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IS looo5: 1994

-I!50 looo: 1992

Indian Sta~ndard
SI UNITS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
FOR THE
USE OF THEIR MULTIPLES AND OF CERTAIN
OTHER UNITS
(Second Revision)

UDC

006.057.5

Q BIS 1994

BU-REAU
MANAK

November 1994

BHAVAN,

OF

IN~DIAN
9

BAHADUR

NEW

DELHI

STA~NDARDS
SHAH

ZAFAR

MARG

110002

Price

Group

Basic Standards

NATIONAL

Sectional

Committee,

MSD 1

FOREWORD

This Indian Standard (Second Revision) which is identical with IS0 1000 : 1992 SI units and
recommendations
for the use of their multiples and of certain other units, issued by the International
Organization
for Standardization
(ISO), was adopted by the Bureau of Indian Standards on the
recommendation
of the Basic Standards Sectional Committee
(MSD 1) and approval of the
Management and Systems Division Council.
The text of the IS0 Standard has been approved as suitable for publication as Indian Standard without
deviations.
Certain conventions
are, however, not identical to those used in Indian Standards.
Attention is particularly drawn to the-following:
a)

Comma ( , ) has been used as a decimal marker while in Indian Standards


is to use full point ( ) as the decimal marker.

b)

Wherever the words International


read as Indian Standard.

This standard

was first published

In this second

revision,

a)

the current practice

Standard appear referring to this standard,

they should be

in 1980 and then revised in 1985.

the following

changes

have been made:

Quantities and units from IS 1890 (Parts 9, 10, 12, and 13)/ISO 31 (Parts 9, 10, 12 and 13)
have been added to Annex A (Normative) giving examples of decimal multiples and submultiples of SI units and of some other units which may be used. A cross reference to the item
numbers of relevant standard has been made.

b)

The old definition

c)

The decision by International


Committee for Weights and Measures
concerning the status of supplementary
units has been incorporated.

of metre in Annex B has been replaced

by new definition.
(CIPM)

in 1980

In the adopted standard, normative references appear to certain International Standards for which
Indian Standards also exist. The corresponding
Indian Standards which are to be substituted in their
place are listed below along with their degree of equivalence for the editions indicated:

In terna tional
Standard

Corresponding
Indian Standard

Degree of
Equivalence

IEC 27-l

: 1971

IS 3722 (Part 1) : 1983 Letter symbols


and signs used in electric technology :
Part 1 General guidance on symbols
and subscripts (first revision)

Technically
equivalent

IS0 31-l

: 1992

IS 1890 (Part 1) : 1994 Quantities and


units: Part 1 Space and time (first
revision)

Identical

IS0 31-2 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 2) : 1994 Quantitiesand


units: Part 2 Periodic and related
phenomena (second revision)

Identical

IS0 31-3 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 3) : 1994 Quantities and


units: Part 3 Mechanics
(second
revision)

Identical

IS0 31-4 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 4) : 1982) Quantities,


units and symbols: Part 4 Heat (first
revision)

Technically
equivalent

IS0 31-5 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 5) : 1994 Quantities and


units: Part 5 Electricity and magnetism
(first revision)

Identical

I) Under Revision

(Continued

on third cover)

IS 10005: 1994
IS0 1000:1992

Indian Standard
SI UNITS

AND RECOMMENDATI.ONS FOR~THE


USE OF THEIR IViJLTlPLES AND OF CERTAIN
OTHER UNITS
(Second Revision)

IEC and IS0 maintain


International Standards.

Scope

This International

of currently

valid

Standard
Letter symbols to be used in elec- Part 1: General

IEC 27-l :1971,2)

a) describes the International


clauses 3, 4 and 6);

System

trical technology

of Units) (in

b) recommends selected decimal multiples and submultiples of St units for general use and gives
certain other units which may be used with the
International System of Units (in clauses 5 and 7,
and annex A);
quotes the definitions
nex B).

Normative

registers

SI units

The name International


System of Units (Systeme
International dunites), with the international abbreviation SI, was adopted by the 11 th General Conference
on Weights and Measures (Conference G&kale
des
Poids et Mesures, CGPM) in 1960.

of the SI base units (in an-

This system includes:

reference

The following
standard contains provisions which,
through reference in this text, constitute provisions
of this International Standard. At the time of publication, the edition indicated was valid. All standards are
subject to revision, and parties to agreements based
on this International Standard are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the most recent
edition of the standard indicated below. Members of

base units

derived units including

which together

3.1

supplementary

form the coherent

units

system of SI units.

