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Department of Mathematics

How the System Works


A Handbook for Undergraduate Students 2010/11

School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences

Department of Mathematics
How the System Works
2010-2011
A Handbook for Undergraduate Students

CONTACT DETAILS
Department of Mathematics
Kings College London
Strand
London WC2R 2LS
Name
Prof C Albanese
Dr A Annibale
Dr AD Barnard
Mrs MJ Bennett-Rees
Ms F Benton
Prof J Berndt
Prof D Brigo
Dr C Buescu
Prof DJ Burns
Dr PP Cook
Miss J Cooke
Prof ACC Coolen
Prof EB Davies
Prof F Diamond
Dr T di Matteo
Dr B Doyon
Dr P Emms
Dr S Fairthorne
Dr N Gromov
Dr WJ Harvey
Dr LH Hodgkin
Prof PS Howe
Dr P Kassaei
Dr E Katzav
Dr R Khn
Prof N Lambert
Dr DA Lavis
Dr BL Luffman
Prof D Makinson
Dr A Macrina
Dr D Martelli
Dr B Noohi
Prof G Papadopoulos
Dr I Prez Castillo
Dr D Panov
Prof AN Pressley
Dr A Pushnitski
Dr HC Rae
Dr A Recknagel

Tel: 020 7848 2828


Fax: 020 7848 2017
Email: ug.maths@kcl.ac.uk
Website: www.mth.kcl.ac.uk
Ext No
2877
2245
1071
2216
2814
2855
2226
2863
2217
2235
2698
1068
2223
2854
2852
2245
2149

2225
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1035
2240
1071
1443
2633
2153
2219
2227
2860
1212
2975
1167
1071
2244
3

Room No

Email Address

TBA
S5.26
K4U.19
K4U.21
S5.01
S4.30
S5.35
S5.37
S4.18
TBA
S5.01
S4.06
S4.20
S4.21
S5.28
S4.12
S5.30
K4U.19
S5.27
K4U.21
K4U.21
TBA
S4.07a
S4.13a
S4.13
TBA
K4U.24
K4U.21
S4.05
S5.36
S5.29
S4.22
S4.17
S4.07
S4.08
S4.19
S5.32
K4U.21
S4.10

claudio@albanese.co.uk
alessia.annibale@kcl.ac.uk
tony.barnard@kcl.ac.uk
jane.bennett-rees@kcl.ac.uk
frances.benton@kcl.ac.uk
jurgen.berndt@kcl.ac.uk
damiano.brigo@kcl.ac.uk
cristin.buescu@kcl.ac.uk
david.burns@kcl.ac.uk
paul.cook@kcl.ac.uk
joanne.cooke@kcl.ac.uk
ton.coolen@kcl.ac.uk
e.brian.davies@kcl.ac.uk
fred.diamond@kcl.ac.uk
tiziana.di_matteo@kcl.ac.uk
benjamin.doyon@kcl.ac.uk
paul.emms@kcl.ac.uk
fairthorne@breathe.com
nikolay.gromov@kcl.ac.uk
bill.harvey@kcl.ac.uk
luke.hodgkin@kcl.ac.uk
paul.howe@kcl.ac.uk
payman.kassaei@kcl.ac.uk
eytan.katzav@kcl.ac.uk
reimer.kuehn@kcl.ac.uk
neil.lambert@kcl.ac.uk
david.lavis@kcl.ac.uk
bernard.luffman@kcl.ac.uk
david.makinson@gmail.com
andrea.macrina@kcl.ac.uk
dario.martelli@kcl.ac.uk
behrang.noohi@kcl.ac.uk
george.papadopoulos@kcl.ac.uk

isaac.perez_castillo@kcl.ac.uk

dmitri.panov@kcl.ac.uk
andrew.pressley@kcl.ac.uk
alexander.pushnitski@kcl.ac.uk

hamish.rae@kcl.ac.uk
andreas.recknagel@kcl.ac.uk

Miss S Rice
Dr K Rietsch
Prof DC Robinson
Prof FA Rogers
Prof Y Safarov
Dr S Schafer-Nameki
Prof PT Saunders
Prof SG Scott
Prof E Shargorodsky
Prof W Shaw
Dr JR Silvester
Prof PK Sollich
Dr DR Solomon
Prof R Streater
Prof JG Taylor
Dr G Tinaglia
Dr J Van Baardewijk
Dr GMT Watts
Prof PC West

2828
1443
2221
2242
2215
2853
2218
2778
2676
1119
1071
2875
1165
2220
2214
2981
1197
1013
2224

S5.01
S4.05
K4U.22
S4.35
S4.17
S4.08a
K4U.19
S4.09
S4.11
S5.24
K4U.21
S5.25
S4.15
K4U.25
S3.20
S5.31

stephanie.rice@kcl.ac.uk
konstanze.rietsch@kcl.ac.uk
david.c.robinson@kcl.ac.uk
alice.rogers@kcl.ac.uk
yuri.safarov@kcl.ac.uk
sakura.schafer-nameki@kcl.ac.uk

peter.saunders@kcl.ac.uk
simon.scott@kcl.ac.uk
eugene.shargorodsky@kcl.ac.uk

william.shaw@kcl.ac.uk
jrs@kcl.ac.uk
peter.sollich@kcl.ac.uk
david.solomon@kcl.ac.uk
raymond.streater@kcl.ac.uk
john.g.taylor@kcl.ac.uk
giuseppe.tinaglia@kcl.ac.uk

Chesham Bldg. johannes.van_baardewijk@kcl.ac.uk

S4.14
S4.34

gerard.watts@kcl.ac.uk
peter.west@kcl.ac.uk

Preface
This handbook is issued to every undergraduate student in the Mathematics Department.
The information it contains has been compiled by the Department and is valid for the
2010/11 academic session only. Please note that any rules and regulations outlined in this
handbook exist in addition to College Regulations. No information given in this booklet
overrides any regulation set by the College.
Further information
You may find it useful to know the following contact numbers and websites:
Mathematics Department Academic Staff
Head of Department
Professor Jurgen Berndt (020 7848 2814)
Director of Studies
Professor Alice Rogers (020 7848 2242)
Senior Tutor
Professor Simon Scott (020 7848 2778)
UG Chair of Exam Board
Professor Andrew Pressley (020 7848 2975)
UG Admissions Tutor
Dr David Solomon (020 7848 1165)
Chair of Staff/Student Committee
Professor Fred Diamond (020 7848 1068)
Mathematics Departmental Office Staff
Departmental Administrator
Student Administrator
Operations Assistant
Fax Number for office
Student Registration Office

Assessment and Records Centre

The Compass

Ms Frances Benton (020 7848 2216)


Miss Joanne Cooke (020 7848 2217)
Miss Stephanie Rice (020 7848 2828)
Fax: 020 7848 2017

Tel: 020 7848 3410


Fax: 020 7848 3059
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/structure/admin/acservices/reg/
Tel: 020 7848 2268/1715
Fax: 020 7848 2766
Email: ug_arc@kcl.ac.uk
Tel : 020 7848 7070
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/structure/admin/facser/centre/
Email : thecompass@kcl.ac.uk

Emergency

Tel: 2222

Security

Tel: 2874

Disclaimer
The information in this booklet was compiled in August 2010. Whilst every attempt has
been made to ensure that details are as accurate as possible, some changes are likely to
occur before or during the 2010/11 session. You are advised to check important
information either with the Assessment and Records Centre or with your personal tutor. If
you notice any errors, please tell your personal tutor.
A more recent version of this booklet will be maintained on the website address. If you
have doubts or questions please consult the online version.

Contents
Preface.............................................................................................................................5
Further information ...........................................................................................................5
Disclaimer ........................................................................................................................6
Contents...........................................................................................................................7
1. INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................................10
About your Departmental Handbook ..............................................................................10
History of the Department of Mathematics .....................................................................10
Mission Statement..........................................................................................................12
Term dates 2010-11 .......................................................................................................12
2. ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS.......................................................................................13
The Mathematics Departmental Office ...........................................................................13
The School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences ........................................................13
The Tutor System...........................................................................................................13
The Senior Tutor ............................................................................................................14
The Link-up System .......................................................................................................14
How we contact you .......................................................................................................14
Attendance and absence................................................................................................14
3. ORGANISATIONS FOR STUDENTS ............................................................................15
MathSoc .........................................................................................................................15
4. GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION..............................................................16
Finding your way around the Department ......................................................................16
Local Safety Procedures ................................................................................................19
Staff/Student Liaison Committee....................................................................................19
Prizes for Students 2009/10 ...........................................................................................19
5. STUDYING IN THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS .............................................21
Code of Conduct ............................................................................................................21
The Semester System....................................................................................................22
Lectures and Tutorials....................................................................................................22
Walk-in Tutorials ............................................................................................................22
Pop-In Tutorials..............................................................................................................23
Coursework ....................................................................................................................23
Does Coursework Count? ..............................................................................................24
Class Tests in Year 1 .....................................................................................................24
Monitoring of Progress ...................................................................................................25
Student Presentations ....................................................................................................25
Evaluation of Presentations............................................................................................25
Workload ........................................................................................................................26
Submission of Projects and Essays ...............................................................................26
6. EXAMINATION REGULATIONS ...................................................................................27
Registration for and Admission to Examinations ............................................................27
Special Examinations Arrangements..............................................................................28
Attendance at Examinations...........................................................................................28
When are degree examinations held?............................................................................28
Examination Papers .......................................................................................................29
Rubrics ...........................................................................................................................29
Calculators .....................................................................................................................29
Marking Procedures .......................................................................................................30
7

Mitigating Circumstances ...............................................................................................30


Appeal against a decision of a Board of Examiners .......................................................32
Degree Titles..................................................................................................................32
Course Units or Credits How many do I need to pass for a degree? ..........................33
Award of Honours ..........................................................................................................33
Examination Results.......................................................................................................34
College Debtors and Release of Examination Results ...................................................35
August Resits .................................................................................................................35
Progression & Resits......................................................................................................35
Overseas Examinations .................................................................................................37
BSc/MSci transfers.........................................................................................................38
All your own work? .........................................................................................................38
Cheating.........................................................................................................................38
Collusion ........................................................................................................................38
Fabrication .....................................................................................................................38
Plagiarism ......................................................................................................................38
7. PROGRAMMES OF STUDY .........................................................................................40
Single subject honours ...................................................................................................40
Joint honours..................................................................................................................40
Mathematics BSc/MSci ..................................................................................................41
Mathematics with Management and Finance BSc .........................................................46
Graduate Diploma in Mathematics .................................................................................48
Mathematics and Computer Science BSc ......................................................................51
Mathematics and Computer Science MSci.....................................................................54
Mathematics and Physics BSc .......................................................................................56
Mathematics and Physics MSci......................................................................................59
Mathematics and Physics with Astrophysics BSc ..........................................................63
French and Mathematics BA .........................................................................................66
Mathematics and Philosophy BA....................................................................................68
Change of Degree Course .............................................................................................72
8. MODULE/COURSE UNIT LISTING ...............................................................................72
4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I ...................................................................................73
4CCM112a (CM112A) Calculus II ..................................................................................75
4CCM113a (CM113A) Linear Methods ..........................................................................76
4CCM115a (CM115A) Numbers and Functions .............................................................77
5CCM115b (CM115B) Numbers and Functions for Joint Honours.................................78
4CCM121a (CM121A) Introduction to Abstract Algebra.................................................79
5CCM121b (CM121A) Introduction to Abstract Algebra for Joint Honours.....................80
4CCM122a (CM122A) Geometry I .................................................................................81
5CCM122b (CM122A) Geometry I for Joint Honours.....................................................82
4CCM131a / 5CCM131b (CM131A) Introduction to Dynamical Systems.......................83
4CCM141a / 5CCM141b (CM141A) Probability and Statistics I.....................................85
5CCM211a / 6CCM211b (CM211A) PDEs & Complex Variables ..................................86
5CCM221a (CM221A) Analysis I ...................................................................................88
5CCM222a / 6CCM222b (CM222A) Linear Algebra.......................................................90
5CCM223a / 6CCM223b (CM223A) Geometry of Surfaces ...........................................91
5CCM224A / 6CCM224B (CM224X) Elementary Number Theory .................................92
5CCM231a / 6CCM231b (CM231A) Intermediate Dynamics .........................................93
5CCM232a / 6CCM232b (CM232A) Groups and Symmetries .......................................94
5CCM241a / 6CCM241b (CM241X) Probability and Statistics II....................................95
8

5CCM250a (CM2504) Applied Analytic Methods ...........................................................96


5CCM251a / 6CCM251b (CM251X) Discrete Mathematics ...........................................98
6CCM318a Fourier Analysis ..........................................................................................99
6CCM320a (CM320X) Topics in Mathematics .............................................................100
6CCM321a / 7CCM321b (CM321A) Real Analysis II ...................................................103
6CCM322a / 7CCM322b (CM322C) Complex Analysis ...............................................104
6CCM326a / 7CCM326b (CM326Z) Galois Theory......................................................105
6CCM327a / 7CCM327b (CM327Z) Topology .............................................................106
6CCM328a (CM328X) Logic ........................................................................................107
6CCM330a (CM330X) Mathematics Education & Communication ..............................108
6CCM331a (CM331A) Special Relativity and Electromagnetism .................................110
6CCM332a (CM332C) Introductory Quantum Theory ..................................................111
6CCM334a / 7CCM334b (CM334Z) Space-Time Geometry & General Relativity .......112
6CCM338a (CM338Z) Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time ..............................113
6CCM350a / 7CCM350b (CM350Z) Rings and Modules .............................................115
6CCM351a (CM351A) Representation Theory of Finite Groups ..................................117
6CCM356a (CM356Y) Linear Systems with Control Theory ........................................118
6CCM357a (CM357Y) Introduction to Linear Systems with Control Theory.................119
6CCM359a (CM359X) Numerical Methods ..................................................................120
6CCM360a (CM360X) History and Development of Mathematics ...............................121
6CCM380a (CM380a) Topics in Applied Probability Theory ........................................122
6CCM388a (CM388Z) Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time ....................................125
6CCMCS02 / 7CCMCS02 Theory of Complex Networks .............................................126
6CCMCS05 / 7CCMCS05 Mathematical Biology .........................................................127
7CCMMS01 (CM424Z) Lie Groups and Lie Algebras ..................................................128
7CCMMS03 (CM422Z) Algebraic Number Theory .......................................................129
7CCMMS08 (CM414Z) Operator Theory .....................................................................130
7CCMMS11 (CM418Z) Fourier Analysis ......................................................................131
7CCMMS18 (CM437Z) Manifolds ................................................................................132
7CCMMS19 (CMMS29) Modular Forms ......................................................................133
7CCMMS20 Algebraic Geometry .................................................................................134
7CCMMS31 (CM436Z) Quantum Mechanics II............................................................135
7CCMMS32 (CM438Z) Quantum Field Theory ............................................................136
7CCMMS34 (CM435Z) String Theory and Branes .......................................................137
7CCMMS38 (CM433Z) Advanced General Relativity...................................................138
7CCMMS41 Supersymmetry and Gauge Theory.........................................................139
Projects ........................................................................................................................140
The BSc Project Option 6CCM345a (CM345C) ...........................................................140
The MSci Project 7CCM461a (CM461C) .....................................................................140
With Management programmes .................................................................................142
4CCMY129 - Organisational Behaviour .......................................................................144
4CCMY110 Economics .............................................................................................145
5CCMY210 - Accounting..............................................................................................146
5CCMY212 - Marketing................................................................................................147
6CCMY325 Business Strategy and Operations Management...................................148
6CCMY339 Human Resource Management .............................................................149
9. SAFETY CHECK LIST.................................................................................................150
10. ETHICS IN MATHEMATICS ......................................................................................151
11. INDEX........................................................................................................................153

1. INTRODUCTION
About your Departmental Handbook
This handbook is intended as a guide for all undergraduate students in the Department of
Mathematics, Kings College London, during the academic session 2010/11. It should be
your first point of reference should you need to know anything about the Department.
In this booklet you will find information about the Department, details of important
procedures which you will need to follow during the session, assessment information and
details of programmes and modules available in the Department.
We hope you find this handbook a useful accompaniment to your studies at Kings
College, and wish you an enjoyable and successful year.
History of the Department of Mathematics
Mathematics has been studied at King's throughout its history and the first Professor of
Mathematics was appointed in 1830. Since then the Mathematics Department has
established a record of accomplishments in central areas of pure mathematics and
physical applied mathematics. It achieved very high profiles in both Pure and Applied
Mathematics in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and was well within the top
quartile nationally.
The Department provides degree programmes and modules for both undergraduate and
postgraduate degrees in mathematics. Its teaching programmes are influenced by the
research interests and activities of the staff.
The Department is a member of the School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences at
King's. The Departments of the School together provide a wide range of degree
programmes and modules in mathematics, informatics and physical sciences, from first
year to postgraduate level, and in a variety of modes from full- and part-time to continuing
education.

10

Structure of the Department of Mathematics


Head of Department and Professor of Mathematics:
Professors:
D Brigo, PhD
DJ Burns, MA, PhD
CJ Bushnell, BSc, PhD, FKC
ACC Coolen, MSc, PhD
FI Diamond, PhD
N Lambert BSc, PhD
GP Papadopoulos, PhD
AN Pressley, MA, DPhil
FA Rogers, BA PhD
Y Safarov, BSc, PhD, DSc
SG Scott, BSc, DPhil
E Shargorodsky, MSc, PhD
WT Shaw, MA, DPhil
PK Sollich, MPhil, PhD
PC West, BSc, PhD, FRS, FKC

Professor J Berndt, PhD


Emeritus Professors:
EB Davies, MA, DPhil, FRS, FKC
PS Howe, BSc, PhD
DC Robinson, MSc, PhD
PT Saunders, BA, PhD
RF Streater, BSc, PhD, DIC, LFS,
ARCS
JG Taylor, BSc, MA, PhD
Emeritus Readers:
JA Erdos, MSc PhD
WJ Harvey, BSc, PhD
Research Assistants/Associates:
J Gutowski
T Koeppe
C Papageorgakis, PhD
F Riccioni
S Sasaki
N Shayeghi

Readers:
T di Matteo PhD
R Khn, PhD
AH Recknagel, PhD
DR Solomon, BA, PhD
GMT Watts, BA, PhD

Visiting Research Fellows:


AD Barnard, MA, PhD
DA Lavis, BSc, PhD, FInstP, FIMA

Senior Lecturer:
AB Pushnitski, PhD

Visiting Professor:
C Albanese, PhD

Lecturers:
A Annibale, PhD
C Buescu, PhD
PP Cook, PhD
B Doyon, PhD
P Emms, DPhil
N Gromov
PL Kassaei, PhD
E Katzav, PhD
A Macrina, PhD
B Noohi, PhD
I Prez Castillo, PhD
S Schafer-Nameki, PhD
G Tinaglia, PhD

Visiting Lecturers:
J Bennett-Rees, MA
S Fairthorne, BSc
LH Hodgkin, BA, DPhil
D Makinson, PhD
J Van Baardewijk, PhD
Professional Services Staff
Departmental Administrator
Frances Benton, BA
Student Administrator
Joanne Cooke, BA

EPSRC Advanced Fellows:


D Martelli, PhD
KC Rietsch, MA, PhD

Operations Assistant
Stephanie Rice, BA

Royal Society University Research Fellow:


D Panov, PhD

11

IT Support Officer
Dan Wade
Dennis Hyde

Mission Statement
The Colleges Mission Statement is:The College is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge, learning and understanding in
the service of society. Since its foundation in 1829, King's has come to occupy a leading
position in higher education in the UK and to enjoy a world-wide reputation for teaching
and research. The College's objective is to build on this reputation and to have all its
research and teaching activities judged excellent by peer review. King's, in line with its
founding principles, will continue to foster the highest ethical standards in a compassionate
community. This all-embracing pursuit of excellence will touch every part of the College
and its constituencies:
Staff: The College will continue to appoint outstanding academic and support staff.
Training and staff development programmes will help staff to reach their full potential. A
continuous programme of improvement of all College facilities will underpin research of the
highest standard.
Students: King's will continue to encourage applications from students of all backgrounds,
selecting only on the grounds of academic merit and potential. Students will study in a
research environment which values scholarly enquiry and independence of thought and
will enjoy high levels of staff contact, free and open discussion, and flexible course
structures. All students will be encouraged to follow an additional course, the
Associateship of King's College, which further challenges them to think systematically
about their values and beliefs.
Location: The College's location in the heart of London brings special advantages and
responsibilities. King's will utilise its location to promote the exchange of ideas and skills
with government and the business community, the professions, the arts and the world of
education.
Society: The College, by capitalising on its position, will bring informed influence to bear on
national and international decision makers. It will also meet its obligations to society by
undertaking and disseminating the results of research, and by producing balanced and
well educated graduates.
Term dates 2010-11
Monday 27 September 2010
Monday 10 January 2011
Monday 26 April 2011
Departmental Registration
First Semester
Reading Week
January Exams
Second Semester
Revision/Teaching Weeks
Summer Exams
Resits/Replacements
Graduation Dates

-Friday 17 December 2010 (12 weeks)


-Friday 1 April 2011 (12 weeks)
-Friday 3 June 2011 (6 weeks)

Thursday 23 September
Monday 27 September
Monday 8 November
Monday 10 January
Monday 17 January
Tuesday 26 April
Monday 9 May
Monday 8 August
July 2010

12

-Friday 24 September 2010


-Friday 17 December 2010
-Friday 12 November 2010
-Friday 14 January 2011
-Friday 1 April 2011
-Friday 7 May 2011
-Friday 3 June 2011
-Friday 19 August 2011

Students are expected to be available on all of the above dates (a specific graduation date
will be given nearer the time). Coursework deadlines will not be extended and neither will
other special arrangements be made simply because a student has made travel
arrangements which are within these semesters.

2. ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS
The Mathematics Departmental Office
The Departmental Office is open to students from 10.00am12.30pm and 14.30pm
16.30pm, Monday to Friday, except on Wednesdays when the office is closed for the
afternoon. The office is located on the 5th Floor, Strand Building, Room S5.01.
The School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences
The School of Natural and Mathematics Sciences comprises the Departments of
Informatics, Mathematics, Physics, the Division of Engineering (Electronic and
Mechanical) and the Centre for Bioinformatics. The Head of School is Mr Chris
Mottershead. Each Department or Division also has its own Head. Examination business
is co-ordinated by the Chair of Undergraduate Programme Boards (each Department has
its own Programme Board). The business of the Undergraduate Programme Boards is coordinated by the School Undergraduate Examination Board, which in turn reports to the
College Examination Board.
The Tutor System
Each student (whether single subject or joint honours) will be assigned a Personal Tutor in
the Mathematics Department. Personal Tutors are a primary point of contact between the
student and the College and, whenever possible, a student will have the same tutor
throughout his or her entire career. They can be consulted about academic, financial or
personal matters; where problems are serious, the tutor will help the student find more
specialised help. The Department looks to Personal Tutors for information about students,
for example, on attendance, examinations performance, other college activities, outside
interests and so on. Personal Tutors may speak on behalf of their Tutees on occasions
such as examiners meetings. At the end of their college careers students will want their
tutors to write testimonials and references supporting applications for employment or
further courses.
The Department places great importance on the tutorial system; its function depends
critically on students keeping in contact with their Personal Tutors. Students are entitled to
make appointments with their Personal Tutors, who can be seen at short notice in an
emergency. Students must make themselves known to their Personal Tutor on enrolment
day, and are strongly urged to keep in regular contact. You should be aware that there are
College regulations which state that if a member of College staff knows of any activity
which contravenes College regulations (e.g. drug abuse), they should report it to the
Academic Registrar. If you wish to discuss matters of a sensitive nature, you may find it
more appropriate to visit a College Counsellor, who will maintain confidentiality as far as
possible.

13

The Senior Tutor


The Senior Tutor also plays a pastoral role for all students and may be approached
whenever students feel that it would be appropriate to do so. In exceptional circumstances
students are permitted to change their tutor by making a request to the Senior Tutor or, if
necessary, the Head of Department.
The Link-up System
Following recommendations from the Staff-Student Committee, a Link-up Scheme has
been established between incoming first and second year mathematics students, and
between second and third/fourth year students. The aims of the scheme are to make the
transition to university as smooth and enjoyable as possible for incoming students, and to
provide a network of contacts between first, second and third year students with the
purpose of providing academic and social advice. Further information about this scheme
will be circulated at the beginning of the academic year.
How we contact you
The most important means of communication is the College electronic mail network which
is frequently used for the dissemination of information to students and for communication
between students and their tutors. Students are required to check their e-mail on a
regular basis. The College email system can be accessed at all PAWS machines and via
the web. All new students will be automatically registered to use the system. Another
method of communication is via the Mathematics departmental notice boards, which are
situated near the Departmental Office on the fifth floor of the Strand Building.
If you have any correspondence for a member of staff, you should leave it with a member
of staff in the Departmental Office.
Each student is required to sign a form to indicate that they realise their responsibilities to
regularly check email sent to their College email address (which has the standard form
firstname.lastname@kcl.ac.uk) and to keep up with College/Departmental information via
the relevant web pages.
Each student is also required to supply term-time and home addresses. You can make
amendments to personal information yourself via OneSpace. A student is responsible for
the consequences of not receiving information conveyed by these means.
Attendance and absence
Students are of course normally expected to attend all lectures, tutorials and other classes
for all their modules. Absence is permissible under certain circumstances (such as illness)
but students are generally expected to attend as regularly as possible. [Regulation B4
4.1.2 is available via: www.kcl.ac.uk/about/governance/regulations/students.html.
Any student who is absent from College for 7 days or more because of illness, or for
some other reason, should keep her or his Personal Tutor informed of the
circumstances. Medical certificates should be handed in to the Departmental Office,
Room S5.01.
Information about medical and other difficulties is important when decisions are made
regarding progress to later years and eventually final degree classification. The information
is also significant in relation to coursework assignments and assessments which are

14

carried out during the course of the year. Overseas students under the new visa
requirements should be aware that the college must report any prolonged absences.
If the illness or other problem is of a confidential nature, the Personal Tutor, Senior Tutor
or some other staff member can keep detailed information privately, and will, on request,
give a note to be filed in the office stating the existence of the document, the implications it
has for the student's performance, and information as to which member of staff has charge
of the document. The actual document will then be seen only by those, such as external
examiners and the Chair of the Board of Examiners, who need the information to fully
assess a student's performance.

