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S GIO DC V O TO

AN GIANG
-----------------------

CHNH THC

IM
(BNG S)

K THI CHN HC SINH GII CP TNH LP 12


Nm hc: 2012 2013
Kho ngy: 20/10/2012
MN: TING ANH
Thi gian lm bi: 180 pht (Khng k thi gian pht )
(Th sinh lm bi trn thi; thi c 09 trang)

IM
(BNG CH)

CH K
GK 1

CH K
GK 2

S PHCH
(Do CTH chm ghi)

PART ONE: LISTENING


A. There are seven questions in this part. Listen carefully. You will hear each rocording twice. For
each question, circle the correct answer (A, B or C) (1.4m)
1. What does the boy want from the shop?
A. a newspaper
B. a football DVD

C. a bike

2. Which programme is on first this evening?


A. Elephants in Danger
B. The final parts of Stars

C. Kerri Ramsey in concert

3. What present will the girl give Luisa?


A. a t-shirt
B. a necklace

C. flowers

4. Which instrument does the boy play now?


A. piano
B. guitar

C. violin

5. What will the weather be like for sports day tomorrow?


A. rainy
B. sunny

C. windy

6. Who is the boy phoning?


A. a hairdresser

C. an ophthalmologist

B. a doctor

7. What food will the boys mother buy?


A. ice cream
B. chocolate

C. pizza

B. You will hear part of an interview with a girl called Sally Myers whose first book has recently
been published. For each question, circle the correct answer (A, B or C) (1.8m)
8. Why did Sally decide to write her first book?
A. People said her stories were good.
B. Her family bought her a diary.
C. Her penfriend suggested it.
9. Why didnt Sallys Dad want her to send her book to a publisher?
A. He didnt like it very much.
B. He had given her help to write it.
C. He was worried that they wouldnt be interested.
10. Sally sent her book to a company which
A. published books only on the internet.
B. published her favourite stories.
C. published books of a similar type.

11. How did Sally feel when the company phoned her Mum?
A. very excited
B. extremely surprised

C. anxious about the future

12. Sally says that, as a result of her book,


A. she now has more money.
B. she has lost some of her friends.
C. she is in contact with new people.
13. What does Sally say about her next book?
A. It will be quite different from her first one.
B. It will be written for older readers.
C. It will be about something all children experience.
PART TWO: PHONETICS + GRAMMAR
A. Circle the word (A, B, C, or D) whose underlined part is pronounced differently from that of the
others in the group (0.4m)
1. A. idiot
2. A. moment
3. A. would
4. A. the

B. idol
B. opponent
B. shoulder
B. thus

C. icon
C. component
C. should
C. thumb

D. item
D. monitor
D. could
D. mother

B. Circle the word (A, B, C, or D) whose main stress is different from that of the others in the
group (0.4m)
1. A. nature
2. A. company
3. A. competence
4. A. considerate

B. culture
B. employment
B. computer
B. equivalent

C. measure
C. atmosphere
C. commuter
C. agriculture

D. mature
D. miracle
D. compliance
D. redundancy

C. Put the verbs in brackets into the correct tense or form (1m)
a. This candidate (1. look) very promissing. Just think about his experience. He (2. live)
in Hong Kong, Australia and the USA and (3. work) for a number of multinational companies. I (4. think) we definitely (5. interview) him.
b. How many times Stephen (6. telephone) ? I (7. not know) , but I wish he
(8. stop) . Its such a bore when he keeps on phoning.
c. Visitors to the castle (9. show) around by an experienced guide. They (10. not allow)
to wander around on their own.
Your answers:
1.
3.
5.
7.
9.

2.
4.
6.
8.
10. ..

D. Fill in each blank with ONE appropriate preposition or particle (1m)


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

All the animals in the forest fled the fire.


My car is guaranteed rush for eight years.
He is certainly good maths, if not much else.
That house has been up sale for two years.
Come to the party, all means.
He came a collection of valuable old coins in the attic.
How do you deal a class when they are constantly unruly?
Their house was cut from the village by the flooding river.
I dont know if shell ever get her husbands death.

10. The athlete has decided to give amateur competition and become a professional.
E. Read the text below. Use the word given in capitals at the end of each line to form a word that
fits in the space in the same line. There is an example at the beginning (1m)
WHAT MAKES A CLOSE FRIEND
For all of us, close (0) personal friends are important. Good
friends are above all (1) people who you can trust to
keep a secret. If you have a problem to solve, or a (2)
to make, they will listen and give you (3) advice.
Their (4) is such, that they do not expect anything
in return, but they know with (5) that you would do
the same for them. Close friends are (6) ever to let
you down or make you feel (7) when you tell them
about your problems. On the contrary they are a real source
of (8) when you feel weak and in need of support.
They will tell you (9) what they think, and help you
find your way out. As a result, your (10) will grow
even stronger.