Base wits

The International
System of Units
seven base units listed in table 1.

is based on the

1) Full InformatIon about the lnrernational System of Units IS given in a publication by the InternatIonal Bureau of Weights ana
Measures (Bureau lnternationai des Poids et Mesures, BIPM): Le Sysr&ne lnremarional dlJnir6s (SO, irkluding an authorized
English transiation.
2) 5th edition. currently

being revised.

IS looo5: 1994
IS0 MOO : 1992

Table 1 -

SI

tively instead of the number 1 in many practical cases;


for example the SI unit for angutar velocity can be
written as radian per second (rad/s).

base units
SI base unit

Base quantity

Name

length

metre

mass

kilogram

kg

time

second

ampere

thermodynamic
temperature

kelvin

amount of substance

mole

mol

luminous

candela

cd

electric

current

intensity

For the definitions

of the base units, see annex

~3.2 Derived units including


units

It may sometimes be useful to express derived units


in terms of other derived units having special names;
for example, the SI unit for electric dipole moment is
usually expressed as C - m instead of A. s - m.

Symbol

SI units

The symbol of a prefix is considered to be combined


with the kernel symbol to which it is directly attached, forming with it a new symbol (for a decimal
multiple or sub-multiple)
which can be raised to a
positive or negative power, and which can be combined with other unit symbols to form symbols for
compound units.

6.

supplementary

EXAMPLES
=

(JO-* m)3

10b6m3

ps-

(lo-6s)-

106s-

1 mm*/s

(10m3 m)*/s

lo-

For some of the SI derived units, special names and


symbols exist; those approved by the CGPM are listed
in tables 2 and 3.

m*/s

Compound prefixes shall not be used; for example,


write nm for nanometre, not mFm.

The SI units radian and steradian are called supplementary units. They are dimensionless
derived
units (more precisely, derived units of dimension one)
with special names and symbols. Although the coherent unit for plane angle and for solid angle is expressed by the number 1, it is convenient to use the
special names radian (rad) and steradian (sr) respec-

For historical reasons the name of the base unit


NOTE 1
for mass, the kilogram, contains the name of the SI prefix
kilo. Names of the decimal multiples and sub-multiples
Df the unit of mass are formed by adding the prefixes to the
word
Mg).

3) In this case, the term kernel


note 1 in clause

of

The prefixes given in table4 are used to form names


and symbols of multiples (decimal multiples and submultiples) of the SI units.

Derived units are expressed algebraically in terms of


base units. Their symbols are obtained by means of
the mathematical signs of multiplication
and division;
for example, the SI unit for velocity is metre per second (m/s).

however,

Multiples

symbol means only a symbol


4 about the base unit the kilogram.

gram,

e.g. milligram

for a base unit or a derived

(mg) instead of microkilogram

unit with a special name. See,

IS 10005 : 1994
IS0 1000: 1992

Table 2 -

SI derived units with special names, including SI supplementary units

SI derived unit
Derived quantity
Spatial name

Symbol

Expressed in terms of SI base units


and St derived units

plane angle

radian

rad

1 rad = 1 m/m = 1

solid angle

steradian

sr

1 sr=l

frequency

hertz

Hz

1 Hz = 1 s-l

force

newton

1 N = 1 kg - m/s2

pressure,
stress

Pascal

Pa

1 Pa = 1 N/m2

energy.
work,
quantity

joule

1 J=l

power,
radiant flux

watt

1 W = 1 J/s

electric charge,
quantity of electricity

coulomb

1 C=l

A-s

eiectric potential,
potential difference,
tension,
electromotive
force

volt

1 V=l

W/A

capacitance

farad

1 F=l

C/V

electric resistance

ohm

1 Q = 1 V/A

electric conductance

siemens

1 s = 1 a-

magnetic

flux

weber

Wb

1 Wb=l

magnetic

flux density

tesla

1 T=l

inductance

henry

1 H = 1 Wb/A

Celsius temperature

degree Celsiusl)

1 CF~

luminous

lumen

Im

1 Im = 1 cd asr

lux

IX

1 lx = 1 lm/m2

m2/m2=1

N-m

of heat

illuminance

flux

V.s
Wb/m2

1) Degree Celsius is a special name for the unit kelvin for use in stating values of Celsius temperature.
also note6 concerning the kelvin in annex B.)

(See

IS 19905 : 1994
IS0 1000: 1992

Table 3 -

SI derived units with special names admitted


I

for reasons of safeguarding

human health

SI derived unit
.Derived quantity
Special name

Symbol

Expressed in tarms of SI base units


and SI derived units

becquerel

Bq

1 Bq = 1 s-

absorbed dose,
specific energy imparted,
kerma,
absorbed dose index

gray

GY

1 Gy = 1 J/kg

dose equivalent,
dose equivalent index

sievert

sv

1 Sv = 1 J/kg

activity

(of a radionuclide)

Table

4 -

5.2
The multiple can usually be chosen so that the
numerical values will be between 0,l and 1 000. In
the case of a compound unit containing a unit to the
second or third power, this is not always possible.