3. ORGANISATIONS FOR STUDENTS


MathSoc
All Maths students are automatically members of MathSoc, which is a student run society
whose main aims are to organise social and academic activities throughout the year.
The main events are the summer boat party, Cumberland Lodge and for the first time, a
Christmas Party. Other subsidised events such as ice-skating and trips to Pizza Hut take
place throughout the year. Cumberland Lodge is a fantastic weekend away, which occurs
midway through the second semester; talks on the more appealing side of maths are
organised, and there is plenty of leisure time to enjoy Windsor Great Park.
Another purpose of MathSoc is to welcome the first years, and a parenting system is
arranged for the beginning of the year. A link-up party is organised for the last day of
registration. Here you will be able to chat informally with your fellow students, as well as
enjoy the free food and drink. You will also be given the opportunity to meet your
designated parents current students - who will be available to answer any questions
and offer advice on life in the Department.
Members of the MathSoc committee are usually available in Room S4.37, although they
can be contacted via email: the President; Roshni Sakaria (roshni.sakaria@kcl.ac.uk) the
Treasurer; Hina Varsani (hina.varsani@kcl.ac.uk) and the Social Secretary; Faris Ahmad
(ahmad.bin_ahmad_kabeer@kcl.ac.uk).

15

4. GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION


Finding your way around the Department
Departmental staff have rooms spread across several corridors and buildings of the Strand
campus. Figure 4.1 shows the central rooms and south side of the 4th floor of the Strand
Building.
Offices 4th Floor, South Side
Gents'
Toilets

Ladies'
Toilets

Stairs

S4.37

To King's Main Building


LIFTS
S4.36

S4.26

S4.27

MSc
Coffee
Room

S4.35

Alice Rogers

S4.34

Peter West

TBA

MSc Computer Room

S4.25

Photocopy Room

S4.24

S4.28

S4.32

S4.23

Seminar
Room
S4.29

S4.31

Seminar Room

S4.30

Head of Department's Office

Fire
Escape
Figure 4.1

16

Figure 4.2 shows the offices of academic staff along the north side of the 4th floor of the
Strand Building.
Academic Offices - 4th floor, North Side
S4.03 Gutowski, Koeppe, Papageorgakis
S4.04 Riccioni, Sasaki, Shayeghi
S4.05 - Konstanze Rietsch
S4.06 - Ton Coolen
S4.07 - Isaac Prez Castillo
S4.07a - Payman Kassaei
S4.08 - Dmitri Panov
S4.08a - Sakura Schafer-Nameki
S4.09 - Simon Scott
S4.10 - Andreas Recknagel
S4.11 - Eugene Shargorodsky
S4.12 - Benjamin Doyon
S4.13 - Reimer Khn
S4.13a - Eytan Katzav
S4.14 - Gerard Watts
S4.15 - David Solomon
S4.16 - George Papadopoulos
S4.17 - Yuri Safarov
S4.18 - David Burns
S4.19 - Andrew Pressley
S4.20 - Brian Davies
S4.21 - Fred Diamond
S4.22 - Behrang Noohi

Figure 4.2

17

Figure 4.3 shows the offices occupied by academics on the 5th floor Strand Building, north
and south side.

5th Floor
S5.01 Departmental
Office
Gents' Ladies'
Toilets Toilets
S5.23 Dan Wade

Stairs
Lifts

S5.24 William Shaw


S5.25 Peter Sollich
S5.26 Alessia Annibale

S5.40 John Taylor

S5.27 Nikolay Gromov


S5.28 Tiziana di Matteo
S5.29 Dario Martelli
S5.30 Paul Emms

S5.37 Cristin Buescu

S5.31 Giuseppe Tinaglia

S5.36 Andrea Macrina

S5.32 Alexander Pushnitski

S5.35 Damiano Brigo


Figure 4.3

Figure 4.4 shows the


mezzanine rooms which
are occupied by other
academic staff.

K4U.19/21/22/24/25
K4U.25 - Ray Streater
K4U.24 - David Lavis
K4U.22-David Robinson
K4U.21 - Luke Hodgkin
/ Bill Harvey

K4U.21 - Bernard
Luffman / Jane BennettRees / Hamish Rae/
John Silvester
Stairs
K4U.19 - Tony Barnard
/ Simon Fairthorne /
Peter Saunders

Figure 4.4

18

Local Safety Procedures


All students should be aware of basic safety procedures you will find a basic checklist at
the back of this booklet.
The Departmental Administrator acts as the Safety Officer. The Department has a Safety
Notice Board for the display of relevant notices. A list is displayed of First Aiders who
have been trained to give immediate medical help in the event of an accident. Whilst the
Health Centre (please see details under Advisory & Welfare Services) can help in these
circumstances, it is best to follow the advice of the First Aider and call an ambulance
should he/she consider this appropriate.
First Aid boxes are located in the Departmental Office as well as in the Undergraduate
Common Room, S4.37.
When it is necessary to evacuate a building in an emergency, bells will sound and you
should leave the building immediately by the nearest marked emergency exit. On
emerging from the building it is vital that you move right away from the building to provide
access for emergency vehicles and to allow others to leave quickly too. Provide an
example to others and follow the instructions of fire marshals.
If you are ever concerned about any aspect of safety or have suggestions to make, please
direct these to the Departmental Safety Officer on extension 2216. Further information
can be found on the College website: www.kcl.ac.uk/about/structure/admin/safety .
Staff/Student Liaison Committee
The Staff-Student Committee is the principal formal mechanism for feedback from
students to staff about all aspects of College life, particularly those directly related to the
Department. It also provides a forum for discussion on matters of common concern. It
has two calendared meetings every semester, but students can ask for a special meeting
at any time.
The student membership of the Committee consists of all officers of the undergraduate
Mathematics Society, together with a further seven elected representatives, consisting of
one single subject student and one joint honours student from each of the three years.
The current staff members include the Senior Tutor and the Head of Department.
Prizes for Students 2009/10
The prizes listed below are offered to undergraduate students, and the recipients in 2010
are as indicated. The Award Ceremony this year will take place on 10 November 2010.
Kings College London Prizes:
Jelf Medal for the most distinguished student (academically, socially and athletically)
no award
Layton Science Research Award 0613894 Mr SH Benson (MSci Mathematics and
Physics)
Sambrooke Joint Honours 0903655 Mr J Baker (BSc Mathematics and Physics with
Astrophysics)
The Florence Hughes Prize awarded to female student achieving highest standard in
second year 0804236 Miss A Kumon (BSc Mathematics)
19

Alan Flower Memorial Prize 0613894 Mr SH Benson (MSci Mathematics and Physics)
Mathematics Departmental Prizes:
Drew Prize and Medal 0728164 Mr PJK Stapelfeldt (BSc Mathematics with
Management and Finance)
Second Drew Prize 0729496 Mrs AL Houghton (BSc Mathematics) and 0708972 Miss
LJ Elvidge (BSc Mathematics)
The George Bell Prize for the most meritorious performance in mathematics by a third
year MSci student 0719657 Mr NA Malik (MSci Mathematics)
2 IMA Prizes (free graduate membership for one year) 0701945 Miss CY Ying (BSc
Mathematics) and 0707078 Mr SS Mondair (BSc Mathematics)
The J G Semple Prize for the best project by a final-year student 0844059 Mr S Heise
(Graduate Diploma)
The John Tyrrell Prize for the most meritorious performance in mathematics by a first
year student no award
The John Tyrrell Prize for the most meritorious performance in mathematics by a
second year student 0804236 Miss A Kumon (BSc Mathematics)
Prize for Joint Honours Mathematics 0961452 Mr R Solamides (BA Mathematics and
Philosophy)
The Marianne Merts Prize for outstanding contribution to the life of the Department
0801270 Mr MK Khan (BSc Mathematics with Management and Finance)
Prize for Mathematics and Philosophy non-graduating student most worthy of award
0803195 Mr WDH Hiscock
Sambrooke Exhibition in Mathematics for the most meritorious performance in
mathematics by a 1st or 2nd year student 0900827 Mr V Solanki (MSci Mathematics)
Spackman Prize Joint First Prize: 0958807 Miss A Aneja (MSci Mathematics) and
0728164 Mr P Stapelfeldt (Mathematics with Management and Finance)
Mathematics with Management and Finance best graduating student no award
Mathematics with Management and Finance second best graduating student no
award
Prize for the best Mathematics with Management and Finance student (2nd year)
0803026 Mr S Al Khalifa
Prize for the best Mathematics with Management and Finance student (1st year)
0909819 Mr MP Wolfers
Graduate Diploma in Mathematics Prize for best performance by a Graduate Diploma
Student 0974074 Mr B Gancarz

20

5. STUDYING IN THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS


Code of Conduct

Code of Conduct & Behaviour in Lectures


The way you are taught at university may be very different to what you have experienced
before. You may be taught in a very large or very small group. You may be expected to
think quickly and follow complicated material at a pace you may find too fast - or too slow.
Overall, you will be given greater academic and personal freedom than you have
experienced before, and this can be bewildering at first. You will have to learn how to
organise your own time so that you get the most from your education.
However, there are still certain rules that have to be obeyed. You are required to attend
lectures and you will expect these to be well-prepared, logical, audible and correctly
paced. You can contribute to the success of lectures by following the guidelines shown
below:

Arrive in good time - late arrivals disrupt the rest of the class.

Turn off your mobile phone before the lecture starts. Never make or answer calls
during a lecture. Do not receive or send text messages. Do not use any other
electronic devices during a lecture without permission of the lecturer.

Sign any attendance register.

Concentrate on the material that is being presented.

Do not talk when the lecturer is talking; only conversations and discussions expressly
permitted by the lecturer are allowed.

If you have a question for the lecturer, please attract his/her attention by raising your
hand.

Do not eat or drink.

Disruptive behaviour destroys learning and will not be tolerated by teachers. If they are
disturbed by disruptive or interfering behaviour, teachers have a right to ask offending
students to leave the lecture theatre or teaching room and to enquire of their name.
Students who commit misconduct on College premises are liable to the Colleges
Disciplinary Procedures
It is in the interest of the whole class and the lecturer that these guidelines are followed.
Please encourage others to follow them.
PLEASE THINK OF OTHERS AS WELL AS YOURSELF; HELP MAKE THE LECTURE A
SUCCESS FOR EVERYBODY.

21

The Semester System


Mathematics modules are almost all given either wholly in the first semester or wholly in
the second semester. Note, however, that second semester modules continue for the first
week of term following the Easter break. All exams for Mathematics modules for single
and joint honours Mathematics students are held in the Summer Exam Session in May,
with the exception of 4CCM111a (CM111A) which is examined in January. Joint Honours
students, in addition to the 4CCM111a (CM111A) examination, may find that they also
have examinations in January for some of their non-mathematics first semester modules.
The term after Easter (that is, the period from April to June) consists largely of
examinations. However, as noted above, the first week is used to complete second
semester modules, and the second week is normally devoted to revision, although
occasionally new material may be presented during this week full details will be found on
the course information sheet issued during the first lecture of each unit.
Lectures and Tutorials
Attendance at lectures and tutorials is compulsory. Listening to an exposition of a subject
developed in lectures is an important part of the process of learning mathematics.
Copying another student's notes is not a valid substitute. Tutorials are your opportunity to
clear up difficulties and consolidate your understanding, as well as to review the
assignment work. You cannot expect sympathy if you miss the tutorials and subsequently
need individual help for your difficulties.
It is recognised that occasional absences may be inevitable. However, in cases of
prolonged systematic absences, the students concerned may be excluded from the
examination on the grounds that they have not completed the course of study. If you are
absent because of illness or some other good cause, you should comply with the
procedures concerning such matters (see 'Matters regarding attendance and absence').
Extraneous noise and casual chatter can sometimes be a problem in lectures, particularly
if the class is large. It makes difficulties for the vast majority of students and is distracting
to the lecturer, resulting in a loss of quality in the lecture. (Conversely, interest and
attentiveness of a class can inspire the lecturer to an enhanced performance.) Students
are asked to ensure that lectures are not disrupted by extraneous noise. Mobile phones
must be switched off during lectures.
Walk-in Tutorials
These tutorials are for First Year students. The intention is to give students who are at the
beginning of their course the opportunity to have their difficulties sorted out in an informal
way. They can ask for any topic to be gone over at their own pace, and guidance will be
given on how to approach the problems on the weekly exercise sheets (although the
actual work set will not be done for you!) You are encouraged to make use of these
sessions to sort out anything you are having trouble with.
These tutorials are run by Mrs J Bennett-Rees and will take place on Wednesdays from
14.0017.00 in room 520 in semester one and two. You should aim to come early in the
session but only stay for as long as you wish.

22

Pop-In Tutorials
In addition to the Walk-in tutorials, the Department offers Pop-in tutorials for First Year
students.
Usually, there are two such tutorials per week, probably starting in the second week of
term and are conducted by a Final Year Mathematics student at Kings. (Students will be
notified of the days and times.) These tutorials are informal, and you are free to come and
go as you please. You may ask questions about any aspects of your First Year modules
which are troubling you, or which you are finding difficult, but please note that these Pop-in
tutorials are NOT intended as a forum for solving the problems on next weeks exercise
sheet! In the past many students have found these tutorials very helpful and you are
encouraged to avail yourself of this opportunity.
Students will be advised of times and rooms closer to the time.
Coursework
Mathematics is a subject that can only be mastered by relating the theory to applications
and examples. The Department of Mathematics attaches great importance to students in
all years attending the tutorial classes and handing in weekly assignments as well as going
to lectures. For all compulsory and core modules, attendance and assessment marks will
be recorded for each tutorial, and for these courses students will be required to attend a
minimum of 70% of the tutorials.
For all first year students additional coursework requirements are imposed, which are
intended to help in making the transition from school to university. Mathematics modules
normally taken by first year students have either an element of continuous assessment
counting towards the final result for the module, or a coursework requirement based on
weekly assignments done in the students' own time. The information sheet for a module
will indicate which of these methods is being used.
Any coursework requirement for a particular module will be specified on the Course
Information Sheet. In cases where the requirement is based on weekly assignments,
students are responsible for keeping marked assignments in case of possible appeals
concerning their standard, and are asked to make any enquiries about the marking at an
early stage. Coursework requirements may be waived for medical or other similar good
reason. You should keep your Personal Tutor informed about any problems.
The above requirements also apply to joint honours students taking Mathematics modules.
Regulations require that a student must complete a proper course of study before being
admitted to the summer examinations. The Department of Mathematics rules that, in
addition to attendance at lectures and tutorials, meeting a coursework requirement, as
appropriate for a module, forms part of the proper course of study. Students who do not
meet the coursework requirement will not normally be allowed to sit the Sessional
Examination for the module concerned.
All coursework tests, which count in the final assessment, are College examinations. The
way that they will count in the final assessment will be announced at the beginning of the
course and will have been agreed with the Chair of the Board of Examiners. There will be
no replacement or resit course tests. Failure to attend a test, except under special
circumstances, will normally be penalised. If there are extenuating circumstances,

23

medical certificates or other written evidence must be received by the Departmental Office
within 48 hours of the test. The condition for a bare pass is a pass on aggregate.
Does Coursework Count?
All students should read this section carefully especially First Year students. It is
important that all students, particularly First Year students, be aware of the fundamental
importance of sitting and performing well in all the Class Tests which will contribute to the
final mark for the module; these are discussed in more detail below.
Please note that Second Year students do not receive a coursework mark in
5CCM1xxxB modules; they are graded solely on the basis of the written
examination.
Class Test marks relate to First Year students taking Level 4 modules (4CCM1xxxA)
only.
Lecturers teaching First or Second Year modules set homework exercises week by week.
At Third and Fourth Year level exercises will also be set as a module progresses, but not
necessarily on a weekly basis. Making a serious attempt to do the set questions is a
crucial ingredient in developing your understanding of Mathematics; Mathematics is a
subject where one learns by doing. Although studying lecture notes is an important and
valuable activity you will never really discover whether or not you understand a topic until
you try to solve the weekly exercise problems. A sensible approach involves studying the
lecture, thinking about the definitions and theorems, trying to understand the proofs, and
so on. Then attempt some questions from the weekly exercise; at that point you may have
to return to your lecture notes, you may have to read the relevant part of a textbook, and
perhaps think more deeply about a definition or a theorem which you had previously
thought you understood.
For First and Second Year students your attempts at the exercises will be graded week by
week, and the results recorded; in a few modules these marks may contribute to your final
mark. For precise information you should study the Course Information sheet, distributed
by lecturers at the start of a module; the Course Information sheet is also available on the
module web-site. The primary factor in determining your mark for most modules will be
the mark you obtain in the written examination in May/June (but that in turn may be heavily
influenced by your attitude to exercise work throughout the year!).
However, many modules do have a coursework element and a coursework mark which
does contribute to your final mark. This is assigned on the basis of your performance in
class tests, or by some other method of assessment. In every case the mode of
assessment is described in the Course Information sheet; in particular, this will make clear
whether or not there are class tests, and the extent to which these contribute towards the
final mark for the module.
You should note that coursework marks only have relevance the first time round; if you
fail to pass a module at the first attempt and have to resit an examination, your mark in the
resit examination will be determined solely on the basis of the written paper and any
coursework mark will not be taken into account.
Class Tests in Year 1
In 2009/10 there will be a coursework mark for each First Year module, contributing 20%
towards the final mark for the course, the remaining 80% being secured on the basis of the
written examination which will be held in May/June. In the First Semester there will be four
24

Class Tests in each course (except for 4CCM111a/CM11A), conducted under examination
conditions; three of these tests will be held during the period in which the course is actually
taught, and a fourth test will be held in January 2009 during Examination Week.
In the Second Semester there will be three Class Tests, all being held during the period in
which the course is taught.
It is crucial that you sit all these tests; there will be no re-sit tests.
Information about the Class Tests, including the dates the tests will take place, can be
found on the web: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/nms/maths/curr/ug/tests.html
The importance of working hard throughout the module, and sitting and performing well in
all the Class Tests, cannot be overestimated. The tests will be designed to gauge
whether or not you have mastered the basic concepts; although the questions will not be
trivial, neither will they be difficult. A student who works diligently should be able to
approach the January and May/June examinations secure in the knowledge that she/he is
well on the way to reaching the 40% pass mark.
Please note that if you fail an examination in January and/or May/June your mark in any
re-sit examination (taken in August or subsequent years) will be determined solely on the
basis of the written paper; coursework marks will not count. Marks obtained in August resit examinations are capped at 40%.
Monitoring of Progress
Your performance in class tests and homework will be monitored on a continuous basis.
Students whose progress is unsatisfactory will be required to attend a meeting with the
Senior Tutor.
Student Presentations
All Single Honours Mathematics students in Years 1, 2 and 3 will be required to give a
short presentation, once a year, on a mathematical topic. First Year presentations,
relating to a topic prescribed by the lecturer responsible, will normally take place in a
tutorial class, unless the lecturer decides that it is appropriate for the presentation to take
place at the start or end of his/her lecture, for example. In most cases students will be
asked to present their solution to a simple problem, to be assigned in advance by the
relevant lecturer. The presentation should last five minutes or a little longer.
Second and Third Year students will be invited to sign up to give a presentation in a
module of their choice although there will be a limit as to how many presentations may
take place in any one module; the sooner you sign up, the more likely you will be to be
able to give your presentation on your favourite subject!
Evaluation of Presentations
Your presentation will be graded as Excellent, Good, Satisfactory or Fail. These grades
will be recorded in your student file, and although they have no bearing on the class of
degree that you will receive, they could be important if you ask a member of the
Department to write a job reference on your behalf. The ability to express oneself clearly
is highly valued in todays world, and it is important to obtain some practice in the art of
verbal communication before you graduate from Kings. Presentations are a small step in
helping you to develop your skills in this area.

25

Workload
During term time you should expect to spend at least 40 hours per week on your studies.
Lectures and tutorials will normally take up 16 hours of your time, but you cannot expect to
follow your course successfully without several hours a week of additional work on each
module. It is particularly important that after each lecturing session you go through your
notes making sure that you understand the material, and that your notes are sufficiently
clear for you to be able to follow them when the lecture is no longer fresh in your memory.
If you are not on top of the material from the preceding lectures you will find subsequent
lectures hard to follow. It is also essential that you complete the assignments which are
set as the module progresses. If you do this you will find you have digested a useful
proportion of the material.
Most of the time, when one is learning mathematics, one is struggling to cope with material
that seems difficult. If you really are struggling, you will be learning more than you realise,
but if you are stuck, do not give up there are sources of help:

Other students on the course. While you must not copy assessed coursework whose
mark contributes towards the mark for the module, most assignments are set as
practice and collaboration is encouraged. Students helping each other is a two-way
benefit; the student who needs help is assisted while the giver of help usually discovers
that she/he understands the work better from having had to put it in her/his/ own words.

Tutorials, including the walk-in tutorials for first year students, provide an opportunity to
ask questions about any aspect of the course.

The course lecturers and helpers will have office hours when they are available for
consultation.

Submission of Projects and Essays


All project or essay work must be handed in to the Office by 4pm on the date which will be
specified at the beginning of the module. Normally two copies will be required and receipts
will be provided by the Office. Late work will not be accepted except under special
circumstances and it will normally receive a mark of zero. If the deadline is not met
written evidence of extenuating circumstances, such as medical certificates or other
written evidence, must be received by the Departmental Office within 48 hours of the
deadline.

26

6. EXAMINATION REGULATIONS
These instructions supplement the College Regulations. They do not replace the Colleges
Academic Regulations, Regulations Concerning Students & General Regulations and the
Schools Programme Specifications and Marking Scheme, which cover all aspects of your
degree programme in detail. You can find the College Regulations in the College Libraries
and on the web at:
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/governance/regulations
Our aim here is simply to help you to understand the way in which our exams are
organised, the options available to you, and the procedures that you must follow for
various eventualities. Please read this material carefully (and the College Academic
Regulations, Regulations Concerning Students & General Regulations if you have concern
on matters not covered here) and remember: Ignorance is no excuse for failure to
comply.
The School for Natural and Mathematical Sciences has produced a handbook for students
available at
www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/nms/current/handbook.html
It should be consulted for further information about several of the issues addressed below,
in particular those not specific to the Mathematics Department.
Registration for and Admission to Examinations
Registration for examinations has to be made online via OneSpace within the first two
weeks of the session for all subjects (whether taught in the first or second terms or both)
so that your entries can be registered in the College records. You will be notified of the
detailed arrangements near to the time. Compulsory subjects will be entered automatically
on your record but you must enter all optional subjects and resit examinations, even if you
are only to resubmit coursework. You will then receive a list of your examination entries
via OneSpace. It is YOUR responsibility to check your entry, to inform the
Assessment and Records Centre (ARC) if there are any errors or omissions, and to
meet all the relevant deadlines. The importance of doing this carefully cannot be
overstated. In this context it is of the utmost importance that you regularly study the
Urgent Notices Board opposite the Departmental office and read your e-mail on a daily
basis. It may be possible to amend your registration list at a later date if you wish to
change your choice of subjects, but (except in the case of a withdrawal under exceptional
circumstances, see below) this will not be possible after a prescribed date to be
announced early in the session. Any amendments should be approved by your Senior
Tutor and must be submitted in writing by completing a form available from ARC. Students
should be aware, that if, come the examination, it is found that they are not registered for
an examination there is no guarantee that they will be allowed to sit it and/or gain credit for
it. It should also be noted that admissions to an examination may be refused if, because
27

your attendance is deemed inadequate, the authorities are unable to complete the
certificate of attendance for the relevant subject.
Special Examinations Arrangements
If you have a learning or physical disability/condition (including pregnancy), and have not
already received concessions for the whole of your programme, you can apply to the
College's Special Examination Arrangements Committee (SEAC) for special examination
provisions in respect of written examinations.
Please note that if you are dyslexic (or believe you may be), you must provide a full
dyslexia assessment. This assessment must be conducted by a chartered educational
psychologist and show all your test results. It should also be dated within three years of
the date of your application to the SEAC. If you have a physical disability/condition, the
medical evidence must be detailed and recent - preferably written by a consultant.
Alternatively, an additional section of the application form can be completed.
Information regarding the closing dates for the submission of completed application forms
and supporting documentation, are available on the web. No arrangements will be
considered where the appropriate deadline has not been met, except in the case of
accidental injury or acute illness. An application form is available from the School Office or
on the web at: www.kcl.ac.uk/about/structure/admin/acservices/examinations/sea/
and must be returned to the Examinations Office. If special provision is granted, then it will
apply to one examination period only, and you will need to reapply for subsequent
examination periods if the disability persists.
Please note that special examination arrangements are do not automatically carry over to
class tests, which you may need to sit during the semester.
Attendance at Examinations
You must make every effort to attend your examinations. It is YOUR responsibility to
ascertain the time and place of all the examinations which you are sitting. Be sure
to check the FINAL timetable which is available via:
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/structure/admin/acservices/examinations/students
Absence from an examination, will count as a failed attempt, you will receive a mark of
zero. (See the section on Mitigating Circumstances below on what to do, if you fall
seriously ill.)
You must take a printout of your Examination Passport to all your examinations. It
lists all examinations for which you are registered and will be obtainable from OneSpace.
Note that you will normally not be permitted entry to any examinations for which you are
not registered.
When are degree examinations held?
All Mathematics examinations are examined at the end of the teaching year (with the
exception of 4CCM111a (CM111A) and 7CCMMS30 (CMMS30) and one or two ancillary
modules with degree or midsessional exams in January). The examination period itself
lasts for about a month and in the current session runs from Mon 9 May to Fri 3 June
2011.

