Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 33

•  Four square leagues of land 
•  The plaza had a council house, church, and jail.  The life of the community revolved 
around these central squares 
•  Each se>ler had a house lot, livestock, an allowance for clothing and supplies and 
common pasture.  All surplus went to the presidios and he always had to be ready 
for military service. 
•  Alcalde was the mayor, regidores were councilmen, and the governing body was 
the ayuntamiento.  High crimes were brought before the governor in Monterey.  
The alcalde was like the father of the town. 
•  San Jose was originally a few mud huts on the Guadalupe river.  Los Angeles was 
founded on September 4, 1781 by 11 couples and 22 children. 


•  Neve set up the civic pueblos.  He was a military commander and governor.  The 
Yuma massacre occurred during his governorship. 
•  Fages was an indian fighter and explorer who led expediQons to San Francisco.  
Frequent conflicts between he and the missionaries. 
•  Borica proposed to link the missions in a chain to reduce the number of guards 
needed.  He made it possible for one to travel over a distance of 500 miles and stay 
at a mission each night. 
•  Arrillaga served a second term as governor and had a good relaQonship with the 
missionaries.  During his Qme in office the viceroy lost interest in the missions and 
they and the presidios and civil building fell into a deplorable state. 
•  Sola was of Spanish birth and looked upon the colonials as incompetent.  He was 
angered by the smuggling that occurred between Californians and foreigners.  
Many American ships came to harbor in California.  Spain’s empire was soon about 
to crumble. 


•  Perouse led a French scienQfic expediQon that landed in Monterey bay that lasted 
for 10 days.  They le\ in 1825 but shipwrecked.  Perouse sent his journals ahead to 
France. 
•  Malaspina was an Italian from Spain.  He gave an account of his expediQon and 
brought the first American body ashore. 
•  Vancouver, an Englishman, received orders to invesQgate the Spanish holdings in 
California and seize any unclaimed land in 1792.  He arrived in the bay of San 
Francisco and visited a few of the missions.  He came back a second Qme to a cool 
recepQon because Arrillaga did not like foreign encroachments. 
•  The O>er was the first US vessel to visit Spanish California.  On board were 11 
convicts who were secretly dropped off on Carmel beach and reluctantly put to 
work by governor Borica. 
•  The fur trade brought many visitors to CA.  The Spanish tried to resist the Yankee 
ships interested in trade, they did not have the resources to enforce their policies.  
New England wares or East Asian goods were traded for o>er furs, which were sold 
in America or China.  The trade could very profitable but it was also dangerous if 
the ships were caught.  The forbidding Alaskan landscape brought the Russians 
farther south into California.  In 1805, Nikolai Rezanov was sent to scout out 
California and fell in love with a Spanish woman.  He sailed back to Russia but died 
along the way.  Ivan Kuskov was also sent from Russia to scout out a locaQon for 
trade.  He chose a site north of Bodega bay which took on the name Fort Ross.  
Arrillaga was took weak to do anything about the fort. 
•  No one at this Qme had really ventured into the interior of CA. 


•  Fages had allowed land grants of up to three square leauges (a square league is 
4,438 acres).  During the Spanish period no more than 30 of these were handed 
out.  By the Mexican period the number increased to more than fi\y.  The size also 
increased to up to 11 square leagues, or nearly 50,000 acres.  Any Mexican of good 
character or a foreigner who willed to become a Mexican ciQzen and adopt the 
Catholic faith could receive a land grant. 
•  The rancho era occurred a\er the missions were secularized.  Rancho boundaries 
were very ill defined.  Family fortunes depended on these ranchos.  Francisco 
Pacheco owned property totaling over 125,000 acres with 14,000 ca>le, 500 
horses, and 15,000 sheep.  Americans like Abel Stearns (thousands of acres) and 
John Su>er (over 60 miles in length) had huge property holdings. 
•  Ca>le hides were the cornerstone of the California economy.  They were the 
“California bank note.”  Some ranches employed 100 naQve employees.  Many 
horses or ca>le ran wild.  The rodeo was the round‐up of the livestock for branding 
and a judge would se>le disputes over individual animals.  Hides were sold, meat 
was dried, and tallow was used for candles. 