PERSON
RELY
CONFESS
HELP
GENEROUS
CERTAIN
LIKE
RIDICULE
STRONG
SINCERE
FRIEND

Your answers:
1.
3.
5.
7.
9.

2.
4.
6.
8.
10. ..

F. Circle the one underlined word or phrase that must be changed in order for the sentence to be
correct (1m)
1. It is you that I have seen in the garden at seven.
A
B
C
D
2. My father wants that I go to college when I finish school.
A
B
C
D
3. It was rude to refuse to help mother. You should help her.
A
B
C
D
4. All her children have graduated from a university, that is a reason for her to be proud.
A
B
C
D
5. My brother was watching TV during I was doing my homework.
A
B
C
D
6. What you are saying suggests that you are unwilling to agree with me, does it?
A
B
C
D
7. I really wouldnt like that friend of yours to treat me as something that belongs to him.
A
B
C
D
8. Could you tell me how your new friend look like?
A
B
C
D
9. I got her take an umbrella in case it rained.
A B
C D
10. Having had a good rest, the cowboy set out to cover other 20 miles.
A
B
C
D
PART THREE: READING COMPREHENSION
A. Read and then circle the option (A, B, C, or D) that best fits each space (1m)

BELIEVE THE EYES


How do you know when someone is lying? Scientists studying the human face with sensitive
cameras may have discovered the answer, almost by accident. When someone in the laboratory
dropped a book, (1) a loud noise, the camera they were using to study someones face showed an
unexpected (2) . The sudden fear had caused the (3)of the persons face around the eyes to
change. This led the researchers to come up with the idea that if a super-sensitive camera could spot
fear, it would be quite (4) of showing when people were telling a lie.
The researchers then (5) up an experiment to test out their theory. Some volunteers were
told a secret which they were forbidden to (6) with another set of volunteers, who were told to
find out what it was. The results were (7), with the camera correctly identifying which of the
volunteers was lying.
Some people believe that these tests could lead to the development of a camera which would
(8) airport security staff who, at the moment, have to rely on their own judgement when asking
passengers about the contents of their luggage. However, although the camera could be more (9)
than traditional ways of discovering whether people are lying, most scientists believe that more (10)
tests are needed before it goes into widespread use.
1.
making
2.
reply
3.
variety
4.
skillful
5.
6.
inform
7.
wondering
8.
attract
9.
accurate
10.
proving

A. getting
B. having
D. doing
A. reaction
B. relation
D. remark
A. example
B. description
D. appearance
A. talented
B. clever
D. capable
A. held
B. put
D. gave
A. argue
B. spill
D. share
A. famous
B. amazed
D. impressive
A. assist
B. appeal
D. accept
A. right
B. correct
D. honest
A. convincing
B. persuading
D. agreeing

C.
C.
C.
C.
C. set
C.
C.
C.
C.
C.

B. Fill in each blank with ONE appropriate word (2ms)


IQ TESTS
Psychologists have long been interested in how we judge intelligence in strangers. Now
scientists have designed tests (1) try to discover which cues help people to judge IQ accurately,
and which cause them to get (2) wrong. High school pupils were videotaped answering thoughtprovoking questions and the videos were then shown to groups of judges who were asked to assess the
students physical type and monitor a variety of behavioural cues. Next the judges were asked to rate
the students intelligence. At the (3) time, each student was also required to sit a standard IQ test.
Certain cues matched the (4) of the IQ tests more closely than others. While speaking
quickly, using a lot of words or displaying ease (5) understanding caused the judges to rate the
students intelligence highly, and was reflected in the IQ tests, (6) cues seemed to give the judges
an entirely false impression of intelligence (7) measured by the IQ test. (8) the cues that led
judges to assess students as dull were factors (9) as using halting speech or slang. Cues that led

judges to view students as bright included talking loudly and using proper English. (10) of these
traits correlated with measured IQ, however.
Your answers:
1.
3.
5.
7.
9.

2.
4.
6.
8.
10. ..