28

Joint Honours students need to bear in mind that some departments (e.g. Computer
Science and Management Studies) examine their First Semester modules in January.
Examination Papers
At the end of each session, students are examined in the modules which they have taken
during that session. The common format is a two or three hour written exam.
The precise format of an examination paper is described in a so-called rubric which
appears on the front cover of the examination paper in question. The rubrics in most
common use are described below.
Rubrics
The Department's `standard rubric' for first-year examination papers in the Mathematics
Department runs as follows:
This paper consists of two sections, Section A and Section B.
Section A contributes half the total marks for the paper.
All questions in Section B carry equal marks. Answer all questions.
For second- and third-year exams the standard version is:
This paper consists of two sections, Section A and Section B.
Section A contributes half the total marks for the paper.
Answer all questions in Section A.
All questions in Section B carry equal marks, but if more than
two are attempted, then only the best two will count.
In such an exam students are advised to concentrate first on completing Section A. This
consists mainly of easier questions which should generally resemble exercises and/or
examples from the lecture. In order to obtain a high grade (as opposed to a pass) students
will also need to provide answers that are as full as possible to two questions from Section
B. These may require a little more thought and the rubric clearly encourages you to focus
your energy on at most two such questions.
Some exams may employ other, `non-standard' rubrics (because of the nature of the
material of the module, for example, or because the paper has several sections). In thirdand fourth-year exams this is particularly common. For instance, there may be a `nonstandard' rubric of the following form (with some value of N, which is often less than the
total number of questions on the paper):
Full marks will be awarded for complete answers to N questions.
Only the best N questions will count towards grades A or B, but credit will be given
for all work done for lower grades.
In all modules the lecturer will inform you of which rubric is to be used.
If coursework marks are included in the assessment of a module, then normally the
provisions of the rubric are applied before these are added in.
Calculators
For examinations in which the use of calculators is permitted, students are expected to
bring their own calculators. However, these calculators must be one of the two
following approved models CASIO-FX83xx, or CASIO-FX85xx. In these specifications,
29

xx stands for an arbitrary two-letter model specification (e.g. xx=ES). All such
specifications are allowed. Bringing a non-approved calculator to an exam will be regarded
as an examination offence!
Marking Procedures
All examination scripts are marked by a first examiner, who is normally the lecturer for the
module, and then by a second examiner. This is formally Model 2 as described in the
College Marking Framework The script may also be considered by an external examiner.
This will always happen, if the script turns out to be a borderline case.
The criteria for judging the quality of a script or project report are summarised in a set of
mark schemes which will be available, when finalised, on the NMS website at:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/nms/internal/pol/mark.html
Marking of BSc and MSci/MSc projects on the other hand basically follows Model 1 of the
College Marking Framework, in that two copies of the project report are marked separately
and independently by two examiners.
Mitigating Circumstances
Withdrawal from Examinations or Extension of Deadlines
The following notes are for guidance only. They address the question of what to do when
circumstances beyond your control would seriously affect your performance in one or
more examinations or prevent you from submitting an assessment by the deadline. Such
`mitigating circumstances' might include significant illnesses or accidents, or the death of a
close relative.
For details concerning rules governing mitigating circumstances, students are urged to
consult the student guidance supplied with the mitigating circumstances form (MCF). The
MCF
is
available
by
following
the
appropriate
link
on
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/governance/regulations/acregs.html
An overarching principle of the Colleges assessment policy is that if you present
yourself for an examination or submit an assessment, then by doing so you are
declaring yourself fit to take that examination or to undertake that assessment, and
therefore whatever mark you are awarded will stand. Only in very exceptional
circumstances will a mark awarded be annulled if you have sat the examination or
submitted the assessment.
For mitigating circumstances to be taken into account, you must complete a Mitigating
Circumstances Form (MCF) or an Extension Request Form (ERF). You may use these
forms to request (possibly retroactive) withdrawal from the examination(s) in question or
an extension to the deadline for the submission of an assessment. Alternatively, if you do
not wish to withdraw from the exams, you may ask for consideration (of the mitigating
circumstances). Please note however, that as of September 2005 it is no longer possible
for individual examination marks to be altered as a result of any such consideration, even if
granted by the board. It follows that consideration is only relevant (if granted at all) to the
board's decision in assigning the overall degree class, and this only in cases in which the
class as predicted by the C-Score or I-indicator (`Award of Honours' below) is very close
indeed to the borderline between classes. Consideration is therefore mostly of concern to
finalists (although in some circumstances it may, if granted, be carried over to the final
year).

30

MCF and ERF forms are available from ARC or the Examinations Office, and may also be
downloaded from the College Policy Zone:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/college/policyzone/ (search term MCF)
They must be completed in full (incomplete forms will not be accepted) and submitted
directly to your Department along with all supporting documentary evidence. Until
supporting documentary evidence is provided, your form will not be passed to the relevant
board chair for consideration.
The case you need to make for withdrawal/extension must satisfy very strict criteria. These
criteria then depend crucially on when the MCF and complete documentation are
submitted:

If submitted at least 7 days before the start of the first examination from which you wish
to withdraw/the deadline for which you require extension, you must have serious
reasons beyond your control (not simply lack of preparation, or a minor ailment or
condition, or illness several months before the exam) which would either prevent you
from sitting the exam or which would make you unfit to sit it (or prevent you from
submitting the assessment in time). You must include full documentary evidence (e.g.
doctor's certificate) to prove that your mitigating circumstances are true.
In this case, it should be possible for you to receive a decision before the exam.

If less than 7 days before the first exam/the deadline (or after the exam/deadline) your
MCF1 will in addition need to show that you were unable, or for good reasons
unwilling, to request a withdrawal/extension before the 7-day deadline prior to the
examination. Good reasons would include the circumstances arising less than 7 days
before the examination, or if you were ill and in hospital up until 7 days before the
examination or deadline and therefore unable to submit your MCF. The circumstances
must also be severe enough to prevent you from attending and completing the exam
(even under special arrangements, see above). Your MCF must be submitted within 7
days of the missed examination.
In this case, because of the lack of time, a decision will only be reached after the
exam(s) at the next meeting of the relevant Board of Examiners. The Board also
reserves the right to offer you an alternative form of assessment. Only in exceptional
circumstances may you request to be retroactively withdrawn from an exam from which
you have actually sat. In this case, your MCF and accompanying evidence must be
submitted in advance of the meeting of the Board of Examiners at which the
results of your examination or assessment will be discussed. It must satisfy the
next meeting of the Board of Examiners not only of serious mitigating circumstances
which made you unfit to sit the exam but also why you were, for good reason, unable at
the time of the exam to recognise that you were unfit to sit it (e.g. due to the nature of
an illness).

If your withdrawal request is accepted, you will be withdrawn from the exam (if
retroactively, your mark will be ignored) and it will not count as an attempt. Except under
special conditions in which it is not appropriate (for example, if you are interrupting your
studies) you will be offered a replacement examination which you must normally take at
the first available opportunity. This might mean an August replacement (if a finalist, this
would normally mean that you would not graduate until the following January). However, it
1
Late extension requests must be submitted on a MCF not on an ERF.

31

might also mean that you are required to take the replacement the following year instead.
If an extension request is accepted, a new deadline for the submission of the assessment
in question will be set, or you will be permitted to negotiate a new deadline with the
assessment organiser.
If your withdrawal/extension request is rejected, you will not be allowed to withdraw/submit
the assessment after the deadline. In particular, if you do not attend (or have not attended)
the examination in question or submit the assessment after the deadline, a mark of zero
will be recorded.
Finally, you should note that relatively few requests for withdrawal and replacement are
granted. Only well-documented, serious circumstances are considered and they
must be unlikely to persist until the date of the replacement. You should read carefully
the criteria supplied with the MCF. You should also ensure that you inform the Senior
Tutor, your Personal Tutor or Programme Board Chair of your situation as soon as
possible.
Appeal against a decision of a Board of Examiners
If you wish to appeal against a decision of the Mathematics or School Board of Examiners
you are advised first of all to contact the Chair of the UG Mathematics Board to discuss the
situation. You should note in particular:

That you may not challenge a decision of the board on academic grounds (e.g.
because your assessment of your performance is different from theirs). In particular,
you may not simply ask for a `re-mark': Contrary to some students' belief, College
exam papers are never re-marked simply at a student's request.
That an appeal must meet very strict criteria before it is even considered. If, for
instance, it is based on mitigating circumstances, then you will need to show that there
is new information that, for good reason, could not be brought to the attention of
the board (e.g. via an MCF) before the Board made its original decision.
That any appeal and all relevant documentation must normally be submitted within 14
days of the publication of progression or degree results on the departmental notice
board or of the notification of individual exam results on OneSpace, whichever is
relevant

You should realise that few appeals are granted because of the strict criteria. However, if
after discussion and serious consideration you decide to submit an appeal, you will find full
details of the procedure at:
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/governance/regulations/acregs.html
Degree Titles
The title of your degree will normally be that of your field of study. Single subject students
may take some modules in (say) theoretical physics or computer science but provided that
at least 3/4 of the modules passed are in mathematics then the degree title will be
"Mathematics". For the precise rules concerning degree titles in single honours and in joint
honours (and or with degrees) please see Colleges Academic Regulations,
Regulations Concerning Students & General Regulations, under Field of Study

32

Course Units or Credits How many do I need to pass for a degree?


Pre-2007 Course Unit System: Kings College requires that for the award of a three-year
degree based on course units, a student should complete, and satisfy the examiners in
courses to the value of 9 units. For the four-year MSci degree, a minimum of 14 course
units is normally required. For further details see previous versions of this handbook,
available from the Departmental web site
Post-2007 Credit Framework System: For students starting their programme in 2007 or
later the minimum requirement is:

for a three-year BSc Degree: 360 credits, of which (i) at least 90 at level 6 or above, (ii)
at most 150 at level 4, and (iii) at most 45 credits are condoned fails.
for a four-year MSci Degree: 480 credits, of which (i) at least 120 at level 7, (ii) at most
150 at level 4, and (iii) at most 45 credits are condoned fails.
for the Graduate Diploma: 120 credits, of which (i) at least 90 at level 6 or above, at
most 30 at level 4, and (iii) at most 30 credits are condoned fails.

Condoned credits: For the BSc at most 45 at levels 4, 5, or 6. For the MSc at most 45 at
levels 4, 5, or 6, or 30 at levels 4, 5, or 6 plus 15 at level 7. In general, condoned fail
marks are between 33-39%, or 40-49% for level 7; for Mathematics modules, fails can be
condoned irrespectively of the mark obtained.) Note that condoned fails cannot contribute
to the minimum number of credits required at the highest level, nor to the minimum
number of credits required for progression.
Award of Honours
Assuming that these minimum requirements are met, you will be considered for award of
honours in one of the categories: First Class (1), Second Class Upper Division (2A),
Second Class Lower Division (2B), Third Class (3). The award of honours is a College
matter with procedures laid down in the College Regulations and the final decision on an
award rests with the College. Recommendations to the School Boards for award of
honours are made by the Board of Examiners in Mathematics for single subject students
and the appropriate BSc or BA Joint Honours Board for joint honours students. As noted
above (see Examination papers) visiting examiners from other London Colleges and other
Universities are appointed to membership of the Boards to monitor the standard. The
visiting examiners can see all the examination scripts, comment on the level of difficulty of
the papers and act as arbitrators in borderline cases.
The Boards make recommendations for award of honours on the basis of a full record of
all course-unit examinations taken by the student. A preliminary indicator is calculated
from the marks, but the Board decides each case on the basis of the students total
performance and may take special circumstances into account. All marks for course-unit
examinations (including coursework marks, if appropriate) are used in the calculation of
the guiding indicator.
Pre-2007 Course Unit System: For three year BSc degrees the first, second and third
year marks are weighted in the ratio 1:3:5. For four year MSci degrees, the marks for
each year are weighted in the ratio 1:3:5:5. Values of the indicator I in the ranges 100
I 70, 70 > I 60, 60 > I 50, and 50 > I 40 correspond to the classes 1, 2A, 2B and
3 respectively. However, in addition, a candidate for a first or upper second class degree
33

must pass relevant modules to the value of 1.5 units in the final year at or above the level
of honours being awarded. In this context language modules are not relevant.
A brief description as to how the indicator is calculated including a link to an online
calculator which allows you to perform these calculations automatically using a complete
set of real or hypothetical marks can be found at:
www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/~database/Database/Award.html.
The indicator formula will apply to almost all students of Mathematics, single and joint
honours, in the School of Physical Science and Engineering. Other formulae apply, for
instance to students who entered the College in their second or third year. Students
reading for the BA in Mathematics and Philosophy or the BA in Mathematics and French
are assessed for Honours in the School of Humanities Full details of the scheme for the
award of honours are to be found in the College Academic Regulations.
Post-2007 Credit Framework System: For students starting their program in 2007 or
later a so called C-score is calculated as a weighted average as follows
C = [mark x relevant credit volume x weight]/ [relevant credit volume x weight]
where for BSc degrees

The marks of the best 90 credits at level 6 (and/or level 7 where taken) have weight 5
The mark for any remaining level 6 credits and any level 5 credits have weight 3
The mark for all level 4 credits have weight 1.

for MSci degrees


The marks of the best 120 credits at level 7 have weight of 71
The marks for any remaining level 7 credits and all level 6 credits have weight 5
The marks of all level 5 credits have weight 3
The marks for all level 4 credits have weight 1.
and for the Graduate Diploma the weights are independent of level (meaning that a plain
average of your results is taken).
Values of the indicator C in the ranges 100 C 70, 70 > C 60, 60 > C 50, and 50
> C 40 correspond to the classes 1, 2A, 2B and 3 respectively.
It is important to understand that in either case the indicator is merely a guide to the
classification and the decisions are not made mechanically. The Boards have discretion
which is exercised with great care to recommend just awards. However, for a student
below but close to a degree boundary to be raised to the next higher degree level, a
minimum requirement is that at least 45 credits in the final year have been obtained at or
above the higher level.
Examination Results
Final degree classifications and progression lists will be displayed on OneSpace as soon
as possible after the meetings of the Programme and School Boards of Examiners. In the
2010/11 session this should be around July 7, 2011 or soon thereafter. Staff are
precluded by College rules from disclosing marks or literal grades. Complete details
of your results will normally be mailed to you in late July by the School Office, so please do

For students starting their programme 2009/10 or later; for those starting their programme prior to
2009/10 the weight of the best 120 credits at level 7 is 5 instead of 7.

34

NOT contact the College asking to be told your results over the telephone; Data Protection
restrictions do not permit staff to tell you your results in this way.
College Debtors and Release of Examination Results
The College is dependent on all students meeting their obligations in respect of fees at the
proper time, i.e. on receipt of an invoice from the Accounts Department.
Under no circumstances will students have their results released (nor will they be able to
obtain references from members of staff) if they have unpaid debts in respect of tuition or
hall fees, or if they have any library books still on loan. Be warned: every year some
finalists have the upsetting experience of discovering that their names have been omitted
from the Honours List because they have defaulted in this area. A student who is in debt
to the College should note that even after a debt has been discharged, several weeks may
elapse before the necessary administrative procedures can be completed and the
students results finally disclosed.
August Resits
Pre-2007 Course Unit System: Please refer to previous versions of this handbook,
available from the Departmental website at:
www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/nms/maths/curr/ug/
Post-2007 Credit Framework System: For students starting their programme in 2007 or
later, all examinations failed in January or May/June must be resat at the earliest available
opportunity, which is the August examination period of the same year. Resit examinations
under the New Credit Framework System are always capped at the pass mark (40% at
levels 4, 5, and 6, and 50% at level 7), irrespectively of whether they are taken as 2nd
attempt in August or (as possibly 3rd attempt) in the following year; they are normally
based entirely on the exam excluding any existing coursework.
Progression & Resits
Progression Criteria (BSc and MSci)
Year 1 - Year 2
- Must have passed all 4. c.u. (SH), or at least 3 c.u., all maths modules and any
requirements of sister department (JH), if starting course after Sept 2004 & prior to Sept
2007.
- Must gain an average mark of at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with
no mark lower than 33% and 90 credits (excluding condoned fails) passed overall (SH),
and any requirements of sister department (JH and Math with ... programmes), if starting
course after Sept 2007.
Year 2 - Year 3
- Must have passed a minimum of 3 2nd year c.u. (SH), a total of 6 c.u (JH), if
starting course after Sept 2004 & prior to Sept 2007.
- Must have obtained 210 credits (excluding condoned fails), if starting course after
Sept 2007.
- Must have passed a minimum of 7 c.u. (MSci), and overall performance in 2nd year
with average mark > 59%

35

- Must have obtained 210 credits (excluding condoned fails) and good second class
performance in Year 2 (MSci) [guideline: an average of at least 65 % on the best 105
credits at level 5].
Otherwise demote to BSc, and progress if possible.
Year 3 - Year 4 (MSci.)
- Must have passed a minimum of 10 c.u. (MSci) and overall performance in first 3
years giving I > 59%, and not on significant downward trend.
- Must have obtained 330 credits (excluding condoned fails) and an overall
performance approaching IIa level [guideline: 3-year C > 59 and trend not significantly
downwards]. For JH, other departments opinion should also be sought. Otherwise
demote to BSc. and consider for honours.
Progression (Graduate Diploma, PT)
Year 1 - Year 2
- Part time students should normally obtain 60 credits (excluding condoned fails), i.e.
passes in all 4 modules for which they are registered in their first year.
- Part time students may, at the discretion of the Board of Examiners, be allowed to
progress to second year also if they fall short of the normal requirement.
This
will
normally require students to obtain at least 45 credits (excluding condoned fails), i.e.
passes in 3 modules, and the Board will base its decision on whether the candidate has a
reasonable chance of successfully completing the programme.
If in September, students have failed to meet the progression criteria, they will be
required to retake, in the following year, all papers which they have failed.
Under the pre-2007 Course Unit System, examinations sat the following year are
uncapped (unlike August resits), whereas under the new post-2007 Credit Framework
System all resits, whether August resits or exams sat the following year, will be capped.
In Mathematics all resit marks are based on the written paper alone, discounting any
existing coursework mark.
However, even if students do meet the progression criteria, the College Regulations
allow them to resit failed examinations. First year modules and compulsory modules in the
second year are important constituents of the degree and students are normally expected
to resit any such modules which they fail; students may also resit other failed modules and
this is usually advisable. The College Regulations require that all resits must be taken at
the first available opportunity, otherwise the right to a resit may be forfeited.
Consequently re-entry for a failed examination must be made in the following year.
Moreover, students may be allowed to re-sit a particular examination at most twice
(making 3 attempts in all, including any August re-sits) but this is subject to the approval of
the Chair of the School Board of Examiners, acting on the recommendations of the Board
of Examiners in Mathematics, and it should not be assumed that a total of three attempts
is guaranteed.
If students have an un-condonable fail in a module after their third attempt, their degree
programme will have to be terminated (despite the fact that they may still formally satisfy
normal progression criteria).
Students who contemplate withdrawing from a degree programme before its completion,
because they feel they might not be up for it, should note that the timing of their withdrawal

36

could affect their eligibility for funding of another degree programme. Further information is
available from King's compass (Tel: 020 7848 7070, www.kcl.ac.uk/thecompass.
What should I do if I cannot progress?
If, following the May/June or August examinations, you find that you have not qualified for
admission to the next year of the course, you are strongly advised to contact your
Personal Tutor or the Senior Tutor as soon as possible in order to discuss your position
and talk over future plans. Far too few students come to discuss their failure with
members of staff, all of whom are ready and willing to help where they can, and some
students probably give up quite unnecessarily for want of freely available advice at the
right time.
Please note the following: If you are resitting exams from outside College, it is your
responsibility to register for resit examinations with ARC (see Registration for
Examinations above). It is also your responsibility, in the case of a re-sit, to contact the
current lecturer to check for any change either in content or the style of the examination. If
you have passed an examination, you are NOT allowed to retake it to improve your mark.
If you fail both an exam and all the resits for a particular module, the highest mark will be
the one entered into the indicator calculation (see above).
Overseas Examinations
Resits and replacement examinations may be sat at a British Council (or similar approved
institution) office overseas. If you wish to sit these examinations overseas then you should
complete an Application for Special Examination Arrangements for Written Examinations
available from the Examinations Office, email: exams.office@kcl.ac.uk or on the web at
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/structure/admin/acservices/examinations/sea/
Deadlines for applications are published on this site, and must be adhered to.
Special rules pertaining to MSci students
Students registered for the MSci in Mathematics will be assessed at the end of their
Second Year of study. Those who have passed modules to the value of 210 credits (7
course units in pre-2007 currency) and whose overall performance in the second year is of
good second-class standard (normally interpreted as meaning an average mark of at least
60%) may continue in the MSci programme if they wish to do so. Students who do not
continue in the MSci programme transfer to the BSc programme, complete their studies,
and are assessed for Honours after one more year. In order to progress from the third to
the final year of the MSci programme, a student must have passed at least 330 credits (10
course-units), and an overall performance approaching the Upper Second Class level is
normally required. This is understood to imply that the student has an indicator I (based on
the marks for the first three years) in excess of 59, and that the trend of the students
marks in the third year is not significantly downward. Similar considerations apply to Joint
Honours MSci Students whose progression will be determined in consultation with the
other department. Students who do not meet these requirements will be automatically
transferred to the BSc programme and considered for Honours and graduation, by the
Board of Examiners, at the end of their third year.

37

BSc/MSci transfers
Transferring `up': Transfer from the BSc to the MSci will, with the approval of the
Programme Director for the Fourth Year MSci Programme and the School of Natural and
Mathematical Sciences, be possible up to 31 March of the third year of full time study (or
its part time equivalent), subject to respective curricula, provided they reach the required
standard at the end of their second and/or third year (see MSci progression above).
You should bear in mind that you must keep your Local Education Authority / Student Loan
Company informed of any changes in your degree programme, or your funding may be
terminated.
Transferring `down': Transfer from the MSci to the BSc may, with the approval of the
Senior Tutor and the School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, be possible at any
time up to the end of the third year of full time study, or its part time equivalent, again
subject to respective curricula.
All your own work?
The College regards the following types of behaviour as serious disciplinary
offences for which severe penalties can be applied. It is important that, as a
student, you understand that cheating, collusion, fabrication and plagiarism, as
defined below, are unacceptable; furthermore, they will not help your learning in the
long term.
Cheating
Includes: communicating with any other student in an examination
copying from any other student in an examination
bringing any unauthorised material into the examination room with the intention of using
it during the examination
copying coursework
Collusion
Includes:collaborating with other students in preparing a piece of work and the submitting it in an
identical or similar form and claiming it to be your own
obtaining unauthorised co-operation of any other person when preparing work which
you present as being your own
allowing someone to copy your work which they then present as being their own

Fabrication
Refers to research or experimental work, when unjustifiable claims are made to have
obtained certain results.
Plagiarism
Includes:-

38

creating the impression that someone elses work is your own


quoting someone word for word or summarising what they say without acknowledging
them in a reference.

You are reminded that all work submitted as part of the requirements for any examination
of the University of London (of which Kings College is a part) must be expressed in your
own words and incorporate your own ideas and judgements. Plagiarism must be avoided
in examination scripts but particular care should also be taken in coursework, essays and
reports. Direct quotations from published or unpublished works of others (including lecture
hand-outs) must always be clearly identified as such by being placed inside quotation
marks and a full reference to their source must be provided in the proper form. A series of
short quotations from several different sources, if not clearly identified as such, constitutes
plagiarism just as much as does a single unacknowledged long quotation from a general
source. Paraphrasing expressing another persons ideas or judgements in other words
can be plagiarism if the origin of the text is not acknowledged or the work paraphrased is
not included in the bibliography. Also counted as plagiarism is the repetition of your own
work, if the fact that the work has been or is to be presented elsewhere (especially if it has
already been presented for assessment) is not clearly stated.
Plagiarism is a serious examination offence. An allegation of plagiarism or any other
form of cheating can result in action being taken under the Colleges Misconduct
regulations available from
www.kcl.ac.uk/about/governance/regulations/students.html.
A substantiated charge of plagiarism will result in a penalty being ordered ranging from a
mark of zero for the assessed work to expulsion from the College.
You will be asked to sign the College Plagiarism Statement saying that you understand
what plagiarism is.

39

7. PROGRAMMES OF STUDY
Students in the Department of Mathematics are classified as either single subject or joint
honours students. The following fields of study are available.
Single subject honours
Mathematics
Mathematics with Management and Finance
Graduate Diploma
Joint honours
In the School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences:
Mathematics and Computer Science
Mathematics and Physics
Mathematics and Physics with Astrophysics
In the School of Humanities:
Mathematics and Philosophy
Changing from one field of study to another may be possible but only with the approval of
all departments involved.
Set out below are the normal programmes for each year of each field of study. The aim of
the Department is to provide as much flexibility as possible in the choice of modules, but it
has been found in practice that this can only be achieved in the later years by restricting
the first year choice.
There is a Programme Director for each year of each field of study. Students should
discuss their programme with the appropriate Programme Director, who must approve the
programme and any subsequent changes. Some modules have prerequisites, which
should be discussed with the Programme Director. As a general rule, students who fail a
compulsory module are required to resit the examination.
Information on programme regulations is found in programme specifications which are
available here:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/about/structure/admin/acservices/asq/prog/spec/pse/math09a.html
Please note: As of 2005/06 the word `core', as applied to all Mathematics modules, is
used in this handbook to mean `has to be taken AND has to be passed' In the same
context, `compulsory' will be used to mean only that the module `has to be taken'. For
core modules in other disciplines, students are advised to refer to the appropriate
department for clarification.

