

Not all current Master Stations require analog reference information, and some have
the capability to turn the feature on or off.
It will be up to the programmer to define the points as required for the system they
have.
In cases where several different Master protocols are in use, several sets of reference
values may have to be created in the A035 Application

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Section 5:

Configuring Data Processing


Applications

Background of DPAs
Introduction

In order to address the wide range of Master Station Protocols used in the market;
GE Energy Services has developed over one hundred variations of Data Processing
Applications.
Virtually all DPAs are structured the same way, and are configured using the same
concepts.

Common
Structure

A typical DPA will have three primary types of configuration tables:


Map tables
Logical Remote (Terminal) Unit, or LRU tables
Communication Port tables
The DPAs that are exceptions to this structure are protocol applications that operate
in an ISO layered model. Examples of these include DNP 3.0, IEC 104 and UCA.
In these cases, the communication (Data Link) components are separated from the
DPA as independent applications.
Note:
Chapter 8: Configuring Layered Protocols of this tutorial will discuss these
types of applications in more detail.

Data Processing
Applications:
The Map Tables

As discussed in a previous section of this manual, the System Point Database is now
filled with data points created by DCAs and DTAs.
The order that the data points are seen in the database is determined by first, the
index of the DCA or DTA, and then the order that the data is collected from these
applications.
Continued on next page

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Background of DPAs, Continued


Why Maps?

If you were to simply map the System Point Database to a communication port
directly, two problems would arise:
The entire IEDs database would be sent to the Master.
Communications system performance could be impaired due to excessive
traffic.
In systems with multiple Masters, this would cause operational problems, as
well as possible security trouble. e.g., two masters operating the same
controls.
It is very likely that some of the data points in the IED are unused or spare,
and would not be used by the Master.
The sequence of the data points would be determined by the IED.
Many Master Stations are configured to accept specific quantities of points
of data in a specific order.
This sequence may be determined by protocol limitations, or it may be
simply that the Master was configured first, and the IED has to conform to
that configuration.

A Solution

The Map Table concept was created to address these concerns.


A typical DPA will have at least five map tables, one for each of the five data
types. Some DPAs will provide extra maps for specific data sub-types such as
frozen accumulators, or raise/lower control points.
The purpose of a Map Table is to provide the programmer the control he needs
to select from the System Point Database only the points, in the correct quantity,
that the Master Station requires, and to sequence the data points into the order
that they are required by the Master.

Mapping Rules

Many existing Master Station protocols were created with very specific
requirements.
As an example, some protocols specify that Digital Input points be reported in blocks
of a certain size.
Examples are:
The Conitel protocol must have multiples of twelve status points.
The Harris 6000 protocol requires 16, 32 or 63 status points be reported as a
group referred to as a port.
When DPAs have limitations such as these, the Map Tables will have to be defined
with them in mind.

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Data Processing Applications: The LRU


Introduction

Due to the scalable nature of the GE Energy Services products, and also to address
their multiple Master Station capability, the Logical RTU or LRU was created.

Why LRUs?

A majority of legacy Master Station protocols have limitations regarding the quantity
and type of data points that can be reported by a single RTU.
These limits governed the design of the RTUs that the Master Station could
communicate with.
When designing and programming a DPA for a GE Energy Services IED, these same
limitations have to be considered.
In effect, we will be creating a software image of an RTU, called a Logical Remote
(terminal) Unit, which the Master Station will see as an independent physical unit.
In situations where the size of the database in the IED exceeds the limitations of the
protocol, we can simply create several LRUs.
The Master Station will see these LRUs as separate physical RTUs on the same
communication link.

What the Master Sees:


RTU
RTU
RTU

What really exists:


HARRIS

LRU
]
]
]
]
]
]
]

LRU

]
]
]
]
]
]
]

LRU
]
]
]
]
]
]
]

]
]

Continued on next page

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Data Processing Applications: The LRU, Continued


A Bonus

Another capability was provided by the LRU concept.


In some SCADA networks, there may be a need for more than one Master Station.
This may be to allow a back-up or off site Master Station to be used when the
main Master is out of service for some reason.
It may also be required, as part of a partnership between Power Utility
Companies, and both partners would like to collect and control data from a
single IED.

