Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 25
The Structure and Properties of Civil Engineering Materials
The Structure and
Properties of Civil
Engineering Materials
Fromcontinuingeducation.construction.com

Fromcontinuingeducation.construction.com

http://landarchs.com/naples-geodesic-gridshell-urban-furniture-experiment/
http://landarchs.com/naples-geodesic-gridshell-urban-furniture-experiment/
The Structure and Properties of Civil Engineering Materials
The Structure and Properties of Civil
Engineering Materials

Paulo J.M. Monteiro Fall Semester, 2014

How to reach me
How to reach me

725 Davis Hall

phone: 643-8251

Office Hours: TuTh 10-11 am, M 1:00-2:00 pm

Email: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu

(please identify yourself as a CE60 student)

First Lecture – Introduction
First Lecture – Introduction

Two important components of the course:

Formal lectures

Lectures: Presence recommended but not required

Laboratory

Labs: Presence mandatory

Objectives of the course
Objectives of the course

Develop an appreciation for construction materials

Understand the fundamental principles of materials science and how it applies to civil engineering materials

Develop laboratory skills: a) how to measure, b) what it means, c) why it matters (lab report)

Improve interaction with your colleagues

Hopefully an enjoyable experience with “practical” engineering

How I will measure your progress
How I will measure your progress

Weekly homework (10%) Two midterms (15% each) Lab reports (20%) Final (40%)

Yes, the final is only 40% of the grade!!

Material (1)
Material (1)

Fundamentals of materials science atomic bonds crystal structures alloys microstructure of steel phase transformations steel treatments

MIDTERM (1/3 of the course)

Material (2)
Material (2)

Concrete (greater emphasis because as a civil engineer you will be responsible for making it)

cements

aggregates

mix design properties durability

SECOND MIDTERM

Material (3)
Material (3)

Wood

Polymers

Composites

Sustainability

THE END

Policy regarding reviews of the midterms
Policy regarding reviews of the
midterms

You’re welcome to bring your exam to discuss until the last day of class.

Late HW Policy:
Late HW Policy:

50% off if handed in the next lecture (please do not place it in my mailbox or under the door of my office).

HW will not be accepted after that.

BOOKS etc
BOOKS etc

Reader from Foundation of Materials Science and Engineering, W.F. Smith, McGraw-Hill.

Concrete: Structure, Properties and Materials by Mehta and Monteiro, Fourth Edition, McGraw- Hill 2013.

Class slides are in the web (free, of course)

Lab notes in the web page

Labs
Labs

Play with Bungee Cord Break Steel Heat Steel Making Concrete (trial and error) Making Concrete (ACI code) High-strength competition [(root?) beer and pizza) after you’re tired of concrete, you test wood.

A few notes about the lab:
A few notes about the lab:

It’s an integral part of the course.

You will join a group (4-5) and perform the experiment together, however the laboratory report will always be individual. The data obviously will be the same but the analysis and interpretation should be in your own words.

Plagiarism will not be tolerated. The University now has even tougher rules. Contact me if you have any doubts, questions, and concerns

A few words about the reports
A few words about the reports

Soon (hopefully) you will be a proud Berkeley engineer and you should be able to communicate your ideas clearly.

Here are some suggestions for good practice:

Complete the cover page carefully. Never, ever, forget to write your name.

Write a clear introduction: a) explain what the objectives were and b) what you have done.

Next describe the experimental conditions: materials, equipment, and methods.

More “few words…”
More “few words…”

Provide the experimental results in tables and graphs that are easy to understand. Be extremely careful with units.

Discussion. Here is your chance to distinguish yourself from the crowd. Do the results make sense? Do they follow what would be theoretically expected? If not, why not?

Conclusion: A few paragraphs should be enough to summarize your work.

Appendix: Include raw data, etc.