40

Mathematics BSc/MSci
BSc programme: UCAS Code: G100 Route Code: UBSH3CSMM;
MSci programme: UCAS Code: G103 Route Code: UMSH4CSMM
Single subject Mathematics students are registered either for the BSc degree or the MSci
degree. The BSc in Mathematics is a three-year programme, whilst the MSci in
Mathematics is a four-year programme. All students take official examinations, mostly at
the end of each year. The BSc and MSci programmes are the same for the first two years.
All information in this booklet about first and second year single subject Mathematics
applies to both programmes.
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.
First Year
Programme Director:

Professor PK Sollich

First semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM111a (CM111A)
4CCM113a (CM113A)
4CCM115a (CM115A)
4CCM122a (CM122A)

Calculus I
Linear Methods
Numbers & Functions
Geometry I

Second semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM112a (CM112A)
4CCM121a (CM121A)
4CCM131a (CM131A)
4CCM141a (CM141A)

Calculus II
Introduction to Abstract Algebra
Introduction to Dynamical Systems
Probability and Statistics I

NOTE: in order to progress from Year 1 to Year 2 a student must gain an average mark of
at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with no mark lower than 33% and 90 credits
passed overall.

Second Year
Programme Director: Professor AN Pressley
There is a group of compulsory modules which all students must take, and a choice of
optional modules. It is advisable to try all of the modules for the first two weeks before
finally selecting the eight which you will continue with.
First semester
Compulsory modules:
5CCM211a (CM211A)
5CCM221a (CM221A)
5CCM222a (CM222A)

PDEs and Complex Variable


Analysis 1
Linear Algebra
41

5CCM231a (CM231A)

Intermediate Dynamics

Second semester
Compulsory modules:
5CCM223a (CM223A)
5CCM232a (CM232A)

Geometry of Surfaces
Groups and Symmetries

Standard options:
5CCM224a (CM224X)
5CCM241a (CM241X)
5CCM251a (CM251X)
5CCM328b (CM328X)

Elementary Number Theory


Probability and Statistics II
Discrete Mathematics
Logic

Third Year (BSc)


Programme Director: Dr E Katzav
There are ten selected options of which students are required to take at least two,
and a choice of standard optional modules.
First semester
Selected options:
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM322C)
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM332a (CM332C)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)

Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Special Relativity and Electromagnetism
Introductory Quantum Theory
Rings and Modules
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time

Standard options:
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM356a (CM356Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS02

Topics in Mathematics1
Linear Systems with Control Theory
Numerical Methods
Topics in Applied Probability
Theory of Complex Networks

Second semester
Selected options:
6CCM318a (CM418Z)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)

Fourier Analysis
Galois Theory
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time

Standard options:
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM241b (CM241X)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM330a (CM330X)
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM360a (CM360X)

Elementary Number Theory


Probability and Statistics II
Discrete Mathematics
Topics in Mathematics
Logic
Mathematics Education and Communication
Space-Time Geometry and General Relativity
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
History and Development of Mathematics

6CCM320a (CM320X) and 6CCM380a (CM380A) cannot be taken together

42

6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05

Topics in Applied Probability


Mathematical Biology

Third year BSc students may elect to do a project 6CCM345a (CM345C).


They may also choose to take a language module at credit level 5 or higher, normally
from the KCL language unit, subject to the approval of the Programme Director. Note
however, that under the course unit system, a pass in a language module, although
counting towards your indicator, does not contribute to satisfying the requirement that in
order to obtain a First or Upper Second class degree a candidate must pass at least 3
modules at the level at which the degree is awarded.
Students may, subject to the approval of the Programme Director, also take up to two
modules at other colleges of the University of London or at Imperial College.

Third Year (MSci)


Programme Director: Dr E Katzav
There are ten selected options of which students must take at least four. Optional units
are subject to the agreement of the Programme Director and timetable issues.
First semester
Selected options:
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM322C)
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM332a (CM332C)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)

Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Special Relativity and Electromagnetism
Introductory Quantum Theory
Rings and Modules
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time

Standard options:
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM356a (CM356Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS02

Topics in Mathematics
Linear Systems with Control Theory
Numerical Methods
Topics in Applied Probability
Theory of Complex Networks

Second semester
Selected options:
6CCM318a (CM418Z)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)

Fourier Analysis
Galois Theory
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time

Standard options:
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM241b (CM241X)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM330a (CM330X)
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)

Elementary Number Theory


Probability and Statistics II
Discrete Mathematics
Topics in Mathematics
Logic
Mathematics Education and Communication
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
43

6CCM360a (CM360X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05

History and Development of Mathematics


Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Biology

Third year MSci students may elect to do a project 6CCM345a (CM345C).

Fourth Year (MSci)


Programme Director: Professor Y Safarov
There is a compulsory Project Option 7CCM461a (CM461C), which all students are
required to take, and a choice of optional modules. In addition to the optional modules
given below, students may also take suitable third year modules subject to the approval of
the Programme Director.
All fourth year MSci students are required to complete a project on a mathematical topic.
This involves writing a report of between 5,000 and 10,000 words, giving an informal
seminar to staff and fellow students and producing a poster. The project counts as 30
credits (a full unit), which makes it a very important part of the final year.
Each student will have a supervisor; their task is to advise not direct the project, but
students are advised to show them a draft of the report at an early stage. Students must
complete a form stating the topic and provisional title of the project which must be signed
by the supervisor and returned to the projects co-ordinator, Dr Nikolay Gromov, by
Monday 11 October 2010. The deadline for submission of projects is Wednesday 23
March 2011.

Note: 6CCM320a (CM320X), 6CCM356a (CM356Y), 6CCM360a (CM360X) cannot be


taken in the fourth year.

First semester
Compulsory module:
7CCM461a (CM461C)

Project

Standard options:
7CCM321b (CM321A)
7CCM322b (CM322C)
7CCM327a (CM327Z)
7CCM350a (CM350Z)
7CCMMS01 (CM424Z)
7CCMMS08 (CM414Z)
7CCMMS18 (CM437Z)
7CCMMS31 (CM436Z)
7CCMMS32 (CM438Z)
7CCMFM01 (CM467Z)

Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Rings and Modules
Lie Groups & Lie Algebras
Operator Theory
Manifolds
Quantum Mechanics II
Quantum Field Theory
Applied Probability and Stochastics

44

Second semester
Standard options:
7CCM326a (CM326Z)
7CCM334a (CM334Z)
7CCM351b (CM351A)
7CCMMS03 (CM422Z)
7CCMMS11 (CM418Z)
7CCMMS20 (CMMS20)
7CCMMS34 (CM435Z)
7CCMMS38 (CM433Z)
7CCMMS41 (CMMS41)

Galois Theory
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Algebraic Number Theory
Fourier Analysis
Algebraic Geometry
String Theory and Branes
Advanced General Relativity
Supersymmetry and Gauge Theory

Final year students may, subject to the approval of the Programme Director, also take up
to two modules at other colleges of the University of London or at Imperial College.

45

Mathematics with Management and Finance BSc


UCAS Code: BSc programme G1N2 / Route Code: UBSH3CMMMMF
Programme Director: Dr PL Kassaei
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.
First Year
First semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM111a (CM111A)
4CCM113a (CM113A)
4CCM115a (CM115A)
4CCYM129

Calculus I
Linear Methods
Numbers & Functions
Organisational Behaviour

Second semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM112a (CM112A)
4CCM121a (CM121A)
4CCM141a (CM141A)
4CCYM110

Calculus II
Introduction to Abstract Algebra
Probability and Statistics I
Economics

NOTE: in order to progress to the second year students must:


gain an average mark of at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with no mark
lower than 33%
pass at least one of Economics or Organisation Behaviour
90 credits passed
Second Year
First semester
Compulsory modules:
5CCM211a (CM211A)
Either
5CCM221a (CM221A)
Or 5CCM250a (CM2504)
5CCM222a (CM222A)
5CCYM212

PDEs and Complex Variable


Analysis I
Applied Analytic Methods
Linear Algebra
Marketing

NOTE: students are strongly advised to take 5CCM221a (CM221A), which is a


prerequisite for many third year modules.

Second semester
Compulsory modules:
5CCM232a (CM232A)

Groups & Symmetries

46

5CCM241a (CM241X)
5CCM251a (CM251X)
5CCYM210

Probability and Statistics II


Discrete Mathematics
Accounting

NOTE: students must pass either Marketing or Accounting to progress to the third year.
Third Year
Students must take five compulsory modules in the third year and choose three optional
modules from the list below.
First semester
Compulsory modules:
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)
6CCYM325

Topics in Applied Probability


Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time
Business Strategy

Standard options:
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM322C)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM357a (CM357Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCMCS02

Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Rings and Modules
Introduction to Linear Systems with Control Theory
Numerical Methods
Theory of Complex Networks

Second Semester
Compulsory modules:
6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCYM339

Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time


Topics in Applied Probability
Human Resource Management

Standard options:
6CCM223b (CM223A)
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM330a (CM330X)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM360a (CM360X)
6CCMCS05

Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Galois Theory
Logic
Mathematics Education and Communication
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
History and Development of Mathematics
Mathematical Biology

Third year students may elect to do a project 6CCM345a (CM345C).


Other options may also be permitted subject to the agreement of the Programme Director
and timetable issues. You may also choose to take a language module at credit level 5 or
higher, normally from the KCL language unit, subject to the approval of the Programme
Director.
Students may, subject to the approval of the Programme Director, also take up to two
modules at other colleges of the University of London or at Imperial College.

47

Graduate Diploma in Mathematics


Route codes: CUGD1MATGDD, CUGD2MATGDD
Programme Director: Professor E Shargorodsky
The Graduate Diploma programme consists of a one-year full- time study programme or a
two-year part- time study programme. Students must take eight modules which may
include an individual project on a subject of their choice. All students take official
examinations, mostly in May/June.
Students must select eight of the following options including at least six third year
modules, subject to the approval of the Programme Director. The list of permitted options
includes second and third year modules which can be taken by Single Honours BSc/MSci
students of Mathematics. Exceptionally students may be permitted to take fourth year
modules and up to two first year modules.
First semester
Second year modules:
5CCM211a (CM211A)
5CCM221a (CM221A)
5CCM222a (CM222A)
5CCM231a (CM231A)
5CCM250a (CM2504)

PDEs and Complex Variable


Analysis 1
Linear Algebra
Intermediate Dynamics
Applied Analytic Methods

Third year modules:


6CCM211b (CM211A)
6CCM222b (CM222A)
6CCM231b (CM231A)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM322C)
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM332a (CM332C)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM356a (CM356Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)
6CCMCS02

PDEs and Complex Variable


Linear Algebra
Intermediate Dynamics
Topics in Mathematics
Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Special Relativity and Electromagnetism
Introductory Quantum Theory
Rings and Modules
Linear Systems with Control Theory1
Numerical Methods
Topics in Applied Probability2
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time
Theory of Complex Networks

Or 6CCM357a (CM357Y) Introduction to Linear systems with Control Theory (according to the advice of
your Programme Director)
2
6CCM320a (CM320X) and 6CCM380a (CM380A) cannot be taken together

48

Second semester
Second year modules:
5CCM223a (CM223A)
5CCM224a (CM224X)
5CCM232a (CM232A)
5CCM241a (CM241X)
5CCM251a (CM251X)

Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries
Probability and Statistics II
Discrete Mathematics

Third year modules:


6CCM223b (CM223A)
6CCM224b (CM224X)
5CCM232a (CM232A)
6CCM232b (CM232A)
6CCM241b (CM241X)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM318a (CM418Z)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM360a (CM360X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05

Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries
Groups and Symmetries
Probability and Statistics II
Discrete Mathematics
Fourier Analysis
Topics in Mathematics
Galois Theory
Logic
Space-Time Geometry and General Relativity
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
History and Development of Mathematics
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Biology

Students may choose to do a project 6CCM345a (CM345C).


Students may, subject to the approval of the Programme Director, also take up to two
modules at other colleges of the University of London or at Imperial College.
NOTE: a student may not enrol on a module that the student has already taken and
passed at either undergraduate or postgraduate level. Neither may a student enrol for a
module that overlaps with another module that the student has already taken and passed.
Modules will be deemed to overlap if both the content and the level of complexity are
similar.

49

Joint Honours Modules


In a joint honours course the student's time is divided more or less equally between the
two main subjects. Nevertheless, there is scope for flexibility to take account of individual
preferences and developing interests and abilities. There is in fact the opportunity in later
years to adjust the distribution of modules so that more time is devoted to one subject than
the other. Constraints of the timetable must obviously be borne in mind and, in any case, it
is crucial that the appropriate Programme Director be consulted.
The majority of Mathematics modules taken by Joint Honours students are the same as
the ones taken by Single Subject mathematicians. However, some modules have been
devised with the special needs of the Joint Honours student in mind.
The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department.
They may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must
consult their booklet and/or programme director for definitive information.

50

Mathematics and Computer Science BSc

UCAS code: GG14 / Route Code: UBSH3CJMMCS


Programme Director: Dr AB Pushnitski
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.
First Year
First semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM111a (CM111A)
4CCM113a (CM113A)
4CCS1PRP (CS1PRP)
4CCS1CS1 (CS1CS1)

Calculus I
Linear Methods
Programming Practice
Computer Systems I

Second semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM112a (CM112A)
4CCM141a (CM141A)
4CCS1PRA (CS1PRA)
4CCS1DST (CS1DST)

Calculus II
Probability and Statistics I
Programming Applications
Data Structures

NOTE:
Mathematics modules: in order to progress from Year 1 to Year 2 a student must gain an
average mark of at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with no mark lower than
33% and 90 credits passed overall.
Computer Science modules: students must pass at least one of 4CCS1PRP and
4CCS1PRA in order to progress to Year 2.

Second Year
First semester
Compulsory modules:
5CCM115b (CM115A)
5CCM250a (CM2504)
5CCS2OSD (CS2OSD)
5CCS02DB (CS02DB)

Numbers and Functions


Applied Analytic Methods
Object-Oriented Specification and Design
Database Systems

Second semester
Compulsory modules:
5CCM121b (CM121A)
5CCM328b (CM328X)
5CCS2PLD (CS2PLD)
5CCS2OSC (CS2OSC)

Introduction to Abstract Algebra


Logic
Programming Language Design Paradigms
Operating Systems and Concurrency

51

Third Year
Students will normally take four of the following mathematics modules and four of the
computer science modules:
Standard options:
First semester
6CCM211b (CM211A)
6CCM222b (CM222A
6CCM231b (CM231A)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM357a (CM357Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)
6CCMCS02
6CCS3AIN (CS3AIN)
6CCS3CIS (CS3CIS)
6CCS3GRS (CS3GRS)
6CCS3SMT (CS3SMT)
6CCS3INS (CS3INS)
6CCS3PAL (CS3PAL)
6CCS3PRJ (CS3PRJ)
Second semester
6CCM223b (CM223A)
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM232b (CM232A)
6CCM241b (CM241X)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM330a (CM330X)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM360a (CM360X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05
6CCS3SIA
6CCS3DSM
6CCS3SAD
6CCS3PRJ
6CCS3OME
6CCS3TSP
6CCS3AST

PDEs and Complex Variable


Linear Algebra
Intermediate Dynamics
Topics in Mathematics
Introduction to Linear Systems with Control Theory1
Numerical Methods
Topics in Applied Probability2
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time
Theory of Complex Networks
Artificial Intelligence
Cryptography and Information Security
Computer Graphics Systems
Software Measurement and Testing
Internet Systems
Parallel Algorithms
Computer Science Project
Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries
Probability and Statistics II
Discrete Mathematics
Topics in Mathematics
Mathematics Education and Communication
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
History and Development of Mathematics
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Biology
Software Engineering of Internet Applications
Distributed Systems
Software Architecture and Design
Computer Science Project
Optimisation Methods
Text Searching and Processing
Advanced Security Topics

This course is not an option for students who have previously taken CM131A, Introduction to Dynamical
Systems.
2
6CCM320a (CM320X) and 6CCM380a (CM380A) cannot be taken together

52

Other options available to 3rd year single honours students may be taken where the
timetable allows, subject to approval by the Programme Director.

The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department.
They may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must
consult their booklet and/or programme director for definitive information.

53

Mathematics and Computer Science MSci


UCAS code: GGD4 / Route Code: UMSH4CJMMCS
Programme Director: Dr AB Pushnitski
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.
As of September 2009 there is no first, second or third year on this programme.

Fourth Year
Core module:

CS4PRJ1/2 Computer Science Project

Standard options - A choice of 6 options from the following list, of which 4 should be
Mathematics. One Computer Science option is to be taken in each semester.
First semester
7CCM321b (CM321A)
7CCM322b (CM322C)
7CCM327b (CM327Z)
7CCM350b (CM350Z)
7CCMMS01 (CM424Z)
7CCMMS08 (CM414Z)
7CCMMS18 (CM437Z)
7CCSMAMS (CSMAMS)
7CCSMDBT (CSMDBT)
7CCSMAIN (CSMAIN)
7CCSMART (CSMART)
Second semester
7CCM326b (CM326Z)
7CCM334b (CM334Z)
7CCM351b (CM351A)
7CCMMS03 (CM422Z)
7CCMMS11 (CM418Z0
7CCMMS20 (CMMS20)
7CCSMTSP (CSMTSP)
7CCSMCMB (CSACMB)
7CCSMCFC (CS4CFC)
7CCSMCOM (CSMCOM)
7CCSMOME (CSMOME)

Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Rings and Modules
Lie Groups and Lie Algebras
Operator Theory
Manifolds
Agents and Multi-agent Systems
Database Technology
Artificial Intelligence
Advanced Research Topics
Galois Theory
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Algebraic Number Theory
Fourier Analysis
Algebraic Geometry
Text Searching and Processing
Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology
Computer Forensics and Cybercrime
Computational Models
Optimisation Methods

Fourth year students may elect to do a project 7CCM461a (CM461C45C) which has 30
credits (one full unit).
Other options may also be permitted subject to the agreement of the Programme Director
and timetable issues. Students may, subject to the approval of the Programme Director,
also take up to two modules at other colleges of the University of London or at Imperial
College.
54

The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department.
They may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must
consult their booklet and/or programme director for definitive information.

55

Mathematics and Physics BSc


UCAS code: FG31 / Route Code:UBSH3CJMMPH
Programme Director: Dr N Gromov
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.
First Year
First semester
Core module:
4CCP111A

First Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
4CCM111a (CM111A)
Calculus I
4CCM113a (CM113A)
Linear Methods
4CCM115a (CM115A)
Numbers and Functions
*(Students must take either 4CCM115a or 4CCM141a)
4CCP1471
4CCP1500
Second semester
Core module:
4CCP111A

Thermal Physics
Fields, Waves and Matter

First Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
4CCM112a (CM112A)
Calculus II
4CCM141a (CM141A)
Probability and Statistics I
*(Students must take either 4CCM141a or 4CCM115a)
4CCP1500

Fields, Waves and Matter

Optionally, students may take 4CCP1600 Astrophysics I (2nd semester) in addition to the
modules listed above.
NOTE: in order to progress from Year 1 to Year 2 a student must gain an average mark of
at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with no mark lower than 33% and 90 credits
passed overall.

Second Year
First semester
Core modules:
5CCP211A

Second Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
5CCM211a (CM211A)
PDEs and Complex Variable
Either
5CCM221a (CM221A)
Analysis I
Or 5CCM250a (CM2504) Applied Analytic Methods

56

5CCM231a (CM231A)
5CCP2240

Intermediate Dynamics
Modern Physics

Second semester
Core module:
5CCP211A

Second Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
5CCM121b (CM121A)
5CCP2240
5CCP2380 (CP2380)

Introduction to Abstract Algebra


Modern Physics
Electromagnetism*

* Exceptionally, students may be permitted to omit 5CCP2380 and take 6CCM331a in the
third year instead. In that case they may chose a further module from 4CCP1600,
5CCP211B, 5CCM122b, 5CCM328b or other Maths or Physics modules recommended by
the Programme Director.
Students should attend the Physics laboratory classes 6CCP211A in the first or the
second semester. Please contact the Physics Department at the beginning of the year to
make detailed arrangements.

Third Year
Students must choose one of the following:
6CCP3131 (CP3131)
3rd Year Project in Physics (Semester 2)
6CCP3132
Third Year Literature Review (Semester 1 or 2)
6CCP3133
University Ambassador Scheme (Semester 1)
First Semester
Compulsory modules:
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM436a (CM436Z)
6CCP3212 (CP3212)

Special Relativity & Electromagnetism*


Quantum Mechanics II**
Statistical Mechanics

Standard options:
Students will take four of the following options, of which two will normally be Mathematics,
subject to the approval of the Programme Director:
6CCM222b (CM222A)
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM322C)
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM356a (CM356Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)
6CCMCS02
6CCP3241 (CP3241)
6CCP3380 (CP3380)

Linear Algebra
Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Rings and Modules
Linear Systems with Control Theory
Numerical Methods
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time
Theory of Complex Networks
Theoretical Particle Physics
Optics
57

Second Semester
Compulsory modules:
6CCP3221 (CP3221)

Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics**

Standard options:
6CCM223b (CM223A)
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM232b (CM232A)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM330a (CM330X)
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05

Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries
Discrete Mathematics
Galois Theory
Logic
Mathematics Education & Communication
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity***
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Biology

6CCP3402 (CP3402)
6CCP3630 (CP3630)
6CCPMP36 (CPMP36)

Solid State Physics


General Relativity and Cosmology***
Medical Imaging and Measurement

* Not if 5CCP2380 Electromagnetism was taken in the second year.


** Students must take one of 6CCP3221 (CP3221) and 6CCM436a (CM436Z) but not
both.
*** 6CCP3630 (CP3630) General Relativity and Cosmology and 6CCM334a (CM334Z)
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity cannot be taken together.
6CCP3133 University Ambassador Scheme and 6CCM330a (CM330X) Mathematics
Education and Communication cannot be taken together.
Other options available to 3rd year single honours students may be taken where the
timetable allows, subject to approval by the Programme Director.
The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department. They
may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must consult their
booklet and/or programme director for definitive information.

58

Mathematics and Physics MSci


UCAS code: FGH1 / Route Code: UMSH4CJMMPH
Programme Director: Dr N Gromov
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.
First Year
First semester
Core module:
4CCP111A

First Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
4CCM111a (CM111A)
Calculus I
4CCM113a (CM113A)
Linear Methods
4CCM115a (CM115A)
Numbers and Functions
*(Students must take either 4CCM115a or 4CCM141a)
4CCP1471
4CCP1500
Second semester
Core module:
4CCP111A

Thermal Physics
Fields, Waves and Matter

First Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory module:
4CCM112a (CM112A)
Calculus II
4CCM141a (CM141A)
Probability and Statistics I
*(Students must take either 4CCM141a or 4CCM115a)
4CCP1500

Fields, Waves and Matter

Optionally, students may take 6CCP1600 Astrophysics I (2nd semester) in addition to the
modules listed above.
NOTE: in order to progress from Year 1 to Year 2 a student must gain an average mark of
at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with no mark lower than 33% and 90 credits
passed overall.

Second Year
First semester
Core modules:
5CCP211A
Compulsory modules:
5CCM211a (CM211A)
Either
5CCM221a (CM221A)
Or 5CCM250a (CM2504)
5CCM231a (CM231A)

Second Year Laboratory Physics A


PDEs and Complex Variable
Analysis I
Applied Analytic Methods
Intermediate Dynamics
59

5CCP2240

Modern Physics

Second semester
Core module:
5CCP211A

Second Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
5CCM121b (CM121A)
5CCP2240
5CCP2380 (CP2380)

Introduction to Abstract Algebra


Modern Physics
Electromagnetism*

* Exceptionally, students may be permitted to omit 5CCP2380 and take 6CCM331a in the
third year instead. In that case they may chose a further module from 4CCP1600,
5CCP211B, 5CCM122b, 5CCM328b or other Maths or Physics modules recommended by
the Programme Director.
Students should attend the Physics laboratory classes 5CCP211A in the first or the
second semester. Please contact the Physics Department at the beginning of the year, to
make detailed arrangements.
NOTE: students take either 5CCM221a (CM221A) or 5CCM250a (CM2504). Students
reading for the MSci are strongly advised to take 5CCM221a (CM221A) which is a
prerequisite for many third and fourth year modules.

Third Year
Students must choose one of the following:
6CCP3131 (CP3131)
3rd Year Project in Physics (Semester 2)
6CCP3132
Third Year Literature Review (Semester 1 or 2)
6CCP3133
University Ambassador Scheme (Semester 1)
First Semester
Compulsory modules:
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM436a (CM436Z)
6CCP3212 (CP3212)

Special Relativity and Electromagnetism*


Quantum Mechanics II**
Statistical Mechanics

Standard options:
Students will take four of the following options, of which two will normally be Mathematics,
subject to agreement with the Programme Director:
6CCM222b (CM222A)
Linear Algebra
6CCM321a (CM321A)
Real Analysis II
6CCM322a (CM322C)
Complex Analysis
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
Topology
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
Rings and Modules
6CCM356a (CM356Y)
Linear Systems with Control Theory
6CCM359a (CM359X)
Numerical Methods
6CCM380a (CM380A)
Topics in Applied Probability
6CCM388a (CM388Z)
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time
6CCMCS02
Theory of Complex Networks
60

6CCP3241 (CP3241)
6CCP3380 (CP3380)

Theoretical Particle Physics


Optics

Second Semester
Compulsory module:
6CCP3221 (CP3221)

Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics**

Standard modules:
6CCM223b (CM223A)
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM232b (CM232A)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM330a (CM330X)
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05

Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries
Discrete Mathematics
Galois Theory
Logic
Mathematics Education and Communication
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity***
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Biology

6CCP3402 (CP3402)
6CCP3630 (CP3630)
6CCPMP36 (CPMP36)

Solid State Physics


General Relativity and Cosmology***
Medical Imaging and Measurement

* Not if 5CCP2380 Electromagnetism was taken in the second year.