Master Station #1

HARRIS

LRU
]
]
]
]
]
]
]

LRU

]
]
]
]
]
]
]

LRU
]
]
]
]
]
]
]

]
]

Master Station #2

Multiple Masters

Using multiple LRUs, you can link one or more LRUs to one communication port,
for one Master Station to interrogate, and link the same or unique LRUs to a
different communication port for the other Master to use.
By carefully controlling which data is mapped to which LRU, you can allow or
restrict each Master from seeing or controlling data owned by the other partner.

Data Processing
Applications:
Communication
Ports

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With the exception of the ISO modeled Data Processing Applications, such as DNP
3.0 and UCA, tables in a DPA are provided to allow the programmer to define the
characteristics of one or more communication interfaces linking the IED to the
Master Stations.
Refer to: The specific DPAs Configuration Guide for details.

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DPA Configuration Sequence


Introduction

When configuring a DPA, following a logical sequence will simplify the process.
The following process list outlines a typical order that the application tables should
be configured.
The Harris 6000 DPA is used as an example:

Stage

* DPA Specific
Tables

The programmer will:

Configure all Map Tables

Define the Harris Ports Table (*Harris DPA specific)

Create the LRUs

Assign addresses to LRUs with the LRU X-ref Table

Configure the Communication Ports

Many DPAs will have a protocol-specific table.


In the example above, the Harris 6000 DPA has the Harris Ports table that is used
to define a sub-addressing characteristic.
A very common table for DPAs is the LRU Cross Reference. It is used to assign the
RTU addresses to the LRUs created in the previous step.

NOTE:

In Version 1 and 2 of Config Pro, following the sequence outlined above was
imperative.
For example: it would be impossible to create an LRU before the Harris Ports were
defined.
Config Pro 4 now allows users to access tables from within other tables, making the
sequence less critical.

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Chapter 8:

Configuring Layered Protocol


Applications

Overview
Introduction

The procedures discussed in the previous chapters has been kept as general as
possible, not relating to any specific application, except as examples.
In this chapter, we will focus on the applications relating to communication between:
A DNP 3.0 Master Station and a serially connected device
Two iSCS devices using DNP 3.0 protocol

Interconnect
Techniques

The communication techniques available to us to interconnect devices fall into two


major categories:
Serial RS-232 communication, using direct connection, modems or other similar
media
Internet Protocol over Ethernet LAN
This is the architecture that GE Energy Services refers to as iSCS.
It is very likely that any real application will consist of a mix of some or all of the
above techniques.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics:


Topic

General
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See Page

Serial Communication

82

iSCS - Internet Protocols over Ethernet

84

Ethernet and IP Addressing

87

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Section 1:

Configuring Layered Protocols: Serial

Serial Communication Applications


Introduction

The configuration of the Layered protocol DCA and DPA applications differ from
other DCAs and DPAs only in that the communication-specific tables have been
separated from the applications themselves.
Protocols included in this group include:
DNP 3.0 DCA and DPA applications
IEC 68750-5-101 DCA and DPA applications
UCA 2.0 DCA and DPA applications

Layer
Substitution

Because of the layered nature of these protocols, functional layers of the protocol can
be substituted as required to address different communications requirements. The
table below shows some of the current GE Energy Services implementations of
layered protocols. For example:
The more common Serial DNP 3.0 Data Link application can be replaced by a
data link application developed specifically for the Metricom packet radio
system.
This
DCA/DPA

Config Pro
Icons

DNP 3.0

can use these serial Data Links

Config Pro
Icon

B013 - DNP 3.0 Data Link


B018 - Metricom Data Link

IEC 687505-101

B085 - IEC Balanced Data Link


B058 - IEC 870-5 Data Link

UCA 2.0

UCA
DPA/DCA

ADLC Data Link (not implemented


yet)

N/A

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Serial Communication Applications, Continued


The DNP EPA 3Layer Stack

This diagram shows the data flow from one devices DNP application to another
across a serial physical communication path.
Device #1
Data
In

Device #2

Data
Out

Data
In

Data
Out

Application Layer

Application Layer

Data Link Layer

Data Link Layer


Physical Layer

In some situations, it is desirable to use more than one communication technique


within one system.
To address this situation, the Bridgeman application was created to link the DCAs,
DPAs and various data link applications together.
Bridgeman:
Mapping Links
to Applications

In the example below, Device #2 (possibly a data concentrator) is communicating


with Device #1 using one serial data link type, and it is communicating with Device
#3 using a different data link type.
Device #1

Device #2

Device #3

Data Data
In Out

Data Data
In
Out

Data Data
In Out

Application Layer

Application Layer

Application Layer

BridgeMan

BridgeMan

BridgeMan

Data Link Layer A

Data Link Layer A

Data Link Layer B

Data Link Layer B

Physical Layer A
Physical Layer B

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Section 2:

iSCS & Layered Protocol


Communications

iSCS - Internet Protocols over Ethernet


What is an iSCS?