C. Read the following article. For question 1-8, circle the answer (A, B, C or D) which you think
fits best according to the text (2.4ms)
TWO LANGUAGES GOOD,
THREE LANGUAGES EVEN BETTER
Nine-year-old Naomi Gray is like many British children in that when she gets home from
school, she loves to lose herself in a Harry Porter book. What makes her different is that she will
have chatted to her school friends in French on the bus home, and spent her day with them
learning her lessons in Breton.
Naomi is the daughter of Jane and Dug Gray, a translator and stone-mason who live in
Finistere, the heart of Celtic Brittany in north-west France. They have opted not to bring up their three
children bilingually in French and English, but trilingually, by enrolling them in Brittanys educational
system, Diwan, whereby all lessons, bar English and French, are taught in Breton. Around 3,000
children in Brittany are educated via this immersion method that has played an important role in the
revival of the Breton language.
Jane admits that the decision was controversial: Other British parents said: How dare you do
that? Dont your children have enough to take on?. But she had seen how quickly the girls absorbed
French: I felt sure they could take in another language. The girls father, Dug, admits to being
envious of their abilities. After 16 years in France, Im comfortable with the language, but the kids
still pick me upon my pronunciation and grammar mistakes, he says.
It was once thought that forcing a child to learn more than one language could slow academic
development but according to Professor Colin Baker, a world expert on bilingualism, the efect is
opposite. The evidence is that bi- and trilingualism actually increases mental capacity and that
multilingual children tend to do better at school. The latest research shows that in intelligence tests,
children with two or more well developed languages have higher scores, he says. Bilingual children
have two or more words for objects and ideas, so the link between words and concepts are looser,
allowing more fluent, flexible and creative thinking. He adds that children learning languages young
also tend to have more confidence and better general communication skills.
Professor Tony Cline is an educational psychologist specialising in language development in
children. He says, We used to think the brain had a limited capacity, like a milk bottle, and that it was
impossible to pour two pints of milk into a pint bottle. Now we understand that our brains are capable
of making an infinite number of connections; there is no limit to what we can take in. He concedes
that there might be minor disadvantages in having a bi- or trilingual childhood: The child sometimes
applies the rules of one language to another, and so makes mistakes but these grammatical errors
are soon outgrown, as long as the child is exposed to good models of language.
It seems that by giving your child the option of becoming multilingual, you are offering them
far more than just the acquisition of a foreign language. That certainly seems to be the case for the
Gray girls. All three are getting top grades at school and are literate in three languages, Naomi has also
successfully taken on German, where she is proof that bilingualism increases language-learning
aptitude. Says Prof Cline: Multilingual children pick up other languages quickly because they have a
more flexible approach and are used to handling different forms of syntax, grammar and vocabulary.

Jane thinks her daughters have gained more than just language; they have also gained
culturally. In fact, the girls are all enthusiastic about Breton culture: Naomi does extracurricular Breton
step dancing and loves singing in Breton and attending dance evenings known as fest-noz while Nina
takes part in Breton sport of Gouren, a form of Celtic wrestling. Says Prof Baker: Multilingual
children gain the benefits of multiple sets of literatures, traditions, ideas, ways of thinking and
behaving.
And, he stresses, if parents have the opportunity to give their child the gift of another language,
they should jump at it. Because in todays global market-place, on top of all the above, multilinguals
are far more employable than monolinguals. I find it a great shame that languages dont have a higher
place in the classroom in the UK because English is a mainstream language of business but, in the
future, that is going to change.
1. What does the writer say about the school that Naomi attends?
A. All of the lessons are taught in Breton.
B. English and French are not taught.
C. It is helping Breton to regain its popularity.
D. The pupils are all fluent in three languages.
2. Some people criticised the Grays for
A. not encouraging their children to learn French.
B. helping to promote a minority language.
C. not sending their children to a British school.
D. expecting too much of their children.
3. Dug Gray says that his children
A. sometimes correct him in his use of French.
B. are not as fluent in French as they would like to be.
C. need to improve their French pronunciation.
D. would like to learn another language.
4. Professor Baker says that, compared to other children, multilingual children
A. work harder at school.
B. tend to do better in examinations.
C. have a less rigid way of thinking.
D. are generally more talkative.
5. Professor Cline uses the example of the milk bottle to illustrate
A. our knowledge that the brain has limitations.
B. how much language can be stored in the brain.
C. the link between brain size and intelligence.
D. a previous way of thinking about the brain.
6. What does Professor Cline say about mistakes made by multilingual children?
A. They are only apparent in childhood.
B. They are only a temporary issue, given the right conditions.
C. They usually only occur in one of the childs languages.
D. They can increase in number as the child grows older.
7. Naomis experience is presented as evidence that multilingual children
A. enjoy taking part in group activities.
B. are better equipped to learn foreign languages.
C. take advantage of opportunities they are offered.
D. integrate easily into any new cultural environment.
8. What does it refer to in the first sentence of the last paragraph?
A. the opportunity
B. their child
C. the gift
D. another language

D. You are going to read an article giving advice to teenagers about part-time jobs. Choose the most
suitable heading from the list A-I for each part (1-7) of the article. There is one extra heading
which you do not need to use. There is an example at the beginning (2.1ms)
PART-TIME JOBS FOR TEENAGERS
A. Carry out some research
B. Better off working together?
C. They could do with you
D. Think positively
E. Who to contact
0.