•  Governors were appointed by Mexico, but control from Mexico was weak because 
they lacked soldiers to enforce laws. 


•  Real authority began to move into the hands of the Californios, a small band of 
ranch owning families.  Most of them had been born in CA and many families were 
intermarried and thus armed conflicts among Californios were always very risky.  
They desired to take over the wealth of the missions and their supply of Indian 
labor. The desire for power led to conflicts between those in the north and the 
south.  Leaders such as Juan Alvarado, Mariano Vallejo, and Jose Castro were 
against Jose Carrillo, Pio Pico, and Juan Bandini.  Governors had a hard Qme deals 
with these secQonal conflicts. 


•  Since California was separated from Mexico it encouraged secQonalism.  
Nevertheless, the last Spanish governor Sola replaced the Spanish flag at Monterey 
with the Mexican one. 
•  This process was called secularizaQon, or the transformaQon of the missions into 
ordinary parish churches.  The process also included the “emancipaQon” of the 
Indians by the friars.  This brought about the rise of the ranchos. 
•  Californios prospered greatly from secularizaQon by taking over mission lands and 
assets.  The rancho owners were like lords over their land.  Many of the Indians 
became menial laborers on the ranchos. 


•  Conflict between those who “wore spurs,” the Spanish, and those who had been 
born in the Spanish American colonies. 
•  Estanislao was the leader of a pan‐Indian rebellion in 1829 in the San Joaquin 
Valley.  They were not afraid of the soldiers who they considered as just boys.  
They fought many ba>les with  Mexican forces and blocked Mexican se>lement of 
the San Joaquin Valley. 


10 
•  A\er 1808 the number of ships bringing supplies decreased significantly.  They 
were blocked by revoluQonary a>acks against Spain and privateers roaming the 
seas.  The Californians had complaints against the viceroy in Mexico City but never 
thought of rebelling. 
•  These two ships were led by a Frenchman de Bouchard and an Englishman Peter 
Corney.  The men were a motley crew made up of cu>hroats from Europe, 
Southeast Asia, and Australia.  Their goal was to profit from the disintegraQon of 
the Spanish empire.  The Santa Rosa a>acked the presidio of Monterey and was 
surprised to meet resistance from governor Sola.  But the pirates landed on the 
shore and the Californians were forced to retreat.  The invaders sacked the presidio 
and town.  A\er spending a week pillaging and repairing their ships, and failing to 
convince any Californians to join their libertarian cause, they set sail down  the 
coast, a>acking other ciQes.  This was California’s only contact with 
revoluQonaries.  California remained calm unQl AgusQn Iturbide made New Spain 
independent and renamed it Mexico. 
•  The iniQal news of Californian independence reached CA with disbelief.  Sola was 
sent as the California representaQve to the Mexican congress.  But before he could 
leave a boat arrived from Mexico City carrying the new Mexican appointed 
governor.  The state received independence from Spain without any shedding of 
blood.  Arguello came from norther CA and was chosen over a man from southern 
CA.  Missions came under Qghter scruQny and their power was ending.  Foreigners 
were welcomed.  Some of the traders became local residents.  A generaQon of 
foreigners established close relaQons with the Californios before any people came 
over the great plains.  Some indian rebellions under his governorship when they 
learned how to use guns. 
11 
•  He was an American fur trapper who had come west from St. Louis to Utah and 
into CA.  He was the first white man to reach CA overland from the eastern US.  In 
1826 they reached mission San Gabriel.  He le\ his men behind and he went to San 
Diego to ask permission to trap in CA.  Echeandia was suspicious and put Smith in 
prison unQl he could receive word from Mexico.  Smith wrote a le>er to the US 
minister in Mexico city and released on the condiQon that he never return to  CA.  
Smith and his men moved north, trapping along the way, unQl they reached the 
Salt Lake area.  He was the first white party to cross over the sierra.  But in 1827 he 
returned to CA and many of his men were killed in an a>ack by Indians.  He 
eventually reached Mission San Jose.  This Qme the padre at the mission put him 
under arrest and again he had to meet with the governor.  And again he was 
released, promising never to return. 

