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THE BUSINESS SCHOOL

Postgraduate Dissertation
BMS0013

MODULE HANDBOOK
2015-2016

CONTENTS
This handbook provides information about the module and its operation. Please study it carefully.

Sectio
n

Page

INTRODUCTION / WELCOME

MODULE SPECIFICATION

THE MODULE TEAM

4
4.1
4.2

DELIVERY INFORMATION
Delivery schedule
Module specific attendance requirements

5
5
5

5
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4

5
5
6
13
13

5.5
5.6
5.7

ASSESSMENT INFORMATION
The assessment strategy
Assessment brief(s)
Assessment deadlines
Process for requesting an extension or submitting a claim for
Extenuating Circumstances (ECs)
Formative assessment
Arrangements for the return of work and feedback
Tutor reassessment

6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5

GENERAL INFORMATION
Academic misconduct and referencing information
Further reading
Access to facilities
Health and Safety information
Academic Skills/Subject Librarian

14
14
14
15
15
15

APPENDIX 1: Dissertation Format - Good Practice Advice-Notes

16
27
28
30
33
41

APPENDIX 2: Cover/Title Page


APPENDIX 3: Declaration Form
APPENDIX 4: Ethical Form

APPENDIX 5: Marking Criteria and Feedback Form


APPENDIX 6: Research Strategy/Design

13
13
14

INTRODUCTION / WELCOME
Welcome to the Dissertation module. The Dissertation is a core element of most of the Masters
courses in the Department of Strategy and Marketing. It represents a significant final element of study
where students can develop their own academic and intellectual interests. The module also allows
students to develop their skills in research and independent work. The Dissertation allows students to
draw together different aspects of their study. You will be required to select a topic to research, design,
implement a study, report the findings and draw appropriate conclusions.
The purpose of this handbook is to set out the procedures relating the Dissertation process. The
handbook also offers some guidance about the structuring of the dissertation. Please note however,
that whilst there is a common broad structure and approach to undertaking research and writing up the
dissertation, each student will undertake the work in a different manner. The material in this handbook
is therefore indicative and students should discuss their own individual work with their supervisor.
There is a vast array of books in the library which can help to support you on the research methods
aspect of the work and it is not the purpose of this handbook to address this. A reading list is offered in
this handbook to assist you with this.

MODULE SPECIFICATION
1.

Module Code

BMS0013

2.

MODULE TITLE

Dissertation

3.

Schools involved in delivery

University of Huddersfield Business School

4.

Name of Course(s)

MSc International Business suite


MSc Management suite
MSc Marketing suite

5.

Module Leader

Eftychia Palamida

6.

Location for delivery

Queensgate

7.

Module Type

Core

8.

Credit Rating

60

9.

Level

Masters (FHEQ Level 7)

10.

Learning Methods

Student Contact: 6 hours


Guided Independent Study: 594 hours

11.

Pre-requisites

None

12.

Recommended Prior Study

None

13.

Co-requisites

None

14.

Shared Teaching

None

15.

Professional Body Requirements

None

16.

Barred Combinations

None

17.

Graded or Non Graded

Graded

18.

Synopsis

19.

To enable students to carry out a substantial piece of individual research in the field of the
students degree.
To allow students to deepen their understanding of a particular area relevant to their degree.
To allow students to present an account of their research to a high academic and professional
standards, in a form appropriate to the intended audience.
Outline Syllabus
It is not possible to provide a general syllabus for this type of module. Students are required to
conduct an in-depth piece of individual research on a topic of their own choice in an approved
domain. It is expected that the student will select a research topic which corresponds to his/her
own particular interests and thus allows him/her to develop a more specialised knowledge and
understanding of this area.
The Dissertation will involve review of the literature, research design, appropriate data collection
and data analysis. The Dissertation will also drawn conclusions and make recommendations
where appropriate. The interpretation and evaluation of the findings to be reported to a high
professional standard.

20.

Learning Outcomes
Knowledge and Understanding Outcomes
On completion of this module students will:
1. Have developed an in-depth knowledge and understanding of a specific area within a subject
area relevant to the degree course.
2. Have demonstrated an understanding of the way that the research process has implications
for the development of knowledge in a specific area relevant to the degree course.
Ability Outcomes
On completion of this module students will be able to:
3. Design, implement and write-up an extended piece of work at Masters-level.
4. Conduct this research in a professional manner
5. Produce a written account of the research in the format of a Dissertation which conforms to
the usual academic conventions.

21.

Assessment Strategy

21.1 Formative Assessment


Students will work with a supervisor to develop their ideas and receive interim feedback about
their work.
21.2 Summative Assessment
Assessment tasks (including assessment weightings)
Assessment will be through the presentation of a dissertation (100% weighting) on a topic
relevant to the degree course, normally of the order of no less than 15,000 and no more than
20,000 words.
Final assessment.
Tutor reassessment is not available on this module.
The assignment is not anonymously marked.

Assessment Criteria
The assessment for criteria is as set out in the Huddersfield University Business School
Assessment Guidelines. The guidelines provide criteria for the assessment of both coursework
and examinations.
The criteria of assessment are:
1. The ability to select an appropriate topic of investigation, establish a clear set of aims and
objectives for the research and demonstrate a clear conceptual framework.
2. The ability to demonstrate a thorough grasp of the relevant literature and the way in which the
review of the literature has been used to shape the research design.
3. The application of appropriate methodologies and data collection.
4. The application of appropriate analytical tools.
5. The ability to draw appropriate conclusions and relate the findings to the literature.
22.

Learning Strategy
Supervised individual work. The students will be encouraged to shape their ideas for the
Dissertation during the Research Methods and Techniques module. Thereafter, all students will
be allocated a personal supervisor with whom they must negotiate a research project and meet
on a regular basis. The allocation of supervisor will be based subject-specialism.
Due to the nature of the learning outcomes of the module, the overall design, implementation
and completion will be the responsibility of the student.

THE MODULE TEAM


The address for the Department within which your module is situated is:
Department of Strategy, Marketing & Economics
University of Huddersfield Business School
Queensgate
Huddersfield
HD1 3DH
Staff involved in the organisation and delivery of this module are as follows:
Mr Mike Hopkinson

Course
Administrator

BS1/03

01484 473106
mike.hopkinson@hud.ac.uk

Mrs Gill Healey

Departmental
Secretary

BS2/51

01484 472742
g.healey@hud.ac.uk

Notification of
Absence

Business School
Reception

N/A

Ms Eftychia Palamida

Module Leader

BS2/04

01484 472192
e.palamida@hud.ac.uk

N/A*

Supervisors

N/A*

N/A*

BusinessSchoolAttendance@hud.ac.uk

Note: * Names and contact details of supervisors along with research interests will be provided in
unilearn.

You can normally expect academic staff to be available in their offices at the times displayed on the
notices outside their rooms you do not need an appointment to meet with staff during these times.
Contact details for all Business School staff can be found at http://www.hud.ac.uk/uhbs/staff
Course Administrator
The Course Administrator has responsibility for providing a full and responsive administrative service in

support of the processes and procedures associated with student and course administration. If you
have a problem in accessing systems for results, Unilearn or issues with your module, please contact
your Course Administrator. They can also give you guidance in relation to the submission of
Extenuating Circumstances and take details of any evidence being submitted in relation to your claim.
Departmental Administrator
The Departmental Administrator can be contacted with general enquiries.
Module Leader
The Module Leader has the overall responsibility for organising, delivering and assessing a module. It
is the Module Leader who you should see with any queries or problems related to a specific module, if
the Course Administrator or Departmental Secretary cant help.
Supervisors
The dissertation supervisor is appointed in an advisory capacity.
They are not responsible for obtaining or lending research materials nor are they to be expected to
participate in any of the work to be undertaken, e.g. writing questionnaires, writing letters,
programming or performing calculations.
Students should only engage in activities in which they feel they have competence, or, of course, can
acquire that competence. Direction will be given by dissertation supervisors with regard to reading
matter, the structure of the research, the content and the suitability of methodologies suggested by the
student.
It is important that regular contact is maintained between the student and their supervisor. The
frequency and the duration of these meetings, and the form they take, will depend upon the nature of
the project and is a matter for the parties concerned. Meetings should not be less infrequent than
fortnightly, and it is a requirement that your Dissertation Supervisor sees your primary dataset as it is
collected rather than just at the end, or not at all!
4

DELIVERY INFORMATION

4.1

Delivery schedule
The Dissertation module has no formal classes. The main teaching method is through individual
private study. This is supported by an individual supervisor.
You have 6 hours tutored supervision with your allocated supervisor.
The supervisor will be allocated by the Module Leader during the academic year, normally at least two
terms before final submission.

