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R 180 - Incl. Business Art. E-mail: subs@arttimes.co.za THE SOUTH AFRICAN ART TIMES Aidan Walsh Artist’s
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SOUTH AFRICAN

ART TIMES

Aidan

Walsh

Artist’s feature

supplement

AFRICAN ART TIMES Aidan Walsh Artist’s feature supplement SASOL art sponsorship cutbacks By Michael Coulson While

SASOL art sponsorship cutbacks

By Michael Coulson

While Sasol claims that the disbanding of the team that has been responsible over decades for building up and maintaining its representative collection of con- temporary SA art is just a change of strategy, and that it remains fully committed, observers are less confident.

The death by a thousand cuts process started earlier this year when two junior posts were abol- ished. Then curator Teresa Liz- amore’s contract was downsized; and just a couple of months later, Lizamore was terminated entirely.

Sasol group communications manager Jacqui O’Sullivan, who goes out of her way to praise Lizamore’s contribution over no less than 27 years, says that Sasol is in fact keen to grow its reach into the arts, possibly leveraging

some corporate social investment initiatives, as well as sponsor- ships. In reviewing its approach, it opted to grow links with Business and Arts South Africa (Basa) to secure its inputs and access its network of artists and the broader local art-loving community. “This new approach will bring a variety of perspectives to our collection and we look forward to seeing the strategy develop and grow.”

She adds that it was a difficult decision to move away from a very successful and long standing relationship. Lizamore, incidentally, was reluctant to be quoted in this article.

Asked whether Sasol will continue to develop the collection. However much, and sincerely, Sasol protests, there must be grave reservations on both scores.

Continued on page 3

be grave reservations on both scores. Continued on page 3 Paint by numbers artwork wins Sasol

Paint by numbers artwork wins Sasol New Signatures Award

After the controversy surrounding last years Sasol New Signatures competition, the judges this year opted for a more conventional winner. Marijke van Velden won the R60 000 in prize money for her colour-by-number “Pierneef goes Dulux”. In what the Stellenbosch student explains as her attempt to ‘explore the arbitrary relationship between colour and language’ the work attempts to ‘destablise’ the ‘conventional high art notions of landscape painting’. (Read her

interview on page 3 of the Business Art supplement)

In cutting up a colour-by-number line drawing of a Pierneef painting, (Scene, 1925), that had been trans- posed onto supawood and then painting the sections with randomly selected Dulux paint colours cho- sen by others, van Velden suggests in her artists statement that ‘this interaction creates a rather exciting play in which the viewer also be- comes a feeler by interacting with the work at a tactile level’.

feeler by interacting with the work at a tactile level’. Work from Dylan Graham’s exhibition entitled:

Work from Dylan Graham’s exhibition entitled: In Arms to be seen at The Art Space Jhb Gallery. The show deals with capturing the ambiguities and dualities of people and phenomena. The above work (detail) is based on Rodin’s The Kiss sculpture. See more details at: www.artspace-jhb.co.za

Helen Anne Petrie scam exposed

Steve Kretzmann

If you want to make money off art and don’t have the patience to invest in promising up-and-coming artists and then possibly waiting decades for them to make a name for themselves, you could just buy an unknown dead artist’s body of work at an obscure auction. With photographs of work in hand (and any diaries, clippings or other documents gleaned from the bargain lot you’ve bought) you

can then fabricate a biography which explains why the artist was so great, yet reclusive (hints of mental, emotional abuse explain a lot). Pepper names of calibre and high profile collections which are difficult to check up on and, voila! You can now make thousands of Pounds buy putting a limited number of the works on auction.

Continued on Page 1 Business Art Supplement

The scam in a nutshell:

1. Purchase deceased artist estate,

with paintings and documents. 2. Create highly inflated profile that includes associations with long dead important artists, as well as claim work in important collctions etc 3. Upload inflated profile onto numerous lax artist and history profile websites 4. Get work onto auction, push up the price on auc- tion (maybe pay this price yourself) in order to push up the overall value

of your stock. 5. Get inflated prices published on auction results sites

6. Sell remaining work quickly

on auction results sites 6 . Sell remaining work quickly Bomb scare rocks Michaelis Students were

Bomb scare rocks Michaelis

Students were evacuated and buildings swept by a bomb squad after the police received an anonymous call stating there was a bomb on the University of Cape Town’s Hiddingh campus yesterday. Senior Secretary of the Michaelis art school, Sharon Werthen, said she was contacted by police, and asked to contact the safety officer and evacuate the building. Students and staff gath- ered outside as the bomb squad swept the building. No device was found. “Everyone decamped to Joburg [a bar in Long street] to drink”, said one fourth year art student, Tim Leibbrandt. Theories abound as to the provenance of the threat; many suspected a disgruntled student and in what has been a long-run- ning rivalry between disciplines, one art student even jokingly blamed the drama students.

Conspiracy theorists also suggest that the threat targeted Jonathan Shapiro, aka cartoonist Zapiro, who spoke at the University yes- terday. Director of the art school, Stephen Inggs, was not available for comment.

Got it

school, Stephen Inggs, was not available for comment. Got it The SA Art Times is now

The SA Art Times is now the only exclusive SA visual arts publication with The ABC certificate. From April- June 09 we circulated an average of 6 601 printed copies monthly. On another note, our website has over 20 000 read page impressions for August 09

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South African Art Times.

September 2009

Page 3

SASOL sponsorship cutbacks

Continued from Page 1

O’Sullivan conceded that Sasol, like many companies, “is in a cash containment mode. While new purchases may be delayed in the short term, we remain resolute in our commitment to growing our collection, along with our support of the arts in general.”

O’Sullivan also assures me that Sasol remains committed to the annual New Signatures award.

Not everyone will be reassured by these generalisations, however. It is not Basa’s function to act as a corporate art consultant, and without some sort of internal resource, it will be difficult to main- tain the quality and integrity of the existing collection. As Art Source’s Taryn Cohen, who was involved in another Sasol sponsorship that was abruptly terminated, the Sasol Wax Art award, says, corporates need to take arts sponsorship as seriously as that of sport. Would Sasol have terminated an involve- ment in, say, rugby, in such an out of hand manner? Consultant Nicola Danby, Basa’s founding director, questions how these moves fit into a long-term strategy. “Sasol has invested con- siderable time, effort and capital over many years into its collec- tion. It’s simply not good business sense to jettison this.”

And that surely is the basic point. Will a short-term cash saving – which by definition means that fewer resources will be made available to the collection - end up destroying or, at least, impairing the value of an important asset? And is some degradation not in- evitable when there is no in-house regular oversight?