Sl prefixes
PWfiX

Factor
Name

Symbol

yotta
zetta
exa
peta

Y
2
E
P

lOI2
log
lo6
lo3

tera

T
G
M
k

lo2
10
10-l
lo-*

hecto
deca
deci
centi.

1o-3
1o-6
Or:*
10

milli
micro
nano
pica

lo-l5
1o-l8
lo-*
1o-24

femto
atto
zepto
yocto

1018
1o15

giga
mega
kilo

EXAMPLES
I,2 x lo4 N

can be written

as

12 kN

0,003 94 m

can be written

as

3,94 mm

1 401 Pa

can be written

as

1,401 kPa

3,l x 10-8s

can be written

as

31 ns

However, in a table of values of the same quantity or


in a discussion of such values within a given context,
it will generally be better to use the same multiple for
all items, even if some of the numerical values will
then be outside the range 0,l to 1 000. For certain
quantities in particular applications, the same multiple
is customarily
used; for example, the millimetre
is
used for dimensions in most mechanical engineering
drawings.

h
da
d
C

m
CI
n
P

5.3
The number ~of prefixes used in formrng compound units should be limited as far as is compatible
with practical usage.

f
a
2
Y

5.4
Errors in calculations can be avoided more easrly
if all quantities are expressed in SI units, powers of
10 being used instead of prefixes.

Use of SI units and their multiples

Rules for writing

unit symbols

6.1
Unit symbols shall be printed in roman (upright)
type (irrespective of the type used in the rest of the
text), shall remain unaltered in the plural, shail be
written without a final full stop (period) except for
normal punctuation, e.g. at the end of a sentence, and
shall be placed after the complete numerical value in

5.1 The choice of the appropriate

multiple (decimal
multiple or sub-multiple) of an SI unit is governed by
convenience, the multiple chosen for a particular- application being the one which will lead to numerical
values within a practical range.
4

IS 10005 : 1994
IS0 1uw: 1992

the expression
for a quantity,
leaving a space
tween the numerical value and the unit symbol,

be-

7 Non-S1 units which may be used with


SI units and their multiples

Unit symbols shall in general be written in lower case


letters except that the first letter is written in upper
case when the name .of the unit is derived from a
proper name.

7.1
There are certain units, outside the SI, recognized by the CIPM as having to be retained because
of their practical importance (see tables 5 and 6).

EXAMPLES

7.2

Prefixes given in table4 may be attached to


some of the units given in tables 5 and 6; for example,
millilitre, ml. (See also annex A, column 6.)

metre

second

ampere

Wb

weber

7.3
In a limited number of cases, compound units
are formed with the units given in tables 5 and 6 together with SI units and their multiples; for example,
kg/h; km/h. (See also annex A, columns 5 and 6.)
NOTE 4
There are some other units outside the SI which
are recognized by the CIPM for temporary use. They are
given in column 7 of the table in annex A and marked by
an asterisk (*).

6.2
When a compound unit is formed by multiplication of two or more units, this should be indicated
in one of the following ways:

Table 5 -

Units

used with

the SI

Unit
Quantity

N-m,
NOT5

Nm

Name
:ime

2 In systems with limited character sets a dot on the line


is used instead of a half-high dot.

Symbol

Definition

minute

min

1 min = 60 s

hour

1 h = 60 min

day

1 d=24h

degree

I0 = (x/l 80) rad

minute

I = (l/60)

second

1 = (l/60)

3 The latter form may also be written without a space,


provided that special care is taken when the symbol for one
of the units is the same as the symbol for a prefix, e.g. mN
is used only for millinewton,
not for metre newton.

olane angle

When a compound unit is formed by dividing one unit


by another, this should be indicated in one of the following ways:

volume

litre

I, L)

1 I=1

mass

tonnes)

1 t=103kg

m
S

m/s,

1) The two symbols for the litre are on


footing. The CIPM will, however, make
on the development of the use of the two
in order to see if one of the two may
pressed.

m - s-l.

A solidus (/) shall not be followed by a multiplication


sign or a division
sign on the same line unless
parentheses are inserted to avoid any ambiguity.
In
complicated cases negative powers or parentheses
shall be used.