12 
•  Expelled from governor a\er only three months in office.  He is an example of the 
fact that Mexican governors were not really welcome in CA.  Local no longer called 
themselves Mexicanos but Californios. 
•  He was named the next governor.  He o\en fought with Castro, his millitary 
commander from Monterey. 

13 
•  During the Qme of poliQcal turmoil more Americans arrived overland to CA.  James 
Pake set out on a trapping trip with his family.  Indians stole their pack animals.  
The went west to Santa Fe to trap along the Gila and Colorado rivers.  They went to 
San Diego and met Echeandia who threw them in jail.  The younger Pake 
convinced the governor that he had a vaccine to small pox. 
•  A Mormon who arrived by the sea instead of overland. 
•  They started from Illinois and they followed the advice of a decepQve guidebook.  
In 1846 the party plunged into unknown wilderness and got lost in the mountains.  
It took them a month instead of a week to reach  Great Salt lake.  It became 
apparent their supplies would run out before reading CA.  They sent two men 
ahead to try to reach Su>er’s fort.  A fight broke out among the group caused 
them to banish one of their most needed members.  Winter started while they 
were in the Sierras.  One member of the group made it to Su>er’s Forts.  Winter 
storms came a month early.  They had to wait four months unQl spring.  The snow 
got up to twenty‐two feet. Out of the original 79 people only 49 survived.  They 
became local heroes and symbols of hardy western pioneers. 

14 
15 
16 
17 
•  Le\ in 1845 on his third exploring expediQon and reached Su>er’s fort.  He built a 
log foriQficaQon and raised the american flag.  Fremont’s acQon embarassed those 
who hoped that CA would pass over to the US quietly.  RetreaQng to Oregon, 
Fremont and his men were met by Gillespie, a US marine corps officer in disguise.  
He had secret messages from Washington officials that war with Mexico was 
imminent.  Fremont kidnapped General Vallejo and took him to Su>er’s fort and 
capture Sonoma.  They created a flag with a grizzly bear on it and pronounced CA 
as a republic.  The movement ended when the American flag was raised in 
Monterey in 1846. 

18 
•  Sloat landed 250 marines and seamen at Monterey and the American flag was 
flying at Su>er’s fort, Bodega Bay, and at Sonoma.  Stockton relaced Sloat and 
organized Fremont’s forces into a ba>alion.  Stockton’s forces entered Los Angeles 
in 1846 and he le\ Gillespie in charge with 50 men.  The people of LA rebelled 
against his curfew and he had to send for reinforcements from Stockton.  Gillespie 
had to retreat and Stockton was beaten off by an “Old Woman’s Gun.”  At San 
Diego, Stockton planned how to retake LA 
•  Kearny was proceeding overland from Kansas to set up a government in CA.  He 
received a report that the flag was already being flown and did not know of the 
new rebellion.  Kearny met with 150 Californios near present day Escondido, led by 
Andres Pico.  He had to be rescued by reinforcements from Stockton.  This was 
known as the ba>le of San Pascual.  Kearny joined his forces with Stockton’s to 
retake LA.  Gillespis reflew the American flag by Andres Pico, brother of the last 
Mexican governor Pio Pico, surrendered to Fremont.  Fremont granted pardon to 
the Californios in what became known as the Cahuenga CapitulaQon.  A fight broke 
out between Kearny and Stockton as to who was really in charge.  Kearny prepared 
court marshall charges against Fremont.  The Treaty of Guadalupe Hildalgo ended 
the Mexican War in 1848.  