Reconstructed Monument to Apartheid work might find new home at National Gallery

to Apartheid work might find new home at National Gallery Michael Goldberg, “Nationalist Monument”. Letter from

Michael Goldberg, “Nationalist Monument”.

Letter from Gavin Jantjes

In curating the exhibition “Strengths and Convictions” I tried to locate a work by Michael Goldberg which he exhibited at the Market Theatre in the early 80’s. It had the controversial title “Nationalist Monument”. He was aggressively criticized by his fellow artists and the arts community for this work and the state treated it with great suspicion. Few saw the irony in his sculpture. With hindsight one can see why. The work consists of a a used metal filing cabinet with four drawers, the ones commonly used in govern- ment offices all over the country. Each drawer contained filed copies of the legislation passed under the rule of an apartheid prime minister (Malan, Strijdom, Verwoerd, Vorster). In short the sculpture is an archive of the laws that gave apartheid legality.

Initially this sculpture could not be located. None of the museums had collected it. I finally through friends and contacts in Johannesburg traced Michael Goldberg in Aus- tralia where he is a senior lecturer at Sydney University. He informed me that the sculpture

had been donated to the Market theatre’s art collection. But added the distressful comment that he had last seen the filing cabinet being used as a prop in a perform- ance at the theatre shortly before he left SA for Australia. I asked the Market theatre to investigate

if the work had landed in the prop

room by mistake after the main body of the theatre’s art collection had been given to Wits University collection for safe keeping. Wits had no record of the work. The Market Theatre staff did a search and found nothing. The work had been lost.

In a discussion with Michael I discovered that he had kept a

copy of the entire content of the filing cabinet and we decided to remake the work for the exhibition. It will now hopefully become part

of the collection of the SA National

Gallery who is considering to pur- chase the remade sculpture into its collection.

Here’s the irony. The work has

a brass plaque attached on the

front of the top drawer and a text

in white plastic letters stuck on the

top of the cabinet. When Michael tried to have the plaque remade in Australia, the foundry refused to cast it. Michael’s e-mail explains the rest.

Dear Gavin, I’ve just had the most remarkable experience, which I’d like to share with you. I’m in the process of hav- ing the inscription of the re-made Nationalist Monument cast as a bronze plaque. It reads as follows:

THIS MONUMENT COMMEMORATES LEADERS OF THE NATIONALIST GOVERNMENT, THEIR LEGISLA- TION REGARDING THE SEPARATE DEVELOPMENT OF RACES, AND ALL THAT HAS COME OF IT

He who forsakes the aspirations of his People will also forsake Justice and the Law

Jan Christiaan Smuts Prime Minister Union of South Africa

1919-1924 and 1939-1948

I’ve just received a phone call from the CEO of the foundry in Sydney doing the job, and he enquired after the meaning of the plaque, telling me that his workers had refused to have anything to do with it, as it appeared to be sup- portive of the Apartheid regime! I explained that the words should not be taken out of context of the art work, and once I had clarified the dreadful irony behind the plaque, he was reassured. I was suddenly revisited by the terrible

weight of the Apartheid years, but I felt very, very moved that Austral- ian workers were prepared to take such a stand. The memory of that time has certainly not dis- sipated, not in Australia, and hope-

fully nowhere else in the world.

Best Regards, Michael

time has certainly not dis- sipated, not in Australia, and hope- fully nowhere else in the
time has certainly not dis- sipated, not in Australia, and hope- fully nowhere else in the

Page 4

September 2009

South African Art Times

Page 4 September 2009 South African Art Times Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt
Page 4 September 2009 South African Art Times Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt
Page 4 September 2009 South African Art Times Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt
Page 4 September 2009 South African Art Times Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt
Page 4 September 2009 South African Art Times Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt
Page 4 September 2009 South African Art Times Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt
Page 4 September 2009 South African Art Times Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt

Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt

Memorial to a memorial: stolen struggle memorial rebuilt A bronze memorial to two struggle heroes which

A bronze memorial to two struggle heroes which was stolen from under the noses of the Athlone police in 2008, has been re-cast, replaced in its original site and un- veiled with a cleansing ceremony, according to artist Egon Tanya. The original statue by Tanya and Guy du Toit, was stolen in April 2008 from its location outside the Athlone Magistrate’s Court (situ- ated directly opposite the Athlone Police Station) and sold for scrap. Three days after the theft, a City task team known as the Cop- perheads, discovered the statue hacked into pieces and ready to be smelted down. The sad end to the statue, however, has been turned into a new art project by Tanya and Du Toit, who accepted the brief to re-create the sculpture, incorporat- ing some of the original pieces of the sculpture into their new design. Based loosely around the old sculpture, the new figures are placed closer together, (“so they are more difficult to steal”, says Tanya, laughing), and are flanked by shards of the old sculptures, set into the toilet block wall.

An ironic “monument to a monu- ment”, the exploding shards also mimic the original explosion which took place at the site. On July 23, 1989, MK members Coline Williams and Robbie Waterwitch, were on their way to carry out a mission when a faulty limpet mine

they were carrying blew up. It is believed that the mine was given to the cadres by an infiltrator into the organisation. The piece was unveiled on the

23rd July, earlier this year, on the 20th anniversary of the explo- sion, with a traditional Khoisan cleansing ceremony, and a service

in nearby Methodist Church, with

Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

Tanya says that steps have been taken to ensure that the piece is not stolen a second time. The

piece is secured with cable, a bar and massive concrete block. “If people really want to steal it, they will”, said Tanya, “they’ll have to drive a tank against it though”. And

of course, being located opposite

a police station ought to provide a measure of security.

Then again, this did not seem to provide any sort of protection in the first instance. In what Tanya describes as “comedy of errors”, thieves cut off one of the statues arms, before returning with a bak- kie and ropes to loosen the bronze statues out of the ground. Their first attempt failed, and the statue lay on the ground, allegedly for a full day, while the police directly opposite, seeing it as the council’s problem, declined to take action. The following day, the statue was gone, and after its disappearance was reported by a member of the public, the police appeared 45 minutes later. Pleased that the piece would be re-made, the artists agreed to a significantly smaller sum to complete the re-commission. The event had “an immensely loaded social significance”, said Tanya, who felt that the piece had to be replaced. According to city docu- ments available on the web, the second commission was for a sum of R250 000. Photos: Egon Tanya

According to city docu - ments available on the web, the second commission was for a
According to city docu - ments available on the web, the second commission was for a
According to city docu - ments available on the web, the second commission was for a
According to city docu - ments available on the web, the second commission was for a
According to city docu - ments available on the web, the second commission was for a

South African Art Times

September 2009

Page 5

Tretchikoff blunder raises questions

Art dealer Warren Siebrits responds to the handling of Britz’s sale and post sale of Tretchikoff’s : The Lost Orchid

sale and post sale of Tretchikoff’s : The Lost Orchid Sir With reference to your profile

Sir

With reference to your profile on Graham Britz ( Stirring up SA’s paint pot, The Weekender August 15-16), I would like to challenge a couple of points made by Louis Schachat of Die Kunskamer in Cape Town.