2) Also called the metric


guage.

dm3

an equal
a survey
symbols
be sup-

ton in the English lan-

IS 10005: 1994
IS0 1000 : 1992

Table 6 -

Units used with the SI, whose values in SI units are obtained

experimentally

Unit
Quantity
Symbol

Name
energy

electronvolt

mass

unified atomic
mass unit

eV

Definition
The electronvolt is the kinetic energy
acquired by an electron in passing
through a potential difference of 1 volt
in vacuum:
1 eV 2: 1,602 177 x lo-J.
The unified atomic mass unit is equal
to l/12 of the mass of an atom of the
nuclide *C:
1 u z 1,660 540 x lo-* kg.

IS 10005: 1994
IS0

1000

: 1992

Annex A
(normative)
Examples of -decimal multiples and sub-multiples of SI units and of some
other units which may be used
For a number of commonly used quantities, examples of decimal multiples and sub-multiples of SI units, as well
as of some other units which may be used, are given in this annex. It is suggested that the selection shown, while
not intended to be restrictive, will none the less prove helpful in presenting values of quantities in an identical

manner in similar contexts within the various sectors of technology. For some needs (for example, in applications
in science and education), it is recognized that greater freedom will be required in the choice of decimal multiples
and sub-multiples of SI units than is exemplified in the list which follows.

Item No.
In IS0 31:
1992

Quantity

SI unit

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

Units outsido the SI recognized


by the ClPM as having to be
retained, and for spocisl cases
some of their combina-tlons with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units -given in
column 5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

Part 1: Space and time

1-l

angle,
b rad
(radian)
(plane angle)

mrad

gon [gon (;r grade)],


1 gon=--rad
200
If the radian is not used, the cnits

(degree)

degree or gon (or grade) may be

1 -cad
180

used. Decimal subdivisions of


degrea are preferable to minute
and second for most applications.
For the units degree, minute and
second for plane angle, there
shall be no space between the
numerical value and the unit
symbol.

,
(minute)
lL-&
I,
(secon:~
1 e60

prad
1-2

solid angle
Eteradian)

l-3.1

length

1 nautical mile*
(exactly)

km

= 1 852 m

Retre)
cm
mm
pm
nm

* Recognized by the CIPM for


temporary use.

IS loo05 : 1994
IS0 1000: 1992

ltom No.
in IS0 31:
1992

Quantity

SI unit

Selection
of
multiples
end eubmultlples
ofthrSI
unit

Units outside the SI recognized


by the CIPM es having to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multlples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

1
I-4

area

volume

km2

ha* (hectare), 1 ha = lo4 m2

dm2
cm2
mm2

a* (are), 1 a = lo2 m2

m2

t-5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

Recognized by the CIPM for


temporary use.
l

m3

In 1964, the CGPM declared that

dm3

hi

the name litre (I) may be used as

1 hl = IO- m3

a special name for the cubic


decimetre (dm3) and advised

I, L
(litre)
1 I=
10V3m3=
1 dm3

against the use of the name litre


for high-precision measurements.
cl
1 cl E 10T5 m3
ml
1 ml = 10m6 m3 =
1 cm3

cm3

See also footnote

1) to table 5.

mm3

l-7

time

Other units such as week, month


and year (a) are in common use.
The definitions of month and year
often need to be specified.

d
(day)
1 d=24h
(exactly)
h
(hour)
1 h = 60 min
(exactly)
ks
min
(minute)
1 min = 60 s
(exactly)
Gecond)
ms
c1s
ns

l-8

angular
velocity

rad/s

I-10

velocity

m/s
km/h
1 km/h =

1 knot* = 1,852 km/h (exactly) =


0,514 444 m/s
For the hour, see item No. 1-7.

&

Recognized by the CIPM for


temporary use.

mm/h
l-11.1

accteleration

m/s
l

m/s2

IS 10905:
IS0

Item No.
in IS0 31:
1992

Quantity

Units outside the SI recognized


by the CIPM as having to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

Part 2: Periodic
2-3.1

SI unit

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

1000:

1994
1992

Remarks and information about


units used-in special fields

and related phenomena


THz
GHz
MHz
kHz

frequency

HZ
(hertz)
2-3.2

2-4

-1

rotational
frequency

angular
frequency

rad/s

The designations revolutions


per minute (r/min) and revolutions per second (r/s) are
widely used for rotational frequency in specifications on rotating machinery. (See also IEC
27-l .)
For the minute, see item l-7.

min-

Part 3: Mechanics
3-1

mass

Mg

t
(tonne)
1 t=103kg

See footnote

2) to table 5.

kg
(kilogram)
g
mg
Pg
3-2

3-5

volumic
mass,
density,
mass density
lineic mass,
linear density

3-7

moment
inertia

3-8

momentum

38.1

force

of

Mg/m3 or
kg/dm3
or g/cm3

t/m3 or kg/l

kg/m3

g/ml

For the litre, see item No. l-6.