** Students must take one of 6CCP3221 (CP3221) and 6CCM436a (CM436Z) but not
both.
*** 6CCP3630 (CP3630) General Relativity and Cosmology and 6CCM334a (CM334Z)
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity cannot be taken together.
6CCP3133 University Ambassador Scheme and 6CCM330a (CM330X) Mathematics
Education and Communication cannot be taken together.
Other options available to 3rd year single honours students may be taken where the
timetable allows, subject to approval by the Programme Director.

Fourth Year
Core module:
7CCM461a (CM461C) or 7CCP4100 (CP4100) 30 credits (one unit) Project
Standard options:
First Semester
7CCM321b (CM321A)
7CCM322b (CM322C)
7CCM327b (CM327Z)
7CCM350b (CM350Z)
7CCMMS08 (CM414Z)
7CCMMS01 (CM424Z)
7CCMMS31 (CM436Z)
7CCMMS18 (CM437Z)
7CCMMS32 (CM438Z)

Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Rings and Modules
Operator Theory
Lie Groups and Lie Algebras
Quantum Mechanics II
Manifolds
Quantum Field Theory
61

7CCMFM01 (CM467Z)

Second Semester
7CCM326b (CM327Z)
7CCM334b (CM334Z)
7CCM351b (CM351A)
7CCMMS03 (CM422Z)
7CCMMS11 (CM418Z)
7CCMMS20 (CMMS20)
7CCMMS34 (CM435Z)
7CCMMS38 (CM433Z)
7CCMMS41 (CMMS41)

Applied Probability and Stochastics

Galois Theory
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Algebraic Number Theory
Fourier Analysis
Algebraic Geometry
String Theory and Branes
Advanced General Relativity
Supersymmetry and Gauge Theory

Other options may be taken where the timetable allows, after discussion with the
programme director.
Students may, subject to the approval of the Programme Director, also take up to two
modules at other colleges of the University of London or at Imperial College.
The physics component consists of a choice of intercollegiate modules, a list of which can
be found in the Physics Departments Undergraduate Handbook.
The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department.
They may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must
consult their booklet and/or programme director for definitive information.

62

Mathematics and Physics with Astrophysics BSc


UCAS code: FGJ1 / Route Code: UBSH3CJMMPA
Programme Director: Dr N Gromov
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.

First Year
First semester
Core module:
4CCP111A

First Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
4CCM111a (CM111A)
4CCM113a (CM113A)
4CCP1471
4CCP1500

Calculus I
Linear Methods
Thermal Physics
Fields, Waves and Matter

Second semester
Core module:
4CCP111A

First Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
4CCM112a (CM112A)
4CCP1500
4CCP1600

Calculus II
Fields, Waves and Matter
Astrophysics I

NOTE: in order to progress from Year 1 to Year 2 a student must gain an average mark of
at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with no mark lower than 33% and 90 credits
passed overall.

Second Year
First semester
Core module:
5CCP211A

Second Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
5CCM211a (CM211A)
5CCM231a (CM231A)
5CCP2240
5CCP2621 (CP2621)

PDEs and Complex Variable


Intermediate Dynamics
Modern Physics
Astrophysics 2

Second semester
Core module:
5CCP211A

Second Year Laboratory Physics A

Compulsory modules:
5CCP2240

Modern Physics
63

Standard options:
5CCM121b (CM121A)
5CCM328b (CM328X)
5CCP2380 (CP2380)

Introduction to Abstract Algebra


Logic
Electromagnetism*

* Exceptionally, students may be permitted to omit 5CCP2380 and take 6CCM331a in the
third year instead. In that case they may chose a further module from 4CCP1600,
5CCP211B, 5CCM122b, 5CCM328b or other Maths or Physics modules recommended by
the Programme Director.

Third Year
Student must choose one of the following:
6CCP3131 (CP3131)
3rd Year Project in Physics (Semester 2)
6CCP3132
Third Year Literature Review (Semester 1 or 2)
6CCP3133
University Ambassador Scheme (Semester 1)
First Semester
Compulsory module:
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM436a (CM436Z)
6CCP3212 (CP3212)

Special Relativity & Electromagnetism*


Quantum Mechanics II**
Statistical Mechanics

Standard options:
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM332C)
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM357a (CM357Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)
6CCMCS02
6CCP3241 (CP3241)

Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Rings and Modules
Linear Systems with Control Theory
Numerical Methods
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time
Theory of Complex Networks
Theoretical Particle Physics

Second Semester
Compulsory modules:
Either
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
Or 6CCP3630 (CP3630)
6CCP3221 (CP3221)

Space-time Geometry & General Relativity


General Relativity and Cosmology
Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics**

Standard options:
6CCM223b (CM223A)
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM232b (CM232A)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM330a (CM330X)

Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries
Discrete Mathematics
Galois Theory
Logic
Mathematics Education and Communication

64

6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05

Mathematical Finance II: Continuous time


Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Biology

6CCP3201 (CP3201)
6CCP3402 (CP3402)
6CCPMP36 (CPMP36)

Mathematical Methods in Physics III


Solid State Physics
Medical Imaging and Measurement

* Not if 5CCP2380 Electromagnetism was taken in the second year.


** Students must take one of 6CCP3221 and 6CCM436a (CM436Z) but not both.
6CCP3133 University Ambassador Scheme and 6CCM330a (CM330X) Mathematics
Education and Communication cannot be taken together.
Note: 6CCP3630 (CP3630) General Relativity and Cosmology and 6CCM334a (CM334Z)
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity cannot be taken together.
The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department.
They may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must
consult their booklet and/or programme director for definitive information.

65

French and Mathematics BA


UCAS code: RG11 / Route Code: UBAH4AJFRMM
Programme Director: Prof FA Rogers
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.
As of September 2009 there is no first, second or third year on this programme.

Fourth Year
Students should choose four modules from the following list of Mathematical modules:
First Semester
Standard options:
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM322C)
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM332a (CM332C)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM356a (CM356Y)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)

Topics in Mathematics
Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Special Relativity and Electromagnetism
Introductory Quantum Theory
Rings and Modules
Linear Systems with Control Theory
Topics in Applied Probability1
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time

Second Semester
Standard options:
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM330a (CM330X)
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM380a (CM380A)

Elementary Number Theory


Topics in Mathematics
Galois Theory
Mathematics Education and Communication
Space-time Geometry and General Relativity
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Topics in Applied Probability

Or any other Third Year Single-Honours optional module which is compatible with the
timetable, subject to the approval of the Programme Director.
The French component comprises AF/F300 Core Language final year (0.5 cu) which is
compulsory and a choice to the value of 1.5 cu from the following modules
AF/F332 The Stylistics of Translation (0.5 cu), AF/F336 Use of Spoken French*(0.5 cu),
AF/F334 Citizenship and Exclusion (1 cu). In Semester 1: AF/F338 Medieval Occitan
Literature (0.5 cu), AF/F340 The City in the Literature of Seventeenth- and Eighteenthcentury France (0.5 cu), AF/F349 Shadows of Enlightenment (0.5 cu), AF/F348 French
Literature under the Second Empire (0.5 cu), AF/F317 Proust (0.5 cu), AF/F347
1

6CCM320a (CM320X) and 6CCM380a (CM380A) cannot be taken together.

66

Contemporary Algerian Literature (0.5 cu), AF/F350 Topics in French Film II (0.5 cu), In
Semester 2: AF/F339 The Debate about Women in the Middle Ages (0.5 cu), AF/F309 The
Literary Perception of the honnete homme (0.5 cu), AF/F341 Gender and Discourse in
Eighteenth-century France (0.5 cu), AF/F344 Contemporary Womens Writing in French
(0.5 cu), AF/F351 Troubling Desires (0.5 cu), AF/F320 Recent French Thought (0.5 cu),
AF/F330 (0.5 cu) Dissertation may be offered in place of one of the options by students
who may wish to go on to do research after their degree. *Only students who have not
done year-abroad units in French may do AF/F336; it is not open to francophones.

The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department.
They may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must
consult their booklet and/or programme director for definitive information. Students
may also wish to consult the French Department website:
www.kcl.ac.uk/french.

67

Mathematics and Philosophy BA


UCAS code: GV15 / Route Code: UBAH3AJMMPL
Programme Director: Professor FI Diamond
Please note that the module codes in parentheses are those applying to students who
entered the College prior to 2007.

First Year
Mathematics Modules
First semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM111a (CM111A)
4CCM113a (CM113A)
5CCM115b (CM115A)

Calculus I
Linear Methods
Numbers and Functions

Second semester
Compulsory modules:
4CCM112a (CM112A)
4CCM121a (CM121A)

Calculus II
Introduction to Abstract Algebra

Philosophy modules:
First and Second semesters:
Students must choose three modules, one from each of the three categories:
1)
4AANA001
Greek Philosophy I (semester 1)
4AANB005
Modern Philosophy (semester 2)
2)
4AANA002
Ethics I (semester 1)
4AANB006
Political Philosophy I (semester 2)
3)
4AANA003
Elementary Logic (semester 1)
4AANA004
Metaphysics (semester 1)
4AANB007
Epistemology I (semester 2)
4AANB008
Methodology I (semester 2)
:
NOTE: in order to progress from Year 1 to Year 2 a student must gain an average mark of
at least 40% in level 4 mathematics modules, with no mark lower than 33% and 90 credits
passed overall.

Second Year Mathematics


Students take one 15 credit compulsory mathematics module and three 15 credit optional
modules.
First Semester
Compulsory module:
5CCM221a (CM221A)

Analysis I

68

Standard options:
5CCM122b (CM122A)
5CCM211a (CM211A)
5CCM222a (CM222A)
5CCM231a (CM231A)

Geometry i
PDEs and Complex Variable
Linear Algebra
Intermediate Dynamics

Second Semester
Standard options:
5CCM131b (CM131A)
5CCM141b (CM141A)
5CCM223a (CM223A)
5CCM224a (CM224X)
5CCM232a (CM232A)
5CCM241a (CM241X)
5CCM251a (CM251X)

Introduction to Dynamical Systems for Joint Honours


Probability and Statistics I
Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries
Probability and Statistics II
Discrete Mathematics

Second Year Philosophy


Students must choose three modules from at least two of the following categories:
A)
5AANA001
Greek Philosophy II: Plato (sem 1)
5AANB002
Greek Philosophy II: Aristotle (Sem 2)
5AANA003
Modern Philosophy II: Locke & Berkley (sem 1)
5AANB004
Modern Philosophy II: Spinoza & Leibniz (sem 2)
B)

5AANA005
5AAMB006
5AANB007
5AANB008

Ethics II: history of ethical philosophy (sem 1)


Ethics II: contemporary ethical Philosophy (sem 2)
Political Philosophy II: theories of justice (sem 2)
Political Philosophy II: history of political philosophy (s1)

C)

5AANA009
5AANA010
5AANB011
5AANB012

Epistemology II (sem 1)
Metaphysics II (sem 1)
Philosophy of Logic & Language (sem 2)
Philosophy of Mind (sem 2)

Students must choose one module from the lists above and the following list:
6AANA028
First-order Logic (sem 1)
6CCNB031
Modal Logic (sem 2)
6AANB017
Indian Philosophy: the Heterodox Schools (sem 2)
6AANB023
Medieval Philosophy (sem 2)
6AANA022
Philosophy of Mathematics (sem 1)
6AANA024
Philosophy of Psychology (sem 1)
6AANB0025
Philosophy of religion (sem 2)
6AANA018
Kants Epistemology & Metaphysics (sem 1)
Note:

All modules are worth 15 credits and taught for one semester only.

All the modules require one hours lecture per week plus one hour of seminars/exercise
class per week.

69

Some modules require the submission of coursework instead of sitting an exam (you
can find the module descriptions and requirements in
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/depts/philosophy/current/ug/modules.html

If you are unsure about which modules to choose, please make an appointment via
email with your Philosophy personal tutor or with the senior tutor, Dr Mark Textor, to
discuss your potential choices.

We generally suggest that in the second year, you take all credits at level 5 (these are
the modules whose codes start with 5), unless you have a particular interest in one of
the level 6 modules (whose codes start with 6).

Note: students, who choose to take level 6 Philosophy options in the second year, if
allowable by the Programme Director, may experience timetable clashes which cannot be
resolved.

Third Year
Students should choose three mathematics modules from the following:
Mathematics Modules
First Semester
Standard options:
6CCM211b (CM211A)
6CCM222b (CM222A)
6CCM231b (CM231A)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM321a (CM321A)
6CCM322a (CM322C)
6CCM327a (CM327Z)
6CCM331a (CM331A)
6CCM332a (CM332C)
6CCM350a (CM350Z)
6CCM356a (CM356Y)
6CCM357a (CM357Y)
6CCM359a (CM359X)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCM388a (CM388Z)
6CCMCS02

PDEs and Complex


Linear Algebra
Intermediate Dynamics
Topics in Mathematics
Real Analysis II
Complex Analysis
Topology
Special Relativity & Electromagnetism
Introductory Quantum Theory
Rings and Modules
Linear Systems with Control Theory1
Introduction to Linear Systems with Control Theory2
Numerical Methods
Topics in Applied Probability3
Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time
Theory of Complex Networks

Second Semester
Standard options:
6CCM223b (CM223A)
6CCM224b (CM224X)
6CCM232b (CM232A)

Geometry of Surfaces
Elementary Number Theory
Groups and Symmetries

This course is an option for students who have previously taken 4CCM131a, Introduction to Dynamical
Systems.
2
This is not an option for students who have previously taken 4CCM131a.
3
6CCM380a (CM380A) and 6CCM320a (CM320X) cannot be taken together.

70

6CCM241b (CM241X)
6CCM251b (CM251X)
6CCM320a (CM320X)
6CCM326a (CM326Z)
6CCM328a (CM328X)
6CCM330a (CM330X
6CCM334a (CM334Z)
6CCM338a (CM338Z)
6CCM351a (CM351A)
6CCM380a (CM380A)
6CCMCS05

Probability and Statistics II


Discrete Mathematics
Topics in Mathematics
Galois Theory
Logic
Mathematics Education and Communication
Space-time Geometry & General Relativity
Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time
Representation Theory of Finite Groups
Topics in Applied Probability
Mathematical Biology

Third Year Philosophy Modules


First and Second semester:
Students must take 4 modules (or 60 credits) from the following list:
Dissertation (30 credits)
Arabic Philosophy
Hellenistic Philosophy
Indian Philosophy
Kant
Mediaeval Philosophy
Logic and Set Theory
Neoplatonism
Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy of Science
Pre-Socratics
Reading in Aristotle
Reading in Plato
Topics in Philosophy of Language
Topics in Philosophy of Mind
And other modules in Philosophy, subject to the approval of the relevant Programme
Director in the Philosophy Department.

The responsibility for non-mathematics modules rests with the relevant department.
They may make changes which are not reflected in this booklet, and you must
consult their booklet and/or programme director for definitive information.

71

Change of Degree Course


Students arrive at King's College having given much thought to their choice of course.
Likewise, in admitting students to a particular course, the College goes to some
considerable lengths to ensure that they are suitably qualified. There is, therefore, a high
degree of commitment on both sides.
However, we do realise that inclinations and interests sometimes change, and if you feel
that you would be better suited to a different course you should not delay in seeking advice
and finding out if a change is allowable. As a rule, note that changes of courses are the
more difficult the more material you have missed from your new programme. In the
Department of Mathematics, first year students in their first term should see the
Admissions Tutor (Dr D Solomon). After the first term, the appropriate person is the
Programme Director for the proposed course. Your personal tutor should in any case be
consulted.
A change of degree course requires written permission from all departments involved and
is not automatic. A Change of Registration Status form is available online. The form will be
signed on behalf of the Mathematics Department by the Senior Tutor, and should then be
returned to the Compass. Similar arrangements apply to temporary interruption or
permanent withdrawal. The College will inform your Local Education Authority about any
change in your course of study, but you are also required to write to your LEA.

8. MODULE/COURSE UNIT LISTING


This part of the handbook gives a provisional list of modules, which may be modified
before the session begins. Be reminded that you should always consult your Programme
Director about prerequisites for the modules and your intended programme.
Please remember that you may and should consult members of staff; this includes
consultation by students who are not attending the particular staff member's module. The
names of staff members willing to help with each module will be publicised on
departmental notice boards and given on the information sheet for the course.
At the start of each module, the lecturer will hand out a Course Information Sheet, which
includes more detailed information about the module.

72

4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I

Lecturer:

Professor PK Sollich

Web page:

via links from King's Maths home page

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements: Three hours of lectures each week, one tutorial per week,
throughout the term; one hour of maple tutorial for half the term.
Prerequisites: A-level mathematics
Assessment: The module is assessed by several 30-minute class tests held at intervals
during the First Semester, together with a two-hour written examination in January; there
are NO resit class tests. The class tests together contribute 20% towards the final mark
and the written examination in January generates the remaining 80%; the overall pass
mark is 40%.
Assignments: Exercises will be given out and questions set each week to be handed in
the following week. These problems will be discussed in the tutorials and solutions will be
available on the web. In addition, the Maple tutorials will proceed via a series of computerbased exercises; these are assessed for satisfactory completion directly in the Maple
tutorials.
A full statement of the regulations for tests and assignments will be handed out in
lectures at the start of term.
Aims and objectives: The aim of the module is to review and enhance aspects of preuniversity mathematics in order to foster genuine confidence and fluency with the material.
This will help provide a firm grasp of basic ideas thus allowing concentration on the many
new and often abstract concepts that will be introduced in various modules throughout the
academic programme.
Syllabus: Complex numbers; trigonometric functions; the logarithm and exponential
functions; limits; review of differentiation; integration; series; Taylor's theorem; use of
Maple.
Books: This module does not follow any particular book but printed skeleton notes will
be made available. These will need to be filled in during lectures with proofs, examples etc.
In addition, there are many books which you might find helpful for the module-to provide
background, alternative explanations, and generally supplement the lectures.
The typical US-style introductory Calculus book has on the order of 1000 pages, is rather
heavy to carry around, and goes a long way beyond this module (but will not necessarily
cover all the material either). Having said that, such books can be very well written and
also useful for Calculus II next semester, and also possibly for Analysis I or Joint Honours
Analysis. There are any number to choose from, mostly located in section QA303 in the
library - not a bad example being

73

Calculus (one and several variables) by Salas, Hille and Etgen, Wiley (10th edition, 2007,
or earlier editions).
Less typical is:
Maths - A Student's Survival Guide, Jenny Olive, CUP
which is written in a very `chatty' style. It is intended for `science' students, rather than
mathematics students, and so in parts it is rather basic, as well as missing out some of the
more advanced topics, but it has well written sections on most of the material covered in
this module.
Finally, a book which might also prove useful is:
Engineering Mathematics by K.A. Stroud, Palgrave 2001
Again this is not intended for mathematics students, but covers almost all the topics in the
module in a very straightforward and clear way with many worked examples, and might
prove useful if you find the other books too technical or need to see more examples.
Maple: Maple is a very versatile and powerful computer package for performing
mathematical calculations, from the simplest all the way to research level. As part of this
module students must attend compulsory laboratory sessions designed to introduce them
to aspects of Maple. The times of the various sessions will be displayed on the notice
board and the module web page.

74

4CCM112a (CM112A) Calculus II

Lecturer:

Dr S Schafer-Nameki

Web page:

See departmental web pages

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements: Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour
tutorial.
Prerequisites: 4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I, or equivalent.
Assessment: There are three assessments during the semester, which count for 20% of
the final mark. The remaining 80% of the course marks are assessed by a two-hour written
examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments: There are exercises included in the course notes and you will be set a
selection of questions each week. Some of these are for group work in a tutorial, some for
homework. All students are expected to hand in their homework by a set date for marking
and discussion at a subsequent tutorial.
Aims and objectives: The course aims to extend the methods of calculus of one variable
to calculus for functions of many variables, that is, calculus on higher dimensional spaces.
This involves concepts such as multiple integrals and partial derivatives, which enable us
to make sense of the idea of length of a curve, area of a surface, and maxima and minima
of functions of many variables. The final part of the course presents the great integral
theorems: Greens Theorem, Stokes theorem and the Divergence Theorem which form a
cornerstone of mathematics.
Syllabus: Surface sketching, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, geometry of curves,
vector fields, geometry of surfaces, maxima and minima, generalised derivatives, Stokes
Theorem, the Divergence Theorem.
Books: The Course Notes will be available at the start of the semester. There are many
texts on this subject, and you might take a look at the following:
R Adams, Calculus, a complete course (6th Edition) this includes sections on calculus
using Maple
J Marsden, A Tromba, Vector Calculus (4th Edition)
Salas and Hille, Calculus: one and several variables (6th Edition)
McCallum et al., Multivariable Calculus
W Cox, Vector Calculus
You may also want to look at the worked problems in the following Schaum outline books
by Murray Spiegel:
Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Advanced Calculus
Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Vector Analysis

75

4CCM113a (CM113A) Linear Methods

Lecturer:

Dr PL Kassaei

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm113


Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements: Three one-hour lectures each week. In addition, a one-hour


tutorial each week (beginning Week 2) to discuss Homework exercises from the previous
week.
Pre-requisites: A-level Mathematics (algebra, trigonometry, geometry and calculus).
Assessment: There are three tests during the semester, with the fourth one in January, all
of which comprise 20% of the final mark. The remaining 80% of the course marks are
assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments: There will be a weekly sheet of Homework exercises. You must attempt
these to keep up with the course. Solutions are later posted on the web page.
Aims and objectives: Linear algebra provides basic ideas and tools for much of the work
we do in mathematics, particularly the aspects which concern geometry in 3D Euclidean
space. The course introduces the general notion of linearity, a principle which illuminates
wide areas of Mathematics. In pursuit of this, we cover a range of topics and provide a
unifying framework for them.
Syllabus:
1. Algebra and geometry of vectors in R2, R3 and Rn.
Lines and planes, linear
independence and bases.
2. Matrices, systems of linear equations and linear maps, inverse matrices.
3. Determinants; the cross product for vectors in R3.
4. Eigenvalues & eigenvectors; similarity; complex matrices; canonical forms for rank 2
matrices.
5. Linear ordinary differential equations; solutions, principle of linearity, linear systems.
Coursework: Homework exercises and occasional class tests.
Course Notes: There is a set of lecture notes for this course, containing all the material to
be covered in lectures. They will be available from the departmental office.
Other Reference Texts. In addition, many textbooks in the library cover some or all of the
course, including:
[1] H. Anton and C. Rorres, Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications (J.Wiley).
[2] F. Ayres, Linear Algebra, Schaum Outline Series (McGraw-Hill). Many worked
problems.

76

4CCM115a (CM115A) Numbers and Functions

Lecturer:

Dr AB Pushnitski

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm115
(or via links from the Kings web page)

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial.
Aims and objectives:
To introduce the ideas and methods of university level pure mathematics. In particular, the
module aims to show the need for proofs, to encourage logical arguments and to convey
the power of abstract methods. This will be done by example and illustration within the
context of a connected development of the following topics: real numbers, sequences,
limits, series.
Brief outline of syllabus:
Sets and functions. Real numbers. Sequences: boundedness, convergence,
subsequences, Cauchy sequences.
Assessment:
There are three tests during the semester, and a fourth test in January, which count for
20% of the final mark. The remaining 80% of the marks are assessed by a three- hour
written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets are handed out on a weekly basis and written answers must be given in
by the due date.
Books:
There is no set book for the module. However, there are a variety of books that are useful
for certain sections:
K.E.Hirst, Numbers, Sequences and Series. (Edward Arnold, 1995)
V.Bryant, Yet Another Introduction to Analysis (Cambridge University Press, 1990)
R.Haggarty, Fundamentals of Mathematical Analysis. (Addison-Wesley, 1992)

77

5CCM115b (CM115B) Numbers and Functions for Joint Honours

Lecturer:

Dr AB Pushnitski

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm115
(or via links from the Kings web page)

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial.
Aims and objectives:
To introduce the ideas and methods of university level pure mathematics. In particular, the
module aims to show the need for proofs, to encourage logical arguments and to convey
the power of abstract methods. This will be done by example and illustration within the
context of a connected development of the following topics: real numbers, sequences,
limits, series.
Brief outline of syllabus:
Sets and functions. Real numbers Sequences: boundedness, convergence,
subsequences, Cauchy sequences.
Assessment:
The module is assessed by a three-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets are handed out on a weekly basis and written answers must be given in
by the due date.
Books:
There is no set book for the module. However, there are a variety of books that are useful
for certain sections:
K.E.Hirst, Numbers, Sequences and Series. (Edward Arnold, 1995)
V.Bryant, Yet Another Introduction to Analysis (Cambridge University Press, 1990)
R.Haggarty, Fundamentals of Mathematical Analysis. (Addison-Wesley, 1992)

78

4CCM121a (CM121A) Introduction to Abstract Algebra

Lecturer:

Professor DJ Burns

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from the Kings web page)

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures and a one-hour tutorial each week.
Assessment:
There are three tests during the semester, which count for 20% of the final mark. The
remaining 80% of the course marks are assessed by a three-hour written examination at
the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Problem sheets are given out at the end of each week. All students are expected to hand
in their work on these sheets the following week so that this can be marked, returned and
discussed at the subsequent tutorial.
Aims of the course:
The main aim of the course is to introduce students to basic concepts from abstract
algebra, especially the notion of a group. The course will help prepare students for further
study in abstract algebra as well as familiarize them with tools essential in many other
areas of mathematics. The course is also intended to help students in the transitions from
concrete to abstract mathematical thinking and from a purely descriptive view of
mathematics to one of definition and deduction.
Syllabus:
The integers: Principle of induction, Division Algorithm, greatest common divisor.
Linear diophantine equations. Prime numbers, unique factorisation.
Groups: Examples - roots of unity, rotations, symmetries, dihedral groups, matrices,
permutations. Group axioms and elementary properties. The order of an element and
the orders of its powers. Subgroups, cosets, Lagranges theorem. Cyclic groups,
subgroups of cyclic groups. Homomorphisms, Kernels, isomorphisms, isomorphism
classes of cyclic groups.
Rings: Axioms, examples and elementary properties. Group of units of a ring, units of
the ring Z n of residue classes of integers modulo n. Integral domains, fields.
Homomorphism and isomorphism of rings.
Congruences: Solution of linear congruences. Simultaneous linear congruences,
Chinese Remainder Theorem. Properties of the Euler function. Theorems of Euler and
Fermat.
Polynomials: Degree. Euclidean Algorithm, greatest common divisor. Unique
factorisation theorem for polynomials over a field. Number of zeros of a polynomial over
a field. Polynomials over the rationals - Gausss lemma, Eisensteins criterion.
Books: A set of lecture notes for the course is available from the Mathematics Office.
79

5CCM121b (CM121A) Introduction to Abstract Algebra for Joint Honours

Lecturer:

Professor DJ Burns

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from the Kings web page)

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures and a one-hour tutorial each week.
Assessment:
The course will be assessed by a three-hour written examination at the end of the
academic year.
Assignments:
Problem sheets are given out at the end of each week. All students are expected to hand
in their work on these sheets the following week so that this can be marked, returned and
discussed at the subsequent tutorial.
Aims of the course:
The main aim of the course is to introduce students to basic concepts from abstract
algebra, especially the notion of a group. The course will help prepare students for further
study in abstract algebra as well as familiarize them with tools essential in many other
areas of mathematics. The course is also intended to help students in the transitions from
concrete to abstract mathematical thinking and from a purely descriptive view of
mathematics to one of definition and deduction.
Syllabus:
The integers: Principle of induction, Division Algorithm, greatest common divisor.
Linear diophantine equations. Prime numbers, unique factorisation.
Groups: Examples - roots of unity, rotations, symmetries, dihedral groups, matrices,
permutations. Group axioms and elementary properties. The order of an element and
the orders of its powers. Subgroups, cosets, Lagranges theorem. Cyclic groups,
subgroups of cyclic groups. Homomorphisms, Kernels, isomorphisms, isomorphism
classes of cyclic groups.
Rings: Axioms, examples and elementary properties. Group of units of a ring, units of
the ring Z n of residue classes of integers modulo n. Integral domains, fields.
Homomorphism and isomorphism of rings.
Congruences: Solution of linear congruences. Simultaneous linear congruences,
Chinese Remainder Theorem. Properties of the Euler function. Theorems of Euler and
Fermat.
Polynomials: Degree. Euclidean Algorithm, greatest common divisor. Unique
factorisation theorem for polynomials over a field. Number of zeros of a polynomial over
a field. Polynomials over the rationals - Gausss lemma, Eisensteins criterion.
Books: A set of lecture notes for the course is available from the Mathematics Office.