Contrary to the opinions expressed by Schachat that the South African press made too much of the Tretchikoff debacle, I believe the press needs to be congratulated for their excellent and tenacious work in revealing the irregularities surrounding the sale of what was advertised to be Vladimir Tretchikoff’s iconic painting The Lost Orchid. One can only imagine where the buyer of the painting at the Kebble sale would be if it was

not for the courage and persist ence of Johan Myburg of Die Beeld who first brought the story into the public realm, along with the front page article by Business Day’s Julius Baumann. For one thing Taljaard would be R 2,9m poorer as a result and probably none the wiser that he was without the genuine article on his wall. And why should he have needed to exercise caution and suspicion if it were not for Die Beeld’s article? After all, he had bought the paint- ing accompanied by a lavishly illustrated catalogue with extensive and authorative texts written by “experts”. It was sadly amusing and ultimately farcical seeing Britz, who claims to be a South African art expert with more than 20 years’ experience, having to hide behind the opinions of experts for hire such as Karel Nel, Alexander Duffey and Karin Preller. Where was his genuine expertise when it was most needed? The irony of the situation is that a perceptive child, from any background, with average intelligence, and with little or no exposure to art could have quickly picked up that the two paintings were different, therefore disqualifying the possibility of the Kebble version being correct from

the very beginning.

Within a week of the story making news, both members of Tretchikoff’s family and leading South African art expert Stephan Welz joined myself and others in calling the Kebble version a fake. Why then was it necessary to conduct a “no expenses spared” investigation into the painting’s credentials, background and prov- enance, only to reach the same conclusion reached by the above mentioned parties two-and-a-half months earlier.

With all this said, the most important aspect of the Tretchikoff saga still remains unanswered. How and why did Britz take the liberty of marrying a distinguished provenance to the Kebble work, taking the Kebble work up in value as a result from R 16 000 to R 2,9m in a five year period. “An honest mistake” is how Britz refers to this oversight in hindsight, whilst in other parts of the world with all the evidence that has come to light it would simply be referred to as misrepresentation or fraud. Schachat suggested again in Britz’s defense that if similar things happen overseas “no one [would]

ever say a word”. Clearly Schachat has forgotten about the price-fix- ing scandal that left Sotheby’s chairman Alfred Taubman behind bars and Sotheby’s president and impressionist art expert Diana ‘Dede’ Brooks under house arrest for their role in a price-fixing and manipulation scandal perpetrated over a three-year period with rival auctioneer Christie’s. Christie’s and Sotheby’s agreed to pay $512 million in penalties as a result of an in-depth probe, with Sotheby’s ordered to pay an additional $140 million in criminal penalties.

Our art market is insular and microscopic by comparison and fragile as a result. We can therefore ill afford a similar crisis to befall it, now or in the years to come. The market needs to be regulated in some way, in the proc- ess giving further protection to all who participate in it.

Yours sincerely,

Warren Siebrits, Illovo, Johannesburg. 19 August 2009

Originally printed in The Weekend- er. Art Times requested to reprint letter from the author.

Recession claims latest victims

Bell-Roberts closes their gallery but continues its art dealership and Art South Africa.

Bell-Roberts Gallery has closed its doors with immediate effect, according to Art South Africa editor Sean O’Toole. Rumours that the gallery is in financial trouble have been circulating for some time; sources say that the gallery has been struggling to pay artists and

staff for the past year. Bell-Roberts, which last year moved from their Bree Street loca- tion to a large warehouse space on the Woodstock gallery strip, a move which cost them their tourist traffic, and likely increased their overheads. The current recession cannot have made the situa- tion any easier. Art South Africa readers need not worry; however, although Bell-Roberts Publishing

and Bell-Roberts Gallery were associated, the gallery and journal are separate legal entities, accord- ing to editor, Sean O’Toole. “It’s business as usual”, says O’Toole.

Business Day Art Supplement

Business Day announced the cancellation of their art supplement in view of revising it later. Julius Baumann, the editor of the supple-

ment confirmed with The SA Art Times that together with management, the format is cur- rently undergoing revision. Yet Baumann iterated that it was too early to give an impression of what final form it would take.

Running since 2004 it’s regular contributors included respected art writers Alex Dodd and Sean O’Toole.

respected art writers Alex Dodd and Sean O’Toole. A quality selection of SA old masters and

A quality selection of SA old masters and selected contemporary art

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HIGHLIGHTS

from 10 Years of Collecting for the Sanlam Art Collection

from 10 Years of Collecting for the Sanlam Art Collection George Museum 9 Courtnenay Street George

George Museum 9 Courtnenay Street George Tel: 044 873 5343

For more information call the Sanlam Art Collection Tel: 021 947 3359 / 083 457 2699

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19 September – 23 October 2009

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Whitewashed buildings , 2009 Aidan Walsh Supplement to The South African Art Times “I am

Whitewashed buildings, 2009

Aidan Walsh

Supplement to The South African Art Times

“I am drawn to stone – stone figures in parks, religious figures in churches and temples, rock formations, stone in decay, silent empty houses, dark churches, empty landscapes”

silent empty houses, dark churches, empty landscapes” Although he only started painting professionally in his 50s,
silent empty houses, dark churches, empty landscapes” Although he only started painting professionally in his 50s,

Although he only started painting professionally in his 50s, Walsh had been involved in the fine arts all his adult life, first as a ceramicist and then as an influ- ential gallery owner and curator. Aidan Walsh was a Durban-based painter, gallerist and curator known for his hyper-real depictions of abandoned buildings and desolate landscapes. Additionally, he was the lover and life-partner of celebrated Durban artist Andrew Verster. But it took a trip to Paris, where he spent three months at the Cité Internationale des Arts, to catalyse in Walsh the revelation that was he in fact a gifted painter. Returning to South Africa with a suitcase of painted canvases and little else, Walsh had a new mission in life and devoted the

next 23 years of his life to painting, And while he never achieved what might be called fame in his lifetime, the public – and local critics – took an immediate liking to his gorgeous strain of haunted realism.