For the tonne, see item No. 3-1.

g/f
1 tex = IO-

kg/m
mglm

kg/m = 1 g/km

The unit tex is used for textile


filaments.

kg-m
kg - m/s
MN
kN
N
(newton)
mN
PN

IS iow5
: 1994
Is0
1000: 1992

Item No.
in IS0 31:
1992

-1

Quantity

SI unit

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

3-l 1

moment of
momentum,
angular
momentum

3-12.1

moment
force

Units outside the Si recognized


by the CIPM as heving to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
unlts given in
column 5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

kg - m*/s

MN.m
kN . m

of
N.m

mN-m
PN Bm
3-15.1

bar* (bar), 1 bar = 100 kPa


(exactly)

GPa
MPa
kPa
hPa

pressure

1 mbar = 1 hPa

Pa
(Pascal)

The use of the bar shall be restricted to existing uses in the


field of fluid pressure.

mPa
PPa

l
Recognized by the CIPM for
temporary use.

3-15.2

GPa
MPa
kPa

normal stress

Pa
3-23

3-24

viscosity,
(dynamic
viscosity)

Pa . s

kinematic
viscosity

m2/s

P (poise)
1 cP= 1 mPa.s

mPa.s

The poise and stokes are special


names for CGS units. They and
their multiples and sub-multiples
shall not be used together with
SI units.
St (stokes)
1 cSt = 1 mm*/s

mm*/s

See remark on item 3-23.


3-25

3-26.1
and
3-26.2

surface
tension

N/m
mN/m
EJ
PJ
TJ
GJ
MJ
kJ

energy.
work

J
(joule)
mJ

lb

IS looo!5:1994
IS0

hction
ltom No.
n IS0 21:
1992

1
l-27

Si unit

Quantity

of
multiples
and submultiples
OfthoSl
unit

Units outsidothe SI recognized


by the CIPMas havingto be
rotalnod,and for specialcases
someof theircombinations
with
SI units
Unit8

Multiploaor
rub-multiplesof
units *on in
column6

1990 : 1992

Romrrksand informationabout
units uwd in specirlfields

GW
MW
kW

power

W
(watt)
mW
PW
art 4~ Heat
l-1

thermodynamic
temperature

K
(kelvin)

I-2

Celsius
temperature

C
(degree
Celsius)
I

I
l-3.1

66

The Celsius temperature-r is


equal to the difference (T - TO)
between two thermodynamic
temperatures T and To, where
To =-273.15 K (exactly).
For the definition and the use of
the degree Celsius (C), see
note6 under the definition of the
kelvin in annex B.

linear
expansion
coefficient

K-l

heat

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

EJ
PJ
TJ
GJ
MJ
kJ
J
mJ

67

kW

heat flow rate


W

4-9

thermal
conductivity

W/(m 8Kl

618.1

coefficient
of heat
transfer

W/(m2 - K)

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

4-11

thermal
insulance

m2. K/W

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

Cl6

heat capacity

J/K

For the degree Celsius, see item

4-2.

kJ/K

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

11

IS 10005 : 1994
IS0 1000: 1992

item No.
n IS0 31:
1992

Ouantity

1
I-16.1

massic heat
capacity

I-16

entropy

619

massic
entropy

1-21.2

massic
thermodynamic
energy

art 5: Electricity
i-l

Si unit

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the Si
unit

J/M - K)

Units outside the Si recognized


by the CiPM as having to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
St units

Units

Muitipies or
rub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

kJ/(kg- K)

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

kJ/K

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

kJ/(kg
. K)

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

J/K
J/M - K)

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

J/kg

and magnetism

electric
current

kA
A
(ampere)
mA
PA
nA
PA

5-2

electric
charge,
quantity of
electricity

A-h
1 A-h3,6 kC
kC
C
(coulomb)
ClC
nC
PC

5-3 k

6-4

volumic
charge,
volume
density of
charge,
charge
density

C/mm3 or
GC/m3
MC/m3 or
C/cm3
kc/m3
C/m3
mC/m3
PC/m3

areic charge,
surface
density of
charge

MC/m or
C/mm
C/cm2
kc/m2
C/m2
mC/m2
PC/m

12

For the hour, see item No. l-7.

IS 10005:1994
IS0 1000:1992

item No.
in IS0 31:
1992

5-5

SI unit

Quantity

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

electric field
strength

Units outside the SI recognized


by the CIPM as having to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

MV/m
kV/m or
V/mm
V/cm
V/m
mV/m
Hm

5-6.1

electric
potential

5-6.2

potential
difference,
tension

5-6.3

electromotive
force

5-7

electric flux
density

MV
kV

V
(volt)
mV
IJJ

C/cm*
kc/m*
C/m*
mC/m*
G/m*

5-8

electric flux

MC
kC
C
mC

5-9

capacitance

F
(farad)
mF
PF
nF
PF

5-10.1

permittivity

F/m
pF/m
nF/m
pF/m

5-13

electric
polarization

C/cm*
kc/m*
C/m2
mC/m*
G/m*

5-14

electric dipole
moment

Remerks and information ebout


units-used in special fields

C-m
.