4.2

Attendance requirements
As a registered student of the University, you are expected to attend your scheduled meetings with
your supervisors. Students are expected to take responsibility for making contact with the supervisor to
arrange meetings. The exact pattern of meetings between students and supervisor will vary, but it is
expected that meetings take place at least fortnightly.
Students are reminded that attending supervisory meetings is an aspect of attendance behaviour and
will be noted. If you miss meetings or are late, your absence may be noted and you may find that you
have to explain your poor attendance. Continued poor attendance will lead to exclusion from your
course.
The
regulations
governing
this
can
be
found
at
http://www.hud.ac.uk/registry/regulationsandpolicies/studentregs just click on the Student Attendance
Policy.
For full details on how to register your attendance and report any periods of absence, please refer to
your course handbook.

ASSESSMENT INFORMATION

5.1

The assessment strategy


100% weighting: Dissertation (15,000-20,000 excluding bibliography or reference list, footnotes and

appendices)

5.2

Assessment brief(s)
Assessment will be through the presentation of a dissertation on a topic relevant to the degree course.
The Dissertation is a written report of the design, implementation analysis of a piece of individual
research. The Dissertation itself should be written according to academic conventions and structured
accordingly.
Students are required to conduct an in-depth piece of individual research on a topic of their own
choice in an approved domain. It is expected that the student will select a research topic which
corresponds to his/her own particular interests and thus allows him/her to develop a more specialised
knowledge and understanding of this area. Primary data collection is a requirement of the module.
The Dissertation Topic
Students frequently encounter problems in properly defining their dissertations. A dissertation which
begins life as a vague statement of the sort, I want to do something in product policy, invariably
becomes aimless, troublesome (to the author) and prolonged. The end product is often of dubious
value. Instead of defining the aim of the dissertation in terms of an area of interest, e.g. product
planning, it ought to be framed in the form of a specific problem which the candidate has identified and
wishes to investigate.
Once a dissertation has specified its objectives in a clear manner then the scope of the work and the
direction it will take are quite clear.
The stated aim of your dissertation should make clear the nature and scope of the work to be
undertaken.
Dissertations can be based on any single or combination of disciplines and subjects in the degree
course. However you must realise that your dissertation has to be focussed, demonstrate original
thought and appropriate academic gravitas. This can often be accomplished more professionally by
concentrating upon a single discipline.
Students, who experience difficulties in selecting areas of study for their dissertations, may consult
members of staff in order to solicit ideas. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the student to
present a suitable research proposal, and, therefore, staff are not obliged to provide suggestions.
The Dissertation Research Process
Dissertation work is intended to give students the opportunity to display analytical abilities via:
a specialised dissertation covering a narrow field within a discipline with emphasis on rigour and
precision of treatment.
or
a dissertation which embraces several relevant subject areas and yields an opportunity for the student
to interrelate these disciplines.
In either case it is the analytical quality which is of importance. The dissertation is directly related to the
research process.
Research is a planned, systematic search for information for the purpose of increasing our
understanding of individuals, groups, events or phenomena. The collection of data is not in itself
research. It is analysis, the interpretation of the gathered data, which forms the essence of the
research process. Note, therefore that your dissertation should place due emphasis upon the analysis
and should devote considerable attention to any resulting conclusions. Dissertations which contain
only a few pages of data analysis and conclusion are seldom of any real substance. Nor do they earn
good marks.
There are, of course, different kinds of research, distinguished by the form of the question posed and
the methods adopted to obtain an answer. The following are examples of two quite distinct types:
a) Descriptive Research: this is the systematic observation and description of an existing situation or

event. An example of descriptive research would be reporting of a case study and a discussion of how
it fitted into a theoretical framework. Examples of this might be how a payment system fitted with
motivational theory, how a training scheme fitted with training theory or how a new product launch was
influenced by marketing theory.
b) Experimental Research: this is an attempt to establish a relationship between two or more factors
by controlling all the other factors which could account for their apparent relationship. We frequently do
this in model building, simulation exercises and in the development of economic theory. Statistical
techniques will be used to handle quantitative data n this type of research.
Thus, the purpose of research can be to describe a given situation, to explain why certain events
occur, or to predict what is likely to happen under specific conditions. Irrespective of the purpose or
form of the investigation the whole process consists of a number of steps.
Figure 1 below, sets out the dissertation process from the setting up of the terms of reference to the
final submission of the project or dissertation report.
The steps set out in Figure 1 constitute a framework having wider application than research. They can
also be useful in many kinds of problem solving such as managerial decision-making. At each step,
certain activities must be completed before proceeding to the next. Good research is well-planned
research and for those of you intending to perform well in the final year of the course, self-discipline
and organisation are essential.
Figure 1: Research Dissertation Process

Dissertation Structure/Layout
The dissertation must include the following materials and sections, in the sequence indicated. Students
should discuss the structure of their own dissertation with the supervisor especially when it comes to
the content of each chapter. Make sure that you include all core headings of the main body of the
dissertation and use the style shown below so that headings and subheadings are numbered.
A detailed overview of the Dissertation Format - Good Practice Advice - Notes is shown in
Appendix 1.
Title page
This is a single page that should include title of the dissertation, your name, date, degree and
declaration of original authorship. Please see Appendix 2 for an example.
Declaration Form (please see Appendix 3)
Ethical Form (please see Appendix 4)
ABSTRACT
Acknowledgements
Table of Contents
List of Tables (if applicable)

page i
page ii
page iii
page iv

List of Figures (if applicable)


List of other types of material: maps, photos, etc. (if applicable)
List of Abbreviations (if applicable)

page v

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Title of First Major Subheading
1.1.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
1.1.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
1.2 Title of Second Major Subheading
1.2.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
1.2.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
.

page 1
page
page
page
page
page
page

page vi

page 5
2. LITERATURE REVIEW
2.1 Title of First Major Subheading
2.1.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
2.1.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
2.2 Title of Second Major Subheading
2.2.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
2.2.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
.
3. METHODOLOGY
3.1 Title of First Major Subheading
3.1.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
3.1.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
3.2 Title of Second Major Subheading
3.2.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
3.2.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
.
4. ANALYSIS AND RESULTS
4.1 Title of First Major Subheading
4.1.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
4.1.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
4.2 Title of Second Major Subheading
4.2.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
4.2.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
.
5. DISCUSSION
5.1 Title of First Major Subheading
5.1.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
5.1.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
5.2 Title of Second Major Subheading
5.2.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
5.2.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
.
6. CONCLUSIONS
6.1 Title of First Major Subheading
6.1.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
6.1.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
6.2 Title of Second Major Subheading
6.2.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
6.2.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
.
7. LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH
7.1 Title of First Major Subheading
7.1.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
7.1.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
7.2 Title of Second Major Subheading
7.2.1 Title of First Subsidiary Subheading
7.2.2 Title of Second Subsidiary Subheading
.

page
page
page
page
page
page
page 10
page
page
page
page
page
page
page 15
page
page
page
page
page
page
page 20
page
page
page
page
page
page
page 25
page
page
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page 30
page
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page

REFERENCES

page 35

APPENDICES
Appendix A: Title of appendix
Appendix B: Title of appendix
.

page 45
page 45
page 46
page

Submission Guidelines
Hand-in

Dissertations should be handed in to Business School Reception on the date of


submission. Work submitted after this date (electronic or hard copy) will be
considered late.
Copies may sent by post but students should ensure that they arrive by the
deadline. Copies sent by post should be addressed to:
The Business School
BMS0013 Submission
University of Huddersfield
Queensgate
Huddersfield
HD1 3DH

Copies

TWO identical hard copies should be submitted. These will not be returned to
the student so it is recommended a third copy is also produced to be retained
by the student for future reference.
Additionally, an electronic copy should be submitted on using the Turnitin
system. You must submit the final copy of your work to this section. Once you
have submitted via this section, you will not be able to make any further
submissions. This is the version of the work that we will mark and scrutinise.
The work should be saved as one file as a Word File or a PDF. Microsoft
Publisher or Microsoft Works files will not be accepted. They must meet the
exact specifications detailed below. If not, they will be returned for amendment
and counted as late with a maximum mark of 40% only available.