“Because realism was margin- alized for so long in favour of avant-gardist experiment or politi- cal statement”, wrote critic Lloyd Pollak, “Aidan Walsh was a sadly neglected figure but, as revision- ism broadens our perspectives, he will now be honoured for his valuable contribution to South African art.”

For the greater part of his career, Walsh was painting during a time when painting – and particularly

realist painting – was considered out of vogue. In the early 21st century, painting – so often written off as dead – experienced a resurgence in popularity but Walsh had no interest, according to Verster, in riding that wave. He made little use of his substantial connections in the art world and seemed interested only in painting and finding subject matter. Even his consistent commercial success left little impression on him. He was, according to Verster, more concerned with who bought his work, and whether he liked them or not, and had no interest in the hierarchy of the art world or his position in it.

In a strange way, Walsh operated as an outsider artist even while re-

West Coast, 2003, oil on canvas, private collection. In this image, the horizon – so often parallel to the canvas in Walsh’s painting, curves down towards the left, reflecting the way that the lenses in our eyes - and also in cameras – tend to make straight lines appear curved from a distance. The actual curvature of the earth is visible only from the upper reaches of the atmosphere.

maining entirely inside the gallery system. The lack of specific artistic influences on his work similarly reflect this insularity. His prime influence was in fact his subjects. He painted for himself and of himself and for the abandoned or unnoticed landscapes he loved so much. It seems that his paintings are acts of redemption for his sub- ject matter, or as Verster suggests, prayers. (Walsh was Catholic, although thoroughly lapsed). Walsh, who died earlier this year, had often said that if he hadn’t become an artist, he would have liked to have been an archaeolo- gist. He was fascinated with his- tory – not so much the big picture as the smaller details and the personalities – and his work itself functions as a kind of archeology

Analysis of the Artist’s work/ Key influences

Walsh has said that he found it very difficult to work out what attracts one to various places “enough to make you want to paint them” but it seems that some kind of absence or abandonment was often a defining characteristic of his subject matter. There is often

a sense of long-faded glamour

evident in the buildings that he painted, and a palpable sense that he was painting both for his

own pleasure and for the building or landscape itself - to recall for posterity forgotten and aban- doned places that might never be recorded by another human being:

a weather-damaged church in

central Durban, a dried-up riverbed

in the Free State, an abandoned

farmhouse in the Karoo; a tiny Hindu temple north of Durban. He also strongly believed in the spirits of inanimate objects and in the ability of stones and buildings to somehow absorb the spirit or energy of people who had lived in them .”Dark places and also open spaces affect me: those strange Karoo landscapes, which possibly some antique race used as a place

of prayer and left their imprint in the soil”. When he visited Brittany in France, Walsh once again recalled “a sort of vibration within the stone menhirs” as he touched them. “And there are other landscapes which you later discover contain a sacred grove. You are not to know that someone has seen the Virgin Mary in a field, or that something awful had happened, or which unexplained event is celebrated

in this or that wayside chapel, but

you feel a presence, and like the

others, you stop and pray.”

“Here in Durban, you go to a Hindu temple and people bring offerings

of food, milk and fruit, and even

their cars to, be blessed. All this must permeate the stones. I am drawn to stone – stone figures in parks, religious figures in churches and temples, rock formations, stone in decay, silent empty houses, dark churches, empty landscapes,” stated Walsh.

Painter Lize Hugo and Andrew Verster are two of what might be termed Walsh’s contemporaries. Given Walsh’s strange insular- ity to the art world (although he also was enormously sociable and generous), it is a very small circle indeed and includes other

well known Durban artists such as Marianne Meijer, Pascale Chandler

and Bronwen Findlay. Walsh had many friends in the art world, but he worked and painted only with Hugo and Verster. Hugo had admired Aidan Walsh’s paintings in a Cape Town exhibi- tion and the mysterious and enchanting paintings lingered on in her memory. She met him in 1994 in Paris when she too was staying at the Cité des Arts. They became friends almost immedi- ately, based on their shared love of out-of-the-way places and seedy bars. And so, when Lize decided to do a road trip through the Karoo with the intention of developing paintings, she knew that Aidan was the person that she wanted by her side. They criss-crossed the desolate land together, gathering an enormous amount of material along the way. During their times spent in run- down hotels, seedy bars and the

endless tarmac of the karoo, Hugo observed Walsh’s quirky way of “seeing” paintings and his ability to discover humour in very ordinary, and sometimes, banal objects.

Talking about the experience,

Hugo says: “One of my fondest memories of Aidan is of us at Ver- neukpan, where fantasy and reality became inseparable: the main ingredients for his paintings. We saw mirages of Alpine forests, a car floating in the ocean, a Dakota plane in a lunar landscape and the real starting point for Malcolm Campbell’s land speed record. The memories – the mysterious and enchanting paintings linger on.”

Andrew Verster, Walsh’s best friend, lover and the prime witness to his life, says : “He gave me

a way of seeing. After he had

painted a particular place it was impossible to see it any other way. When I went back to Paris after he had been there for three months, I was aware of buildings I’d walked past every day two years back and noticed them now for the first time. Suddenly they stood out in

a crowd of other buildings. The tiny

synagogue in the side street , the facade of houses facing onto the river, and others , none of them spectacular in their own right, but made memorable because of an image of them that Aidan had planted in my mind. His loving eye had transformed the ordinary into the extraordinary. What had attracted him to them in the first place, I wondered? Slowly it dawned on me. They were oddball buildings which didn’t quite fit in. Some were a little neglected, some clearly were ambitious for greatness and beauty but had failed in their yearning for glory, and some were outsiders, non- conformists, loners.

By painting them he had invested them with the dignity they craved. He had rescued them from anonymity.”

they craved. He had rescued them from anonymity.” Lize Hugo, Car wreck , 2003, oil on

Lize Hugo, Car wreck , 2003, oil on canvas, courtesy of the artist. This is one the painting that Lize Hugo did of her Karoo journey with Walsh. Note how her work is similar but also very different to Walsh. The subject – the burnt out car – differs in its feeling to Walsh’s work as does the light, although, like Walsh’s work, the painting is very evocative of the actual landscape. Most obviously, Hugo foregrounds her subject more intensely than Walsh and allows the earth to dominate with only marginal relief from the sky.

earth to dominate with only marginal relief from the sky. River Signs, 2003, oil on canvas,

River Signs, 2003, oil on canvas, private collection. Markings in the rock of the riverbed.

private collection. Markings in the rock of the riverbed. Mountain (unfinished) 2009, oil on canvas, private

Mountain (unfinished) 2009, oil on canvas, private collection. This was one of only two canvases that Walsh failed to complete before he died. He never left a painting unfinished and only ever worked on two paintings at a time, allowing one to dry while he moved on to the next.