IS 10005:1994
IS0

1000:1992

Item No.
in IS0 31:
1992

1
5-15

5-16

Selection
of
multiples
SI unit

Quentity

andsubmultiples
ofthesl
unit

areic electric
current,
electric
current
density
lineic electric
current,
linear electric
current
density

5-17

magnetic
field
strength

5-18.1

magnetic
potential
difference

Units outsidr the SI recognized


by the CIPM as heving to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

MA/m2 or
A/mm2
A/cm2
kA/m2
A/m2
kA/m or
A/mm
A/cm
A/m

kA/m or
A/mm
A/cm
A/m

5-19

5-20

kA
A
mA

magnetic flux
density,
magnetic
induction

T
(tesla)

magnetic flux

Wb
(weber)

mT
PT
nT

mWb
5-21

magnetic
vector
potential

kWb/m
gblmm
Wb/m

522.1

selfinductance

5-22.2

mutual
inductance

5-24

permeability

H
(henn/)
mH
VH
nH
PH
H/m
PHjm
nH/m

5-27

magnetic
moment,
electromagnetic
moment

A-m

14

Remarks and~lnformetion about


units used in special fields

IS 10005: 1994
IS0 1000 : 1992

Item No.
n IS0 31:
1992

1
i-20

SI unit

Quantity

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

Units outside the SI recognized


by the ClPM as having to be
retainad, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
unlts given in
column 5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

kA/m or
A/mm

magnetization
A/m

i-29

magnetic
polarization

IEC
magnetic
!7-1:1971, dipole
tern 88)
moment
i-33

T
mT
N - m*/A
&b-m
GCI
MCI
kn

resistance (to
direct
current)
Ehm)

mTL
w
i-34

conductance
(of direct
current)

kS
S
(siemens)
mS
PS

j-38

Gf2.m
Mn.m
kf2.m

resistivity

n-mm*
ii-_.(=
is also used.

a-m
R-cm
ma-m
paam
Warn
5-37

MS/m
kS/m

conductivity
S/m

5-38

reluctance

H--l

5-39

permeance

5-44.1

impedance,
(complex
impedance)

MQ
kn
SL
mn

5-44.2

modulus of
impedance,
(impedance)

544.3

resistance

5-44.4

reactance

15

lo-n.m

=pn.rr

IS 10005:1994
IS0 -1000:1992

Item No.
n IS0 31:
1992

1
-45.1

SI unit

Quantity

2
admittance,
(complex
admittance)

i-45.2

modulus of
admittance,
(admittance)

i-45.3

conductance

i-45.4

susceptance

i-49

active power

Selaction
of
multiples
and submultiplas
of-the SI
unit
4

Units outside the SI recognized


by the CIPM as having to ba
ratainrd, and for spatial cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

kS
S
mS
ClS

TW
GW
MW
kW

In electric power technology, active power is expressed in watts


(W), apparent power in volt amPeres (V - A) and reactive power
in vars (var).

W
mW
CIW
nW
i-52

TW.h
GW-h

active energy

For the hour, see item l-7.

TJ
MW-h
GJ
kW.h
MJ
W-h
1 W.h=
3,6 kJ
(exactly)
kJ
J
#art 6: Light and related electromagnetic
i-3

wavelength

radiations
A* (angstrom), I A
IO- nm = 10e4 pm

m
pm
nm

radiant
energy

6-10

radiant
power,
radiant
energy flux

radiant
intensity

W/sr

6-13

m =

l
Recognized by the CIPM for
temporary use.

pm
6-7

= IO-~

16

IS 10005:1994
IS0 1000:1992

item No.
n IS0 31:
1992

Quantity

Si unit

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

b14

radiance

W/(sr - m*)

i-15

radiant
exitance

W/m*

i-16

irradiance

W/m*

i-29

luminous
intensity

cd
(candela)

i-30

luminous

S-31

quantity
light

6-32

luminance

cd/m*

6-33

luminous
exitance

lm/m*

6-34

illuminance

flux

lx
(lux)

6-35

light
exposure

lx * s

636.1

luminous
efficacy

lm/W

Part7: Acoustics
s
ms
Ps
7-2

frequency

MHz
kHz
HZ

7-5

wavelength

m
mm

7-6

volumic
mass,
mass density,
density

Im - h
1 Im-h=
3 600 Im . s
(exactly)

of

period,
periodic time

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

Im
(lumen)

Im - s

7-l

Units outside the Si recognized


by the CiPM es heving to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinatfons with
SI units

kg/m3

For the hour, see item 1-7.

