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Criminal Law Unit #3:

Researching and Compiling Data

Harshil Shah

The Correlation between Educated People and Homicides in Canada


The Hypothesis that I have made regarding Educated People and the Homicide
rates in the provinces and territories of Canada is that the more Educated
People there are per capita, there will be a direct correlation that indicated less
crimes are being committed.
The reason why I believe that educated people are not going commit Homicides
is because theyre aware of the consequences, and will have a more mature
mindset about violent acts. Secondly since Educated people with degrees,
usually have jobs, given the countrys national employment rate at 84% will
most likely be in a huge financial insecurity that they will have to commit a
murder to get money, or even be in scenario of having to rob a bank/store just
to support themselves. Thirdly people with university degrees will not be major
time drug addicts which will cause them to commit crazy acts of murder,
because the effect that some drugs have on the human mind. Educated people
will not be doing this because, the ones with jobs the manager or boss would
find this unacceptable at a workplace, and theyve understood the severity of
drugs like heroin and what they do to the human Brian. Therefore since
Educated people would not be likely to participate in homicidal activities, in
correlation this will lower the crime rate.
Key factors, in that are calculated in when making the correlation, is first the use
of the term which defines Educated People in my scenario. Educated People
that will be represented in my scenario are People in Canada that have at least a
University Degree which I believe makes them an Educated Person. And
Homicides Rate is the percent rate of Homicides being calculated in per capita,
so bigger Provinces dont automatically jump to the top of the table. The
definition of Homicide in the correlation is any (1st,2nd degree Murder,
manslaughter, and Infanticide). The data Collected for this Correlation occurs in
the Year 2011. The territories are not included my data because there is not
enough data on them.
The national Average which I calculated for my rates are a nation average of
0.36% of people with university degrees or higher education (such as
doctorates, masters, Ph.D.). And an average of 1.71 murders per capita. Based
on the result of the data I think I conclude to determine that there is no such
correlation, between Homicide rate and the Education rate Which proves my
correlation wrong, In fact the results of the data are incomparable to each other
as the homicide rate barley shows up in the graphs, giving it not only a weak
correlation but no correlation.

Criminal Law Unit #3:

Researching and Compiling Data

Harshil Shah

This is partly due to the number of homicides being so low in Canada, compared
to a country with a homicide rate, higher than us, like USA, or a place where the
homicide rate is ridiculously high. Also if Canada had a higher population, even
with the same slope of the Homicide rate, there would be a larger possibility for
some correlation to appear, but in this graph there wasnt any hint of
correlation. Another factor that was affecting the result was the high number of
highly educated individuals in Canada, a Total of roughly 36% of the Canadian
population.