80

4CCM122a (CM122A) Geometry I

Lecturer:

Dr G Tinaglia

Web page:

Follow links from Kings Maths home page

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial.
Aims and objectives:
Geometrical ideas are central to several of modern mathematics. This module aims to
describe and link various rather different approaches to geometry, and in doing so
encourage logical argument and convey the power of abstract methods. At the end of the
module a student should understand the key basic ideas in the topics listed below and
have developed abilities to construct mathematical arguments and tackle challenging
problems using a range of techniques.
Brief outline of syllabus
Euclidean geometry, the plane R2, transformations, Non-Euclidean geometries, a brief
introduction to projective geometry.
Assessment:
Class tests held during the semester and in January together count for 20% of the final
mark. The remaining 80% of the marks are assessed by a three-hour written examination
in May.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets are handed out on a weekly basis and written answers must be given in
by the due date.
Course notes
It is an important part of studying this module that each student takes notes during lectures
and edits these into a good set of notes on the material.
Books:
G. D. Birkhoff and R. Beatley, Basic Geometry (AMS Chelsea Publishing)
J. R. Silvester, Geometry Ancient and Modern (Oxford, 2001)
D. A. Brannan, M. F. Esplen and J. J. Gray, Geometry, (Cambridge University Press)
M. J. Greenberg, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries: Development and History (W.
H. Freeman and Company)

81

5CCM122b (CM122A) Geometry I for Joint Honours


Lecturer:

Dr G Tinaglia

Web page:

Follow links from Kings Maths home page

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial.
Aims and objectives:
Geometrical ideas are central to several of modern mathematics. This module aims to
describe and link various rather different approaches to geometry, and in doing so
encourage logical argument and convey the power of abstract methods. At the end of the
module a student should understand the key basic ideas in the topics listed below and
have developed abilities to construct mathematical arguments and tackle challenging
problems using a range of techniques.
Brief outline of syllabus
Euclidean geometry, the plane R2, transformations, Non-Euclidean geometries, a brief
introduction to projective geometry.
Assessment:
The module is assessed by a three-hour written examination in May.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets are handed out on a weekly basis and written answers must be given in
by the due date.
Course notes
It is an important part of studying this module that each student takes notes during lectures
and edits these into a good set of notes on the material.
Books:
G. D. Birkhoff and R. Beatley, Basic Geometry (AMS Chelsea Publishing)
J. R. Silvester, Geometry Ancient and Modern (Oxford, 2001)
D. A. Brannan, M. F. Esplen and J. J. Gray, Geometry, (Cambridge University Press)
M. J. Greenberg, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries: Development and History (W.
H. Freeman and Company)

82

4CCM131a / 5CCM131b (CM131A) Introduction to Dynamical Systems

Lecturer:

Dr A Annibale

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from King's Maths home page)

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures will be held each week. The classes will be divided in five for
tutorials. Tutorial groups will be allocated in the first week of term and the lists will be
posted on the course web page.
Prerequisites:
Normally CM111A Calculus I, and CM113A Linear Methods
Assessment:

4CCM131A: There are three tests during the semester, which count for 20% of the final
mark. The remaining 80% of the course marks are assessed by a two-hour written
examination at the end of the academic year.
5CCM131B: There is a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic year,
which represents 100% of the final grade of this module.
Assignments:

Exercise sheets will be given out. Solutions handed in will be marked and difficulties
discussed during tutorials and in class. Assignments are regarded as an essential element
of the course as they provide the necessary opportunity for active training and for
sharpening ideas about the material presented in the course.
Aims and objectives:
The course aims to introduce students to the analysis of simple dynamical systems
described in terms of first or second order differential equations, emphasising concepts
such as phase flow, fixed points, and stability of fixed points. The ideas introduced have
applications in biology and economics, as well as in Newtonian mechanics. Newtonian
mechanics is taught with emphasis on motion in one spatial dimension, and in that case
furnishes examples of so-called second order dynamical systems. Elements of the
Hamiltonian approach to Newtonian mechanics are also introduced.
Syllabus:
Differential equations; first-order dynamical systems, autonomous systems, phase flow
and fixed points; second-order dynamical systems, phase flow, classification of fixed
points; kinematics of particle motion, Newton's laws; conservation of energy, conservative
forces, motion on a straight line; Hamiltonian systems; elements of Hamiltonian
mechanics.

83

Books:
(i) Introduction to dynamics, by I. Percival and D. Richards (Cambridge University Press), (ii)
Differential equations, maps and chaotic behaviour, by D.K. Arrowsmith and C.M. Place (Chapman
Hall), (iii) Mechanics, by P.C. Smith and R.C. Smith (Wiley), (iv) Differential Equations and Their
Applications, by M. Braun (Springer)
Notes:

A set of lecture notes will be available on the course web page. These notes cover virtually
all material of the course, but the course will not follow the notes strictly.

84

4CCM141a / 5CCM141b (CM141A) Probability and Statistics I

Lecturer:

Dr E Katzav

Web page:

http:/ http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from Kings Maths home page)

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, and a weekly tutorial of one hour.
Prerequisites:
None, but the module is a prerequisite for more advanced probability and statistics
modules such as Probability and Statistics II.
Aim:
The aim of the module is to introduce the basic concepts and computations of probability
theory as well as the statistical analysis of data and the main statistical tests.
Syllabus:
Elementary combinatorial analysis, Definition of probability, Unions and intersections Statistical Independence, Exclusivity and exhaustibility, Conditional probability, Bayes
theorem, Random variables discrete and continuous, The binomial distribution, the
Poisson distribution, the normal distribution, Descriptive Statistics, Correlation and
regression, Hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, Normal, Students t, Chi squared, Sign,
Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests
Reading:
A good textbook that covers all the material of the module, and which is also used in the
more advanced Probability and Statistics II is
Wackerley, Mendenhall & Scheaffer, Mathematical Statistics with Applications.
One highly recommended collection of tables which you will find useful in this module
D.V. Lindley and W.F. Scott, New Cambridge Statistical Table, Second Edition (Cambridge
University Press.)
Assessment:
The current arrangement is 3 class tests (together contributing 20%) and a 2 hour
examination in May for the remaining 80%. You should make every effort to attend all the
class tests. (There are no resits.) Do prepare for the tests so that you will be able to
maximize the 20% coursework component.
The exam paper is also the answer booklet. You must write your answer at the appropriate
places on the question paper. Rough work, which will not be marked, can be done on the
reverse sides of the question paper, or in additional booklets. During the examination you
will have access to the New Cambridge Statistical Tables. You may bring a college
approved calculator.

85

5CCM211a / 6CCM211b (CM211A) PDEs & Complex Variables

Lecturer:

Professor SG Scott

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses


Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial class.
Prerequisites:
A thorough knowledge of 4CCM112a (CM112A) Calculus II. It will be helpful to attend
5CCM221a (CM221A) Analysis I, possibly concurrently, or to have attended 5CCM250a
(CM2504) Applied Analytic Methods, but neither of these is essential.
Assessment:
The module will by assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignments:
Exercises will be given out on a weekly basis, starting in the first week of the module; it is
essential that you make a serious attempt to do these. Solutions handed in will be marked
and difficulties discussed in the tutorial class. In addition, it is essential that students work
through the lectures as the module progresses.
Aims and Objectives:
The theory of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) forms the basis for many fundamental
areas of mathematics. Apart from their fundamental role in physics and mechanics, such
as in describing how electromagnetic-waves propagate through space, PDEs also provide
the tools for many areas of pure mathematics. In geometric analysis, for instance, the
way in which a given space is curved (e.g a surface such as a sphere) is studied by
associating to it a geometric evolution equation ---- the idea is this, different spaces sound
differently when you tap them, as for example we know from tapping drums of different
shapes and sizes; the question, then, is can you hear the shape of a drum?
An important technique in solving PDEs is provided by functions of a complex variable,
which constitutes one of the most elegant branches of pure mathematics. The second part
of the module will be devoted to the implementation of those techniques.
The module will be taught in a manner akin to Calculus II, That is, this is a methods
course and so will not deal with the many abstractions that a more rigorous exposition
would entail. Nevertheless, a student who has mastered this module will be in a strong
position to appreciate the subtleties of a rigorous module on Complex Analysis such as
CM322C, or one of the many third and fourth year modules dealing with various aspects of
PDEs.

86

Syllabus:
Partial Differential Equations
Basic ideas: linear equations, homogeneous equations, superposition principle. Laplaces
equation in two variables, simple boundary value problems. Separation of variables.
Fourier series. Introduction to Fourier transforms with applications.
Complex Variable
Revision of complex numbers. Basic definitions: open sets, domain, curves, trace of a
curve. Definitions of continuity, differentiability, analyticity. Cauchy-Riemann equations.
Integration along a smooth curve; integration along a contour; Cauchys theorem.
Cauchys integral formula, Laurents theorem, Taylors theorem. Calculus of residues.
Contour integration.

Books:
Many books serve to give further information on the topics covered --- visit the Chancery
Lane library! or visit Foyles bookshop in Charing Cross Road. The following are a few
suggestions --- but are fairly arbitrary choices:
For a good quite rigorous text on PDEs:
W A Strauss, Partial Differential Equations An Introduction (Wiley)
Less theory based, possibilities are (for example)
P. Drabek, G. Holubova, Elements of Partial Differential Equations, (de Gruyter)
Y. Pichover, J. Rubinstein, An Introduction to Partial Differential Equations, (CUP)
N. Asmar, Partial Differential Equations with Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems,
(Pearson, Prentice-Hall)
H F Weinberger, Partial Differential Equations with Complex Variables and Transform
Methods (Dover 1995)
For complex variable theory:
H A Priestley, Introduction to Complex Analysis (2nd Edition) (OUP)

87

5CCM221a (CM221A) Analysis I

Lecturer:

Professor Y Safarov

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


or via links from Kings Maths home page
Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements: Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one hour
tutorial.
Prerequisites:
4CCM115a Numbers and Functions (or equivalent background).
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two hour written examination at the end of the academic
year. There will be three class tests during the module, each of which will carry 5% of the
final grade. The dates will be announced in advance. There will be no duplicate class tests
for absentees. Students who miss class tests without good reason will get zero marks.
Students who miss class tests for good reason (e.g. can supply doctors certificates) will
be given an appropriately higher weighting for the final examination.
Assignments: Exercise sheets will be given out. Solutions handed in will be marked.
Students must realise that for successful progress in the module, the coursework has to be
done regularly, as it is handed out.
Aims and objectives:
Real Analysis is one of the core subjects in every reputable Mathematics degree
programme. It enables us to explain why results require proof and that statements are
only true in a context of some precise technical conditions. It also provides the knowledge
needed to make sense of a variety of other topics in the syllabus, such as complex
analysis, dynamical systems and differential equations, all of which have immense
importance within the subject. It is expected that students will understand and be able to
reproduce the proofs of the major theorems of the subject. They should also appreciate
the logical relationships between the different parts of the subject and be able to use the
ideas of the module in a variety of situations.
Syllabus: The module builds upon the material in 4CCM115a Numbers and Functions,
which you are expected to know. It emphasises the difference between school level
calculus and a rigorous treatment of the same topics. The material starts with definitions
of limits of sequences and series, and simple criteria for convergence, with many
examples of the kind you should learn how to handle. This part of the module includes the
Cauchy criterion, absolute convergence of series and a study of power series.
Real variable theorems include definitions of continuity and differentiation with proofs of
well established theorems for functions of a single real variable up to Taylor's theorem.
Properties of an elementary integral in one space dimension will be studied briefly, starting
from a list of axioms for the integral. Proofs will be given of the fundamental theorem of
calculus and of the rules for evaluating integrals.
88

Books: You are advised to acquire and use one of the following books (all available in the
library):
K G Binmore: Mathematical Analysis, a straightforward approach, Cambridge University
Press.
R Haggarty: Fundamentals of Mathematical Analysis. Addison Wesley.
David S. Stirling : Mathematical Analysis and Proof, Albion.
David Brannan: A First Course in Mathematical Analysis, Cambridge University
Not all the books adopt the same approach to integration and some notes will be
distributed on this topic.

89

5CCM222a / 6CCM222b (CM222A) Linear Algebra

Lecturer:

Professor FI Diamond

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from Kings Maths home page)

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements: Three hours of lectures plus a 1hr. tutorial each week.
Prerequisites: 4CCM113a (CM113A) or similar course giving familiarity with basic vectors
and matrices in Rn (especially R2 and R3); 4CCM121a (CM121A) or some course
containing abstract algebraic ideas.
Assessment: For 5CCM222A, a 2hr. written examination at the end of the academic year
will count for 85% of total mark. In addition there will be 3 class tests during the semester,
time-tabled separately from the lectures (each counting for 5% of the total mark). For
6CCM222B, there are no class tests and the exam counts for 100% of total mark
Assignments: Regular exercise work is essential for success in this course.
Exercises will be set and marked weekly and the performance of each student will be
recorded for later reference.
Aims and objectives: This course sets concepts from the methods' course 4CCM113a
(CM113A) (e.g. determinant and dimension) in the more general framework of abstract
vector spaces. It also gives the precise definitions and proofs that are essential for much
of higher mathematics, both pure and applied. Further concepts and methods are also
introduced in the same manner. Examples from Rn and Cn will be given where possible
to illustrate the geometrical meaning behind the algebraic ideas. The course will
emphasize the interplay between abstract and more concrete ideas.
Syllabus: General definition and properties of vector spaces, subspaces and linear maps.
Linear independence, basis and dimension. Rank and nullity for linear maps. The relation
between linear maps and matrices. Change of basis and similarity of matrices. Inverse
matrices. Eigenvectors, eigenvalues and diagonalisation of matrices. Inner product
spaces and orthogonal diagonalisation.
Books: The course will not follow one particular textbook. There is a vast array of books
on linear algebra that contain the material of the course (often also covering the
preliminary material from linear methods). Here is a small sample, listed in roughly
increasing order of sophistication:
1.
2
3
4
5.
6.
7.
8.

Elementary Linear Algebra, Howard Anton, 8th ed., Wiley, 2000.


Linear Algebra with Applications', W. Keith Nicholson, 3rd ed. PWS 1995.
Linear Algebra', RBJT Allenby, Edward Arnold Modular Mathematics, 1995.
Elementary Linear Algebra' W. Keith Nicholson,1st ed., McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Basic Linear Algebra T.S. Blyth and E.F. Robertson, Springer 1998.
Linear Algebra S. Lang, Addison-Wesley, 1966.
Introduction to Linear Algebra Thomas A. Whitelaw, Blackie 1991.
Linear Algebra A. Mary Tropper, Nelson 1969.
90

5CCM223a / 6CCM223b (CM223A) Geometry of Surfaces

Lecturer:

Dr G Tinaglia

Web page:

Follow links from Kings Maths home page

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial
Prerequisites:
4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I, 4CCM112a (CM112A) Calculus II, 4CCM113a
(CM113A) Linear Methods
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year. There will be two versions of the final exam paper, a version for second year
students and a slightly more difficult version for third year students.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out each week. Solutions handed in will be marked and
difficulties discussed in the tutorial.
Aims and objectives:
This module will apply the methods of calculus to the geometry of curves and surfaces in
three-dimensional space. The most important idea is that of the curvature of a curve or a
surface. The module should prepare you for more advanced modules in geometry, as well
as courses in mathematical physics such as relativity.
Syllabus:
Definition of a curve, arc length, curvature and torsion of a curve, Frenet-Serret equations.
Definition of a surface patch, first fundamental form, isometries, conformal maps, area of a
surface. Second fundamental form of a surface, gaussian, mean and principal curvatures.
Gauss map. Theorema Egregium. Geodesics. Gauss-Bonnet theorem.
Books:
M. P. Do Carmo, Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, Prentice-Hall, 1976
A. Pressley, Elementary Differential Geometry, Springer, 2001
A Gray, Modern Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, CRC Press, 1993
S. Montiel and A. Ros, Curves and Surfaces, American Mathematical Society

91

5CCM224A / 6CCM224B (CM224X) Elementary Number Theory

Lecturer:

Dr B Noohi

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements: Three hours of lectures and a one-hour tutorial each week.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4CCM121A or 5CCM121B)
Assessment: The module will be assessed by a class test during the semester (counting
for 10% of the final mark) and a two-hour written exam at the end of the academic year
(counting for 90% of the final mark). There will be two versions of the final exam paper, a
version for second year students and a slightly more difficult version for third year
students.
Assignments: Problem sheets will be given out every week, and work handed in will be
marked and returned to the student. Solutions will be posted on the course web page.
Aims and objectives: The aim of this module is to give an introduction to elementary
number theory and to further develop the algebraic techniques met in Introduction to
Abstract Algebra. By introducing several new concepts in the concrete setting of rational
integers, this module is a good preparation for more demanding modules in number theory
and algebra.
Syllabus: Review of divisibility, prime numbers and congruences. Residue class rings,
Eulers -function, primitive roots. Quadratic residues and quadratic reciprocity law.
Irrational and transcendental numbers. Sums of squares. Some Diophantine equations.
Books: The module is not based on any particular book, but the following books may be
useful:
D. M. Burton, Elementary Number Theory, McGraw-Hill Education, 5th ed., 2001.
J. H. Silverman, A Friendly Introduction to Number Theory, Prentice Hall, 3rd ed., 2005.
G. A. Jones and J. M. Jones, Elementary Number Theory, Springer, 1998.

92

5CCM231a / 6CCM231b (CM231A) Intermediate Dynamics

Lecturer:

Dr PP Cook

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


(or via links from King's Maths home page)
Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures plus a one-hour tutorial each week.
Prerequisites:
Normally 4CCM131a (CM131A) Introduction to Dynamical Systems.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year. The examination will closely follow the material covered in lectures and homework
assignments. You may bring a College approved calculator.
Aims:
The aim of the module is to develop the basic concepts and mathematical techniques of
classical analytical mechanics, including Newtonian, Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian
methods, and to lay the foundation for studies of quantum theory, statistical mechanics,
and chaos.
Syllabus:
Newton's Laws; Conservation Laws; Kepler's Laws; Lagrangian Dynamics; Hamiltonian
Dynamics; Poisson Brackets; Noether's Theorem; Liouville's Theorem and the Poincare
Recurrence Theorem. If there is sufficient time the Action Principle and modes of vibration
will also be studied.
Books:
Any of the many books you can find in the library on classical mechanics or dynamics can
be consulted including:
1. H. Goldstein, C. Poole and J. Safko, Classical Mechanics
2. T. W. Kibble and F. H. Berkshire, Classical Mechanics
3. A. P. French and M. Ebison, Introduction to Classical Mechanics
However, the lectures will cover precisely those things you will need to know. Therefore,
you are advised to attend all lectures, and take time to read through and think about the
notes.

93

5CCM232a / 6CCM232b (CM232A) Groups and Symmetries

Lecturer:

Dr B Doyon

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from Kings Mathematics Dept. home page)

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours a week and one hour tutorials, four tutorial groups
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignment:
Weekly homework will be given out. Solutions handed in will be marked. Difficulties with
the material will be explained during the tutorials. The solutions to the tutorial questions
and homework will be posted on the internet about a week after distribution of the
problems.
Aims and objectives:
To provide an understanding of group theory and its applications in geometry and
theoretical physics.
Syllabus:
General group theory: Definitions of a group, cyclic groups, coset spaces, conjugacy
classes, normal subgroups, quotient groups, dihedral groups, isomorphism theorems,
group of automorphisms.
Classical groups: GL(n,R), U(n), SU(n), 0(n), S0(n) and the various relations between
them; centres of classical groups; 0(n) = Z2 x S0(n), n odd; scalar product and 0(n), U(n);
parametrization of S0(2) and S0(3), rotations in R2 and R3; S0(3) = SU(2)/Z2; Euclidean
group, Lorentz group.
Lattice groups; lattices, lattice translations and rotations; crystallographic restriction; twodimensional lattice symmetry groups.
Books:
J F Humphreys: A course in Group Theory, Oxford Science Publications
C Isham: Lectures on Groups and Vector Spaces for Physicists, World Scientific
E Wigner: Group Theory, Academic Press

94

5CCM241a / 6CCM241b (CM241X) Probability and Statistics II

Lecturer:

Professor PT Saunders

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three lectures and one tutorial per week

Prerequisites:
4CCM141a (CM141A) Probability and Statistics I
Assessment:
One two-hour examination in May
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be handed out weekly and work handed in within a week will be
marked and returned to the student. Solutions will be posted on the web and any
remaining difficulties can be discussed in the tutorial.
Aims and objectives:
This course should make you familiar with the standard techniques of elementary statistics
and, by introducing such fundamental concepts as hypothesis testing, estimation and
analysis of variance, prepare you for further study in both theoretical and practical
statistics.
Syllabus:
Bivariate probability, continuous densities, generating functions. The exponential densities,
including normal, t-, 2 and F. Simple parametric and nonparametric tests. Further topics
include the consistency, efficiency and sufficiency of estimates, maximum likelihood
estimation; the central limit theorem, the Neyman-Pearson lemma and the likelihood ratio
test; regression, analysis of variance.
Books:
Wackerly, Mendenhall & Scheaffer: Mathematical Statistics with Applications (7th edition),
Duxbury. (This text is strongly recommended but it is not compulsory.)
Notes: Not provided, as there are many books that cover the material.

95

5CCM250a (CM2504) Applied Analytic Methods

Lecturer:

Professor E Shargorodsky

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from Kings Maths home page)

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial.
Prerequisites:
4CCM112a (CM112A) Calculus II and 4CCM115a (CM115A) Numbers and Functions.
Assessment:
There will be three class tests during the semester, each counting for 5% of the final
grade, and a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic year, counting for
85% of the final grade.
There will be no duplicate class tests for absentees. Students who miss class tests
without good reason will get zero marks. Students who miss class tests for good reason
(e.g. can supply doctors certificates) will be given an appropriately higher weighting for the
final examination.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out. Solutions handed in will be marked and difficulties
discussed in the tutorials. In addition, it is essential that students work through the theory
as the course progresses.
Aims and objectives:
This module will introduce you to various mathematical problems that can be solved by
analytical means. The goal is to demonstrate in an explicit and non-abstract way the
importance of Analysis and the need to justify formal methods and arguments. The module
prepares you for applying analytical methods to `real world problems.
Syllabus:
About five topics will be selected from the following list: 1) evaluation of integrals from
known results by differentiation under the integral, including some work on improper
integrals; 2) Laplace transforms; 3) solution of ordinary differential equations by power
series; 4) Fourier series possibly used to solve the one-dimensional wave equation; 5)
rudimentary calculus of variations; 6) generating functions; 7) Greens functions for
ordinary differential equations with two point boundary conditions; 8) the Dirichlet problem
in the unit disc; 9) other topics at a similar level.
Books:
The module will be self-contained and there are no required texts. Many books serve to
give further information on the topics covered. A few suggestions are given below.