IS 10005 : 1994
IS0 1000 : 1992

Hem No.
n IS0 31:
1992

1
-9.1

Quantity

SI unit

-3

2
static
pressure

Selection
of
multiples
end rubmultiples
of the SI
unit

Units outside the Slrecognizrd


by the CIPM as having to~be
retained, end for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

Remarks and Information about


units used In special fields

Pa
mPa
PPa

r-9.2

(instantaneous)
sound
pressure

r-11

(i;;;;Tneous)

m/s
mm/s

particle
velocity
r-13

(instantaneous)
volume flow
rate

m3/.s

r-14.1

velocity of
sound

mls

1-16

sound power

kW
W
mW
FW
PW

r-17

sound
intensity

W/m*
mW/m*
pW/m*
pW/m*

7-18

acoustic
impedance

Pa ms/m3
.

mechanical
impedance

N - s/m

surface
_
density of
mechanical
impedance

Pa - s/m

dB.(decibel),

1 dB = 10-l B

IS 10005 : 1994
IS0

item No.
in IS0 31:
1992

SI unit

Quantity

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

Units outside the SI recognized


by the CIPM as having to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

1000 : 1992

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

B
dB

7-28

sound
reduction
index

7-29

equivalent
absorption
area of a
surface or
object

m2

7-30

reverberation
time

Pati 8: Physical chemistry and molecular physics

8-7

molar
thermodynamic
energy

kJ/mol
J/mol

8-8

molar heat
capacity

J/(mol - K)

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

8-9

molar entropy

J/(mol - K)

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

813

concentration
of 8,
amount-ofsubstance
concentration
of B

8-18

8-39

mol/dm3
or
kmol/m3

mol/l

For the litre, see item l-8.

mol/m3

molality of
solute B

mol/kg

diffusion
coefficient

m*/s

mmol/kg

19

IS 10005 : 1994
IS0

1000 : 1992

tern No.
1 IS0 31:
1992

1
-41

SI unit

Quantity

Units outside the SI recognized


by the CPM as having to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations with
SI units

thermal
diffusion
coefficient

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

Unlts

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
units given in
column 5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

m2/s

art 9: Atomic and nuclear physics


I-28.2

mass defect

kg
tnified
atomic
mass unit),
1 uz
1,660 540 x
IO- kg

1-33

activity

Ci+ (curie),
1 Ci = 3.7 x IO Bq (exactly)

MBq
kBq
Bq

b-34

j-37

massic
activity,
specific
activity

l
Recognized by the CIPM for
temporary use.

MBq/kg
kBq/kg
Bqlkg

d
h

half-life

a (year)
For the hour and the day, see
item 1-7.

ms
art 10: Nuclear reactions and ionizing radiations
so-1

reaction
energy

J
GeV
WleV
keV
eV
(electronvolt),
1 eVk:
1,602 177 x
lo-J

10-51.2

absorbed
dose

rad* (rad),
1 rad = lo-

GY
mGy

Gy

* Recognized by the CIPM for


temporary use.
lo-52

dose
equivalent

sv

rem* (rem),
1 rem = lo-

mSv

Sv

l
Recognized by the CIPM for
temporary use.

20

IS 10009: 1994
IS0 1000 : 1992,

ltem No.
in IS0 31:

SI unit

Quantity

1992

IO-58

exposure

Selection
of
multiples
and submultiples
of the SI
unit

Units outside the SI recognized


by the CIPM as having to be
retained, and for special cases
some of their combinations wlth
SI unlta

Units

Multiples or
sub-multiples of
unlts.given In
column 5

Remarks and information about


units used in special fields

7
R (rontgen),
1 R = 2,58 x 10p4 C/kg (exactly)

C/kg
mC/kg

* Recognized by the CIPM for


temporary use.
Part 12: Characteristic
12-1

12-8

numbers

Reynolds
number

Mach number

As prefixes cannot be used,


powers of 10 may be used, e.g.
Re= 1,32 x lo3

Part 13: Solid state physics


13-17

density of
states

For the electronvolt,


item 1O-l.

eVi/m3
J-/m3

see

13-20

Hall
coefficient

m3iC

13-21

thermoelectromotive
force

Thomson
coefficient

V/K

gap energy

13-24

13-28.2

mV

For the degree Celsius, see item


4-2.

mV/K

For the electronvolt,


item 1O-l.

