Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 46

Pa

Contents

Coal Mining Production in Indonesia compared to the Philippines .................. 1


What is Coal? ................................................................................................... 2
Formation ..................................................................................................... 2

Types of Coal ................................................................................................ 3


Coal in the Philippines...................................................................................... 4
The current electricity market ...................................................................... 4
Coal Reserves in the Philippines.................................................................... 5
The challenges ahead ................................................................................... 6
Good news for coal ....................................................................................... 6
The countrys coal deposits and coal mines .................................................. 7
Local coal Production .................................................................................... 7
Coal Demand ................................................................................................ 7
The Philippines' coal potential ...................................................................... 8
High Quality Coals ......................................................................................... 8
Investment opportunities in the coal sector ............................................... 10
Incentives under the Coal Operating Contract (COC) System ...................... 10
Philippine Domestic Coal Deliveries to Philphos ......................................... 21
Philippine Power Generation ......................................................................... 33
Coal Importations .......................................................................................... 33
Indonesian Coal Price, October 2014 ............................................................. 35

Coal Mining Production in Indonesia compared to the Philippines

Factors that make Indonesian coal cheaper and readily available:


1. Indonesia has very huge coal deposits that are concentrated in the big
islands of Borneo and Sumatra while in the Philippines, the deposits are
scattered over many islands. Thus, the Indonesian coal mines are big
operations with the advantage of economies of scale.
2. In the Philippines, developing efficient mining infrastructure, coal
transfer systems and ports in many different places is difficult.
3. Indonesian coal has more uniform heating values, lower sulphur and ash
content compared to the Philippine coals where quality varies from mine
site to mine site. Almost all of the installed coal power plants in the
Philippines are designed to burn imported coal in huge quantities and
uniform quality.
4. There is lack of government incentives to stimulate the establishment of
large coal mining activities. For example, most new mining permits
issued in recent years are for small-scale mining.

Page | 1

What is Coal?
Coal is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring
in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. Throughout history,
coal has been used as an energy resource, primarily burned for the production of
electricity and/or heat, and is also used for industrial purposes, such as refining metals.
A fossil fuel, coal forms when dead plant matter is converted into peat, which in turn is
converted into lignite, then sub-bituminous coal, after that bituminous coal, and
lastly anthracite. This involves biological and geological processes that take place over
a long period.
Coal is the largest source of energy for the generation of electricity worldwide, as well
as

one

of

the

largest

worldwide

anthropogenic

sources

of

carbon

dioxide releases. Coal-fired electric power generation emits around 2,000 pounds of
carbon dioxide for every megawatt-hour generated, which is almost double the
approximately 1100 pounds of carbon dioxide released by a natural gas-fired electric
plant per megawatt-hour generated.
Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining,
or at ground level by open pit mining extraction. Since 1983 the world top coal producer
has been China. In 2011 China produced 3,520 millions of tonnes of coal 49.5% of
7,695 million tons world coal production. In 2011 other large producers were United
States (993 million tons), India (589), European Union (576) and Australia (416). In
2010 the largest exporters were Australia with 328 million tons (27.1% of world coal
export) and Indonesia with 316 million tons (26.1%), while the largest importers
were Japan with 207 million tons (17.5% of world coal import), China with 195 million
tons (16.6%) and South Korea with 126 million tons (10.7%).

Formation
At various times in the geologic past, the Earth had dense forests in low-lying wetland
areas. Due to natural processes such as flooding, these forests were buried
underneath soil. As more and more soil deposited over them, they were compressed.
The temperature also rose as they sank deeper and deeper. As the process continued
the plant matter was protected from biodegradation and oxidation, usually by mud or
acidic water. This trapped the carbon in immense peat bogs that were eventually
covered and deeply buried by sediments. Under high pressure and high temperature,
Page | 2

dead vegetation was slowly converted to coal. As coal contains mainly carbon, the
conversion of dead vegetation into coal is called carbonization.

Types of Coal
As geological processes apply pressure to dead biotic material over time, under
suitable conditions it is transformed successively into:
Peat, considered to be a precursor of coal, has industrial importance as a fuel in some
regions, for example, Ireland and Finland. In its dehydrated form, peat is a highly
effective absorbent for fuel and oil spills on land and water. It is also used as a
conditioner for soil to make it more able to retain and slowly release water.
Lignite, or brown coal, is the lowest rank of coal and used almost exclusively as fuel for
electric power generation. Jet, a compact form of lignite, is sometimes polished and
has been used as an ornamental stone since the Upper Palaeolithic.
Sub-bituminous coal, whose properties range from those of lignite to those of
bituminous coal, is used primarily as fuel for steam-electric power generation and is an
important source of light aromatic hydrocarbons for the chemical synthesis industry.
Bituminous coal is a dense sedimentary rock, usually black, but sometimes dark brown,
often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material; it is used primarily as fuel in
steam-electric power generation, with substantial quantities used for heat and power
applications in manufacturing and to make coke.
"Steam coal" is a grade between bituminous coal and anthracite, once widely used as
a fuel for steam locomotives. In this specialized use, it is sometimes known as "seacoal" in the US.[15] Small steam coal (dry small steam nuts or DSSN) was used as a
fuel for domestic water heating.
Anthracite, the highest rank of coal, is a harder, glossy black coal used primarily for
residential and commercial space heating. It may be divided further into
metamorphically altered bituminous coal and "petrified oil", as from the deposits in
Pennsylvania.
Graphite, technically the highest rank, is difficult to ignite and is not commonly used as
fuel it is mostly used in pencils and, when powdered, as a lubricant.
Page | 3

Coal in the Philippines

The International Energy Agencys Clean Coal Centre (IEA CCC) has released a new
report on the use and prospects for coal in the Philippines. It is the latest in a series
examining coal and clean coal technology prospects in the major economies in the
Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Economic growth is modest by the
standards of the industrialising Asian nations, and far behind the likes of China. The
average economic growth of around 4% is enviable by OECD standards but, for the
region, is fairly modest and has not kept pace with the rise in population.

The current electricity market


In 2009 coal accounted for 15% of the countrys primary energy supply, equivalent to
8.5 million tonnes of coal equivalent (tce). The Philippines is the worlds second largest
producer of geothermal energy (behind Indonesia). In 2010, the countrys geothermal
plants produced 8.5 million tce, generating 8.5 TWh out of a total generation of 67.7
TWh. The key energy demand region (of which there are three) is the northern group
of islands called Luzon where the capital Manila is located and where most of the
countrys population and economic activity occurs. However, a great deal of the
population still relies on biomass waste, which accounts for 18% of primary energy. In
2009, biomass provided 10 million tce.