The term iSCS is an acronym for integrated Substation Control System.


It is used to describe a communication system, based on the Internet Protocol suite
(IP) operating over an Ethernet type LAN, that can integrate all of the
communications within a substation.
The GE Energy Services applications that have been developed to operate over an
iSCS network are shown in the table below:
This
DCA/DPA

Config Pro
Icons

can use these iSCS Data Links

DNP 3.0

B052 - DNP 3.0 Internet Data Link

IEC 687505-101/104

B086 - IEC 68750-5-104 Data Link

UCA 2.0

UCA
DPA/DCA

Config Pro
Icon

RFC 1006 Over TCP/IP Data Link

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iSCS - Internet Protocols over Ethernet, Continued


Internet Data
Link s

As an example, the iSCS system provides services for the DNP 3.0 DCA and DPA
applications to send and receive messages using the DNP 3.0 Data Link protocol
and the DNP Transport Functions, over a network. These DNP DCAs and DPAs can
use either the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), or the Transport Control Protocol
(TCP), together with the Internet Protocol (IP).
The drawing below illustrates the resulting protocol stack, with several possible data
paths shown by the arrows. The other parts of the stack show functions that will be
used in other functional implementations, such as BootP, IEC 104 and UCA, and are
for reference only.
DNP 3.0 IEC 104 UCA 2.0
OSI
Layer #

OSI
Layer

Application

Presentation

Protocols

Bootstrap
Protocol
(BOOTP)

Note:

Encapsulation

Session

Transport

Network

Data Link

Physical

IEC 60870UCA
DNP V3.0
5- 101/104
Trivial File Application Application Application
Transfer
Protocol
(TFTP)

TELNET
IEC 60870DNP V3.0
5-104
Internet Data
Data Link
Link

N/A

RFC 1006
Data Link

TCP

User Datagram Protocol (UDP)


Internet Protocol (IP)

ARP ICMP

IEEE 802.2 Logical Link Control Type 1 (LLC1)


IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD MAC
10BASE-X

For more information about LANs and the Internet Protocols, refer to the
iSCS Users Guide SWM0008.

As you can see from the diagram, DNP 3.0 Application and Data Link functions are
carried by (encapsulated in) UDP or TCP datagrams.
These datagrams are then addressed by the IP layer and passed to the Ethernet Data
Link, made up of the 802.2 LLC1 and 802.3 Media Access and Control (MAC) sublayers.
The Ethernet 10BASE-X Physical layer carries data to destination.
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iSCS - Internet Protocols over Ethernet, Continued


Choice of TCP or
UDP/IP Links

The DNP 3.0 Internet Data Link can be configured to use either TCP or UDP
transport protocols. Which one should you use?
This table may help you make the choice:
This Protocol

UDP

is better

over LANs

because it

TCP

over simple Wide


Area Networks
(WANs)

has lower overhead


means better performance when
bandwidth restricted
lower cost if paying per byte

over WANs

is required for complex and mesh


networks
more intelligent protocol can
manage connections, failures, and
reconnections without data loss
can be used with terminal servers to
convert to serial interface

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is a connectionless protocol
works well over point-to-point links
is a simpler protocol
means lower overhead
simpler to implement
supports broadcasting
can be used for freeze commands

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Ethernet and IP Addressing


Fixed Ethernet
Addresses

Any manufacturer that wishes to develop an Ethernet interface must apply to a


controlling body for a block or range of addresses.
This mechanism is designed to prevent any two IEDs on one network having the
same address, and subsequently crashing the network.
Generally, it should be assumed that because all Ethernet addresses are assigned
when manufactured, they are not user-configurable.
In reality, some products have an override feature allowing changes of address, but
this can be very dangerous to do if not controlled.

Invisible
Addresses

Any IED on a LAN must know the other IEDs Ethernet (MAC) addresses before
they can communicate.
When communicating over an Ethernet network you will probably never see any
reference to the MAC address during their daily work.
The reason for this is that network IEDs have some type of software which links the
higher layer protocol address to the MAC address transparently.