96

1. W. Ledermann, Integral calculus, Library of Mathematics. London:


Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1964.
2. V.I. Smirnov, A course of higher mathematics. Vol. II: Advanced calculus,
International Series of Monographs in Pure and Applied Mathematics.
Oxford-London-Edinburgh: Pergamon Press, 1964.
3. C.H. Edwards and D.E. Penney, Differential equations and boundary value
problems, Pearson Education, 2004.
4. R.K. Nagle, E.B. Saff, and A.D. Snider, Fundamentals of differential
equations and boundary value problems, Pearson Education, 2004.
5. I.N. Sneddon, Fourier series, Library of Mathematics. London: Routledge
and Kegan Paul, 1961.
6. G.P. Tolstov, Fourier series, New York: Dover Publications, 1976.
7. I.M. Gelfand and S.V. Fomin, Calculus of variations, Mineola, NY: Dover
Publications, 2000.
8. D.I.A. Cohen, Basic techniques of combinatorial theory, New YorkChichester-Brisbane: John Wiley & Sons, 1978.
9. N. Biggs, Discrete mathematics, Oxford Science Publications, New York:
The Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1989.

97

5CCM251a / 6CCM251b (CM251X) Discrete Mathematics

Lecturer:

Mr S Fairthorne

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from Kings Mathematics home page

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
tutorial.

Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one hour

Prerequisites:
Although originally designed for joint-honours Mathematics-Computer
Science students, the module is also suitable for other second year single and third year
joint-honours students. There are no formal prerequisites. Pre-knowledge is minimal - a
little linear algebra helps. Any tools needed will be presented in the course, which can be
taken by Computer Science students who have a reasonable pass in CS1MC1 or CS1FC1
and permission from their Programme Director.
Assessment: The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end
of the academic year.
Assignments:
Weekly problems are set which are for learning not assessment. In
previous years there has been a strong correlation between attempting the weekly
problems and passing / doing well in the exam.
Aims and objectives: To give students an understanding of the nature of an algorithmic
solution to problems, to illustrate the idea by applications to problems in discrete
mathematics and to promote an algorithmic viewpoint in subsequent mathematical work.
Syllabus: Elementary properties of Integers. Functions and their behaviour. Introduction
to Recursion. Algorithms and complexity. Graphs including Eulers Theorem, shortest path
algorithm and vertex colouring. Trees - applications include problem solving and spanning
trees. Directed Graphs including networks. Dynamic programming. Codes and Cyphers with Hamming codes and RSA.
Books. The module was designed as a combination of useful and interesting (hopefully
both) topics and so is not based on any particular book.
Books you may like to look at are (do not buy but use for background reading):
Introduction to Graph Theory, Robin J Wilson
Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, Kenneth H Rosen
Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics, Ralph P Grimaldi
Elementary number theory and its Applications, K H Rosen (for RSA)
Notes: All the problems, solutions and prepared material shown on the OHP (with two
exceptions) will appear on the module web page and can be downloaded. The web page
will be updated weekly and will carry any news or announcements.

98

6CCM318a Fourier Analysis

Lecturer:

Dr. Behrang Noohi

Web page:

via links from Kings Maths home page

Semester:

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week.
Prerequisites:
Both of CM221A and CM321A, or similar analysis courses using normed spaces.
Assessment:
The course will be assessed by a two hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out.
Aims and objectives:
The purpose of the module is to introduce the notions of Fourier series and Fourier
transform and to study their basic properties. The main part of the module will be devoted
to the one dimensional case in order to simplify the definitions and proofs. Many
multidimensional results are obtained in the same manner, and those results may also be
stated. The Fourier technique is important in various fields, in particular, in the theory of
(partial) differential equations. It will be explained how one can solve some integral and
differential equations and study the properties of their solutions using this technique.
Syllabus:
Series expansions. Definition of Fourier series. Related expansions. Bessel's inequality.
Pointwise and uniform convergence of Fourier series. Periodic solutions of differential
equations. The vibrating string. Convolution equations. Mean square convergence.
Schwartz space S. Fourier transform in S. Inverse Fourier transform. Parseval's formula.
Solutions of differential equations with constant coefficients.
Books:
A book covering most of the module is:
H. Dym and P. McKean, Fourier series and integrals, Academic Press, 1972.
Notes: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/~ysafarov/Lectures/Past

99

6CCM320a (CM320X) Topics in Mathematics

This module will consist of four mini-modules of 10-12 hours duration, and will thus
enable students to gain a satisfactory understanding of the key concepts and applications
of a selection of important topics in both pure and applicable mathematics. Students need
only attend any selection of THREE of these four mini-modules.
Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from King's Maths home page)
Semester:

First and Second

Teaching arrangements: Two hours of lectures per week


Assessment:
This is solely by means of a single two-hour examination at the end of the academic year,
consisting of one selection for each of the mini-modules. Each of the four selections will
have equal weight and students may answer questions from any selection of at most three
of the sections.
The mini-modules which will be offered this year are listed below. In each case, there are
few pre-requisites beyond the material which is covered in the relevant core modules from
the first and second year.
Game Theory
Lecturer:

Professor AN Pressley

Prerequisites:

Linear methods

Assignments:

Exercise sheet handed out each week. Solutions will be provided.

Aims and objectives:


The module aims to give an introduction to the theory of two-person zero-sum games. It
should enable you to go on to more advanced topics involving linear programming, as well
as applications in the theory of financial markets and economics.
Syllabus:
Two-person zero sum games, game trees, pure strategies, mixed strategies, optimal
strategies, minimax theorems, Shapley-Snow algorithm.
Books:
Most books are either too advanced or depend on knowledge of other fields such as
economics. I have prepared a set of printed notes to accompany the module which are
available from the departmental office.

100

Markov Chains
Lecturer:

Dr I Prez Castillo

Prerequisites:
4CCM113a (CM113A) Linear methods, 4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I and 4CCM112a
(CM112A) Calculus II, 4CCM141a (CM141A) Probability and Statistics
Assignments:
Problems will be set each week.
Aims and objectives:
The module aims to introduce the basic concepts of finite-state, discrete-time Markov
chains and to illustrate these with applications to a range of problems such as random
walks and simple statistical mechanical models.
Outline Syllabus:
Definition of Markov chains, forward and backward equations, positive matrices, ergodicity,
stationary states, Perron-Frobenius theorem. Random walks with absorbing and reflective
boundaries. Interacting walkers, detailed balance, Boltzmann distributions. Possible
extensions: Reaction-diffusion systems, kinetic constraints.
Books:
G R Grimmett and D R Stirzaker, Probability and Random Processes, OUP, 3rd edition,
2001.
W Feller, An Introduction to Probability Theory and Its Applications, Wiley, 3rd edition,
1968.
Notes:
To be confirmed; skeletal lecture notes may be made available.

Introduction to Information Theory


Lecturer:

Dr R Khn

Prerequisites:
Mainly 4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I, 4CCM112a (CM112A) Calculus II, 4CCM141a
(CM141A) Probability and Statistics
Assignments:
Problem sheets will be made available via the course web page.
Aims and objectives:
The course aims to give an introduction to concepts and methods for quantifying
information, and analysing the transmission of informaion and various forms of information
processing, including coding and data analysis

101

Syllabus:
The concept of information; introduction to Shannon's information theory: definitions and
properties, with proofs, of the main tools for quantifying information, e.g. Shannon entropy,
relative entropy, conditional entropy, differential entropy, mutual information; coding
theory.
Books:
TM Cover and JA Thomas, `Elements of Information Theory', Wiley 1991
Notes:
A set of self-contained lecture notes prepared by ACC Coolen will be available at the
departmental office.

Distribution of Prime Numbers


Lecturer:

Dr DR Solomon

Prerequisites:
4CCM111a Calculus I, 4CCM121a/5CCM121b Introduction to Abstract Algebra
Assignments:
Problem sheets will be handed out each week.
Aims and objectives:
The aim of this module is to discuss several important results about the distribution of
prime numbers, and to give an understanding of some of the techniques used to prove
these results.
Syllabus:
Divisibility theory of the integers, basic distribution issues, the prime number theorem, the
Riemann zeta function, arithmetic functions and Dirichlet series, primes and arithmetic
progressions.
Books:
A set of lecture notes will be available. In addition, the following books may be useful.
D. M. Burton, Elementary Number Theory, McGraw-Hill Education, 5th ed., 2001.
G. H. Hardy and E. M. Wright, An Introduction to the Theory of Numbers, Oxford University
Press, 5th ed., 1980.
G. J. O. Jameson, The prime number theorem, Cambridge University Press, 2003.

102

6CCM321a / 7CCM321b (CM321A) Real Analysis II

Lecturer:

Professor SG Scott

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/~ysafarov/Lectures/CM321A/


(or via links from Kings Maths home page)
Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week and 3-4 informal tutorials during the revision week and
the last week of the term.
Prerequisites:
5CCM221a (CM221A)
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out.
Aims and objectives:
The main aims of the module are:
(i) to extend your knowledge and appreciation of analysis to a wider range of situations
and introduce you to the important concepts that are applicable in these more general
cases;
(ii) to establish the central results on continuity in this more general context;
(iii) to demonstrate some applications of the theory to other parts of mathematics.
Syllabus:
Metrics and norms. Open and closed sets. Continuity. Bounded linear maps. Cauchy
sequences. Completeness. Absolutely convergent series in complete normed spaces.
Contraction mapping theorem. Connectedness and path connectedness. Totally
disconnected metric spaces. Compactness. Compact and sequentially compact sets.
Uniformly continuous functions. Stone--Weierstrass theorem. Integration (rigorous
definition via uniform approximation by step functions). Integrals depending on a
parameter. Picard's existence theorem for first order differential equations.
Books:
The following books contain a substantial portion of the module:
J.C. & H. Burkill, A second course in mathematical analysis
W.A. Light, An introduction to abstract analysis
W.A. Sutherland, Introduction to metric and topological spaces
A. Kolmogorov & S. Fomin, Introductory real analysis
Notes: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/~ysafarov/Lectures/CM321A/

103

6CCM322a / 7CCM322b (CM322C) Complex Analysis

Lecturer:

Professor Y Safarov

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from Kings Maths home page)

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week.
Prerequisites:
5CCM211a (CM211A) and 5CCM221a (CM221A)
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two hour written examination at the end of the academic
year. There will be two class tests during the module, each of which will carry 5% of the
final grade. The dates will be announced in advance. There will be no duplicate class tests
for absentees. Students who miss class tests without good reason will get zero marks.
Students who miss class tests for good reason (e.g. can supply doctors certificates) will
be given an appropriately higher weighting for the final examination.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out. Solutions handed in will be marked. In addition, it is
essential that students work through the theory as the module progresses.
Aims and objectives:
This module will provide a detailed introduction to complex function theory which
interrelates the geometric and analytic aspects. A principal goal is Cauchys famous
integral theorem and its many intriguing consequences.
Syllabus:
Mbius transformations, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex
trigonometric and exponential functions, complex logarithm, contour integration, Cauchys
Theorem, Cauchys Integral Formulae, Taylor series, Identity Theorem, Liouvilles
Theorem, Laurent Expansion, singularities, residues, winding number, Cauchys Residue
Theorem, Argument Principle, Maximum Modulus Principle.
Books:
Books covering most of the course are
I. Stewart & D. Tall, Complex Analysis, Cambridge 1993
J. Bak & D. Newman, Complex Analysis, Springer, 1997
H A Priestley, Introduction to Complex Analysis, OUP 2003

104

6CCM326a / 7CCM326b (CM326Z) Galois Theory

Lecturer:

Professor D J Burns

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from King's Maths home page)

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week plus occasional one-hour tutorials that will be
announced in advance.
Prerequisites:
5CCM222a (CM222A) (or 4CCM113a (CM113A) with some extra preparation) and
4CCM121a (CM121A) (or CM2501 with some extra preparation).
Assessment:
Assessment is by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments: Exercise sheets will be distributed in lectures. Solutions handed in the
following week will be marked and returned. Solution sheets will be handed out. Particular
points will be discussed in the occasional tutorials.
Aims and objectives:
To develop the theory of finite extensions of fields, culminating in an understanding of the
Galois Correspondence. To demonstrate the power of this theory by applying it to the
solution of historically significant questions. For instance: for which polynomials can all the
roots be written as `radical expressions' (i.e. expressions involving the usual operations
of arithmetic together with roots of any degree)? To provide an important tool for further
studies in Algebra e.g. Number Theory.
Syllabus:
Review of the basic theory of rings, polynomials and fields; Eisenstein's Criterion; first
properties of finite extensions of fields and their degrees; algebraicity and transcendence;
field embeddings and automorphisms; normal extensions; separable extensions; the
Galois Correspondence; examples of practical calculation; soluble groups and extensions;
(in)solubility of polynomial equations by radical expressions.
Further topics may include finite fields, constructibility by straightedge and compass, etc.
as time allows.
Books: The two following are highly recommended:
(1) I. Stewart, `Galois Theory ', Chapman and Hall: 2nd ed. 1989, 3rd ed. 2004.
(2) J. Rotman, `Galois Theory ', Universitext, Springer, 2nd ed. 1998.
The course most closely follows the level and order of exposition of the 2nd edition of (1).
(The 3rd, expanded, edition starts at too elementary a level but contains interesting extra
detail). Rotman's book (2) lacks some of the colour and historical detail of (1). On the other
hand, it has useful sections on groups and rings. Further background material on groups
may be found in:
(3) T. Barnard and H. Neill,`Teach Yourself Mathematical Groups', Hodder and Stoughton,
1996.

105

6CCM327a / 7CCM327b (CM327Z) Topology

Lecturer:

Professor AN Pressley

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a weekly tutorial.
Prerequisites:
6CCM321a (CM321A) Real Analysis II, or equivalent. However, this may in some
circumstances be waived if there is a willingness to read up on the material.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed on a two-hour written examination at the end of the
academic year
Assignments:
Exercises are set each week. The solutions to the homework exercises and any other
difficulties will be discussed in the tutorial. It is essential that students work through the
theory and homework sheets as the module progresses.
Aims and objectives:
The aims of the module are to introduce the basic notions of general topology and
algebraic topology. The concepts of homology and/or homotopy will be introduced and
methods developed for computing the resulting topological invariants.
Syllabus:
Topological spaces, compactness and connectedness, quotient and product topologies,
topological groups, homotopy of maps, fundamental groups, covering spaces, homology.
Books:
JR Munkres: Topology (2nd edition), Prentice Hall, 2000
MA Armstrong: Basic Topology, Springer, 1990
DW Blackett: Elementary Topology, Academic Press, 1982
S Carlson: Topology of surfaces, Knots, and Manifolds, Wiley, 2001
ND Gilbert and T Porter: Knots and Surfaces, OUP, 1994
WS Sutherland, Introduction to Metric and Topological Spaces, OUP, 1988

106

6CCM328a (CM328X) Logic

Lecturer:

Professor D Makinson.
Email: d.makinson@lse.ac.uk or david.makinson@gmail.com
Personal webpage: http://sites.google.com/site/davidcmakinson

Web page: http:/ http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


(or via links from Kings Maths home page)
Semester:

Second

Prerequisites: Working knowledge of sets, relations and functions, as well as some


appreciation of mathematical induction.
Aims: To introduce the student to the basic ideas of mathematical logic.
Syllabus: Classical propositional and predicate logic.
Textbooks and reading: David Makinson Sets, Logic and Maths for Computing (Springer,
2008) chapter 8 and 9 and additional notes on the module webpage.
Teaching arrangements: Three hours of lectures each week, plus a one hour tutorial
session to go through homework and exercises together. Tutorials may sometimes also
introduce new lecture material.
Homework: Taken from exercises in the textbook, additional notes or assigned in class.
They are not collected, but are reviewed in the tutorials.
Assessment: By a two-hour final examination at the end of the semester. The
examination follows the standard undergraduate format.
Past exams: Examination papers for 2008-10 are placed on the module webpage. Papers
from years earlier than that are not a good guide, as the content and angle of approach
differ.
Remark: The module is not difficult, but to be successful the student should attend the
lectures and tutorials, read the textbook and additional notes, conscientiously attempt the
exercises, and do any further homework assigned in class.

107

6CCM330a (CM330X) Mathematics Education & Communication

Lecturers:

Mrs MJ Bennett-Rees and Professor FA Rogers

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm330.html
(or via links from the Kings web page)

Semester: Second
Important note: If you wish to take this module then you must inform Stephanie Rice in writing before the end
of September 2010 by sending an email to ug.maths@kcl.ac.uk with the subject "6CCM330A: registration
request". This does not commit you to taking the module. Numbers are limited and selection of eligible
students will be by means of a short interview in early October. You should also decide which alternative
module you will take in case your application to join 6CCM330A is unsuccessful and initially register for this
alternative module. Please DO NOT register for 6CCM330A until you have been selected to take this
module.

Short Description:
This module provides an opportunity for final year students to gain first hand experience of
mathematics education, through a mentoring scheme with mathematics teachers in local
schools. Each student will work with the same class(es) for half a day every week
throughout the Spring Term (Second Semester). Students will be selected for their
commitment and suitability for working in schools and will be given a range of
responsibilities from classroom assistance to self-originated special projects.
Aims:
To help the student gain confidence in communicating their subject and develop strong
organisational and interpersonal skills that will be of benefit to them in employment and in
life. To enable the student to understand how to address the needs of individuals and
devise and develop mathematics projects and teaching methods appropriate to engage
the relevant age group they are working with. To allow the student to act as an
enthusiastic role model for pupils interested in mathematics and to offer them a positive
experience of working with pupils and teachers.
Training and basic skills:
The student will be given an initial introduction to relevant elements of the National
Mathematics Curriculum and its associated terminology. They will receive basic training in
working with children and conduct in the school environment and also will normally be
given a chance to visit the school they will be working in before the start of the module.

108

Classroom observation and assistance:


Initial contact with the teacher and pupils will be as a classroom assistant, watching how
the teacher handles the class, observing the level of mathematics taught and the structure
of the lesson and offering practical support to the teacher.
Teaching assistance:
The teacher will assign the student actual teaching tasks, which will vary according to
specific needs. This could include offering problem-solving coaching to a smaller group of
higher or lower ability pupils or taking the last ten minutes of the lesson for the whole
class. The student will have to demonstrate that the teaching they give is appropriate for
the level of mathematics knowledge and understanding of the pupils they are teaching.
The teacher will offer guidance to the student during their weekly interaction and also
through feedback and liaison with the Departmental Module Coordinator will individually
determine the level of responsibility and special project given to the student.
Special project:
Each student will devise a special project on the basis of his/her own assessment of what
will interest the particular pupils they are working with. The student will have to show that
he/she can analyse a specific teaching problem and devise and prepare appropriately
targeted teaching materials (including plans for coverage of topic items, integrating
structured activities for pupils and possibly basic tests).
Written reports:
Each student will keep a journal of her/his own progress in working in the classroom
environment and will be asked to prepare a written report on the special project he/she has
run, with an assessment of how well it worked and how it might be improved.
Assessment Methods:
o Students end of module report (40%);
o Teachers end of module report including assessment of students planning and
delivery of special projects (40%);
o Students oral presentation (20%).

109

6CCM331a (CM331A) Special Relativity and Electromagnetism

Lecturer:

Dr N Gromov

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures per week (in the first semester); some lectures can be used as
tutorials and question sessions.
Prerequisites:
Linear methods and vector calculus; Newtonian mechanics; elements of groups and
symmetries. An interest for physical applications of mathematics helps.
Assignments:
There will be weekly assignments which all students should complete as far as possible.
Solutions will be distributed the week after.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by an examination in the summer examination period.
Aims and objectives:
The first part of the module aims at understanding electromagnetism, both in its unified
description in terms of Maxwell's equations and at the level of simple phenomena from
electrostatics, magnetostatics and wave propagation. The aim of the second part is to
give an introduction to Einstein's concept of space-time and to discuss Lorentz
transformations and their far-reaching consequences.
Syllabus:
Electric and magnetic fields; charge; Lorentz force.
forms). Electrostatics; magnetostatics; wave equation.

Maxwell's equations (in various

Inertial frames, Newtonian space and time, Galilei transformations. Propagation of light
and principle of relativity. Derivation of Lorentz transformations. Consequences:
simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, etc. Lorentz group; three- and four-vectors
and -tensors.
Relativistic mechanics: energy and momentum, E=mc2. Relativistic
formulation of electrodynamics.
Books, course material:
Typed course notes, problem sheets and past exam papers are available on
the course homepage. In addition, the following textbooks may be useful:
J.D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics
W. Rindler, Essential Relativity
R. Feynman, Lectures on Physics, vols. I and II

110

6CCM332a (CM332C) Introductory Quantum Theory

Lecturer:

Professor FA Rogers

Web Page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


Semester:

First

Teaching Arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, and one of tutorials.
Prerequisites:
Normally 5CCM231a Intermediate Dynamics, 5CCM222a Linear Algebra and 5CCM211a
Partial Differential Equations and Complex Variable.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Aims and Objectives:
This module provides a self-contained introduction to the theory of quantum mechanics,
describing the basic formalism, where states are vectors in an infinite-dimensional space
and observables such as position and momentum are operators on this space, and
considers the dynamics of various simple quantum systems. It is shown how two of the
key features of quantum mechanicsHeisenberg's uncertainty principle and the surprising
discreteness of certain quantitiesflow naturally from the formalism.
Syllabus:
The module starts with a historical account of the problems with classical physics which
led to the development of quantum physics. The remainder of the module includes a
development of the basic formalism of quantum mechanics and its probabilistic
interpretation, examples of simple systems, the particular case of a particle in one
dimension in a variety of potentials, the Dirac delta function, Heisenberg's and
Schrdinger's equations of motion and the relationship between these two approaches, a
derivation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle for two observables which do not commute
and a discussion of symmetry.
Books:
R Shankar: Principles of Quantum Mechanics, Springer (1994)
(paperback ISBN: 0306447908 hardback ISBN 0306447908)
K Hannabuss, An Introduction to Quantum Theory, Oxford University Press (1997)
(hardback ISBN 9780198537946)
Course Materials: Supporting material, tutorial exercises and a past examination paper
will appear on the web page as the module proceeds
.

111

6CCM334a / 7CCM334b (CM334Z) Space-Time Geometry & General Relativity

Lecturer:

Professor N Lambert

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, and there maybe additional tutorials.
Prerequisites:
No formal requirements but students should be familiar with special relativity as in Special
Relativity and Electromagnetism (cm331).
Forbidden Combinations:
It is not possible to take both this course and the Physics department course CP3630,
General Relativity and Cosmology. It is not possible to take this course and the course
7CCMMS38, Advanced General Relativity, in the same year.
Assessment:
The courses will be assessed by a two hour written examination at the end of the
academic year.
Assignments:
During the lectures problems will be given and then discussed the following week.
Complete solutions will be made available. It is crucial that students work through these
problems on their own.
Aims and objectives:
The aim of the course is to show how the concept of a 4-dimensional manifold provides a
model for spacetime and gravity, with the geometric notions of metric and curvature
leading to Einstein's general theory of relativity. The course develops differential geometry
from simple cases and includes tensor calculus and covariant differentiation, as well as
solutions to Einstein's field equations.
Syllabus:
Equivalence principle and special relativity. Basics of Geometry: Tensors, Geodesics,
Connections. Einsteins equations. Schwarzchild solution: bending of light, perihelion shift
of Mercury. Cosmology: FRW, Big Bang and inflation.

Books:
The lecture notes taken during the lectures are the main source and there are many good
books but in particular try:
Hartle, An Introduction to Einsteins General Relativity, Benjamin Cummings, 2003.
Wald, General Relativity, Chicago, 1984
112

6CCM338a (CM338Z) Mathematical Finance II: Continuous Time

Lecturer:

Dr P Emms

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm338.html

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures and a one hour tutorial weekly.
Prerequisites:
6CCM388A (CM388), 4CCM141A (CM141A) essential, 5CCM241A (CM241X) advisable.
Assessment:
One 2 hour examination in May/June.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out regularly. In addition, it is essential that students work
through the theory as the module progresses.
Aims and objectives:
This module aims to introduce students to a number of topics in continuous-time
mathematical finance theory, along with the associated probabilistic background. The
approach will be applied and practical in character, while at the same time mathematically
rigorous.
Syllabus:
Students will receive an introduction to elements of the following topics: Stochastic
processes in continuous time, Brownian motion; Elements of continuous-time martingale
theory; Ito calculus, elementary stochastic differential equations; Absence of arbitrage,
forward prices; Asset pricing in continuous time; Geometric Brownian motion asset model;
Option pricing in continuous time, Black-Scholes-Merton model, PDE methods;
Introduction to continuous-time term structure models
Books:
Lecture notes for the previous combined discrete and continuous time course are
Financial Mathematics: An Introduction to Derivatives Pricing by Hughston & Hunter
(1999). These are available from the Mathematics Department Office.
This module expands on those notes using the course text book Stochastic Calculus for
Finance II: Continuous-Time Models, 2nd Edition, Springer (2008) by S. E. Shreve.
It will be assumed that you are familiar with the material in Stochastic Calculus for
Finance I: The Binomial Asset Pricing Model, 2nd Edition, Springer (2008) by S. E.
Shreve.
Other good books for background reading

113

1. M. W. Baxter and A. J. O. Rennie, Financial Calculus, Cambridge University Press


(1996).
2. J. C. Hull, Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives, Prentice-Hall (Seventh Edition,
2008).
3. R. Jarrow and S. Turnbull, Derivative Securities, Southwestern Press (1999).
4. B. Oksendal, Stochastic Differential Equations, Springer-Verlag (Sixth Edition,
2007).
5. P. Wilmott, Derivatives, Wiley (1998).