The governments Philippines Energy Plan recognises the need to diversify the energy
sector and to become more energy independent. The plan aims to increase the use of
indigenous energy resources by 2030. While there is interest in expanding renewable
energy, fossil fuels are currently the key energy resources and dominate primary
energy demand with around an 86% share of the energy mix.

The main driver for energy policy in the Philippines is achieving energy independence
through use of indigenous energy resources while promoting reforms in the power
market. However, the geographical nature of the Philippines with around 7100 islands
covering 300,000 km2 with 20 active volcanoes and mountainous terrain makes it
difficult to provide the entire population of 94 million with electricity.

Page | 4

A major issue is the increasing energy demand, coupled with a population growing at
an annual rate of 2.3%. Electricity shortages remain a major problem. The government
programme for energy development places more focus on renewable energy, but
whether this will satisfy the growing demand for reliable electricity is questionable. The
country remains reliant on oil imports. Historically, the Philippines has been dependent
on imported oil to meet its energy demand. In recent years the government has
undertaken several measures to encourage a greater understanding of the countrys
resources. Hydrocarbon reserves have been identified with a Norwegian-funded study
finding twelve basins with gas and oil deposits.

Coal Reserves in the Philippines


Estimates for coal reserves from several studies are wide-ranging and contradictory.
However, with estimates of 316 million t to as much as 19 billion t, the potential is
considerable. In addition, there is potentially up to 270 billion t of coal resources.
Of the known 316 million t that is economically recoverable, most are coals that are
higher in moisture with 170 MT being sub-bituminous coal, 105 million tons being lignite
(brown coal). The Philippines also has 41 million t of bituminous coal and anthracite.
Confirmation of the coal resources beyond those currently identified is needed if the
Philippines is to reduce its reliance on imports. With coal scattered over many islands,
developing the infrastructure and mine facilities might prove difficult. For this reason,
domestic coal production is concentrated in Semirara where 96% of the countrys coal
production occurs. The coal here comprises of sub-bituminous and bituminous rank
coals.
The Philippines depends on imports for about 75% of its coal supply, and is a regular
participant in the international seaborne market as a buyer. The increase in imported
coal occurred in the 1990s due to the building of a number of large coal-fired power
plants designed to burn imported coals. More recently in 2010, demand for coal from
the power sector was 12.5 million t and could yet increase to 16 20 million t by 2015,
and 30 40 million t by 2030. There is currently 6.5 million tpa domestic production,
which means that imports could increase from the current 11 million tpa to 41.5 million
tpa. Policy incentives to develop new mines are being provided by the government;
however most of the permits given are for small-scale mining. This is unlikely to
increase coal production to the scale needed, resulting in potential future coal
shortages and increasing coal imports.

Page | 5

The challenges ahead


Since the 1970s the Philippines has suffered on-going blackouts that continue today in
some areas. With any system, investment in generating capacity must be carried out
with investment in network and distribution. Supply side constraints regarding electricity
supply still blight many parts of the country. The southernmost region, Mindanao has a
power grid that operates with a narrow reserve margin, even when hydropower is
plentiful. The Luzon and Visayas grids are also exhibiting increasing signs of stress.
One option to increase electricity supply is to increase coal-fired power plant utilisation
from the current 50% to 75%. As a result this could add an additional 14% power to
national generation. However, the growth in electricity demand is spread widely across
many islands, and so increased utilisation of capacity in one region may not be
sufficient to serve the needs of another region.

Although the energy sector has undergone deregulation and privatisation of generators
this has yet to trickle down in benefits to energy consumers. The Philippines has one
of the highest prices for electricity in Asia and is still heavily subsidised. The
introduction of feed-in tariffs for increasing renewables, while a laudable policy, is likely
to meet widespread opposition if electricity prices increase further. Roughly 13% of the
population live on less than US$ 1/day, and a third live below the poverty line.

Good news for coal


The potential to adapt and retrofit current power plants with high efficiency upgrades is
good, given the fleet of subcritical stations. Either way, the prospects for coal demand
appear positive, providing this demand can be met from expanded indigenous
production or from imports. Coal demand from the power sector could increase in 2015
as the development of new generating capacity pushes consumption up to 16 20
million t and, over the long term, to a possible 30 40 million t by 2030. The opportunity
to adopt cleaner coal technologies is good, especially with high efficiency coal plants
using the latest air pollution technology. While air pollution regulations exist, they must
be adhered to and strengthened.

Page | 6

The countrys coal deposits and coal mines


Coal deposits are scattered over the Philippines but the largest deposit is located in
Semirara Island, Antique. The countrys largest coal producer is Semirara Mining
Corporation (SMC), which contributes about 92% of the local coal production. Coal
mines are also located in Cebu, Zamboanga Sibuguey, Albay, Surigao and Negros
Provinces.

Local coal Production


Based on the 2006 Update of the Philippine Energy Plan (PEP), coal production in
2004 surpassed the 2003 level by 34 percent from 2.0 MMMT in 2003 to 2.7 MMMT in
2004. Improved coal production of big mining companies such as the Semirara Mining
Corporation (SMC) as well as good weather conditions contributed to this positive
development. SMC produced a total of 10.09 MMBFOE of coal from its Panian Pit on
Semirara Island, Antique, increasing by 1.39 MMBFOE from its 2004 production level.
In 2005, local coal production reached 3.1 MMMT or an increase of 26% from the 2004
level.
Domestic coal production is estimated to yield an 11.7% increase in the next 10 years
from 3.1 MMMT in 2005 to 6.6 MMMT in 2014 @10,000 BTU/lb.
Coal production in 2006 as of December 12 stands at 2.3 MMT run-of-min, 2.5% of
which came from small-scale coal mining operations.

Coal Demand
With the cement industry, power generating plants and process industry as major coal
users, coal consumption for the year 2005 reached 33.76 MMBFOE or 1.45 percent
lower than the 2004 consumption figure of 34.45 MMBFOE.
Coal consumption of the industrial sector reached 7.3 MMBFOE in 2005, 8.75 percent
lower than the 2004 level of 8 MMBFOE. This is primarily due to the decreased
consumption of some of the local cement factories and coal-fired power plants.