Device Properties

In GE Energy Services iSCS systems, with the exception of PowerLink, the linking
of the IP address and UDP port number to the IEDs communication channel is done
by you when programming Config Pros Device Properties.

Dual LANs

All D20, D200 and D25 IEDs may be fitted with more than one Ethernet
communication channel.
In this case, each channel will have to be assigned a unique IP address, each one on a
separate LAN.
The use of the dual channel option requires that each channel is connected to a
different Subnet, and the subnets may be connected but isolated from each other
by an IP Gateway.
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Ethernet and IP Addressing, Continued


Diagram of Dual
LAN

The following diagram shows how the networks could be connected.

iSCS Host

iSCS Host

iSCS Host

LAN Address 209.197.139.000

LAN A

Gateway
LAN Address 209.197.138.000

Device Names

LAN B

Using Config Pro 4, you must give each iSCS device a unique name when it is
created. <Device_name> can be used as an example.
In order for an iSCS Master Station, or any other host to communicate with another
iSCS host over dual Ethernet connections, there must be a way to differentiate one
channel on an IED from another.
To do this, Config Pro will automatically assign to each interface the channel names:
<Device_name>-A
and
<Device_name>-B

Host Tables

Once the properties are set for both the Project and all network IEDs, clicking the
Generate iSCS LAN Configuration option in Config Pro 4 will create the Host
table for all Project IEDs.
This Host table links the Ethernet channel names with the IP addresses for all
devices on the iSCS LAN.
Internally, each device maintains the IP address to Ethernet address association.
In this way, all devices on the iSCS LAN can send messages to each other simply by
using their channel names
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Ethernet and IP Addressing, Continued


UDP Port
Numbers

In both TCP and UDP over IP networking, a Port Number identifies the link between
the Transport Layer and protocols higher in the stack.

Well-Known
Port Numbers

Many standard IP protocols have well known port numbers assigned to them. For
example:
This IP protocol

has this port #.

The BootP bootstrap protocol, Server

UDP 67

The BootP bootstrap protocol, Client

UDP 68

TFTP Trivial File Transfer Protocol

UDP 69

TELNET protocol

TCP 23

Example:
DNP-UDP Port
Number

In order for the UDP Transport Layer to forward DNP 3.0 messages to the DNP 3.0
Data Link, UDP Datagrams must know the port number of the DNP 3.0 link.

Unique Port
Number

The DNP Users Group has been granted a Standard port number of 20000 for
both UDP and TCP.
The actual port number you choose is not important in itself, except that the
number used must not conflict with any other UDP (or TCP) application.
What is important is that all DNP 3.0 devices, including PowerLink or other
third-party devices, on a given network must be assigned the same port number
for all channels.

One Port, Two


Channels

The last step in associating the Port Number to the DNP Data Link Channel is to
assign this port number to a Service.
To provide for dual channels, two Services have been created, called:
DNP_UDPx
where the x is the UDP data link channel number, using 0 based numbering.
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Ethernet and IP Addressing, Continued


Opening
Channels

When the Bridgeman tries to open a channel, it converts the channel number into
the string:
DNP_UDPx
that is mapped to the UDP Port Number. For example:
if an IED has two Ethernet/IP interfaces, it will have the same unique DNP 3.0 port
number assigned to the two services named:
DNP_UDP0
and
DNP_UDP1

Defaults That
Work

The first applications that were developed to use iSCS required you to manually
program all Port Number and Service Names into Config Pro application tables.
More recently, these same applications will assume default values for both the port
numbers (based on the IEC recommendations) and service names.
To use these defaults, leave the Port Number and Service Name fields totally blank.

!! WARNING:

If not using default values, these two Service Names must be entered exactly as
shown, or communication will not be successful.

Remember

The example shown in these pages should not be used as a configuration example;
only for comparison.
All other protocols, like UCA and IEC104, will be set up in a similar way, each one
having their unique aspects.
Refer to: the iSCS Users Guide SWM0008, and the specific configuration guides
for details on each protocol application.

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Chapter 9: Configuring TELNET


Remote Maintenance Access
The TELNET Application, B051, provides remote access from remote TELNET
clients to local WESMAINT II+ server processes that reside on D20/200/25 iSCS
equipment.
The application also provides a menu in WESMAINT II+ that allows a local user to
establish and maintain a TELNET client connection to a remote host. This host
service will typically be a WESMAINT II+ task in another iSCS host
The objective of this section is to introduce you to the TELNET application, and the
associated configuration tables.
What is
TELNET?