Printing

Copies must be submitted in a single-side typewritten or printed form on paper


of international standard size A4.

Binding

The copies of the dissertation must be bound using either tape or spiral
binding. You are not required to have a hard cover.
A clear PVC sheet (acetate) should be used at the front. The back cover
should be black card. If you cannot find a black finish, then white or neutral is
suitable.
Students are advised to check with their proposed Binders prior to submission
to ensure that they meet their deadlines for submission (normally needed
several days prior to the submission date) and provide the binders with all the
information/material that they require binding the dissertation.

Front cover
wording

The dissertation must be prefaced by:


1. A title page giving the full title and a statement as follows: A dissertation
submitted to the University of Huddersfield for the degree of MSc/MA* (* as
applicable), the year of presentation; the candidates name and, if appropriate,
the name of the candidates Department.

10

A dissertation which is resubmitted must bear the year of re-submission on the


title page and not the year of original submission.
2. A declaration stating:
EITHER that no portion of the work referred to in the dissertation has been
submitted in support of an application for another degree or qualification of this
or any other university or other institution of learning;
OR: what portion of the referred to in the dissertation has been submitted in
support of an application for another degree or qualification of this or any
institution of learning.
Language

Dissertations must be written in English; quotations, however, may be given in


the language in which they were written. Dissertations should ALWAYS
ALWAYSALWAYS be written in third person and passive voice.

Abbreviations

Any abbreviations should be those in normal use. Where necessary a key to


abbreviations should be provided.

Colour

The default colours are black and white. Other colours should only be used
where appropriate and where they help the reader to understand the data
better.

Margins

Left (binding edge)


Bottom margin
All other margins

Spacing

1.5 spacing should be used in typescript, except for indented quotations where
single spacing may be used (and the size of the type font dropped to 11point).

Font

The font should be Times New Roman (12) or Arial (12).

Headings

A consistent style of Heading and Sub-headings should be used. For example:


FIRST LEVEL HEADINGS
Second Level Headings
Third Level Headings
Use a double return between paragraphs.
Use a double return before a heading and a single return after.
Use single return before and after a single spaced quotation.
Use a double space between sentences.

Page headers
and footers

These may be used to indicate the page number. It is acceptable to use a


header to indicate a chapter number, but not necessary.
Fancy headers and footers including logos (e.g. a company logo or university
logo) should NOT be used.

Footnotes

Footnotes should be in font size 8.

Captions

Bold and 1.5 spacing. Indicated above the Table/Figure/Graph. For example:
Figure 1. Conceptual Model

Bullet points

Bullet points should be used only where they are strictly necessary and should
be a simple circle shape. Fancy bullet points should be avoided.

Page numbers

All pages of the work, including appendices, references and bibliography,


should be numbered consecutively. The page number should be at the bottom
of the page either centred or right.

Length

The word length of a dissertation should be no less than 15,000 and no more
than 20,000 words excluding bibliography or reference list, footnotes and
appendices. Where appropriate the inclusion of interview transcripts and/or

40 mm
20 mm
20 mm

11

complex datasets would be outside of this limit and should be therefore


included in the appendix. A dissertation that only just made 12,000 words is
unlikely to being doing justice to the subject and the author. We would always
suggest at least 15,000 words.
Citations /
References

All citations should be at the end of the work. No chapter-end citations should
be used.
The APA 6th referencing conventions should be used. A guide for the APA 6th
System
is
available
at
https://www.hud.ac.uk/library/finding-info/apareferencing

Marking process
Each Dissertation is marked by the Supervisor (1st marker) and a second independent marker (2nd
marker). The markers then meet to discuss the work and agree on a mark. In exceptional cases,
where agreement cannot be reached, the work is given to a 3rd marker. The grade awarded by the 3rd
marker stands. In line with the Universitys regulations, a sample of the work is sent to the External
Examiners for approval.
Marks
1. The pass grade for the module is 40%.
2. Students who are given a grade between 30 and 39% should re-submit the work at the next
opportunity, having improved the work to achieve a mark of 40%. The resubmitted work will be capped
at 40%.
3. Students who obtain a grade of 0 29% will Fail the module. They will be required to retake the
module. The resubmission date will be determined by the Course Assessment Board. Fees will be
charged for the re-take of the module.
Marking Criteria
Examiners look for a number of qualities in assessing work. The principal ones are:
1. Analytical quality and awareness of implications of conclusions and recommendations (Here it is
often the case that students give cursory attention to analysis, conclusions and recommendations with
the result that a potentially good dissertation receives a disappointing mark. This should be borne in
mind in writing up the work.)
2. Familiarity with the literature (theoretical underpinning)
3. Framing of research objectives
4. Methods of approach (Here credit is given for suitability of the methodology adopted and
acknowledgement of the limitations.)
5. Analysis & evaluation & appraisal of results
6. Awareness of theoretical & practical implications
7. Critical judgement
8. Clarity of expression & presentation
Detailed marking criteria and feedback form are shown in Appendix 5.
Plagiarism
Students must indicate any material contained in the work which has been used in other publications.
The APA 6th referencing conventions should be used.
Plagiarism is regarded very seriously and students who have been found guilty of major plagiarism in
the past have failed their year modules. Make sure that you do not put yourself in this position by
keeping a file of your source materials which you can show to your supervisor at regular intervals.

12

In addition there is an online service called TurnitinUK (JISC) to which we subscribe and can run all
work through to check for plagiarism. This is why you must submit an electronic copy of your work.
If you do not understand what we mean by plagiarism then proceed no further until you have read the
current University Regulations, seen the Academic Skills Tutors and discussed this with your
supervisor.
5.3

Assessment deadlines
Element of
assessment
Dissertation:
15,000 - 20,000
words excluding
bibliography or
reference list,
footnotes and
appendices

Submission
method
Turnitin
+
2 Typed and
Bound Copies

Submission date
09/09/2016
Applicable for
September 2015
start students

Receipt
issued
Yes

Date work and feedback


returned
Marks and Feedback will be
released as confirmed after
the Course Assessment
Board (CAB) meetings.

27/01/2017
Applicable for
January 2016 start
students

Note: Details of the exact submission arrangements may vary nearer the actual submission date. Please
check Unilearn.

It is important that you keep a copy of all of the work you submit for assessment. You are strongly
advised to use the electronic storage system provided by the University, using the allocated space on
the K drive.
It is School policy that all assessed work must be submitted electronically via Turnitin, by 23:59 on the
published date of submission. No hard copies should be submitted unless this is identified as a
requirement in the Assessment Brief. Where hard copies are required, please ensure the work
submitted is stapled in the top left hand corner, not submitted in folders or ring binders and your
student ID number and name are clearly visible on the assessment.
If you are not able to submit by the deadline, you must inform your Course Leader. Depending on the
circumstances, you may need to ask for an extension or submit an extenuating circumstances form
see Section 5.4 below.
Assessed work which is submitted late but within five working days of the agreed submission date will
be accepted and the maximum mark available for that piece of assessment will be 40%. This does not
apply to the submission of assessed work relating to Tutor Reassessment, referral or deferral
requirements but does apply to previously agreed extended or renegotiated deadlines. Work submitted
later than this without an approved extension will receive a mark of 0%.
Please note that loss of data or printing error are not deemed to be acceptable reasons for the late
submission of work.
It is important that the following regulations are adhered to regarding assessment word limits as
penalties do apply if limits are exceeded. In essence, you will only be awarded a grade on the content
of your assessment up to the word limit and anything past that will be discounted.
1. The word limit is as set out in the assessment task and is not subject to variation.
2. The limit excludes the bibliography or reference list, footnotes, appendices and details of the
assessment task.
3. The mark to be awarded will therefore be that which applies at this word limit.
5.4

Process for requesting an extension or submitting a claim for Extenuating Circumstances


(ECs)
There are procedures in place for you to request a short extension to a deadline but this request has to