Page | 7

The countrys coal requirements are sourced from domestic production and
importation. As of 2005, total importation reached 6.3 MMMT*, 50% of which came
from Indonesia, 33% from China, 10% from Australia and 7% from Vietnam.
Coal consumption for 2006 as of December 12 is 9.5 MMT, 73% of which for power
generation, 22.5 % for cement production and 3.75% for other industrial operations.

The Philippines' coal potential


The Philippines has a vast potential for coal resources. As of 31 December 2005, we
have delineated in-situ coal reserves amounting to 446 million metric tons, or 18.8 %
of the country's total coal resource potential of 2.37 billion metric tons.

High Quality Coals


There are Philippine coals which are of such quality that they can be used without the
need for any coal preparation or blending with imported coals. Among these are the
coal deposits being mined in Malangas by the Philippine National Oil Company (PNOC)
with its Taiwanese partner, in Southern Cebu by Ibalong Resources and Development
Corporation (IRDC), and in Batan Island by Rock Energy International Corporation
(REIC). The coal deposits in Catanduanes Island and the coal areas in Gen. Nakar,
Quezon are also of good quality.
Programs are being undertaken by DOE to spur coal exploration and development
activities. With the onset of the rising cost of fossil fuel in the world market and its
eminent threat to the worldwide energy supply and security, the Philippine invigorates
its program of continuous energy exploration and promotion of development,
production and utilization of the countrys indigenous energy resources which includes
coal. Deriving motivation from this renewed interest in coal mining, the Geothermal and
Coal Resources Development Division (GCRDD) continues its resource assessment
particularly in un-explored and un-developed coal prospect areas. Coal resources
assessment is conducted through reconnaissance to semi-detailed surveys. This is
done on a regular basis.
The effort has resulted to the granting of several Coal Operating Contracts (COCs) and
Small-Scale Coal Mining Permits (SSCMP) for coal areas in the provinces of Cebu,
Sultan Kudarat, South Cotabato, Isabela, Quezon, Masbate, Samar, Surigao Del Sur,
Page | 8

Albay, Zamboanga Sibuguey, Zamboanga Del Norte, Saranggani, and Catanduanes


among others.
The milestones in the coal industry sector are the launching and conduct of the
following projects:
1. Philippine Energy Contracting Round (PECR) 2005

In continuous support of our quest for energy independence, the Department of


Energy (DOE) launched the contracting round for energy resources,
the Philippine Energy Contracting Round (PECR) 2005 which offers
petroleum, geothermal and coal areas, in cooperation with the USAID's Energy
and Clean Air Project (ECAP) under its "Investment Promotion for
Sustainable Development of Indigenous Energy Resources" program.
For the coal sector, prospective coal areas in the provinces of Quezon, Negros
Occidental, Negros Oriental, Zamboanga Del Norte, Surigao Del Norte and
Surigao Del Sur were offered as prospective areas for investment.
There were five (5) companies who participated in the coal contracting round:
Lucanin Resources and Eastsun Mining and Power Corporation for the coal area
in Polillio, Quezon; Miocene Mining and Energy Corporation for Gigaquit,
Surigao Del Norte; and Guidance Management Corporation for coal areas in the
provinces of Negros Occidental and Negros Oriental. None of the companies
qualified based on the criteria set for the contracting round.

2. Coal Bed Methane (CBM) Project

A joint collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and
DOE was launched to determine the methane gas content and adsorptive
capacity of Philippine coals. The recent study from the USGS
entitled Assessment of Philippine Coal Bed Methane submitted to DOE in
2005 identified several coals, from lignite to semi-anthracite, in the country that
possess large gas storage capacity compared with coals in known coalfields in
the US. With the gas holding capacity of coals in the Philippines coalfields
known, a detailed study was proposed to determine the amount of Coalbed
Methane (CBM) resource and prove recoverable reserve potential. Coalbed
methane is an emerging natural gas resource that has evolved worldwide as an
alternative clean-burning fossil fuel.
Page | 9

Research on coal market development with the view of providing sustainable market
for local coal is likewise being undertaken. This activity aims to stabilize the domestic
coal mining industry to enable the local coal production to compete with imported coal
from Indonesia, Australia and other coal exporting countries.

Investment opportunities in the coal sector


For private companies, the key investment opportunities in the coal sector are (1) the
setting-up of coal preparation plants to upgrade the quality of Philippine coals and make
them acceptable to current users; (2) the expansion of production volumes of higherrank Philippine coals which can be used without upgrading and/or blending with highquality imported coal; (3) the introduction of clean coal technologies (i.e., circulating
fluidized bed combustion) to ensure utilization of Philippine coals with minimal adverse
effects on the environment; and (4) the putting-up of mine-mouth power plants
designed to utilize the abundant low-rank coals that have no alternative markets.
Investments for the exploration and development of indigenous coal covering the
period 2005 2014 are estimated at PhP 162.3 billion. Of the said amount, PhP 45.6
billion will be used to develop potential areas in Luzon, PhP 77.4 billion for Visayas and
PhP 39.3 billion for Mindanao.

Incentives under the Coal Operating Contract (COC) System


The current coal operating contract (COC) system gives the following incentives to
contractors:
Exemption from all taxes except income tax
Exemption from payment of tariff duties and compensating tax on importation of

machinery/equipment/spare parts/materials required for the coal operations


Entry of alien technical personnel
Recovery of operating expenses

The combustion of coal and other fossil fuels emits oxides of Sulfur (SOX) and
Nitrogen (Nox) as well as Carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere but these are

Page | 10

minimized or eliminated using clean coal technologies such as fluidized bed


combustion, flue gas de-sulfurization and electrostatic precipitation.

Page | 11

Page | 12

Page | 13

Page | 14

Page | 15

Page | 16

Page | 17

Page | 18

Page | 19

Page | 20

Philippine Domestic Coal Deliveries to Philphos

SUPPLIER

H20,

H20,

DATE

HV

ASH

VCM

FC

RES.

A.R.