While Walsh is often described as

a photo-realist, like many other

so-called photo-realists (but not all

of them), up close he is actually an

impressionist painter. Looking at the canvas closely, the brushwork

is not nearly so fine as the viewer

might suppose but from a distance

the impression of realism is cre- ated.

In fact, photo realism is not as

clear cut a category as it might

seem . Photographs are techni- cally also impressionist in the

. Photographs are techni - cally also impressionist in the Whitewashed buildings , 2009, oil on

Whitewashed buildings, 2009, oil on canvas, private collection. In this painting, like so many others, built structures occupy a strange relationship to the landscape. They both define the landscape and, at the same, there is an awareness that the buildings, even when they seems to be relatively new, will eventually join the landscape, leaving only traces and ghosts.

join the landscape, leaving only traces and ghosts. Entrance , 2003, oil on canvas, private collection.

Entrance, 2003, oil on canvas, private collection. Walsh believed that stones embody energy in some way. When he visited Brittany in France, Walsh once again recalled “a sort of vibration within the stone menhirs” as he touched them.

of vibration within the stone menhirs” as he touched them. Mountain Pool , 2009, oil on

Mountain Pool, 2009, oil on canvas, private collection. In Walsh’s work, even the most natural of landscapes point to the traces of human existence. In this work, the stairs near the centre of the painting might or not have been made by human beings but there is little doubt that human feet have worn the stones smooth.

Artist’s Signature Style

same way but at a scale that is

generally so fine, it’s difficult to see with the naked eye (when the

grain in analogue photographs is larger, photographs become more evidently impressionist). And so

what might be seen as a strict split between impressionism and realism or photorealism is actually a sliding scale. South African artist Gavin Rain reverses this notion

by making the pixels or grain in his paintings so large that the image can only be seen clearly from some distance away, or when

photographed with a cell-phone which compresses the size of the image.

It is said that impressionism creates the feeling of being “in” the place that an image invokes. Impressionist such as Van Gogh understood this. Implicit in this recognition is the fact that human vision and experience is itself not very photo-realist. Our day to day experience of seeing the world is in fact an endless shift between blur and focus as we shift our

depths of field. The job of the artist who engages in any kind of descriptive representation is, in a sense, to construct clarity from the blur of human perception.

Today, when virtually all images are digital, and many of them ma- nipulated, the very notion of photo- realism is ambiguous. Additionally, contemporary critical theory points to ways in which the photograph itself, digital or analogue, always constitutes a constructed reality.

Karoo House with Water Tanks , 2009, oil on canvas, private collection. Walsh is often

Karoo House with Water Tanks, 2009, oil on canvas, private collection. Walsh is often described as a photo-real- ist but in fact he uses impressionist brush strokes to simulate a stylised but profoundly evocative realism. This work is a clear example, the patterns in the earth expressing the motion of time in the manner of more overt impressionists.

motion of time in the manner of more overt impressionists. Homestead , 2009, oil on canvas,

Homestead, 2009, oil on canvas, private collection. The buildings that Walsh painted were often Western in design and, in all probability built by local labourers. Note how the vertical lines of the telephone poles, fencing and buildings exist in contradistinction to the organic shapes of the land and how the scrubby vegetation seems to be moving towards a single point on the left. Again Walsh makes use of classical proportions and perspective, moving our eye towards the centre of the picture, just as Leonardo Da Vinci does in The Last Supper.

picture, just as Leonardo Da Vinci does in The Last Supper. Church , 2007, oil on

Church, 2007, oil on canvas, private collection. An abandoned church and possibly a classroom in the Eastern Cape. Note Walsh’s classical use of proportions, something that is very evident here but present in nearly all of his painting. The dominant building occupies the very middle of the canvas, with the horizon likewise cutting the canvas in half, reinforced by the parallel lines of the wire fence.

in half, reinforced by the parallel lines of the wire fence. Angel, Burnt Mountainside , 2007,
in half, reinforced by the parallel lines of the wire fence. Angel, Burnt Mountainside , 2007,

Angel, Burnt Mountainside, 2007, oil on canvas, private collection. It would be easy to make an image of a cem- etery angel looking over the blackened landscape of a freshly burnt mountainside into an obvious allegory but, by concentrating on the blackness of the mountainside rather the pathos of the statue, allegory gives way to the landscape itself. Aidan’s compositions were seldom “about” something in the conventional sense.

were seldom “about” something in the conventional sense. Reservoir , 2009, oil on canvas, private collection.

Reservoir, 2009, oil on canvas, private collection. Note how the curvature of this water reservoir resonates with the landscape rather than competing with it.

resonates with the landscape rather than competing with it. Théodore Géricault, Raft of the Medusa ,

Théodore Géricault, Raft of the Medusa, 491 × 716 cm , 1818-19, The Louvre. Walsh loved Géricault’s famous painting. In Paris, he visited the artist’s mausoleum which has a bronze relief version of the painting below his tomb.

Tower of Babel, 2008, oil on canvas, private collection. This is an unusual work for Walsh. Although many of his paintings suggest a meeting of the day-to-day with the fantastic, this is one of the few paintings where he works with both fantasy and direct allegory.

THE ARTIST’S LIFE

Early Life: “One quarter French, three quarters Irish and one hundred percent South African,” was how Walsh described himself. The youngest of seven children, he was born in Silver Road in Greyville, Durban, in 1932, at the tail-end of the Great Depression.