13

be made no later than two working days after the published submission date.
If you have difficulties such as a short term illness and need to request an extension, you should
submit a request via the eCover extension and submission system supporting information to confirm
your circumstances may be required. A guide to the eCover system is available on the intranet.
Late requests for extensions are not accepted and you run the risk of scoring a maximum of 40% for
that piece of work if submitted late but within 5 working days of the original deadline, or 0% if submitted
later than this without an approved extension.
The University understands that there may be times when your ability to complete a piece of assessed
work or to concentrate on your studies may be hindered by factors beyond your control such as
illness or significant personal difficulties. The regulations include a process to allow students who are
affected in this way to bring these extenuating circumstances (ECs) to the attention of the relevant
people in the School (such as the Course Assessment Board) so that proper account can be taken.
Please be aware that a claim for ECs will usually only be accepted where youve been able to
demonstrate that the circumstances described have had a direct impact on you and were substantial
and unexpected - in all other cases students would be expected to negotiate an extension. The
regulations
for
ECs
can
be
found
in
Section
5
at
http://www.hud.ac.uk/registry/regulationsandpolicies/studentregs
When completing an EC form please be careful to include the correct modules and assessments and
to be sure that you attach appropriate and acceptable evidence to your claim.
Once completed your claim has to be submitted to the Course Administration Office (BS1/03) within 5
working days of the date by which your assessment should have been completed.
5.5

Formative assessment
Students will work with a supervisor to develop their ideas and receive interim feedback about their
work.

5.6

Arrangements for the return of work and feedback


You should normally receive feedback on your assessments three teaching (i.e. term time) weeks after
the submission date for the assessment. Dates for the return of work and feedback are indicated within
Section 5.3 of this handbook. Feedback should help you understand why you received the mark and
what you can do to improve your performance in future assessments.
You can obtain feedback on your coursework by accessing it via Turnitin three weeks after the
submission date. You will be given a lecture detailing general feedback on the coursework question in
the first lecture three weeks after the submission date. You may discuss any queries you have about
your coursework feedback in the lecture or by appointment with the tutor who marked it.

5.7

Tutor Reassessment
Tutor Reassessment (TR) is where a student is given a single opportunity to re-submit an eligible piece
of work and for it to be remarked prior to the meeting of the Course Assessment Board. Tutor
reassessment will only be offered if you submit a piece of work for the original assessment and
achieve a mark of between 0 and 39%. The maximum mark available for a tutor reassessment is 40%.
The full regulations for tutor reassessment can be found in Section E at
http://www.hud.ac.uk/registry/regulationsandpolicies/studentregs
Tutor reassessment is not available on this module.

GENERAL INFORMATION

6.1

Academic misconduct and referencing information


The University regards any action by a student that may result in an unfair academic advantage as a
serious offence. It is your responsibility to ensure at all times that the assessments you complete are
entirely your own work and that you have used the relevant referencing technique correctly and in full.
The full set of regulations which govern Academic Integrity can be found under Section 4, Assessment
Regulations 3 and 4 at http://www.hud.ac.uk/registry/regulationsandpolicies/studentregs

14

Further information on academic integrity, including an overview of the support available for
referencing, can be found within your course handbook; it is important that you familiarise yourself with
this information.
6.2

Further reading
Recommended Reading
Peer-reviewed articles relating to your dissertation topic.
Recommended Research Methods Textbooks
Birn, R. J. (2002). The international handbook of market research techniques. Kogan Page Publishers.
Bryman, A. (2012). Social research methods. Oxford university press.
Bryman, A., & Bell, E. (2015). Business research methods. Oxford university press.
Burns, R. P., & Burns, R. (2008). Business research methods and statistics using SPSS. Sage.
Collis, J., & Hussey, R. (2013). Business research: A practical guide for undergraduate and
postgraduate students. Palgrave Macmillan.
Silverman, D. (2011). Interpreting Qualitative Data. Sage.
Field, A. (2013). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS statistics. Sage.
George, D., & Mallery, P. (2012). IBM SPSS Statistics 21: Step by Step. Allyn and Bacon.
Hine, D., & Carson, D. (2007). Innovative methodologies in enterprise research. Edward Elgar
Publishing.
Jankowicz, A. D. (2005). Business research projects. Cengage Learning EMEA.
Lee, S. H. (2006). Constructing effective questionnaires. Handbook of human performance technology,
Hoboken, NJ: Pfeiffer Wiley, 760-779.
Mason, J. (2002). Qualitative Researching. Sage.
Maylor, H., & Blackmon, K. (2005). Researching business and management: a roadmap for success.
Palgrave Macmillan.
McGiven, Y. (2005). The Practice of Market and Social Research: An Introduction. FT Prentice Hall.
Quinlan, C. (2011). Business Research Methods. South-Western Cengage Learning.
Robson, C. (2002) Real World Research. Blackwell.
Robson, C. (2011). Real world research: a resource for users of social research methods in applied
settings. Blackwell.
Saunders, M., Lewis, P. & Thornhill, A. (2012). Research Methods for Business Students. Pearson.
Seale, C., Gobo, G., Gubrium, J. F., & Silverman, D. (2004). Qualitative research practice. Sage.
Seale, C., Gobo, G., Gubrium, J. F., & Silverman, D. (2004). Qualitative research practice. Sage,
Thousand Oaks.
Tayor, S. (2001). Business Statistics. Palgrave MacMillan.
Thomas, A. B. (2004). Research skills for management studies. Psychology Press.

6.3

Arrangements for borrowing equipment/accessing labs/studios


If you wish to borrow equipment or gain access to specialist facilities please discuss your requirements

15

with your Course leader or Year Tutor.


6.4

Aspects of Health and Safety specific to the module


An overview of the Health and Safety arrangements in place for both the University and the Business
School can be found within your course handbook.

6.5

Academic Skills/Subject Librarian


Learning Development Group (LDG)
The LDG tutors understand the skills and processes which make a good dissertation. Students come
to the LDG for support in all areas of dissertation writing. The LDG tutors would expect students to
come for appointments periodically throughout the writing process, so that we support your academic
development. We do not offer a proof-reading service or last minute checking. Please take time to
consider how the LDG can help you and give yourself enough time to make corrections or review work
between appointments.
Subject librarians
Subject librarians can help with your dissertation research. You can get guidance on finding
appropriate books, journal articles, market research and other relevant information for your topic area,
most of which you will not find on Google. You can also get information which helps you to search
using Summon and techniques to organise your references. A subject librarian will be at the Library
Help Centre Monday Sunday (during term time) on floor four of the library, no appointment required.
If you would like a one-to-one appointment, emaillibrary@hud.ac.uk with a short description of your
dissertation topic. You can also find resources for your subject area by going
to http://hud.libguides.com/ and select Business.

Appendix 1: Dissertation Manuscript Format - Good Practice Advice - Notes

The Dissertation Manuscript must include the following materials and sections, in the sequence ind

Clear Acetate
Protection Sheet
Front Cover

FORMAT
Recommended as a protection for the card
cover.

GOOD PRACTICE ADVICE

NOT

The title page should follow the format shown in


Appendix 2.

The title should be academic

Try
you
stat
spe
spe
stud
e.g.
SME
stud

For example:
THE ROLE OF THE FINANCIAL
CRISIS IN VENTURE CREATION:
OPPORTUNITIES AND BARRIERS IN
THE UK
Whilst there are good and less good
journals and good and less good
articles, consider how your title
compares in terms of conveying
information and gravitas to those titles
that you have read in your literature
review.
Declaration

As per our standard layout.

Dec
3) m
inclu

16

Ethics Statement

As per our standard layout.

Ethics approval must be obtained prior


to collecting data. Full information about
the Ethics approval process is shown in
the Ethics Policies and Procedures
resource in Unilearn. Ethics approval is
considered in the first instance by the
supervisor.

Abstract

The abstract should not exceed 250 words.


Single space the text. The importance of the
abstract will be appreciated by the candidate
who may well have suffered during a literature
search by finding abstracts which did not
accurately reflect the contents of the works to
which they referred. Researchers and students
who may in the future consult your work will
invariably use just the abstract to determine
whether or not it covers their own area of
interest. More pragmatically it is your selling
pitch. The abstract is not an introduction to the
dissertation. Rather, it is a summary of the
dissertation, so you should pay sufficient
attention to outlining your results / findings.