fJ
aJ

see

eV
13-38.1

Curie
temperature

For the degree Celsius; see item


4-2.
I

21

IS lwo!5: 1994
IS0 1000.: 1992

Annex B
(informative)
Definitions of the base units of the international system of units
metre: The metre is the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of l/299 792 458
of a second.
[17th CGPM (1983), Resolution I]
kilogram: The kilogram is the unit of mass; it is equal to the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram.
[3rd CGPM (1901)]

second: The second is the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods-of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom.
[13th CGPM (1967), Resolution l]
ampere: The ampere is that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite
length, of negligible circular cross-section, and placed 1 metre apart in vacuum, would produce between these
conductors a force equal to 2 x Leo_newton per metre of length.
[CIPM (1946), Resolution 2 approved by the 9th CGPM (1948)]

kelvin: The kelvin, unit of thermodynamic temperature, is the fraction l/273,16 of the thermodynamic temperature
of the triple point of water.
[13th CGPM (1967), Resolution 4)
NOTES
5 The 13th CGPM(1967, Resolution 3) also decided that the unit kelvin and its symbol K should be used to express an interval
or a difference of temperature.
6 In addition to the thermodynamic temperature (symbol T), expressed in kelvins, use is also made of Celsius temperature
(symbol r) defined by the equation t-T-To,
where TO= 273,15 K by definition. To express Celsius temperature, the unit
degree Celsius, which is equal to the unit kelvin, is used; in this case, degree Celsius is a special name used in place
of kelvin. An interval or difference of Celsius temperature can, however, be expressed in kelvins as well wasin degrees
Celsius.

mole: The mole is the amount of substance of a system which contains as many elementary entities as there are
atoms in 0,012 kilograms of carbon-l 2. When the mole is used, the elementary entities must be specified -and
may be atoms, molecules, ions, electrons, other particles, or specified groups of such particles.
[14th CGPM (1971), Resolution 33

candela: The candela is the luminous intensity, in a given direction, of a source that emits monochromatic radiation
of frequency 540 x 1012 hertz and that has a radiant intensity in that direction of l/683 watt per steradian.
[16th CGPM (1979), Resolution 31

22

(Continued

from second cover)


corresponding
Indian Standard

Degree of
Equivalence

IS0 31-6 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 6) : 1983) Quantities,


units and symbols: Part 6 Light and
related electromagnetic radiations

Technically
equivalent

IS0 31-7 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 7) : 1994 Quantities and


units: Part 7 Acoustics (first revision)

Identical

IS0 31-8 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 8) : 1994 Quantities and


units: Part 8 Physical chemistry and
molecular (first revision)

Identical

IS0 31-9 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 9) : 1994 Quantities and


units: Part 9 Atomicand nuclear physics
(first revision)

Identical

IS0 31-10:

1992

IS 1890 (Part 10) : 1994 Quantities and


units: Part 10 Nuclear reactions and
ionizing radiation (first revision)

Identical

IS0 31-11 : 1992

ISl890(Pattll):
1994Quantitiesand
units: Part 11 Mathematical signs and
symbols for use in the physical science
and technology (second revision)

Identical

IS0 31-12 : 1992

IS1890(Part12):1994Quantitiesand
units: Part 12 Characteristic number
(first revision)

Identical

IS0 31-13 : 1992

IS 1890 (Part 13) : 1983l) Quantities,


units and symbols: Part 13 Solid state
physics

Technically
equivalent

IS0 2955 : 1983

IS 11366 : 1985 Representation of SI


and other units in systems
with
limited characteristics for information
processing

Identical

In term tional
Standard

) Under Revision.

Bureau of Indian Standards

BIS is a statutory institution established under the Bureau ofhfiun


Stumfurds Act, 1986 to promote
harmonious development of the activities of standardization, marking and quality certification of goods
and attending to connected matters in the country.
Copyright

BIS has~the copyright of all its publications. No part of these publications may be reproduced in any form
without the prior permission in writing of BIS. This does not preclude the free use, in the course of
implementing the standard, of necessary details, such as symbols and sizes, type or grade designations.
Enquiries relating to copyright be addressed to the Director (Publications), BIS.
Review of Indian Standards

Amendments are issued to standards as the need arises on the basis of comments. Standards are also
reviewed periodically; a standard along with amendments is reaffirmed when such review indicates that
no changes are needed; if the review indicates that changes are needed, it is taken up for revision. Users
of Indian Standards should ascertain that they are in possession of the latest amendments or edition by
referring to the latest issue of BIS Handbook and Standards Monthly Additions.
This Indian Standard has been developed from Dot No. MSD 1(89)

Amendments

Amend No.

Issued Since Publication

Text Affected

Date of Issue

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