Durban, in 1932, at the tail-end of the Great Depression. He remembered his mother reminiscing endlessly

He remembered his mother reminiscing endlessly about the famous Bourbon family of France, while his father, who was a boxing promoter, was often away from home, in Berlin, Willamaloo or London. Walsh’s French ancestry goes back several generations and ended with the political murder of his great grandfather. Before that, the family had lived grand lives on the Boulevard Henri IV, five minutes away from the studio in Paris that Walsh rented more than a century later and which was to change his life forever. But the family felt that France was not a safe place for the de Beauforts and the children were dispatched to Australia, America, England and South Africa. As the son of a boxing promoter, Walsh’s life was itinerant. The family moved often around England and South Africa, and their fortunes were just as unstable. “You could say I was born with a silver spoon in my mouth but it was soon plucked out, and then put back the next second, and then pulled out again. My father enjoyed a gamble,” said Walsh. At the height of the war, the family returned home to South Africa, where Walsh was to spend the rest of his life, and in his later years, devote himself to documenting the landscape. While still in England, Walsh had studied at Hammersmith Art School, graduating as a ceramicist and painter. After art school he started a pottery studio. “Those were the days of criss-crossing the country on slow trains with my cardboard suitcases of samples – Beaufort West, Windhoek, Kroonstad, de Aar – I know them all”. While the seeds of his Karoo paintings may have been planted then, it was many years before Walsh would become a full-time professional painter. His ceramic career came to an end after he damaged his wrist in a fight with his lover of the time. He subsequently, together with ceramicist Carol Marais, opened the Walsh Marais Gallery in the early 60’s, where he had important impact on Durban’s art scene as a gallerist and curator. The gallery opened with an exhibition of work by Walter Battiss, and subsequently gave many artists who are now of national and international importance their first show. The gallery was the first in Durban to show regular exhibitions of contemporary work, something which Walsh was encouraged to do by Verster, who would shortly become his lover and life partner. Many works that now reside in the Durban Art Gallery’s perma- nent connection were purchased from the Walsh Marais gallery.

Artistic Breakthrough : In the early ‘80s, the Walsh Marais Gallery hav- ing run its course, Walsh moved to the NSA (Natal Society for the Arts), where he was appointed as curator and continued to support the work of young artists on the rise. But it was only in his 50s, during a three month residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris, that Walsh started to pursue painting with any seriousness. Verster recalls Walsh returning from Paris with a suitcase filled only with perfectly formed paintings. Over the next two decades, the eternally gentle Walsh became one of Durban’s best selling painters and achieved much critical recognition. In Walsh’s own words, “My Damascus was my first stay at the

Walsh’s own words, “My Damascus was my first stay at the Andrew Verster, from the Alter

Andrew Verster, from the Alter Ego series, 2009, ink and water colour on paper, courtesy of the artist. This drawing by Andrew Verster is one of his most recent works and brings many of the themes and motif of his career into a single image. It is part of a series called Alter Ego.

Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. I had always painted, but how often does one get the chance of painting when you are running galleries and organizing other peoples exhibitions? I had every day to paint or just wander around gathering material.” The other part of his Damascus was the gargoyles in the towers of Notre Dame, where he went within a few days of arriving. “I looked at them and they looked at me. I felt that at midnight they came down from the towers and danced in the cathedral.”

came down from the towers and danced in the cathedral.” Middle Career: Walsh’s first exhibition –

Middle Career: Walsh’s first exhibition – at the NSA – featured the gargoyles that spoke to him, as well as other bits of Paris that he was at- tracted to, and which, in all probability, nobody else noticed. The medium was oil and Walsh’s subjects were painted in the same carefully observed hyper-realism that was to become his distinctive trademark. From the dark baroque of Paris and the gargoyles of Notre Dame, Walsh turned his attention to the local South African landscape, concentrating on dilapidated properties in and around Durban, as well as the large selec- tion of Hindu temples which populate the city and its surrounding areas. He also found much pleasure in painting the solitary landscapes of the Karoo and its ever deteriorating architecture as well as the natural archi- tecture of stones, river beds and sand dunes that are found in the region. While he consistently had commercially successful exhibitions in Durban and around the country, Walsh never sought recognition for his work. The act of painting was, it seems, enough.

for his work. The act of painting was, it seems, enough. Andrew Verster and Aidan Walsh

Andrew Verster and Aidan Walsh

Photo: Brenton Maart

End : Walsh died on the 31 July 2009 of a heart attack after a year of troubled health. He left behind a body of art that was remarkably consist- ent in its styles and concerns. The suitcases that are a central element in the narrative of his life – the one he carried around the Eastern Cape with his ceramic samples – and the one in which he carried his Paris painting back to Africa, functioned as a kind of artistic Pandora’s box, opening Walsh’s work up to the world, and the world to his work. Together with his early role as gallerist and curator, Walsh leaves a significant legacy to the South African art world, one that has yet to be fully appreciated or embraced.

A Year in the life of the Artist – 1986

1986 was a turning point for Walsh. Although, he was already in his 50s, and had been involved in art nearly all his life, it was the year that he truly became a painter, during a three month residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. Despite having moved back and forth between London during his youth, it was the first time that he had been to Paris and he fell in love with its grey beauty and its stone archi- tecture imbued with the centuries. He loved the Royal tombs in the Basilica of St. Denis. “I love these still, dark interiors”, he said, “the only light being daylight filtered through the stained glass windows and the glittering candles”. The cemetery of Pere Lachaise was another favourite spot, and he and fellow artist Penny Siopis, who was also at the Cité at the time, spent many days wandering through the avenues of grand mausoleums. He particularly loved the mausoleum of the artist Theodore Gericault which features his painting of the Raft of Medusa done in relief in bronze below. Walsh returned to Paris three more times during his life, revisiting both his ancestry and the place where he was reborn.

1986 in the World

- Seven Nasa astronauts were killed in the skies above Florida when the US Space Shuttle Challenger exploded two minutes after take-off. - Britain and France an-

nounced plans to build the Channel Tunnel. - The first PC virus, called Brain, was discovered - Dalai Lama met Pope John Paul II in India. - The largest Mafia trial in history, with 474 defendants, opened in Palermo, Italy .- The Single European Act modifying the Treaty of Rome was signed in Luxembourg to end trade restrictions and create a single European market by 1992. - The Soviet Union launched the first component of its Mir space station. - Microsoft Corporation, an 11-year-old company, went public.- Pakistan acquired weapons-grade uranium. - Halley’s Comet passed by

earth, as it does every 76 years

in Paris, as did Jean Genet .- The world’s worst nuclear accident occurred in Pripyat,

Ukraine, north of Kiev, as the Chernobyl atomic power plant exploded. - Jorge Luis

Borges, Argentine author, died in Geneva. - An Irish referendum upheld a ban on divorce. - The US Supreme Court upheld affirmative action in two separate rulings.

- Henry Moore, English sculptor, died - The Dow Jones Industrial Average suffered its biggest 1-day decline to date - China’s first stock market opened in Shanghai.

- President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev opened two days of talks concerning arms control - The US government closed down due to budget problems.