Probably the penultimate task when


you doubtless never wish to see your
dissertation ever again but the second
thing that you reader will see. Sweat
blood over your abstract, make every
word count if you intended to dash it
off in five minutes do not I often
will spend up to an hour crafting this
important window to my work.

Acknowledgements

It is customary that the dissertation carry an


acknowledgement of assistance, supervision or
collaboration given by companies, other
agencies and individuals.

Customary but not compulsory your


chance to briefly thank whoever you
want to if anyone. Please bear in
mind professional courtesy here.

Table of Contents

The table of contents contains the headings and


subheadings of the chapters and sections of the
dissertation, with the numbers of the pages on
which these chapters and sections begin.
The title page and abstract are not entered in
the table of contents and therefore the first item
to be listed would be the preface.
The minimum content of the table of contents
should be the preface, each chapter or main
division title, each appendix and the references.
All headings should correspond exactly in
wording, arrangement, punctuation and
capitalisation with the headings as they appear
in the body of the written project.

List of Tables (if any)


List of Figures (if any)
List of other types of
material: maps, photos,
etc. (if any)
List of Abbreviations(if
any)

If the dissertation contains charts, figures, maps,


tables, photographs or other types of material,
each series of these should be listed separately
on the page immediately following the table of
contents. Each list should follow the format of
the table of contents.
The number of the item is given at the left-hand
margin of the page under the appropriate
column heading entitled charts, figures,
maps, tables, or photographs. The number is
followed by the title of the item, given exactly as
it appears in the body of the thesis tables,
figures etc. and should be numbered
accordingly to their chapter and position in that

DO NOT use pictures / cartoons /


logos unless they relate to the
research. e.g. if you are referring to the
company image reference to the logo
would be acceptable as would a few
illustrations of CD covers etc. (though
do not make it too many, you could put
them into the appendices.)
Avoid using colour as far as possible. If
you are using graphs try and make
sure that they work in Black and white
or grey tone. If you are using
illustrations colour may be essential
but do keep them to a minimum.

17

Ethi
mus
sup
diss

chapter. Thus, figure 2.10 is the tenth figure in


chapter two.

Make sure that all Abbreviations used


in the manuscript appear in the List.
Abbreviations are a shorter form of a word or a
Make sure that the first time that you
phrase. The list of Abbreviations should be
want to write something about e.g. the
presented in alphabetical order and look like
Theory of Planned Behaviour you
present the full phrase in the
SMEs
Small and Medium Enterprises manuscript and afterwards using the
TPB
Theory of Planned Behaviour abbreviation TPB. This will save words
and would improve the flow of the
manuscript.

General Instructions
The dissertation begins with the first page of the first chapter. Each chapter should represent an important division of the p
to dividing the text into paragraphs and the use of subheadings to help the reader. Good dissertations have chapters arran
the reader to move smoothly through the work. Each chapter should have a title identifying the subject contained therein, a
The chapters are identified by Arabic numerals e.g. 1, 2, 3 etc. and the sub-chapters as specified 1.1, 1.2, etc. Start each n
The referencing convention to be used in the project is the APA6th style. The authors name is followed by the date of publ
to this work is then given in the references/bibliography chapter at the end of the dissertation or the chapters. Details regar
available at the Huddersfield University Learning Centre / Library Guide https://www.hud.ac.uk/library/finding-info/apa-refer
Do not use headers and (only) place the page number in your footer centred or right side.

Clearly label any table, chart, diagram etc. that you use in your dissertation using the convention of chapter number followe
table number 4 in chapter 3, will appear as Table 3.4, and follow the table number with the heading for the exhibit.
For example: Table 3.4 R & D Expenditure as s Percent of Sales
All diagrams, figures and tables used in the text, that are not derived from your own work must be referenced.

Footnotes must only be used in moderation to make short statements of comment, amplification or qualification which migh
of the text. Long and/or frequent footnote should be avoided, and bibliographical references should never be put as footnot
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
(Typically 10% of
the overall number
of words)

Introduce the subject under investigation (include


citations!!!).
Provide the reasons why it is important to
investigate the specific subject (include citations!!!).
Present the aim of the study.
Present the research objectives of the study.
Present the research questions of the study.
At the end include a Chapter Overview: Provide
a short description of all the chapters that will
follow. This will map out the work for the reader.

CHAPTER 2
LITERATURE
REVIEW

Introduction: Introduce what you will present in


this chapter
Main Body: A Literature review is a discussion of
the academic literature by using a logical structure
and is written around themes and clusters of ideas.
Therefore, it might help you to use subheadings
where needed.

This chapter initially sets the general


scene and afterwards provides a detailed
overview of what the specific study
investigates. What you need to do is to
articulate your broad perspective and then
sub-divide it into researchable
components.
Make sure that your research questions
should be in accordance to your research
objectives and both should be linked to
your conceptual model. Do not state or
introduce new info!!!! Keep the same
components-aspects-variables!!!

A literature review does what it says it


reviews the appropriate literature what
is out there and perhaps what is not out
there. You may have to adapt literature to
you specific needs. Articles are your tools
that help you build your argument.
Notice that the research objectives and

18

The literature review should be based on academic


journal articles. Make sure the information is
correctly cited.
Academic textbooks are acceptable in some
discipline areas but should be kept to a minimum.
Non academic sources should go into other parts of
the dissertation.
Include tables / figures/ diagrams if relevant and
make sure the source is cited.
Make sure that you present your conceptual model
here.
In the case that you are employing a quantitative
research approach, hypotheses should be also
included.
Summary: Summarise what have been stated in
this chapter and Link it to the next chapter

questions should be directly linked to your


literature review. This means that for
every research objective/question that you
have you need to present the relevant
theoretical background in your literature
review.
For example, if your research objective is
to determine identify the opportunities and
barriers in the venture creation context
then you need to present and discuss the
opportunities and barriers that previous
research has identified.
Your conceptual model should be linked
to YOUR LITERATURE REVIEWand
should graphically present the theory of
your study.
In the case that you are employing a
quantitative research approach,
hypotheses formulation is vital. You need
to present the relationships that you
expect to find in your study based on the
relevant theoretical background.
Hypotheses should ALWAYS be based on
theory. For example, if the theory
indicates a positive relationship between
intentions and behaviours and in your
study you want to test for the applicability
of this theory, then your hypothesis should
be:
H1: Intentions are positively related to
behaviours.

CHAPTER 3
METHODOLOGY

Introduction: Introduce what you will present in


this chapter
Main Body:
This section discusses and defends how you are
going to methodologically approach your study.
You need to include subchapters in order to
organise your work. Please see sub-chapters
below
Research strategy/design (Present very briefly your
overall methodological approach. You may want to
use a figure in order to show the reader from the
beginning what you did explanations and details
will follow in the following sub-chapters; please see
Appendix 6 for a figure example)
Research philosophy (Interpretivism or Positivism)
Research approach (Inductive or Deductive)
Research methods (Qualitative or Quantitative)

In the methodology chapter your


competence as a researcher will be
examined. This is the tipping point
chapter between the literature review and
reporting the results. You should be
prepared in this chapter to be reflective, to
critique (but not to destroy) what you have
done ... to show that you are a competent
and thinking researcher. Therefore, make
sure that your research questions can be
answered by the research methodology
that you have chosen.
For example, if your research questions
are related to whether a relationship
between two research variables exists
(e.g. Do intentions relate to behaviours?)
then you can not answer this question by
implementing a qualitative research
design. Instead, you need a quantitative
research approach in order to check for
the existence of the relationship by using
the SPSS software.

19

P
g
a
s
p
y
H
s
s
b

Sample size and characteristics (How have you


selected your sample? Provide all the info that
describes your final sample whether this refers to
companies, individuals or both, report the actual
response rate e.g. you have distributed 200
questionnaires or asked 50 individuals to
participate in your interviews but how many of them
did actually participate in the study?)
Data collection (Questionnaires with pilot study or
Interviews/Focus groups, What type and which
specific questions have been used in the
questionnaire in order to measure the study
variables? What type and which specific questions
have been used in the interview?)
Data analysis (NVivo or SPSS)
Ethical Considerations (Anonymity and
confidentiality)
Summary: Summarise what have been stated in
this chapter and Link it to the next chapter

CHAPTER 4
RESULTS

Introduction: Introduce what you will present in


this chapter
Main Body: This is the chapter where you present
your Primary Data analysis.