F. Not always straightforward


G. Working for free
H. Pick a service to provide
I. Income and other benefits

As a teenager, you are likely to have both a fair amount of spare time and a desire to earn some
money. By working to earn money yourself, you can learn a lot about the value of things as well as the
world of business. Typical and obvious jobs for teenagers include working at a fastfood restaurant,
working as a shop assistant or stacking shelves at a supermarket.
1.
What you get out of a job like this depends on your attitude. If your attitude is I hate this job
then obviously you wont benefit much from it; if, on the other hand, you look at it as an opportunity
to learn how a business works from the inside out, then the benefits can be great. Many of the new
generation of millionaires, for example, are owners of franchise and private restaurants. Owning a
restaurant is not easy, however, and it requires knowledge and skill to be successful, so start gathering
this as a teenager. Try as many positions as possible and ask lots of questions about cash flow, staffing,
etc. Applying this attitude to any job you have will really pay off; youll learn a huge amount.
2.
For many teenagers, there are a variety of problems associated with getting a job. You may not
be old enough or you may lack reliable transportation. You may not have enough total time available
or a regular enough schedule for someone to be willing to hire you. You might not even be able to find
a job in an area that you enjoy. If any of these problems holds true for you, then working for yourself
on a part-time basis may be the best way to go.
3.
Baby-sitting, for example, is a tried and tested way for responsible teenagers who like being
with kids to make money. There are several things you can do to make your services more valuable.
Think about taking a first-aid course so that you know how to handle emergencies. Secondly, you
might want to consider teaming up with some like-minded friends. That way your group will be able to
say yes more often, increasing the amount of work youre offered.
4.
If baby-sitting doesnt appeal to you, then you might want to consider garden care. During the
summer you mow lawns, trim hedges and so on, in the autumn you rake leaves and in the winter you
shovel snow! Indoor house painting is another option. Before undertaking this, you need to make sure
you know what you are doing by working with someone with experience and practising at home (but
get your parents permission first!). Other activities include providing in-home pet care when owners
are on holiday; errand-running for busy people; washing cars for neighbours or teaching people how to
use computers or the Internet.
5.
One question you will have as soon as you choose an activity is How much should I charge?
This is a question which is best answered by doing a market survey. Youll need to call around and ask
potential customers what they are used to paying and/or willing to pay, or ask your friends what they

charge for similar activities. In the case of an activity like car washing, you could also call garages in
your area and ask what they charge.
6.
Another way of gaining experience is to offer your services to a small business. Although it
may not be obvious to you, every community has thousands of small firms which do all sorts of things:
printing, plumbing, computer programming, advertising and so on. Many of these could really benefit
from a part-time helper who is reliable and mature. In return, you can learn an amazing amount about
the business. You will be surprised at how quickly you become a valued part of the team.
7.
Volunteer positions are another option. You can volunteer your services at many hospitals, old
peoples homes, and most charitable organizations or political groups. You wont earn any money, but
you can gain valuable experience and colleges and universities will be impressed by any volunteer
work you have done.
PART FOUR: WRITING
A. Finish each of the following sentences in such a way that it means exactly the same as the
sentence printed before it (2ms)
Ex:

The film was so boring that I fell asleep.


It was such a boring film that I fell asleep.

1. Our opinions on the subject are identical.


We
2. If only Id learnt to drive, Roger said
Roger wishes
3. It seems that Mary forgot about our meeting.
Mary .
4. Its thought that the accident was caused by human error.
The accident .
5. Because of working hard, she fell ill.
She worked ..
6. Mr. Pike used to jog a lot.
Mr. Pike jogged
7. It is useless to persuade him to do this.
Theres ..
8. They dont mind which film they go to.
It doesnt ..
9. The patient recovered more rapidly than expected.
The patient made ..
10. My father finds maps hard to follow.
My father has
B. Complete the second sentence so that it has the similar meaning to the first sentence, using the
word given. Do not change the word given (1m)
Ex:

I never have enough time these days. (short)


I am short of time these days.

1. Jeremy joined the cricket club a year ago. (member)


Jeremys a year.
2. He has never felt so embarrassed before.
(ever)
Its embarrassed.
3. Being her only niece, Ann is very precious to her. (apple)
Being her only niece, . eye.
4. I always think about transport costs when job hunting.
(consideration)
I always when job hunting.
5. She was pleased that he didnt get the job. (help)
She . he didnt get the job.
C. This is part of a letter you receive from an English friend.
For my homework project I have to write
about a special day that people celebrate
in your country. Which special day should I
write about? What information should I
include?

Now write a letter to your friend. Write your letter in about 100 words on the space below
(1.5m)

Dear Peter,

Nam
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