19 
20 
•  He conducted government affairs from San Diego rather than Monterey.  This 
helped fuel the rivalry between the two halves of the state.  He faced problems 
with unpaid soldiers and their families.  A local revolt was led against him at 
Monterey.  He regime was hurt by Mexico’s sending over convicts and Chief 
Estanislao’s rebellion.  In 1831  Echeandia began secularizing some of the missions. 
One problem was that the missions were sQll supplying the presidios.  Cash 
revenues from duQes levied on the trade of hides and tallows, chiefly produced at 
the missions, was sQll large porQon of the governments budget. 

21 
•  Californians became upset by Mexican neglect and mediocre governors.  A 
previous Mexican regime had appointed Jose Maria Padres as governor.  He 
strongly disliked the missions.  But before he could take power, the government in 
Mexico changed.  Colonel Manuel Victoria was sent as governor and he disliked the 
Californios.  He used the death penalty and he said Monterey would be safe for 
anyone to leave their valuables out in the open.  He was o\en stern and unfair and 
opposiQon to him increased.  50 rebels took control of the presidio at San Diego 
and marched on LA. Victoria marched south to put down the rebellion.  Victoria 
was surprised by some of his own soldiers taking part in the rebellion and a 
daredevil, Avila, who rushed with a lance and shot one of his assistants.  Victoria  
was forced out of office.  The governorship switched hands between Echeandia, 
Zamorano, and Pio Pico. 

22 
•  This ended with the appointment of Figueroa.  He was an amiable and thoughnul 
person.  He granted amnesty to everyone who had parQcipated in the rebellion.  
Figeuroa oversaw the secularizaQon of the missions due to a proclamaQon from 
the Mexican government.  He ordered that half of the mission lands and ca>le go 
to the neophytes.  Figueroa died in 1835 as one of California’s best Mexican 
governors. 

23 
•  The civil and military rule fell to Nicolas GuQerrez.  Californios wanted to be 
independent of Mexico and saw how weak it was a\er the foreign visitaQons.  In 
1836 Alvarado decided to seize the governorship.  He was allied with Jose Castro 
and Isaac Graham, the la>er had been promised land and other favors.  Graham 
headed up a band of 50 riflemen and Alvarod and Castro had 100 men.  They took 
control of Monterey without bloodshed.  Alvarado was named governor.  He 
appointed Mariano Vallejo, his uncle, as the military commander of the Californias.  
But then fights arose between southerners from San Diego who wanted some 
things moved south.  Alvarado tried to send an olive branch by allowing them to 
have a subgovernor with local authority.  Mexico was busy at this Qme with the 
Texas war for independence.  Alvarado appointed Hartnell to oversee the 
disbanding of the missions.  Hartnell faced opposiQon from local authoriQes and 
became disillusioned with the anarchic state of affairs in CA.  Alvarado sQll faced 
dissidents from the south, many of whom he arrested in 1840. 

24 
•  Next governor from Mexico.  He arrived with 300 ex‐convicts and bullies in San 
Diego.  He had to deal with the tense issue of Thomas Ap Catesby Jones.  Jones 
mistakenly thought that war had been declared with Mexico.  He landed in 
Monterey with his marines and raised the American flag.  In 1844 Micheltorena 
faced another revolt from Alvarado and Castro.  Foreign se>lers like Abel Stearns, 
Isaac Graham, and Johann Su>er sided against the Mexican governor.  The two 
forces met at the Cahuenga Pass, outside Los Angeles, and had a two day arQllery 
duel.  Micheltorena was deported from CA and it was now under local control. 

25 
26 
27 
28 
•  He obtained from Alvarado a 50,00 acre tract near the juncQon of the Sacramento 
and American rivers.  He created an outpost named New HelveQa.  He was a 
trapper, trader, stock raise, and feudal ruler.  He was the only foreigner to se>le 
inland. 

29 
30 
31 
32 
33