In qualitative studies this would mean presenting


the interview transcriptions (only relevant
information to your research questions should be
presented here - detailed transcriptions can be
included in the appendix).
In quantitative studies this would mean presenting
the SPSS results (only relevant information to your
research questions should be presented here - full
SPSS outputs can be included in the appendix). In
this case you need to indicate whether hypotheses
has been accepted or rejected based on the SPSS
output.

The Methodology chapter needs


precision
For example the statement:
This study has administered 50
questionnaires. is too vague.
Enrich it with more detailsFor example:
The questionnaire has been mailed in
January 2016 to a convenience sample of
customer service managers in three water
utility companies in the UK.
Every time that you make a statement
regarding the chosen methodological
approach you need to justify it.
For example:
Considering that this research concerns
the relationship between the variables
under investigation, namely intentions and
behaviours, and that the aim of the study
is to test the applicability of the Theory of
Planned Behaviour while generalising the
findings, quantitative research methods
have been implemented (Saunders et. all,
2012).
Present the findings according the
research objectives/questions. Try to
follow exactly the same order as in your
research questions so that the reader can
easily make the link between the research
questions and the research findings.
Appropriate statistical analysis could be
used in qualitative studies (NVivo
software).
Appropriate statistical analysis should be
used in quantitative studies (SPSS
software). You may want to use tables,
graphs to help the reader understand your
findings.

Summary: Summarise what have been stated in


this chapter and Link it to the next chapter
CHAPTER 5
DISCUSSION

Introduction: Introduce what you will present in


this chapter
Main Body: Discussion of findings relate to the
literature review, your research

Discuss what you have found in your


study. DO NOT USE NUMBERS here
only present findings with words.
In order to discuss your findings you also

20

objectives/questions and the topic being


researched.
Again follow exactly the same order as in your
research questions and discuss the findings of your
study.
Include citations!!!!!!!!

need to compare them with previous


research. What did previous research
indicate (very briefly present what has
been stated in detail in the literature
review regarding findings from previous
research)? Are your findings in contrast
with previous research or do your findings
verify previous research results or do your
findings extent previous research? What
does this mean?

Summary: Summarise what have been stated in


this chapter and Link it to the next chapter
For example:
Quantitative studies - This study found
that intentions are positively related to
behaviours in the UK venture creation
context which contradicts previous
research (REF indicate which previous
studies you are referring to by including
citations) indicating that intentions do not
lead to action in Greece.
Qualitative studies - This study extents
previous research (REF indicate which
previous studies you are referring to by
including citations) by providing a
framework with barriers related to venture
creation in the UK during times of severe
financial constraints.
In case that your findings are not as
expected (for qualitative studies this
means that results do not add something
new to the theory for quantitative
studies this means that results are not in
line with what the theory indicates), you
may want to provide a possible
explanation for this.
CHAPTER 6
CONCLUSION

A conclusion should summarise whether you have


answered the research questions.
Link your findings with your research questions.
State why these are important both form a
theoretical and practical perspective.

CHAPTER 7
LIMITATIONS
AND FUTURE
RESEARCH

Limitations of the dissertation may reflect on time,


resources available, sample characteristics and
size, measurements, data analysis, aspects that
have been not included in the study and could
potentially provide a more holistic perspective of the
subject under investigation etc.
Future research refers to your
propositions/recommendation regarding what future
studies should do in order to verify your findings or
extend your study.

Simplest way is to repeat your research


aims and objectives, or research
questions and say briefly what you have
found.
DO NOT INTRODUCE NEW
INFORMATION INTO THE
CONCLUSION!!!
The best way is to present each limitation
separately and directly link this with future
research.
For example:
This study was based on relatively small
sample. Future research based on a larger
sample group is needed in order to verify
the results of this study.

21

APPENDIX OR
APPENDICES
(if any)

The principal purpose of an appendix is to keep the


text of the project from being cluttered and
interrupted with supplementary, minor and
illustrative materials. The text of pertinent
documents, tables that present extensive data, or
data of minor or ancillary importance, the text of
legal decisions or laws, very lengthy quotations,
excerpts from diaries, transcripts of minutes, forms
of documents, copies of sample questionnaires, and
the like, may be included as appendices.

Each appendix should begin on a separate page.


The appendix pages should continue the regular
pagination of the dissertation. Appendices should be
designated sequentially as Appendix A, Appendix B,
etc. and they should appear in the order that they
are referred to in the text. Whenever possible and
appropriate, the source of the material in the
appendix should be given.
REFERENCES

The Reference section should contain only the


works consulted and found relevant and thus cited
by the author in the dissertation. The inclusion of an
irrelevant work is as much a defect as the exclusion
of a relevant one. The references should be
arranged alphabetically by author using a consistent
style.

Use only the APA 6th convention.


DO NOT separate the list as books/papers
etc. It is one single a-z listing.
Your reference list would look better for
being single spaced, with one blank line
between each reference.

We expect a dissertation to have 50 - 100


references but the more the better!!!

R
s
li
c
y
in

W
p
p
2
le

D
r
H
C
h
in
Plain Card Cover
Clear Acetate
Protection Sheet

Appendix 2: Cover/Title Page Example


22

Supply and Demand for Labour in the


Financial Services industry in Jersey
Gilbert K Smith

September 2016

Thesis submitted to the University of Huddersfield


(Huddersfield University Business School)
in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Science in Business

No portion of the work referred to in the Dissertation has been submitted in support of an
application for another degree of qualification of this or any other University or institute of
learning.

23

Appendix 3: Declaration Form

Business School
Department of Strategy, Marketing and Economics
Declaration of Original Authorship
This declaration of Original Authorship must be bound into both copies of your
dissertation
Name:
Course:

Dissertation Title:

In submitting this dissertation, I confirm that:


(If you are unable to sign off any of the conditions (i - v)... you must refer this dissertation to
the module leader).
(i)

The material contained within this dissertation is all my own work. Where the work of
others has been drawn upon (for example: books; articles; unpublished papers
including the work of staff and students; non-book materials such as videos and audio
recordings; electronic publications on disk, CD-ROM or the internet), it has been
acknowledged and properly referenced using APA 6th notation.

(ii)

The work has not already been accepted in substance for any other degree and
is not being concurrently submitted in substance for any degree other than the one on
which I am currently registered.

(iii)

My original (primary) data has been seen by, and discussed with, my dissertation
supervisor.
I have down loaded an electronic version of this dissertation to Turn-it-in having made
allowance for any confidentiality issues.

(iv)
(v)

Si

If I consider any part of this work to be CONFIDENTIAL I have detailed on the


next page which parts are confidential.

gned:

Date:

24

If you believe that any part(s) or part of this Dissertation are/is confidential, then please help us either
by:
Stating below that the whole Dissertation is CONFIDENTIAL, or, referencing those pages that are
confidential.
If none of the dissertation is confidential ... then please leave this page out of your work.
Please remember that when submitting to Turn-it-in, you need to remove or edit any confidential
material.

25

Appendix 4: Ethical Form


THE UNIVERSITY OF HUDDERSFIELD
Business School
STUDENT PROJECT / DISSERTATION ETHICAL REVIEW
APPLICABLE TO ALL UNDERGRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
Please complete and return via email to your Project / Dissertation Supervisor along with the required
documents (shown below)
SECTION A: TO BE COMPLETED BY THE STUDENT
Before completing this section please refer to the Business School Research Ethics web pages. Students
should consult the appropriate ethical guidelines. The students supervisor is responsible for advising the
student on appropriate professional judgement in this review.
Please ensure that the statements in Section C are completed by the student and supervisor prior to
submission.
Project Title:
Student:
Student number:
Course:
Supervisor:
Project start date
SECTION B: PROJECT OUTLINE (TO BE COMPLETED IN FULL BY THE STUDENT)
Issue

Please provide sufficient detail for your supervisor to assess strategies used to
address ethical issues in the research proposal

Aim / objectives of the


study
These need to be clearly
stated and in accord with
the title of the study.
(Sensitive subject areas
which might involve
distress to the participants
will be referred to the
Course Approval Panel).
Brief overview of
research methodology
The methodology only
needs to be explained in
sufficient detail to show the
approach used (e.g.
survey) and explain the
research methods to be
used during the study.
Does your study require
any permission for
study? If so, please give

26

details
Participants
Please outline who will
participate in your
research. If your research
involves vulnerable groups
(e.g. children, adults with
learning disabilities), it
must be referred to the
Course Assessment Panel.
Access to participants
Please give details about
how participants will be
identified and contacted.
How will your data be
recorded and stored?
Confidentiality
Please outline the level of
confidentiality you will offer
respondents and how this
will be respected. You
should also outline about
who will have access to
the data and how it will be
stored. (This should be
included on information
sheet.)
Anonymity
Do you intend to offer
anonymity? If so, please
indicate how this will be
achieved.
Could the research
induce psychological
stress or anxiety, cause
harm or negative
consequences for the
participants (beyond the
risks encountered in
normal life)? If yes, you
should outline what
support there will be for
participants.