BICOL COAL CORPORATION

DEC. 28, 1984

6,896

1.42

22.92

37.66

28.45

10.97

17.23

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

DEC. 22, 1984

6,481

0.928

21.95

39.20

27.53

16.68

BICOL COAL CORPORATION

DEC. 16, 1984

7,662

2.46

19.45

43.31

25.40

22.31

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

DEC. 11, 1984

7,841

1.05

22.12

40.61

26.53

22.60

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

NOV. 25, 1984

6,400

0.738

21.46

38.04

28.54

18.10

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

OCT. 15, 1984

7,528

0.773

19.15

42.06

25.18

1000

1984

1985

3000

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

DEC. 24, 1985

8,485

0.64

12.37

39.65

29.22

18.76

22.34

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

DEC. 1, 1985

8,675

0.67

12.00

38.00

33.02

16.98

22.51

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

NOV. 11, 1985

8,831

0.89

11.88

44.89

26.91

16.32

21.52

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

OCT. 16, 1985

8,642

0.25

10.38

43.45

28.39

17.78

20.48

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

SEPT. 4, 1985

7,885

0.72

21.16

46.72

18.44

13.68

20.21

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

AUG. 21, 1985

9,113

0.73

16.24

41.89

27.55

14.32

23.53

JUNE 14,
SEMIRARA COAL MINES

1985

8,250

0.43

20.15

40.90

24.15

14.80

21.40

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

JUNE 8, 1985

7,150

0.93

27.09

39.77

20.75

12.09

19.55

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

MAY 19, 1985

6,427

0.63

31.11

35.55

21.54

11.8

20.81

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

MAY 5, 1985

6,428

0.64

36.27

38.66

12.65

12.42

20.56

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

APR. 27, 1985

6,651

0.95

30.93

33.28

22.89

12.90

21.60

DANAO, CEBU

APR. 25, 1985

8,047

0.59

27.64

31.22

30.75

10.39

17.57

Page | 21

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

APR. 2, 1985

6,241

0.693

35.34

39.62

14.83

10.21

15.20

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

FEB. 3, 1985

8,006

0.91

19.00

43.74

26.13

13.13

21.14

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

FEB. 12, 1985

7,282

0.92

20.22

49.97

20.34

9.47

14.92

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

JAN. 24, 1985

8,461

1.05

24.36

44.26

16.23

15.15

17.98

DANAO, CEBU

JAN. 9, 1985

6,695

0.506

33.83

42.80

17.02

6.46

24.50

DEC. 8, 1986

7,750

0.68

23.97

37.97

27.24

10.82

21.80

DEC. 8, 1985

7,419

0.58

25.65

37.18

25.60

11.57

20.65

NOV. 19, 1986

8,183

0.45

22.97

35.89

28.80

12.34

19.12

NOV. 16, 1986

9,157

0.37

13.50

41.18

30.89

14.43

19.01

NOV. 3, 1986

9,343

0.49

13.41

39.38

31.89

15.32

20.20

OCT. 2, 1986

9,899

0.69

7.43

42.25

34.58

15.74

18.68

1986

8,976

0.45

16.11

41.77

29.48

12.64

14.11

SUL

SEPT. 1, 1986

8,109

0.64

17.29

38.82

29.88

14.01

15.12

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

SEPT. 1, 1986

8,356

0.62

12.75

42.79

26.53

17.93

22.35

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

JULY 1, 1986

8,429

0.65

10.67

41.43

35.37

12.53

18.44

1986
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL

SEPT. 23,

PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL

JUNE 26,
SEMIRARA COAL MINES

1986

8,259

0.63

16.51

40.72

29.08

13.69

19.73

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

MAY 7, 1986

8,411

0.75

11.71

38.75

30.89

18.65

21.36

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

APR. 22, 1986

8,150

0.74

15.68

34.15

34.90

15.27

19.97

MAR. 14,
SEMIRARA COAL MINES

1986

8,383

0.96

13.82

38.66

30.66

16.86

18.70

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

MAR. 3, 1986

8,423

0.97

12.39

42.96

26.09

18.56

19.56

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

FEB. 11, 1986

8,728

0.73

10.18

39.44

30.46

19.92

20.33

SEMIRARA COAL MINES

JAN. 22, 1986

8,054

0.75

18.90

42.30

23.95

14.85

19.53

Page | 22

1987
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL

DEC. 30, 1987

8,655

0.76

17.31

42.15

29.07

11.47

18.38

DEC. 7, 1987

8,580

0.91

17.24

42.14

30.33

10.29

21.53

DEC. 7, 1987

7,807

0.85

24.84

37.57

25.94

11.65

20.90

OCT. 28, 1987

8,493

1.02

17.89

39.66

28.67

13.78

19.31

OCT. 28, 1987

8,837

1.06

15.02

40.25

30.42

14.31

18.77

AUG. 22, 1987

7,642

0.94

23.69

38.07

25.47

12.79

18.77

AUG. 22, 1987

7,188

0.87

27.01

35.20

25.66

12.13

16.30

MAY 31, 1987

7,581

0.69

26.05

37.63

26.11

10.21

16.03

MAY 31, 1987

7,484

0.85

27.70

35.34

26.47

10.49

14.38

1987

7,814

0.43

23.92

35.96

28.63

11.49

13.32

FEB. 02, 1987

7,098

0.74

26.38

35.36

24.35

13.91

20.70

NOV. 12, 1988

11,918

0.84

20.45

38.10

39.60

1.85

10.95

1988

11,563

0.72

21.32

30.05

47.63

1.00

9.63

SEPT. 5, 1988

9,772

0.55

25.64

30.52

40.97

2.87

9.85

AUG. 11, 1988

9,495

1.21

17.51

43.12

27.16

12.21

18.93

JULY 25, 1988

10,484

0.51

23.39

32.03

39.41

5.17

9.73

JUNE 7, 1988

10,649

0.58

25.41

26.40

45.65

2.54

10.03

1988

11,513

0.57

21.19

22.93

51.85

4.03

7.97

FEB. 18, 1988

9,187

0.98

11.47

39.92

31.54

17.07

23.77

MAY 16, 1988

11,797

0.69

20.31

25.58

52.55

1.56

8.28

MAY 1, 1988

10,105

1.38

8.54

41.22

38.38

11.86

13.84

PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL


SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL

MAR. 20,
PNOC, NAGA, CEBU
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SUL
1988
PNOC, MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC, MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR

SEPT. 22,

PNOC, MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL


SUR
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SULR
PNOC, MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC, MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC, MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR

MARCH 5,

PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL


SULR
PNOC, MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL
SULR

Page | 23

PNOC, BISLIG, SURIGAO DEL


SULR

APRIL 7, 1988

9,168

1.29

14.99

40.47

32.23

12.31

23.23

PNOC - CC ULING, NAGA, CEBU

NOV. 23, 1989

8,392

0.96

23.21

34.60

33.74

8.45

12.68

PNOC - CC ULING, NAGA, CEBU

OCT. 26, 1989

8,520

1.04

24.31

35.80

33.87

6.02

14.50

1989

8,196

1.05

25.37

33.50

33.70

7.43

14.92

AUG. 25, 1989

11,792

0.42

20.17

19.38

59.51

0.94

9.61

JULY 22, 1989

11,256

0.43

24.19

18.68

55.71

1.42

8.85

1989

11,480

0.58

22.34

20.48

55.98

1.20

12.15

MAY 11, 1989

11,433

0.60

22.18

19.98

56.44

1.40

9.56

APR. 10, 1989

11,281

0.63

24.23

19.61

55.00

1.16

8.53

1989

11,321

0.60

24.44

19.69

54.66

1.21

8.44

JAN. 25, 1989

11,644

0.50

25.18

20.00

53.55

1.27

6.43

OCT. 1, 1990

9,032

1.04

21.24

42.51

32.57

3.68

12.33

1990

9,027

0.98

21.67

41.72

33.87

2.74

11.71

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

JULY 26, 1990

7,237

0.88

33.20

38.22

27.19

1.39

12.74

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

JUNE 4, 1990

8,070

0.66

26.37

40.53

29.05

4.05

15.90

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

MAY 19, 1990

8,026

0.84

25.23

42.79

27.23

4.75

15.85

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

MAY 14, 1990

8,094

0.71

25.03

40.98

31.80

2.19

10.05

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

MAY 7, 1990

7,732

0.82

28.69

38.72

31.05

1.54

7.95

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

APR. 27, 1990

7,507

0.70

30.19

38.65

29.09

2.07

9.02

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

APR. 18, 1990

7,464

0.72

30.47

39.21

27.76

2.56

10.15

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

APR. 6, 1990

7,675

0.73

29.65

38.61

28.03

3.71

10.86

1989

SEPT. 20,
PNOC - CC ULING, NAGA, CEBU
PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC-MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR

JUNE 10,

PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL


SUR
PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR

MAR. 10,

PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL


SUR
1990

PNOC - NAGA CEBU

SEPT. 14,
PNOC - NAGA CEBU

Page | 24

MAR. 30,
PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

1990

7,647

0.83

26.92

38.32

28.69

3.37

11.10

MAR. 20,
PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

1990

7,453

0.84

30.43

38.88

27.48

3.21

11.50

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

MAR. 1, 1990

8,586

1.03

27.50

40.19

28.52

3.79

13.01

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

FEB. 15, 1990

8,245

0.75

23.33

42.42

28.71

5.54

14.32

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

FEB. 9, 1990

7,638

0.64

28.76

41.79

23.82

5.63

13.75

PNOC - ULING NAGA CEBU

JAN. 24, 1990

8,015

0.71

27.19

40.47

26.45

5.89

15.18

PNOC - NAGA, CEBU

DEC. 12, 1991

9,230

0.93

13.92

41.00

39.78

5.30

8.59

PNOC - NAGA, CEBU

NOV. 30, 1991

9,478

0.78

11.08

41.38

40.35

7.19

5.76

BADECO

OCT. 11, 1991

8,884

1.17

14.62

42.31

37.45

5.62

15.81

OCT. 17, 1991

10,148

0.80

20.53

26.42

49.53

3.52

13.61

JULY 11, 1991

11,152

0.65

23.58

20.46

54.50

1.19

11.85

1991

11,527

0.63

21.11

19.86

58.42

0.61

12.00

MAY 17, 1991

11,273

0.66

22.56

19.32

56.64

1.48

9.18

1991

11,118

0.78

21.96

19.61

57.34

1.09

4.10

MAR. 17,1991

9,299

1.32

20.03

37.58

35.49

6.90

10.98

PNOC - NAGA CEBU

MAR. 2, 1991

9,343

1.20

20.73

37.45

36.82

5.00

7.60

PNOC - NAGA, CEBU

JAN. 13, 1991

9,499

1.13

20.28

43.52

32.20

4.00

13.00

MMDC - DALAGUET, CEBU

DEC. 4, 1992

10,009

1.33

12.64

39.10

43.48

4.78

BADECO, SAMAR

NOV. 5, 1992

8,855

1.17

10.15

38.54

42.44

8.87

BADECO, SAMAR

NOV. 8, 1992

7,376

2.38

8.81

50.00

34.81

6.38

MMDC - DALAGUET, CEBU

OCT. 28, 1992

10,964

0.88

8.73

40.83

48.46

1.98

1991

PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL


SUR
PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR
PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR

JUNE 13,

PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL


SUR
PNOC - MALANGAS, ZAM. DEL
SUR

APRIL 18,

1992

Page | 25

MMDC - DALAGUET, CEBU

OCT. 22, 1992

10,810

1.25

10.93

39.46

47.21

2.4

1992

10,840

1.24

13.32

37.79

45.42

3.47

14.75

BADECO, SAMAR

SEPT. 1, 1992

8,521

1.25

10.46

41.10

38.05

10.39

14.39

BADECO, SAMAR

AUG. 27, 1992

8,613

1.23

13.59

41.58

34.69

10.14

17.70

PNOC - NAGA, CEBU

AUG. 31, 1992

11,060

1.32

14.69

60.72

21.75

2.84

16.25

BADECO, SAMAR

AUG. 21, 1992

8,575

1.23

13.37

42.33

34.15

8.15

14.66

BADECO, SAMAR

JULY 3, 1992

8,584

1.27

12.03

42.41

35.27

10.29

17.83

BADECO, SAMAR

AUG. 20, 1992

8,593

1.26

13.37

42.79

34.56

9.28

14.33

PNOC

JULY 28, 1992

9,405

1.08

8.65

58.74

22.76

13.46

9.85

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 29, 1992

8,506

2.40

13.46

44.06

24.53

17.95

15.99

1992

8,741

1.14

12.95

38.89

40.23

7.93

19.04

PNOC - NAGA, CEBU

JULY 7, 1992

8,332

0.80

13.28

33.30

39.72

13.70

21.68

PNOC - NAGA, CEBU

MAY 26, 1992

8,876

0.50

14.41

52.18

21.82

11.59

22.22

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 31, 1992

7,011

2.78

13.42

42.35

24.45

19.78

18.56

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 30, 1992

6,593

2.33

12.93

43.12

24.61

19.34

17.93

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 29, 1992

8,171

2.33

13.5

45.74

24.65

16.11

13.42

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 28, 1992

7,752

2.30

10.59

45.46

22.81

21.14

16.34

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 27, 1992

6,982

2.63

13.50

43.32

19.70

21.34

19.84

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 26, 1992

7,045

2.52

14.98

39.43

26.25

19.34

22.51

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 25, 1992

8,281

2.58

11.16

40.21

34.11

14.52

14.22

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 24, 1992

7,371

2.09

19.01

40.83

20.62

19.54

18.27

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 22, 1992

8,947

1.28

13.09

40.31

38.73

7.87

15.53

SEPT. 19,
PNOC - NAGA, CEBU

APRIL 23,
BADECO, SAMAR

Page | 26

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 20, 1992

8,834

1.23

11.08

39.40

41.37

8.15

17.17

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 18, 1992

8,617

1.11

11.29

39.57

40.91

8.23

23.46

BADECO, SAMAR

MAY 16, 1992

8,739

1.15

13.25

37.73

40.87

8.15

12.68

BADECO, SAMAR

APR. 24, 1992

8,865

1.17

14.61

38.20

39.56

7.63

14.62

BADECO, SAMAR

APR. 10, 1992

8,989

2.10

15.01

40.85

35.75

8.39

21.45

BADECO, SAMAR

APR. 6, 1992

8,891

1.38

14.65

41.26

36.16

7.93

25.09

BADECO, SAMAR

APR. 1 , 1992

8,249

1.94

10.01

37.30

30.03

22.66

15.16

8,688

1.31

12.21

37.79

31.28

18.72

14.41

8,416

1.40

14.78

48.83

27.48

8.91

20.76

7,985

2.10

13.44

45.07

31.35

10.14

17.23

9,128

1.70

9.91

49.74

39.35

1.00

5.64

1992

11,455

1.35

10.31

46.96

40.97

1.76

6.79

BADECO, SAMAR

FEB. 16, 1992

8,909

0.93

6.62

39.05

46.77

7.62

16.60

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

FEB. 24, 1992

10,166

1.38

14.45

44.32

34.32

6.91

13.81

BADECO, SAMAR

JAN. 23, 1992

8,766

1.31

12.32

39.69

40.11

7.88

17.53

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

JAN. 22, 1992

9,366

1.04

7.92

39.07

44.56

8.45

7.83

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

JAN. 19, 1992

9,345

0.97

14.94

40.26

40.91

3.89

11.04

BADECO, SAMAR

JAN. 7, 1992

8,973

1.13

11.83

38.76

42.57

6.84

20.51

BADECO, SAMAR

JAN. 6, 1992

8,774

1.02

13.23

40.69

39.70

6.38

17.70

CAPP INDUSTRIES

AUG. 30, 1993

10,255

1.09

20.53

40.08

34.87

4.52

14.04

CAPP INDUSTRIES

JULY 10, 1993

11,244

0.98

10.44

34.32

46.75

8.50

13.82

7,847

0.68

16.20

37.54

31.61

14.65

22.20

MAR. 29,
BADECO, SAMAR

1992
MAR. 26,

BADECO, SAMAR

1992
MAR. 20,

BADECO, SAMAR

1992
MAR. 19,

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

1992
MAR. 18,

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

1993

JUNE 19,
SEMIRARA COAL MINES

1993

Page | 27

SEMIRARA, DEMCI

JUNE 6, 1993

8,310

0.76

15.91

38.77

34.67

10.65

18.26

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

MAY 17, 1993

9,716

1.61

11.82

39.36

44.15

4.67

9.35

DM CONSUNJI

APR. 25, 1993

6,401

0.66

23.80

41.48

30.81

3.91

12.02

11,260

1.31

8.23

39.44

47.32

5.01

10.73

MAR. 29,
MMDC - DALAGUET, CEBU

1993
MAR. 18,

MMDC, DALAQUET CEBU

1993

11,551

1.42

9.33

44.29

43.02

3.36

11.09

MMDC, DALAQUET CEBU

FEB. 25, 1993

10,800

1.52

12.92

45.61

37.65

3.82

11.90

MMDC, DALAQUET CEBU

FEB. 4, 1993

10,590

1.37

9.70

41.36

44.77

4.17

11.67

NOV. 16, 1995

10,821

0.62

4.87

39.35

45.13

10.65

7.56

1995

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

SEPT. 10,
BISLIG, SURIGAO CITY

1995

8,660

0.69

13.55

38.17

34.03

14.25

6.25

BISLIG, SURIGAO CITY

SEPT. 1, 1995

8,744

0.84

14.76

34.43

36.74

14.07

3.87

BISLIG, SURIGAO CITY

AUG. 9, 1995

9,298

0.96

12.76

33.90

37.80

15.54

4.31

MMDC, DALAQUET CEBU

JULY 2, 1995

11,334

1.09

13.86

40.49

41.66

3.99

13.42

PNOC, NAGA, CEBU

JUNE 4, 1995

11,458

1.23

12.88

40.25

42.65

4.22

3.49

BISLIG, SURIGAO CITY

FEB. 23, 1995

9,371

2.38

15.83

31.08

38.70

14.39

5.60

JAN. 17, 1996

11,094

0.44

5.19

39.23

44.09

11.49

9.25

DMCI BISLIG, SURIGAO

OCT. 16, 1997

9,010

0.66

23.57

29.20

29.25

17.98

DMCI BISLIG, SURIGAO

MAY 29, 1997

9,253

1.14

10.38

33.53

36.47

19.62

DMCI BISLIG, SURIGAO

APR. 3, 1997

9,363

0.69

10.43

51.76

20.89

16.92

21.87

DMCI BISLIG, SURIGAO

FEB. 14, 1997

11,222

0.87

7.52

49.54

26.65

16.29

21.73

1996

PNOC - NAGA CEBU


1997

Page | 28

1998

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

OCT. 17, 1998

9,769

0.42

20.25

41.69

29.73

8.33

1.44

DMCI BISLIG, SURIGAO

AUG. 24, 1998

9,940

0.84

17.62

56.68

20.27

5.43

10.11

1998

8,449

0.74

17.33