TELNET is the Internet Protocols remote login terminal service.

A TCP
Application

If you refer back to the Protocol Stack diagram, on page 85 you will see that the
TELNET application uses the TCP network layer to establish its connection.

It allows you to initiate a terminal session with another TELNET host on a


network, and act as a local user to that host.

This is in contrast to the DNP 3.0 protocol, which currently can use either the TCP or
UDP network layers.
This table outlines the main differences between UDP and TCP:
UDP

No Automatic
Login

TCP

connectionless

establishes a Session

sends each message in a unique


Datagram or independent package

controls the connection until it is broken


down or logged off

Does not use sequence numbers

Uses sequence numbering

It is important to recognize that TELNET does not provide any automatic login
service.
This means that any user or process which tries to open a connection to a remote host
must provide account (user) name and password information before the connection
will be accepted.
Equally important is the maintaining of secure account information on the TELNET
host to prevent unauthorized access.
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Remote Maintenance Access, Continued


Configuring
TELNET

Simply enabling the TELNET B051 application in Config Pro 4 will turn on the
TELNET functionality of an iSCS host that has otherwise been configured for IP
networking.
Before an operator can use B051, it must have two other application tables set up to
provide access to both incoming and outgoing connections.

B051_CFG Table

The B051 configuration table allows you to specify a maximum number of incoming
(server) or outgoing (client) TELNET sessions that can be established concurrently
with the iSCS host.

The Server
Function

allows remote TELNET user(s), or client, access to the local WESMAINT II+,
is configured by enabling one or more TEL ports in the WESMAINT II+ Port
Configuration (B014_CFG) table

The Client
Function

provides a local WESMAINT II+ user a menu that allows him to establish a
TELNET session with another network host.
is configured by entering the B051 application into the WESMAINT II+ User
(B014USER) table Applications menu.

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Chapter 10: Configuring for Redundancy


Overview
Introduction

This Chapter introduces the theory and functionality of the Redundancy option
available on either the D20 or D200 products.
There are two software applications that are configured when implementing the
redundancy option. Information about these applications is also included.
Note:

In This Chapter

This option is Not available for D25s at this time.

This chapter contains the following topics:


Topic

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See Page

About Redundant IEDs

102

The Redundant Monitor/Failover Application

104

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About Redundant IEDs


Introduction

This chapter is designed to introduce the configuration of applications related to a


Redundant D20 or D200.
At this time, the redundancy option has not been provided to the D25 product.

Two Applications

There are two applications related to a redundant system:


The Redundant Monitor
The Failover DTA

The Redundant
Monitor

This application is required for a redundant system.

Failover DTA

is optional.
is only necessary if a switch over capability, initiated from a master station is
required.

The Master Station operating one or more pseudo control points owned by the
FAILOVER DTA provides the switch over function.
Identical IEDs

It is essential that both D20s be equipped with Exactly the same software and are
configured as mirror images of each other.
The following diagram represents a simple Redundant D20 system.
SERIAL COMMUNICATION INTERFACE

Redundant D20
Diagram

RS232 SWITCH
PANEL

SWITCH
CONTROL

SWITCH
CONTROL

INTER CCU LINK

HARRIS

HARRIS

D.20
Link
]
]
]
]
]
]
]

]
]]
]
]
]
]
]]
]]
]
]

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About Redundant IEDs, Continued


Defining the
Device Properties
for Redundancy

The first step in configuring a Redundant D20 or D200 is to set the Device Properties
to enable redundancy.

NOTE:

Do NOT select Redundant Device in the Properties window if the IED is not
actually installed in a redundant system.
Doing so will cause a system failure.

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Before doing so, several checks should be made:


Is the IED using CCU Base software? (this only applies to a D20)
Does it have the Redundant Monitor, B034 application in its firmware?
Is the hardware physically configured for redundancy?

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The Redundant Monitor/Failover Applications


Background

This tutorial will not discuss the hardware configuration issues, except to mention
that before configuring, the programmer has to decide what type of Inter CCU Link
will be used.

Configuring the
Redundant
Monitor

Configuring the Redundant Monitor B034 application is a simple matter of


defining the timers and retry count for the selected Inter CCU Link.
The link can be either:
a D.20 link, running HDLC protocol at 250 Kbps, or
an RS-232 serial link at 9600 bps.
The D.20 link is the preferred choice, due to its higher bandwidth.
The serial option can be used if both of the D.20 links are in use already.