SECTION C SUMMARY OF ETHICAL ISSUES (TO BE COMPLETED BY THE STUDENT)


Please give a summary of the ethical issues and any action that will be taken to address the issue(s).

27

SECTION D ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS CHECKLIST (TO BE COMPLETED BY THE STUDENT)


Please supply to your supervisors copies of all relevant supporting documentation electronically. If
this is not available electronically, please provide explanation and supply hard copy
I have included the following documents
Information sheet

Yes

Not applicable

Consent form

Yes

Not applicable

Letters

Yes

Not applicable

Questionnaire

Yes

Not applicable

Interview schedule

Yes

Not applicable

SECTION E STATEMENT BY STUDENT


I confirm that the information I have given in this form on ethical issues is correct.
Signature _________________________________

Date: _____________________

Affirmation by Supervisor
I have read the Ethical Review Checklist and I can confirm that, to the best of my understanding, the
information presented by the student is correct and appropriate to allow an informed judgement on whether
further ethical approval is required

Signature ____________________________________

Date: _______________________

SECTION F: SUPERVISOR RECOMMENDATION ON THE PROJECTS ETHICAL STATUS


Having satisfied myself of the accuracy of the projects ethical statement, I believe that the appropriate action
is:
The project proceeds in its present form
The project proposal needs further assessment under the appropriate Course
Approval Panel
The project needs to be returned to the student for modification prior to further
action

All documentation must be submitted to the Course Department Office.

28

Appendix 5: Marking Criteria and Feedback Form


BMS0013 Dissertation marking criteria and grid
There are two levels at which the Dissertation should be judged: 1) its overall internal consistency the way the whole piece of work fits together; and 2) in
terms of its individual components. Feedback should be given at both levels as indicated on the feedback sheet.
The internal consistency should be treated as a first order criterion. This means that a dissertation cannot be awarded a class of degree mark above that
given to this category, whatever the performance in the other categories.
The individual elements of the dissertation should be treated as second order criteria. The second order criteria are designed to pick up specific features of
the dissertation which contribute to its overall coherence. A dissertation should receive a grade for three of these that reflect the standard achieved of the first
order criterion in order to achieve that mark. Less than three would mean the grade below (though in practice this is unlikely to happen very often.)
Marking procedures
Each Dissertation is marked by the Supervisor (1st marker) and a second independent marker (2nd marker). The markers then meet to discuss the work and
agree on a mark. In exceptional cases, where agreement cannot be reached, the work is given to a 3rd marker. The grade awarded by the 3rd marker stands.
In line with the Universitys regulations, a sample of the work is sent to the External Examiners for approval.
First order criteria
Internal consistency of
Dissertation

Distinction
70% and above
Extremely strong internal
consistency making the
project a convincing whole
which addresses the
original research
questions. Evidence of
originality. Impressive use
of information gathered to
support argument.

Good pass
60-69%
Good evidence of internal
consistency which relates
to original questions.
Good use of information
gathered to support
argument.

Satisfactory pass
50-59%
Some evidence of internal
consistency with
moderate attempt to
integrate different
sections. Moderate use of
information gathered to
support argument.

Second order criteria

Bare Pass
40-49%
Some, but limited,
evidence of internal
consistency which relates
to original questions but
with some weaknesses in
the integration of different
sections. Use of
information gathered but
with some weaknesses in
the integration of
evidence.

Refer
30-39%
Little evidence of internal
consistency which relates
to the original with
significant weaknesses in
the integration of different
sections. Limited use of
information gathered to
sustain the argument with
significant weaknesses in
the integration of
evidence.

Fail
0 29%
Lack of internal
consistency. Very limited
use of information
gathered to sustain the
argument with serious
weaknesses in the
integration of evidence.

INTRODUCTION

Focus
Rationale
Formulation

LITERATURE
REVIEW

Very clearly
formulated aim of the
study.
Very clearly
formulated research
objectives.
Very clearly
formulated research
questions.

Good pass
60-69%
Good evidence of
subject based focus.
Clear and well
thought through
rationale.
Clearly formulated
aim of the study.
Clearly formulated
research objectives.
Clearly formulated
research questions.

Satisfactory pass
50-59%
Satisfactory evidence
of subject focus.
Competent rationale
is provided.

Bare Pass
40-49%
Little subject focus.

Refer
30-39%
Lacks subject focus.

Rationale present but


of marginal relevance

Competently
formulated aim of the
study.
Competently
formulated research
objectives.
Competently
formulated research
questions.

Limited formulation of
aim of the study.

Rationale poorly
articulated and
justified.
Poorly formulated aim
of the study.

Limited formulation of
research objectives.

Poorly formulated
research objectives.

Limited formulation of
research questions.

Poorly formulated
research questions.

Evidence of only
limited knowledge of
the literature.
Little critical
comment.

Reliance on limited
sources.

Range of reading

Extensive reading.

Wide reading.

Evidence of
appropriate reading.

Critical evaluation
of literature

Thorough critical
evaluation of
literature.

Evidence of critical
evaluation of
literature.

More limited
evaluation.

Relation to research
questions

Literature is explicitly
related to the
research questions.

Literature is clearly
related to the
research questions.

Literature is not
consistently clearly
related to the
research questions.

Literature is limited in
its relation to the
research questions.

Literature is poorly
related to research
question.

Development of
subject related
conceptual
framework

Explicit and well


justified subject
related conceptual
framework to
investigate the
research problem.
Very well structured
hypotheses with a
very clear link to the
conceptual
framework.

Clear development of
subject related
conceptual
framework which
addresses the
research problem.
Well structured
hypotheses with a
clear link to the
conceptual
framework.

Presents conceptual
framework which
satisfactorily
addresses the
research problem.

Vaguely implicit
subject related
conceptual
framework which is
poorly articulated.

Scant reference to a
subject related
conceptual
framework.

Limited formulation of
hypotheses with
limited link to the
conceptual
framework.

Poorly formulated
hypotheses with poor
link to the conceptual
framework.

Very clear
presentation of
research
strategy/design.
Very clear and
detailed presentation
of research
philosophy.
Excellent rationale for
research approach

Clear research
presentation of
research
strategy/design.
Clear and detailed
presentation of
research philosophy.

Competently
formulated
hypotheses with a
competent link to the
conceptual
framework.
Moderate research
presentation of
research
strategy/design.
Moderately clear and
detailed presentation
of research
philosophy.
Competent rationale
for research

Limited research
presentation of
research
strategy/design.
Limited presentation
of research
philosophy.

Very limited research


presentation of
research
strategy/design.
Very limited
presentation of
research philosophy.

Limited rationale for


research approach

Little rationale
presented for

Hypotheses
formulation
(applicable for
quantitative
research only)
METHODOLOGY

Distinction
70% and above
Clear subject based
focus.
Excellent and
convincing rationale.

Research
strategy/design
Research
philosophy
Research approach

Clearly presented
rationale for research

Lack of evaluation of
literature.

Fail
0 29%
Inadequate subject
focus.
Inadequate rationale.
Incoherently
formulated aim of the
study.
Incoherently
formulated research
objectives.
Incoherently
formulated research
questions.
Over reliance on very
restricted range of
sources.
No evaluation of
literature.
Not related directly to
research question.
Very little evidence of
independent research
for sources.
No reference to
subject related
conceptual
framework.
Incoherently
formulated
hypotheses with
incoherent link to the
conceptual
framework.
Absence research
strategy/design.
Absence research
philosophy.
Inappropriate or nonexistent rationale

Distinction
70% and above
adopted and the data
collection methods
used.