47.46

25.11

9.70

5.85

DMCI - CERI, BISLIG, SURIGAO

APR. 27, 1998

8,147

0.80

22.16

34.44

28.49

14.91

DMCI - CERI, BISLIG, SURIGAO

FEB. 19, 1998

9,089

0.24

16.74

44.37

20.32

18.57

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

OCT. 15, 1999

10,724

1.86

35.13

42.54

18.35

3.975

10.06

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

AUG. 22, 1999

10,239

1.98

26.86

38.33

30.98

3.83

10.23

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

JULY 8, 1999

10,352

1.27

40.16

52.86

2.75

4.23

9.60

JUNE 16,
DMCI BISLIG, SURIGAO

1999

APRIL 22,
JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

1999

10,795

1.56

11.24

48.16

32.75

7.26

12.67

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

FEB. 22, 1999

10,060

0.82

11.10

33.45

45.46

9.99

13.96

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

JAN. 29, 1999

8,741

0.66

24.63

50.98

16.67

7.72

12.93

2000

9,831

0.61

3.61

42.77

38.90

14.94

6.07

JULY 14, 2000

9,597

0.99

2.18

42.14

37.84

17.84

23.72

2000
SEPT. 24,
JJMC/PACEMCO

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

MAR. 22,
JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

2000

9,848

1.25

20.61

56.61

9.41

13.36

17.83

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

JAN. 31, 2000

9,867

1.39

22.75

49.01

21.16

7.07

12.28

JJ MINING CORP. DANAO

JAN. 4, 2000

10,230

1.68

25.51

44.46

24.85

25.17

9.52

SEMIRARA COAL CORP.

NOV. 29, 2002

9,030

0.38

5.75

21.17

53.45

19.63

1.92

SEMIRARA COAL CORP.

OCT. 8, 2022

8,643

0.46

34.16

23.09

23.49

19.26

6.77

2001
NO LOCAL SHIPMENT
2002

Page | 29

NOBLE ENERGY INC.

MAR. 8, 2002

9,313

1.04

6.63

30.66

49.21

13.5

2.88

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

NOV. 22, 2003

8,485

0.50

9.77

25.80

47.31

17.11

6.10

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 21, 2003

8,724

0.38

6.59

21.04

52.28

20.08

4.94

9,014

0.39

10.52

31.97

42.02

15.48

4.17

2003

APRIL 10,
SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

2003
MAR. 18,

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

2003

9,437

1.13

8.07

28.78

48.20

14.94

5.95

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

APR. 17, 2003

9,694

1.40

8.35

32.58

46.15

12.91

2.11

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

FEB. 8, 2003

8,927

0.58

6.11

22.79

52.21

18.87

7.92

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

JAN. 11, 2003

8,765

0.62

10.80

25.75

45.46

18.16

18.16

NOV. 8, 2004

7,203

0.50

27.33

43.64

17.39

11.63

8.22

7,538

0.56

23.26

38.97

23.51

14.25

9.34

2004

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

JUNE 14,
SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

2004
MAR. 29,

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

2004

8,492

0.69

16.20

35.30

36.13

12.35

6.34

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

JAN. 15, 2004

8,318

0.31

12.39

28.73

40.31

18.57

3.50

DEC. 4, 2005

8,170

0.35

12.13

32.25

35.62

20.00

7.21

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

AUG. 12, 2005

8,615

0.26

9.89

27.85

44.47

17.80

8.74

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

JUNE 3, 2005

8,825

0.35

13.45

36.74

37.1

12.71

11.01

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 15, 2006

8,745

0.34

7.60

25.53

48.61

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 15, 2006

8,745

0.34

7.60

25.53

48.61

18.26

7.10

2005

SEMIRA MINING CORP.

2006

18.26

7.10

JUNE 23,
SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

2006

9,042

0.34

8.20

25.60

47.87

18.34

0.83

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

FEB. 11, 2006

9,002

0.47

6.09

24.01

50.75

19.46

4.35

Page | 30

2007

SEMIRA MINING CORP.

DEC. 14, 2007

9,437

0.46

4.24

48.32

33.92

13.54

3.27

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

NOV. 5, 2007

8,142

0.36

9.56

48.60

18.00

23.84

4.19

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 6, 2007

8,851

0.08

9.38

38.52

33.74

18.36

5.84

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 8, 2007

9,370

0.38

7.09

42.98

33.41

JUNE 2, 2008

8,639

0.90

19.70

24.00

39.70

16.60

9.75

2008

9,230

0.62

4.36

29.78

46.67

19.19

7.15

SEMIRA MINING CORP.

FEB. 1, 2008

9,535

0.33

6.48

28.92

48.38

16.28

4.75

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

FEB. 4, 2008

9,530

0.34

5.91

28.95

48.24

16.90

6.41

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

JAN. 15, 2008

9,213

0.34

6.80

34.39

43.87

14.94

3.37

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

JAN. 15, 2008

9,107

0.49

8.10

35.47

42.38

14.06

3.50

SEMIRARAMINING CORP.

JAN. 4,2008

8,883

0.38

6.73

46.96

36.99

9.33

3.86

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 15, 2009

9,262

0.32

5.34

40.42

35.08

19.15

3.04

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

FEB. 22, 2009

9,048

0.37

7.58

41.50

34.83

16.11

5.22

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

FEB. 17, 2009

9,483

0.39

7.87

38.43

33.95

16.07

4.38

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 29, 2010

8,809

0.56

8.63

42.23

29.89

19.25

4.77

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

OCT. 2, 2010

8,760

0.70

10.66

41.28

32.35

15.68

6.45

16.52

8.14

2008

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

MARCH 17,
SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

2009

2010

SEPT. 27,
SEMIRA MINING CORP.

2010

9,106

0.42

8.15

42.79

32.26

16.82

4.51

SEMIRA MINING CORP.

SEPT. 6, 2010

8,942

0.40

9.19

43.50

30.89

16.44

5.89

SEMIRA MINING CORP.

AUG. 11, 2010

8,184

13.86

41.39

27.80

16.97

SEMIRA MINING CORP.

JULY 14, 2010

8,661

11.04

39.87

30.79

18.3

0.45

0.43

6.80

2.85

Page | 31

SEMIRARA

JUY 2, 2010

9,034

0.63

6.41

44.74

33.18

15.67

3.29

SEMIRARA

JUNE 9, 2010

9,344

0.44

8.42

44.41

31.93

15.24

5.02

SEMIRA MINING CORP.