Configuring the
Failover DTA

The programmer configuring the Failover DTA A118 application will have to
decide how the master will initiate a switch over command:
Will the master initiate a single control operation

Or
Can the master choose from one of several control points, any of which may
initiate switch over. (the OR option)

Or
Must the master initiate multiple control operations, all of which must operate
simultaneously. (the AND option)

All of the control points owned by the DTA must be assigned to the System Point
Database before configuration of the Failover DTA can start.

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Appendix A:

Converting Configurations

Overview
Introduction

This Appendix provides the background information and an exercise where a


configuration file can be updated so that it can be edited by Config Pro V 4.1

In this chapter

This Appendix contains the following topics:


Topic

See Page

Section 1: About Converting Projects


Background

A-2

The Conversion Utility

A-3

Exercise 12: Project Conversion


Exercises

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Section 1:

About Converting Projects

Background
Why is
Conversion
Necessary?

Many customers are in the process of evolving their SCADA systems from
predominantly serial communications systems to the evolving substation LAN type.

Config Pro 3

These changes started with the release of Config Pro 3.

In order to provide the capabilities needed to configure the Ethernet and Internet
Protocol components of an iSCS project, many changes had to be made to Config
Pro.

Version 3:
provided the basic capability to configure the Ethernet interfaces, and the DNP
3.0 over UDP/IP communication parameters.
was the first version to support the configuration of the D25 Plant I/O subsystem.
was only released to customers that either had LAN-based iSCS systems, or
D25s.
Config Pro 4

With the introduction of Version 4, the decision was made to cease support for 16 bit
Windows 3.X.
Together with new capabilities to configure:
BootP
TELNET connections
PPP links
Virtual connection over LANs
TFTP file downloads
Configuration Release
LogicLinx Configuration file embedding
Note:

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Config Pro 4 now supercedes Version 3.

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The Conversion Utility


Introduction

A utility was created to minimize the difficulty migrating from Version 2 or 3 up to


Version 4.
Virtually any configuration created on any previous version of Config Pro can be
upgraded to Version 4.

!! CAUTION:

Backwards
Compatibility

Great effort was expended to ensure that any configurations created in earlier
versions of Config Pro could be converted to Version 4 without any compatibility
concerns.

Once a conversion from Version 2 or 3 to 4 has been performed, it is not


possible to reverse the procedure.
Conversion does not destroy the original configuration files, but a Version 4
configuration cannot be viewed or edited using previous Config Pro versions.

The primary motivation for this is to encourage all customers to upgrade all of their
users to the latest product, rather than try to maintain a variety of different versions.

General
Full Release

SWM0017-4.10-3

A-3

Exercise 12: Project Conversion


Exercises
Before Starting

Before Config Pro 4 can convert a project or device configuration from a previous
version of Config Pro, all application definition files for the original configuration
must be available to the program.
Refer to Exercise 4: for the steps to load application definition files

Procedure:

Follow this procedure to convert a configuration created in Config Pro 2 or 3


Step

Action

Click on Tools from the menu bar

Click Conversion Utility from the drop-down list. The following dialog
box will appear

Select the version of Config Pro that the original configuration was
created in.

Select Project or Device, based on whether you want to convert all IEDs
in a project, or just one IED.

Verify that the path to the application definition files is correct.

Click Next when ready.


Select project

In the Project Directory field, select the directory where the original
project is located
Continued on next page

General
Full Release

SWM0017-4.10-3

A-4

Config Pro 4.1x


Tutorial & Exercises

GE Energy Services

Exercises, Continued
Procedure: (continued)
Step

Action

Select the specific project from the Project List

Click Next when ready.

NOTE:

If you have selected the Convert Project option, jump to step 12.
Select device

10

Select the device from the Device List

Continued on next page

General
Full Release

SWM0017-4.10-3

A-5

Config Pro 4.1x


Tutorial & Exercises

GE Energy Services

Exercises, Continued
Procedure: (continued)
Step

Action
Destination Project

11

Select the destination project directory.

If a suitable directory does not exist, type in a new directory name into
the Data Directory field.
12

In the same way, select or enter a device name.

13

Click Convert, when ready

14

After the conversion is complete, a dialog box similar to this one will
pop-up.

If conversion was performed with no errors, as shown at the top of the


display, click Finish.

SWM0017-4.10-3

A-6

General
Full Release