Good pass
60-69%
approach adopted
and the data
collection methods
used.

Satisfactory pass
50-59%
approach adopted
and the data
collection methods
used.

Bare Pass
40-49%
adopted and data
collection methods
used.

Refer
30-39%
research approach
adopted and the data
collection method
used.

Research methods

Very clear
appreciation of
relevant
methodological
issues and
justification for the
methods adopted.

Competent
presentation of with
key methodological
issues and
satisfactory
justification for the
methods adopted.

Limited awareness of
methodological
issues and basic
justification for the
methods adopted.

Limited awareness of
methodological
issues and little
justification for the
methods adopted.

Sample

Very clear and


detailed presentation
of sample size and
characteristics.
Extremely systematic
and appropriate data
collection.

Very good
appreciation of
relevant
methodological
issues and clear
presentation of the
justification for the
methods adopted.
Clear and detailed
presentation of
sample size and
characteristics.
Very competent and
appropriate data
collection.

Moderately clear and


detailed presentation
of sample size and
characteristics.
Competent data
collection.

Limited presentation
of sample size and
characteristics..

Absence of sample
size and
characteristics.

Clear evidence of
high level (e.g.
inferential statistics).
of analysis using
appropriate
techniques.
Clear evidence of
high level
presentation of
ethical
considerations.

Evidence of
satisfactory but more
limited analysis (e.g.
restricted to use of
descriptive methods
of analysis).
Evidence of
satisfactory
presentation of
ethical
considerations.

Appropriate but
limited analysis which
relies on basic use of
analytical techniques.

Very limited
presentation of
sample size and
characteristics.
Weak data collection
but sufficient
information gathered
to allow for reworking
of data.
Evidence of analysis
but which is limited
and/or logically
flawed.

Limited presentation
of ethical
considerations

Very limited
presentation of
ethical considerations

No evidence ethical
considerations

Good presentation of
results using both
tables and text
appropriately.

Satisfactory
presentation of
results using both
tables and text
appropriately
Moderate
presentation and
justification regarding
hypotheses
acceptance or
rejection.

Adequate
presentation of
results but with
limitation in style.

Poor presentation of
results but could be
reworked

Poor (or no)


presentation of
results

Limited presentation
and justification
regarding hypotheses
acceptance or
rejection.

Very limited
presentation and
justification regarding
hypotheses
acceptance or
rejection.

Absence of
presentation and
justification regarding
hypotheses
acceptance or
rejection.

Data collection

RESULTS

Data analysis

Extensive and high


level analysis (e.g.
inferential statistics)
using appropriate
analytical techniques.

Ethical
Considerations

Extensive and high


level presentation of
ethical
considerations.

Data presentation

Clear and appropriate


presentation of
results using both
table and text
appropriately.
Very clear
presentation and
justification regarding
hypotheses
acceptance or
rejection.

Hypotheses
Acceptance or
Rejection
(applicable for
quantitative
research only)

Clear presentation
and justification
regarding hypotheses
acceptance or
rejection.

Limited data
collection.

Fail
0 29%
presented for the
research approach
and the data
collection methods
used.
Little awareness of
methodological
issues.

Poor and
inappropriate data
collection and
analysis, not capable
of being reworked.
Little or no evidence
of appropriate
analysis and/or
extensive logically
inconsistent.

Distinction
70% and above
Impressive evaluation
of findings.

Good pass
60-69%
Good evaluation of
findings.

Satisfactory pass
50-59%
Moderate evaluation
of findings.

Bare Pass
40-49%
Some evaluation of
findings.

Refer
30-39%
Limited evaluation of
findings.

Fail
0 29%
Very limited
evaluation of findings.

Extensive and very


clear link of findings
with previous
research.
Impressive placing of
dissertation work and
findings in its broader
context.

Clear link of findings


with previous
research.

Moderate link of
findings with previous
research.

Some link of findings


with previous
research.

Limited link of
findings with previous
research

Very limited link of


findings with previous
research

Good placing of
dissertation work and
findings in its broader
context.

Moderate placing of
dissertation work and
findings in its broader
context..

Some placing of
dissertation work and
findings in its broader
context.

Limited placing of
dissertation work and
findings in its broader
context.

Very limited placing of


dissertation work and
findings in its broader
context.

Excellent well
supported conclusion
flows logically from
the main body.
Discusses the studys
findings into context
of the literature.

Conclusion is
coherent and
discusses the
findings of the study
in context of the
literature.

Conclusion may be a
limited to a
competent summary
of the work but with
less focus discussing
the findings of the
study in the context of
the literature.

Limited conclusions
that are only weakly
related to the main
body of the work.
No discussion of
study in context of the
literature.

Conclusions may be
weak and may fail to
identify what has
been achieved.

The conclusion is
poorly related or
unrelated to the body
of research.

Critical awareness of
the weaknesses of
the dissertation.
Very clear link of
weakness with future
research.

Some awareness of
the weakness of the
dissertation.
Clear link of
weakness with future
research.

Some awareness of
the weaknesses of
the dissertation.
Moderate link of
weakness with future
research.

Limited awareness of
the weaknesses of
the dissertation.
Some link of
weakness with future
research.

Little awareness of
the weaknesses of
the dissertation.
Limited link of
weakness with future
research.

No evaluation of the
weaknesses of the
dissertation.
Very limited link of
weakness with future
research.

REFERENCING

Fully and
appropriately
referenced.

Very good
referencing.

Generally well
referenced.

Competent
referencing but some
inconsistencies.

Major inadequacies in
references.

Poorly referenced.

PRESENTATION

Excellent
presentation.

Well presented.

Well presented.

Adequately
presentation.

Adequate
presentation but with
clear deficiencies.

Poorly presented.

USE OF
LANGUAGE

Excellent use of
language.

Clear use of
language.

Clear use of
language but with
some errors.

Clear use of
language but with
significant errors.

Generally correct use


of language, but with
aspects of unclear
expression and a
number of imprecise
statements.

Very unclear
language with serious
errors.

DISCUSSSION

Evaluation of
findings
Reference back to
the literature
Placing of work in
its broader context

CONCLUSION

LIMITATIONS
AND FUTURE
RESEARCH

Limitation

Future research

The University of Huddersfield


Business School
BMS0013 Dissertation Feedback Sheet
Student Name:
Student Number:
1st Markers Name:
Dissertation
Internal consistency
Introduction
Focus
Rationale
Formulation
Literature review
Range of reading
Critical evaluation of literature
Relation to research questions
Development of subject related conceptual framework
Hypotheses formulation (applicable for quantitative research only)
Methodology
Research strategy/design
Research philosophy
Research approach
Research methods
Sample
Data collection
Data analysis
Ethical Considerations
Results
Data presentation
Hypotheses Acceptance or Rejection (applicable for quantitative
research only)
Discussion
Evaluation of findings
Reference back to the literature
Placing of work in its broader context
Conclusions

Comments

Limitations and Future Research


Limitations
Future research
Referencing
Use of language
Presentation
Are you satisfied with the authenticity of the primary material?
Is the Turn-it-in score acceptable?

Yes / No
Yes / No

MARK (1st MARKER)

out of 100

DATE

//

SIGNED

AGREED MARK

OUT OF 100

The University of Huddersfield


Business School
BMS0013 Dissertation Feedback Sheet
Student Name:
Student Number:
2nd Markers Name:
Dissertation
Internal consistency
Introduction
Focus
Rationale
Formulation
Literature review
Range of reading
Critical evaluation of literature
Relation to research questions
Development of subject related conceptual framework
Hypotheses formulation (applicable for quantitative research only)
Methodology
Research strategy/design
Research philosophy
Research approach
Research methods
Sample
Data collection
Data analysis
Ethical Considerations
Results
Data presentation
Hypotheses Acceptance or Rejection (applicable for quantitative
research only)
Discussion
Evaluation of findings
Reference back to the literature
Placing of work in its broader context
Conclusions

Comments

Limitations and Future Research


Limitations
Future research
Referencing
Use of language
Presentation
Are you satisfied with the authenticity of the primary material?
Is the Turn-it-in score acceptable?

Yes / No
Yes / No

MARK (2nd MARKER)

out of 100

DATE

//

SIGNED

AGREED MARK

Appendix 6: Research Strategy/Design

OUT OF 100