MAY 25, 2010

9,559

0.42

3.60

46.99

34.15

15.27

1.97

JAN. 22, 2011

8,985

0.55

6.35

43.86

30.34

19.45

2.56

2011

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

APRIL 11,
SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

2011

8,100

0.64

8.04

40.62

28.19

19.77

7.33

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

MAY 11, 2011

8,673

0.65

5.66

45.70

26.35

16.59

5.04

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

Dec. 22, 2011

7,476

0.51

16.28

36.54

25.86

21.32

2.24

8,378

0.52

11.69

41.22

29.56

17.53

2.69

2013

8,880

0.56

9.83

42.2

30.69

17.2900

6.70

Averages

8,937

0.87

15.39

38.19

34.58

11.83

28.75

2013
MARCH
SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

4,2013
MARCH 20,

SEMIRARA MINING CORP.

Page | 32

Philippine Power Generation

Coal Importations

Page | 33

Page | 34

Indonesian Coal Price, October 2014

Indonesian Coal Price Reference ( HBA)


(US$/MT)

October 2014

67.26

Assessment Basis

HBA, Quality, Delivery

Last Update

10/10/2014 21:06:00

Source

Director General of Mineral and Coal, Indonesia

High / Low HBA Vs. Latest HBA (Comparison)


Hig
h
Year

(US
$/M
T)

Low
(US
$/M
T)

October 2014

Indonesian Coal Price Reference ( HBA)


(Chart)
Go

Page | 35

Benchmark Price - Monthly Coal Price


(US$/MT)
Coal Brand

GCV

(Basic Coal Brand)

(GAR)

TM

Total

(GAR) Sulphur

Ash

September

October

2014

2014

Change
Price
(US$/MT)

Change
%

Gunung Bayan I

7,000

10.00

1.00

15.00

74.69

72.05

2.63

3.52

Prima Coal

6,700

12.00

0.60

5.00

75.45

72.98

2.46

3.27

Pinang 6150

6,200

14.50

0.60

5.50

68.12

65.90

2.21

3.25

Indominco IM East

5,700

17.50

1.63

4.80

57.11

55.14

1.96

3.44

Melawan Coal

5,400

22.50

0.40

5.00

55.74

54.00

1.74

3.13

EnviroCoal

5,000

26.00

0.10

1.20

52.65

51.11

1.54

2.93

Jorong J-1

4,400

32.00

0.25

4.15

42.39

41.14

1.25

2.95

Eco Coal

4,200

35.00

0.18

3.90

38.82

37.70

1.12

2.89

Source : The Directorate General of Mineral, Coal and Geothermal, Ministry of Enegy and Mineral Resources, Republic of
Indonesia

View Monthly Coal Price (Benchmark Price) Chart

Other Coal Brands - Monthly Coal Price


(US$/MT)

Other Coal Brand

GCV
(GAR)

TM

Total

(GAR) Sulphur

Ash

September

October

2014

2014

Change
Price
(US$/MT)

Change
%

Gunung Bayan II

7,000

12.00

2.00

10.00

71.01

68.44

2.57

3.62

Marunda Thermal Coal

6,600

11.00

0.50

10.00

73.58

71.13

2.45

3.33

Page | 36

Trubaindo HCV-HS

6,553

12.00

1.69

4.21

69.85

67.44

2.41

3.45

Medco Bara 6500

6,500

10.00

3.28

9.38

62.42

59.98

2.44

3.91

Trubaindo HCV-LS

6,423

11.50

0.71

4.76

72.57

70.19

2.37

3.27

Pinang 6000 NAR

6,300

14.00

0.60

5.50

69.52

67.25

2.26

3.26

Arutmin Satui 10

6,300

11.00

1.00

10.00

68.38

66.04

2.34

3.43

Arutmin Senakin

6,250

11.00

1.00

12.00

67.05

64.73

2.32

3.46

View All
Source : The Directorate General of Mineral, Coal and Geothermal, Ministry of Enegy and Mineral Resources, Republic of
Indonesia

View Monthly Coal Price (Other Coal Brands) Chart

Page | 37

Assessment Basis ( Coal Marker & Other Coal Brand)


HBA

: Average (SEPTEMBER 2014 Index) of four international coal indices [ICI 1 (6,500 kcal/kg GAR)- 25%, Platts 5900
(5,900 kcal/kg GAR) - 25%, New Castle Export Index (6,322 kcal/kg GAR) - 25% and Newcastle globalCoal Index
(6,000 kcal/kg NAR) - 25%]

Quality

: GCV (GAR) 6,322 kcal/kg, Total Moisture (arb) 8.00%, Sulphur (arb) 0.80% (arb), Ash Content (arb) 15.00%

Delivery : FOB Vessel. 1 - 31 OCTOBER 2014.


Remark

: Eight brands of Indonesia coal which are most commonly traded in the market.
Coal Price Reference (HBA) and coal standard price (HPB) mentioned above constitute coal prices for spot sales in the
period between 1-31 October 2014.
In the case coal sales is carried out certain term (maximum one year), the price of coal generally refers to 3 (three)
latest coal standard price in the months in which agreement on coal price is made, with the multiplication factor of 50%
for coal standard price (HPB) of the latest month, 30% of one month prior coal standard price (HPB) and 20% of two
months prior coal standard price (HPB).
The price marker (coal standard price - HPB) is used to calculate other coal types with a quality similar to the coal price
markers (coal standard price - HPB).

For sales in barge, the reference price is reduced by barging cost, surveyor\'s cost, insurance and transshipment cost.
Transshipment cost US$ 4.00/MT + Surveyor cost US$ 0.25/MT + Insurance 0.80%/shipment + Barging cost (for <
270ft barge - (US$ 0.0221 X barging distance) + US$ 3.7406, for 270 - 330ft barge - (US$ 0.0184 X barging distance)
+ US$ 3.1172 and > 330ft barge - (US$ 0.0154 X barging distance) + US$ 2.6002
* Add new HPB - LIM 3010 - GCV 3,010, TM: 47.50, TS: 0.60 and Ash: 5.30 from 12 August 2014
* Intitirta coal HPB discontinued since April 2012
* Tanjung Formation Coal & Warukin Formation Coal HPB discontinued since September 2013

COALspot.com makes no warranties, express or implied, as to the accuracy adequacy or completeness of the
information and assumes no liability in connection with any party use of it. Information contained within the website of
COALspot.com is intended for informational purposes only and is not intended as professional counsel and should not
be used as such. COALspot.com will endeavor to update information where appropriate, but is under no obligation to
do so. All third party users of this website and or data produced or published by the COALspot.com do so at their own
risk. Read our Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer before use of this site.
Source

: Director General of Mineral and Coal, Indonesia


10/10/2014 21:35:00

Last
Update

Page | 38

Page | 39

Page | 40

Page | 41

Page | 42

Page | 43

Page | 44