- Mozambique President Samora Machel was killed in a plane crash as he returned

from a conference in Zambia. 34 other people also died in the crash.- Mike Tyson knocked out Trevor Berbick and won the WBC title to become the youngest heavy- weight champion in history, at the age of 20.- Nov, The European Commission de-

cided on GSM as the first digital standard. Vodaphone soon looked outside Britain for partners.- The Musee d’Orsay opened in Paris. - 500,000 Chinese students gathered

in Shanghai’s People’s Square calling for democratic reforms, including freedom of

the press. - Andrei Tarkovsky, Russian film maker, died and was buried in Paris.

- Simone de Beauvoir, French feminist author, died

1986 in South Africa

- By 1986, the ANC, with headquarters in Lusaka, London, and New York, had

taken on the key role position of any future black regime. - The Private Schools Act was made into law. This Act officially allows racially mixed private schools. - Winnie

Mandela returned to her home and becomes active in ANC politics. Her opposition to the National Party regime earn her the title “Mother of the Nation.” - Soweto pupils returned to school in January in response to a call from the Soweto Parents’ Crisis Committee - The ANC in exile in Lusaka, called on its supporters to take the struggle into white areas. - Twenty-two black South Africans appeared in the Delmas Court for allegedly attempting to overthrow the government. - Moses Mabhida, General Secretary of the South African Communist Party, died in Maputo. - The Eminent Persons Group met imprisoned ANC leader, Nelson Mandela. - Bishop Desmond Tutu was appointed head of the Anglican Church of South Africa. - The multi-racial National Council, intended to negotiate a constitutional structure for South Africa,

was unveiled. - Influx control restrictions were lifted, with passes to be replaced by

a uniform identity document for all population groups. - Beginning of violence in

Natal between Inkatha and UDF supporters. - The European Economic Community imposed sanctions against South Africa, coal being the exception. - Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act adopted by the USA. - South Africa signs treaty on Lesotho Highlands Water Project.

Bibliography/Sources

- 1986 in the World: source: www.timeline.ws - 1986 in South Africa: source: www.

sahistory.org - Quote from Lloyd Pollak: Artthrob.co.za - Most of the information in this text, including direct quoted from Walsh were provided by Andrew Verster in an interview with Peter Machen and subsequent email - The information about the Walsh Marais Gallery was provided by Carol Brown in an interview with Peter Machen

- The quotes and details from Lize Hugo were provided by Hugo in an email to Peter

Machen - The pictures of Walsh and his artwork provided by Andrew Verster and Brenton Maart - Work by Lize Hugo provided by Liza Hugo - Image of The Raft of the Medusa from Wikipedia commons

Researched and written by Peter Machen

provided by Liza Hugo - Image of The Raft of the Medusa from Wikipedia commons Researched
5 – 26 SEPTEMBER 2009
5 – 26 SEPTEMBER 2009
5 – 26 SEPTEMBER 2009 LYN SMUTS CHRISTINA BRYER PHILIP WILLEM BADENHORST LEON VERMEULEN KATHERINE GLENDAY

LYN SMUTS

CHRISTINA BRYER

PHILIP WILLEM BADENHORST

LEON VERMEULEN

KATHERINE GLENDAY

5 – 26 SEPTEMBER 2009 LYN SMUTS CHRISTINA BRYER PHILIP WILLEM BADENHORST LEON VERMEULEN KATHERINE GLENDAY
5 – 26 SEPTEMBER 2009 LYN SMUTS CHRISTINA BRYER PHILIP WILLEM BADENHORST LEON VERMEULEN KATHERINE GLENDAY
5 – 26 SEPTEMBER 2009 LYN SMUTS CHRISTINA BRYER PHILIP WILLEM BADENHORST LEON VERMEULEN KATHERINE GLENDAY
Durban Art Gallery / 2nd Floor, City Hall, Anton Lembede St. Durban Open Mondays to

Durban Art Gallery / 2nd Floor, City Hall, Anton Lembede St. Durban Open Mondays to

Durban Art Gallery / 2nd Floor, City Hall, Anton Lembede St. Durban Open Mondays to

Durban Art Gallery / 2nd Floor, City Hall, Anton Lembede St. Durban Open Mondays to Saturdays 08:30 to 16:00 / Sundays 11:00 to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za

to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za Daniel Novela “It’s clear that local and international
to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za Daniel Novela “It’s clear that local and international
to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za Daniel Novela “It’s clear that local and international
to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za Daniel Novela “It’s clear that local and international
to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za Daniel Novela “It’s clear that local and international
to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za Daniel Novela “It’s clear that local and international
to 16:00 tel: 031 3112264/9 email: StrettonJ@durban.gov.za Daniel Novela “It’s clear that local and international

Daniel Novela

“It’s clear that local and international collectors see more in Novela’s work than his extraordinary technique and love for his subject. They see Novela as a good investment” New homes Magazine.

Daniel has exhibited regularly in Gauteng and completed a successful tour in Europe. In September 2006 Daniel had his rst international exhibition in New York at the Sankaranka Art Gallery. Firstly the works are special and have integrity, secondly, a Novela canvas is fast increas- ing in value. As a relatively recent discovery, his true worth has yet to be established. So he is therefore considered a good investment opportunity.

“His rened landscapes are inltrating galleries and private collections as his especial brand of African impressionism becomes better known. His success is a result of years of hardship in an almost stereotypical story of an artist who would not let go of his dream”. Business Weekender by Elizabeth Donaldson.

of his dream”. Business Weekender by Elizabeth Donaldson. The boy and cattle in a misty morning

The boy and cattle in a misty morning

To book an appointment please contact the studio at:

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South African Art Times

September 2009

SA Art Times Contemporary Artist’s Profile

WELCOME DANCA

SA Art Times Contemporary Artist’s Profile WELCOME DANCA The interior of the shack is illumi- nated
SA Art Times Contemporary Artist’s Profile WELCOME DANCA The interior of the shack is illumi- nated

The interior of the shack is illumi- nated by the blue glow of a laptop screen. In front of it sits a pastor, staring at the naked woman on its screen, while in the background, illuminated by the glow, two children sit huddled under a blanket. “In life, you can’t judge a book by its cover”, says Danca of his painting. The work, ‘Pastor himself (surfing the web)’ is one of several acerbic works by the artist which make wry comment on the hypocrisy of sacred institutions. Danca, who trained under the de- ceased master of social commen- tary, Trevor Makhoba, has been receiving some invaluable exposure of late. A finalist in the 2008 and

2009 ABSA L’Atelier competitions,

and nominated to take part in the

2010 exhibition at Kizo Gallery,

Danca has come a long way since, so the story goes, a teacher spotted his talent after he drew a map on the board. Today, it’s Danca’s seeringly critical

eye that sets him apart. Danca’s 2008 collaborative show with studio mates Sibusiso Duma and Bheki Khambule – on which ‘Pastor Himself’ appeared – showed some particularly witty works. In ‘A Cow- ardly Proposal’, it is workers travelling on the back of a truck who receive a lashing from Danca’s brush. The acrylic painting sees workmen waving their arms at a woman from the relative safety of their moving truck. The men, says Danca, wouldn’t be so brave if the truck weren’t moving. ‘Love Potion’ meanwhile, depicts a story told to the artist by someone who had taken love potion from a traditional healer and is sharply critical of the practise. “You can see she is naked in front of the old man; she doesn’t even care if this traditional healer says that if she wants this l

ove potion to work she must sleep with him. She can do it.” In a solo show in June of this year at the African Art Centre, the artist gave viewers some insight into his history, growing up in a rural village in Port Shepstone. ‘My Memories’, bears out a sense of nostalgia for the family moments, and a village which is now destroyed. “In 1995 there was a war in the community” says Danca, referring to the violent clashes on Christ- mas day of that year, between the IFP and ANC which saw the Shobashobane village razed to the ground, and nineteen people killed, among them, Danca’s brother. Danca’s house was destroyed by fire, “but they can’t take back memories”, says Danca. ‘Memory Through the Window 1, 2 & 3’, de- pict the view through his bedroom

1, 2 & 3’, de- pict the view through his bedroom window in the morning, afternoon
1, 2 & 3’, de- pict the view through his bedroom window in the morning, afternoon

window in the morning, afternoon and evening. The hill which he used to gaze at was all that remained. Apart from his ongoing e personal painting projects, Danca is currently involved in a mural busi- ness in partnership with Henni Boshoff, Sabelo Kunene and Bheki Khambule. Called ‘Vulindlela’, the company has completed murals in Cape Town, Durban and most recently in George, a large scale mural depicting Heaven and Hell. Despite being forced to leave Port Shepstone after 1995’s violence, the artist still longs for the beauty of his home town. In a statement for his June exhibition, says Danca, “I wish I could move the walls and the hills (to where I am) as they bring me joy and happiness.” images l-r : Road, Pastor himself surfing the web, Love potion, Cowardly proposal, Hell. Above Welcome Danca

Love potion, Cowardly proposal, Hell. Above Welcome Danca Page 13 ������� ������� sasol
Love potion, Cowardly proposal, Hell. Above Welcome Danca Page 13 ������� ������� sasol
Page 13 ������� ������� sasol new signatures art competıtıon 09 Exhibition Pretoria Art
Page 13
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sasol new signatures
art competıtıon 09
Exhibition
Pretoria Art Museum – Arcadia Park
cnr Schoeman and Wessels Streets
27 August – 20 September 2009
Gallery hours: Tuesdays to Saturdays
from 10:00 to 17:00
For further information contact
association of arts pretoria
012 346 3100 or visit
www.sasolsignatures.co.za
Open for art. The Spier Contemporary 2010, the largest competition and exhibition of contemporary art
Open for art.
The Spier Contemporary 2010, the largest competition and exhibition of contemporary art in South Africa,
has put out an open call for submissions. The submission deadline is 30 October 2009.
For further information on the Spier Contemporary 2010, email: spiercontemporary@africacentre.net
website: www.spiercontemporary.co.za or telephone: 0860 111 458
2010, email: spiercontemporary@africacentre.net website: www.spiercontemporary.co.za or telephone: 0860 111 458
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Carmel Art 66 Vineyard Road, Claremont Ph: 021 671 6601 Email: carmel@global.co.za Website: www.carmelart.co.za Cape

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The South African Sale 13 & 14 October 2009 London Enquiries Giles Peppiatt +44 (0)

The South African Sale 13 & 14 October 2009 London

Enquiries Giles Peppiatt +44 (0) 20 7468 8355 giles.peppiatt@bonhams.com

Catalogue +44 (0) 1666 502 200 subscriptions@bonhams.com

Hannah O’Leary +44 (0) 20 7468 8213 hannah.oleary@bonhams.com

Illustrated:

Irma Stern (1894-1966) Ripe Fields oil on canvas Estimate: ZAR 2,000,000 - 2,500,000 (£150,000 - 200,000)

Estimate: ZAR 2,000,000 - 2,500,000 (£150,000 - 200,000) Bonhams 101 New Bond Street London W1S 1SR

Bonhams 101 New Bond Street London W1S 1SR www.bonhams.com/sasale

www.bonhams.com

Maggie Laubser, Composition with Head, Foliage and Huts, 1956 ( d e t a i

Maggie Laubser, Composition with Head, Foliage and Huts, 1956 (detail) R700 000 – 900 000

Huts, 1956 ( d e t a i l ) R700 000 – 900 000 Alexis
Huts, 1956 ( d e t a i l ) R700 000 – 900 000 Alexis
Huts, 1956 ( d e t a i l ) R700 000 – 900 000 Alexis

Alexis Preller Primavera Profile (detail) R400 000 – 600 000

A Pair of George III Silver Wine Coolers, Paul Storr, London, 1819 R600 000 –
A Pair of George III Silver Wine Coolers,
Paul Storr, London, 1819
R600 000 – 800 000
Irma Stern, Carla
signed and dated 1944
R2 500 000 – 3 500 000

We are currently inviting consignments for 2010

3 500 000 We are currently inviting consignments for 2010 Vanessa Phillips Ann Palmer Stephan Welz

Vanessa Phillips

currently inviting consignments for 2010 Vanessa Phillips Ann Palmer Stephan Welz M a r y -

Ann Palmer

inviting consignments for 2010 Vanessa Phillips Ann Palmer Stephan Welz M a r y - J

Stephan Welz

for 2010 Vanessa Phillips Ann Palmer Stephan Welz M a r y - J a n

Mary-Jane Darroll

Welz M a r y - J a n e D a r r o l

Bina Genovese

JOHANNESBURG Fax: +27 (0) 11 728 8247

jhb@straussart.co.za www.straussart.co.za 89 Central Street, Houghton, Johannesburg, 2198

Tel: +27 (0) 11 728 8246

CAPE TOWN Tel: +27 (0) 87 806 8780 Fax: +27 (0) 21 683 6085

The Oval, 1st Floor Colinton House, 1 Oakdale Rd, Newlands, 7700

Mobile : +27 (0) 78 044 8185 ct@straussart.co.za