114

6CCM350a / 7CCM350b (CM350Z) Rings and Modules

Lecturer:

Dr DR Solomon

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm350.html
(or via links from King's Maths home page)

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures per week plus a 1 hour tutorial every other week.
Prerequisites:
CM121A/4CCM121A/5CCM121B Introduction to Abstract Algebra and
CM222A/5CCM222A/6CCM222B, Linear Algebra. If either has not been taken, the lecturer
must be consulted before registering for the module.
Assessment:
By a 3hr. written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be distributed weekly in lectures. Full solutions will be provided and
particular points discussed in tutorials. Doing the exercises and attending lectures and
tutorials are essential to following the course and so must be considered compulsory.
Aims and objectives:
This is a second module in abstract algebra. It aims to develop the general theory of rings
(especially commutative ones) and then study in some detail a new concept, that of a
module over a ring. Both abelian groups and vector spaces may be viewed as modules
and important structure theorems for both follow from the general theory. The theory of
rings and modules is key to many more advanced algebra courses e.g. Algebraic Number
Theory. It can also help with others, e.g. Galois Theory, Representation Theory and
Algebraic Geometry.
Syllabus:
Basic concepts of ring theory: subrings, ideals, quotient, product, matrix and polynomial
rings; factorisation in integral (euclidean, principal ideal) domains. Basic concepts of
module theory: submodules, quotient modules, direct sums, homomorphisms, finitely
generated, cyclic, free and torsion modules, annihilator ideals. Matrices and finitely
generated modules over a principal ideal domain: Equivalence of matrices, structure
theory of modules, applications to abelian groups and to vector spaces with a linear
transformation.
Books (Rough decreasing order of suitability.):
1) B. Hartley and T.O. Hawkes, `Rings, Modules and Linear Algebra',
Chapman and Hall, 1970.
2) N. Jacobson, `Basic Algebra I', W.H. Freeman and co., 1974
3) M.E. Keating, A first Course in Module Theory, Imperial College Press, 1998.
4) J.A. Beachy, `Introductory lectures on rings and modules', Cambridge University Press,
1999
115

5) J.J. Rotman, `A First Course in Abstract Algebra, With Applications', 3rd edition,
Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006.
6) R.B.J.T. Allenby: `Rings, Fields and Groups: an Introduction to Abstract Algebra', 2nd
edition, Edward Arnold, 1991.
.

116

6CCM351a (CM351A) Representation Theory of Finite Groups

Lecturer:

Dr K. Rietsch

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures per week (in the second semester); some lectures can be used as
tutorials and question sessions.
Prerequisites:
Introduction to Abstract Algebra, Linear Algebra, Groups and Symmetries (or equivalents).
Assignments:
There will be some assignments for practice.
Assessment:
The course will be assessed by an examination in the summer examination period.
Aims and objectives:
The aim of this module is to develop the basic theory of linear representations and
characters of finite groups over the complex numbers.
Syllabus:
The basic definitions and standard properties of linear representations of finite groups over
the complex numbers (in particular Schurs lemma and Maschkes theorem). The relation
between representations and characters, the orthogonality relations and other fundamental
properties of characters and character tables. Application of the above results to
performing explicit calculations for groups of small order.
One of the following more advanced topics will be covered: induction and restriction of
representations and characters, algebraic integers and their applications to characters of
finite groups, or representations over the real numbers
Books, course material:
Walter Ledermann: Introduction to group characters''.
The first half of: J-P. Serre, "Linear representations of finite groups".
James & Liebeck: "Representations and Characters of Groups"

117

6CCM356a (CM356Y) Linear Systems with Control Theory

Lecturer:

Dr DA Lavis

Web page:

www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm356.html

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, one of the weekly lectures will be used in part to discuss

assignments. This module has overlapping material with 6CCM357a and the two modules
are taught concurrently.
Prerequisites:
Undergraduate students taking this module must have taken 4CCM131A Introduction to
Dynamical Systems. (This restriction does not apply to postgraduate students who may
take 6CCM356a as an allowed undergraduate module.)
Assessment:
The module is assessed by a 2 hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Weekly assignments are set.
Aims and objectives:
To develop the theory of the use of Laplace transforms for the solution of linear differential
equations and to apply this knowledge to linear control theory.
Syllabus:
Laplace transforms and Z transforms.
Transfer functions and feedback.
Controllability and observability.
Stability: the Routh-Hurwitz criterion.
Optimal control: Euler-Lagrange equations.
The Hamiltonian-Pontryagin method, bounded control functions and Pontryagin's
principle; bang-bang control, switching curves.
Books:
S. Barnett and R. G. Cameron, Introduction to Mathematical Control Theory, O.U.P. (1985)
and O. L. R. Jacobs, Introduction to Control Theory, O.U.P. (1993) are both useful
references. There are multiple copies of each in the library and they can be bought on
Amazon.

118

6CCM357a (CM357Y) Introduction to Linear Systems with Control Theory

Lecturer:

Dr DA Lavis

Web page:

www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm356.html

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, one of the weekly lectures will be used in part to
discuss assignments. This module has overlapping material with 6CCM356a and the two
modules are taught concurrently.
Prerequisites:
Undergraduate students taking this module must not have taken 4CCM131a Introduction
to Dynamical Systems. (Those who have should take 6CCM356a.) The only
postgraduates permitted to take this module are Graduate Diploma students.
Assessment:
The course is assessed by a 2 hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Weekly assignments are set.
Aims and objectives:
To develop the theory of the use of Laplace transforms for the solution of linear differential
equations and to apply this knowledge to linear control theory.
Syllabus:

Linear differential equations: integrating factors and the D-operator method.

Systems of linear differential equations: autonomous systems, bifurcations and the


stability of equilibrium points.

Linearization of non-linear systems.

Laplace transforms and Z transforms.

Transfer functions and feedback.

Controllability and observability.

Stability: the Routh-Hurwitz criterion.

Optimal control: Euler-Lagrange equations.


Books:
S. Barnett and R. G. Cameron, Introduction to Mathematical Control Theory, O.U.P. (1985)
and O. L. R. Jacobs, Introduction to Control Theory, O.U.P. (1993) are both useful
references. There are multiple copies of each in the library and they can be bought on
Amazon.

119

6CCM359a (CM359X) Numerical Methods

Lecturer:

Dr I Prez Castillo

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from Kings Maths home page)

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week and one hour tutorials. In each of the first two weeks
there will also be a one-hour computer laboratory session.
Prerequisites:
Basic theory of polynomials, linear equations and matrices, calculus, intermediate value
theorem, mean value theorem, Taylors theorem with remainder. First year course in
Maple. (No previous knowledge of Excel is assumed.)
Assessment:
One 45-minute practical (computer based) Excel test near the end of the semester, which
counts for 20% of the final mark. Moreover, up to 10% of the final mark can be achieved
by volunteering during tutorials. The remaining 70-80% of the marks are assessed by a
two-hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be handed out weekly. For the first two weeks, homework must be
submitted electronically (as email attachment). After that, work will not be collected, but
solutions to exercises will be discussed during tutorials. Exercise sheets will be placed on
the web page, as the module proceeds.
Aims and objectives:
To learn the theory and practice of numerical problem solving; to learn to use Excel
spreadsheets, and Maple.
Syllabus:
Solution of non-linear equations. Approximation of functions by polynomials. Numerical
differentiation and integration. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, and
systems of linear equations. Rates of convergence, and errors. The algorithms developed
will be implemented in Excel spreadsheets or in Maple.
Books:
R Burden & J Faires, Numerical Methods (3ed), Brooks-Cole 2003
D Kincaid & W Cheney, Numerical Analysis (3ed), Brooks-Cole 2002
R Burden & J Faires, Numerical Analysis (8ed), Brooks-Cole 2005
E Joseph Billo, Excel for Scientists and Engineers: Numerical Methods, Wiley 2007

120

6CCM360a (CM360X) History and Development of Mathematics

Lecturer:

Dr L Hodgkin

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
2 hours of lectures per week.
Prerequisites:
None.
Assessment:
One assessed essay, 2000-2500 words (25% of credit). Two hour written examination
(75% of credit).
Assignments:
Beyond the assessed essay, there are no set assignments.
Aims and Objectives:
This course aims to make you familiar with the broad outlines of the history of
mathematics; to show how to interpret past mathematical writings, and how to construct a
historical argument.
Syllabus:
Ancient mathematics; the Greeks; the Islamic world; medieval and Renaissance
mathematics; the scientific revolution; the invention of the calculus; non-euclidean
geometry; the rigorous approach and problems of foundations; the twentieth century.
Books:
The History of Mathematics --- A Reader, eds J Fauvel and J Gray, (Open University,
1987) (basic reference text, choice of readings)
plus a choice of the following surveys:
A History of Mathematics --- An Introduction, V J Katz (Addison-Wesley, 1998)
A Concise History of Mathematics, D Struik (Dover, 1987)
The History of Mathematics --- An Introduction, D M Burton (McGraw Hill, 1997)
The Fontana History of the Mathematical Sciences, I Grattan-Guinness (Fontana 1997)
A History of Mathematics, C Boyer and U Merzbach (Wiley, 1989)
A Contextual History of Mathematics, R Calinger (Prentice-Hall, 1999)
There will also be notes for the course on sale at the beginning of the semester.

121

6CCM380a (CM380a) Topics in Applied Probability Theory

This module will consist of four mini-modules of 10-12 hours duration, and will thus enable
students to gain a satisfactory understanding of the key concepts and applications of a
selection of important topics in both pure and applicable mathematics. Students need only
attend any selection of THREE of these four mini-modules.
Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm380.html
(or via links from King's Maths home page)
Semester:

First and Second

Teaching arrangements: Two hours of lectures per week


Assessment:
This is solely by means of a single two-hour examination at the end of the academic year,
consisting of one selection for each of the mini-modules. Each of the four selections will
have equal weight and students may answer questions from any selection of at most three
of the sections.
The mini-modules which will be offered this year are listed below. In each case, there are
few pre-requisites beyond the material which is covered in the relevant core modules from
the first and second year.
Game Theory
Lecturer:

Professor AN Pressley

Prerequisites:

Linear methods

Assignments:

Exercise sheet handed out each week. Solutions will be provided.

Aims and objectives:


The module aims to give an introduction to the theory of two-person zero-sum games. It
should enable you to go on to more advanced topics involving linear programming, as well
as applications in the theory of financial markets and economics.
Syllabus:
Two-person zero sum games, game trees, pure strategies, mixed strategies, optimal
strategies, minimax theorems, Shapley-Snow algorithm.
Books:
Most books are either too advanced or depend on knowledge of other fields such as
economics. I have prepared a set of printed notes to accompany the module which are
available from the departmental office.

122

Markov Chains
Lecturer:

Dr I Prez Castillo

Prerequisites:
4CCM113a (CM113A) Linear methods, 4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I and 4CCM112a
(CM112A) Calculus II, 4CCM141a (CM141A) Probability and Statistics
Assignments:
Problems will be set each week.
Aims and objectives:
The module aims to introduce the basic concepts of finite-state, discrete-time Markov
chains and to illustrate these with applications to a range of problems such as random
walks and simple statistical mechanical models.
Outline Syllabus:
Definition of Markov chains, forward and backward equations, positive matrices, ergodicity,
stationary states, Perron-Frobenius theorem. Random walks with absorbing and reflective
boundaries. Interacting walkers, detailed balance, Boltzmann distributions. Possible
extensions: Reaction-diffusion systems, kinetic constraints.
Books:
G R Grimmett and D R Stirzaker, Probability and Random Processes, OUP, 3rd edition,
2001.
W Feller, An Introduction to Probability Theory and Its Applications, Wiley, 3rd edition,
1968.
Notes:
To be confirmed; skeletal lecture notes may be made available.

Introduction to Information Theory


Lecturer:

Dr R Khn

Prerequisites:
Mainly 4CCM111a (CM111A) Calculus I, 4CCM112a (CM112A) Calculus II, 4CCM141a
(CM141A) Probability and Statistics
Assignments:
Problem sheets will be made available via the course web page.
Aims and objectives:
The course aims to give an introduction to concepts and methods for quantifying
information, and analysing the transmission of informaion and various forms of information
processing, including coding and data analysis
123

Syllabus:
The concept of information; introduction to Shannon's information theory: definitions and
properties, with proofs, of the main tools for quantifying information, e.g. Shannon entropy,
relative entropy, conditional entropy, differential entropy, mutual information; coding
theory.
Books:
TM Cover and JA Thomas, `Elements of Information Theory', Wiley 1991
Notes:
A set of self-contained lecture notes prepared by ACC Coolen will be available at the
departmental office.

Time Series
Lecturer: Dr E Katzav
Prerequisites:
Calculus 1 (4CCM112a), Linear Methods (4CCM113a), Probability and Statistics 1
(4CCM141a/5CCM141b), Probability and Statistics 2 (5CCM241a/6CCM214b)
Assignments:
Problem Sheets will be made available via the module webpage.
Aim and objectives:
The module aims at giving the students a basic understanding of the methods and
mathematical theory of time series.
Syllabus:
Stationary processes, auto-correlation and autocovariance functions; Moving Average
(MA) processes, Auto-Regressive (AR) processes and Auto-Regressive/Moving Average
(ARMA) processes; correlogram; spectral analysis, periodogram; elements of estimation
and forecasting and applications to empirical data.
Books:
Hamilton, J.D., (1994). Time Series Analysis. Princeton.
Falk N., (2006) Time Series Analysis - Examples with SAS, University of Wurzburg.

124

6CCM388a (CM388Z) Mathematical Finance I: Discrete Time

Lecturer:

Dr C Buescu

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cm388.html

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures per week. One further hour will be used for lecture or tutorial as
required.
Prerequisites:
Probability and Statistics I (or equivalent) 4CCM141A(CM141A)
Assessment:
One 2-hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be posted on the module webpage.
Aims and objective:
This module aims to model the evolution of asset prices using the methodology of noarbitrage in complete markets. The binomial asset pricing model will be the
(mathematically easy!) vehicle used to introduce (profound!) financial concepts and
necessary probability notions. This facilitates an intuitive understanding of terminology,
preparing the student for the continuous-time equivalent, as well as providing a powerful
practical tool.
Syllabus:
Asset price in discrete time, random walks, conditional expectation, elements of discretetime martingale theory, the binomial asset pricing model, option pricing in discrete time,
and -time permitting- discrete time term structure models and/or discrete time portfolio
theory.
Books:
The material covered will be similar to that in the book (although extra material might
replace some portions):
Steven E. Shreve: Stochastic Calculus for Finance I: The Binomial Asset Pricing Model,
(Springer Finance)

125

6CCMCS02 / 7CCMCS02 Theory of Complex Networks

Lecturer:

Dr. J. van Baardewijk

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses-10-11/cmcs02.html


Semester: First

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week.
Prerequisites:
Good knowledge of probability concepts, multivariate calculus and linear algebra.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignments:
Problems will be handed out regularly. The students are expected to attempt solving these
problems. The problems are regarded as examinable material.
Aim of the course:
Present the basic concepts of the theory of complex networks.
Introduce various techniques which should enable the student to partake in active
research in the field.
Syllabus:
Concepts of local- and global measures of network structure. Adjacency matrix, vertex
degree, clustering coefficient, degree distributions, degree correlations. Example networks.
Eigenvalue spectra, Laplacian. Spectra of random matrices. Random graph ensembles.
Complexity and entropy. Generating function methods. Giant components. Percolation.
Path length characteristics. Evolving networks, preferential attachment, scale-free
networks. Derivation of power-laws.
Books:
M.E.J. Newman, A.L. Barabasi, D. Watts, The Structure and Dynamics of Networks,
Princeton University Press (2006).
S.N. Dorogovtsev, J.F.F. Mendes, Evolution of Networks, Oxford University Press
(2003).
S.Bornholdt, H.G. Schuster, Handbook of Graphs and Networks, from the Genome to the
Internet, Wiley (2003)
R. Pastor Satorras, M.Rubi, A.Diaz-Guilera, Statistical Mechanics of Complex Networks,
Cambridge University Press (2004).
Course notes:
Follow as lectures progress.

126

6CCMCS05 / 7CCMCS05 Mathematical Biology

Lecturer:

Dr E Katzav

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cmcs05.html


(or via links from Kings Maths home page)
Semester:

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week.
Prerequisites:
Some background in Ordinary Differential Equations and Probability Theory is required,
e.g. 4CCM131A and 4CCM141A.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out.
Aims and objectives:
Mathematical biology is a very active and fast growing interdisciplinary area in which
mathematical concepts, techniques, and models are applied to a variety of problems in
developmental biology and biomedical sciences. Many biological processes can be
quantitatively characterized by differential equations. This course introduces students to a
variety of models mainly based on ordinary differential equations and techniques for
analyzing these models. Mathematical concepts on nonlinear dynamics and chaos will be
introduced. Population models (predator-prey, competition), epidemic models and reaction
enzyme kinetics will be discussed. Some probabilistic modelling of molecular evolution will
also be introduced.
No previous knowledge of biology is necessary.

Syllabus:
Continuous population models for single species; Discrete population models for single
species; Continuous population models for interacting species; Modelling infectious
disease transmission/spread using ODEs; Reaction kinetics; Introduction to DNA and
modelling of molecular evolution

Books:
The following book contains a substantial portion of the module:
J.D. Murray, Mathematical Biology, Vol I, 3rd Edition, Springer, 2002.

127

7CCMMS01 (CM424Z) Lie Groups and Lie Algebras

Lecturer:

Dr B Doyon

Web page:

See http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures per week.
Prerequisites:
Basic knowledge of vector spaces, matrices, groups, real analysis.
Assessment:
One two-hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments:
Exercises taken from the main notes and books. Solutions will be provided (see above).
Aims and objectives:
This course gives an introduction to the theory of Lie groups, Lie algebras and their
representations. Lie groups are essentially groups with continuous parameters, in such a
way that the elements form a manifold. They arise in many parts of mathematics and
physics, often in the form of matrices satisfying certain conditions (e.g. that the matrices
should be invertible, or unitary, or orthogonal). One of the beauties of the subject is the
way that methods from many different areas of mathematics (algebra, geometry, analysis)
are all brought in together. The course should enable you to go on to further topics in
group theory, differential geometry, quantum field theory, string theory and other areas.
Syllabus:
Definitions of the basic structures: Lie algebras and Lie groups. Examples of Lie groups
and Lie algebras. Matrix Lie groups, their Lie algebras, the exponential map, BakerCampbell-Hausdorff formula. Abstract Lie algebras, examples: sl(2), sl(3) (maybe),
Poincare algebra. Representations of Lie algebras, sub-representations, Schur's Lemma,
tensor products. Cartan-Weyl basis, classification of simple Lie algebras (without proof).
Books:
There is no book that covers all the material exactly as taught, but the following will be
useful:
1. BC Hall: An Elementary Introduction to Groups and Representations. arxiv:mathph/0005032v1
(see also BC Hall: Lie Groups, Lie Algebras and Representations: An Elementary
Introduction. Springer 2003)
2. JE Humphreys: Introduction to Lie Algebras and Representation Theory. Springer 1972
3. ML Curtis: Matrix Lie Groups. Springer 1984
4. R Gilmore: Lie groups, Lie algebras and some of their applications. Krieger 1994

128

7CCMMS03 (CM422Z) Algebraic Number Theory

Lecturer:

Professor FI Diamond

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cmms03.html


(or via links from King's Maths home page)
Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements: 2 hours of lectures per week. 1 further hour will be used for
lecture or tutorial as required.
Prerequisites: Normally students should have taken Rings and Modules
(CM350A/6CCM350A/7CCM350B) and be familiar with the elementary theory of field
extensions (degree, minimal polynomials and algebraicity, embeddings eg as contained in
the early part of the syllabus for Galois Theory (CM326Z/6CCM326A/7CCM326B)). If
either condition is not met, the lecturer must be consulted before registering for the
course.
Assessment: By a 3 hour written examination at the end of the academic year.
Assignments: Exercise sheets will be distributed weekly in lectures. Full solutions will be
provided. Doing the exercises and attending lectures and tutorials are essential to
following the course. For this reason they are compulsory.
Aims and objectives: To give a thorough understanding of the `arithmetic' of number
fields (finite extensions of Q) and their rings of integers, making use of abstract algebra.
We shall note the analogies and differences between this arithmetic and that of Q and Z
(e.g. unique factorisation may not hold). This motivates the study of ideals of the ring of
integers, the class group and units. Concrete examples will illustrate the theory. This
course provides a foundation for studies in modern (algebraic) number theory and is an
esssential ingredient of some other areas of algebra and arithmetic geometry.
Syllabus: Polynomials and field extensions (brief reminders and terminology). Number
fields. Norm, trace and characteristic polynomial. The ring of integers, integral bases,
discriminant. Quadratic fields. Cyclotomic fields. Non-unique factorisation of elements,
ideals, unique factorisation of ideals, norms of ideals, class group. Lattices, Minkowski's
Theorem, computation of the class group. Extra topics (as time allows): Applications to
Diophantine equations, Units, Dirichlet's Unit Theorem.
Books (Rough decreasing order of suitability. All are good and recommended):
1. Ian Stewart and David Tall, `Algebraic Number Theory and Fermat's Last Theorem', 3rd
ed., AK Peters, 2001
2. Richard Mollin, `Algebraic Number Theory', Chapman and Hall, 1999
3. Daniel Marcus, `Number Fields' (3rd, corrected reprint) Springer-Verlag, 1995.
4. Pierre Samuel, `Algebraic Theory of Numbers', Hermann, 1970.
5. Jurgen Neukirch, `Algebraic Number Theory', Springer-Verlag, 1999.

129

7CCMMS08 (CM414Z) Operator Theory

Lecturer:

Professor E Shargorodsky

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/cmms08/414Z.htm


(or via links from Kings Maths home page)
Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements: Two hours of lectures each week, together with a half hour
informal tutorial.
Prerequisites: 6CCM321a (CM321A) and 5CCM222a (CM222A) or equivalents (that is, a
course in analysis using normed spaces and a course in linear algebra).
Assessment: The module will be assessed by a two hour written examination at the end
of the academic year.
Assignments: Exercise sheets will be given out. Solutions handed in will be marked and
difficulties discussed in class. In addition, it is essential that students work through the
theory as the module progresses.
Aims and objectives: This module will introduce you to the terminology, notation and the
basic results and concepts of Banach and Hilbert spaces. The goal is to establish one
major theoretical result (the spectral theorem for compact self-adjoint operators) and
demonstrate some applications. The relation of the subject with other branches of
mathematics (Fourier analysis, complex functions, differential equations) will be indicated.
This course should prepare you for reading the literature of a wide variety of subjects in
which Hilbert space ideas are used.
Syllabus: Elementary properties of Hilbert and Banach spaces. Orthonormal bases.
Fourier expansions. Riesz representation theorem. The adjoint. Orthogonal projections.
Spectral theory of bounded linear operators. The spectral theorem for compact self-adjoint
operators. Applications to differential and integral equations. Further topics as time
permits chosen from: the spectral theorem for bounded selfadjoint operators; comments
on unbounded operators and applications; Fredholm operators.
Books: The module will be self-contained so there are no required texts but the following
books are suitable:
1. E. Kreyszig, Introductory Functional Analysis with Applications. Wiley.
2. B. Bollobas, Linear Analysis. Cambridge University Press.
3. H.G. Heuser, Functional Analysis. Wiley.
4. A.N. Kolmogorov and S.V. Fomin, Elements of the Theory of Functions and Functional
Analysis. Vol. 1 Graylock, Vol. 2 Academic Press.
Supplementary book list:
5. W. Rudin, Functional Analysis. Mc Graw-Hill Book Company.
6. M. Schechter, Principles of Functional Analysis. Academic Press.
7. G.K. Pedersen, Analysis Now. Springer-Verlag.

130

7CCMMS11 (CM418Z) Fourier Analysis

Lecturer:

Dr B Noohi

Web page: via links from Kings Maths home page


Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week.
Prerequisites:
Both CM221A and CM321A, or similar analysis courses using normed spaces.
Assessment: The course will be assessed by a two hour written examination at the end of
the academic year. The course will involve supplementary reading on Sobolev spaces and
distributions in one and higher dimensions. This will make up 15% of the final exam mark.
Assignments:
Exercise sheets will be given out.
Aims and objectives:
The purpose of the module is to introduce the notions of Fourier series and Fourier
transform and to study their basic properties. The main part of the module will be devoted
to the one dimensional case in order to simplify the definitions and proofs. Many
multidimensional results are obtained in the same manner, and those results may also be
stated. The Fourier technique is important in various fields, in particular, in the theory of
(partial) differential equations. It will be explained how one can solve some integral and
differential equations and study the properties of their solutions using this technique.
Syllabus:
Series expansions. Definition of Fourier series. Related expansions. Bessel's inequality.
Pointwise and uniform convergence of Fourier series. Periodic solutions of differential
equations. The vibrating string. Convolution equations. Mean square convergence.
Schwartz space S. Fourier transform in S. Inverse Fourier transform. Parseval's formula.
Solutions of differential equations with constant coefficients.
Books:
A book covering most of the module is:
H. Dym and P. McKean, Fourier series and integrals, Academic Press, 1972.
Notes: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/~ysafarov/Lectures/Past

131

7CCMMS18 (CM437Z) Manifolds


__________________________________________________________________________________

Lecturer:

Dr PP Cook

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements: Two hours of lectures per week


Prerequisites: Ideally 5CCM211a (CM211A), 6CCM321a (CM321A), 5CCM222a
(CM222A) and 6CCM327a (CM327Z), but knowledge of multivariable calculus and basic
linear algebra, together with a willingness to read up some topology and any other missing
background, should be sufficient.
Assessment: There will be a 2 hour written examination at the end of the academic year
Assignments: Exercises will be set as the module proceeds.
Aims and objectives: The module aims to provide an introduction to differential geometry
and topology, both for students whose interests are in pure mathematics and for those
who are studying theoretical physics and other areas of applied mathematics. The basic
objects of study are manifolds, which allow one to translate familiar ideas from vector
calculus to curved space. Applications to topology and theoretical physics will be
discussed as time allows.
Syllabus: Definition and examples of topological spaces and manifolds; functions between
manifolds; the tangent space; the tangent bundle; vector fields; Lie derivatives; tensor
fields; affine connections; torsion; curvature; covariant derivatives; parallel transport;
manifolds with metrics; the Levi-Civita connection; differential forms; exterior calculus and
integration on manifolds. If time permits additional topics such as de Rham cohomology
and fibre bundles will be discussed.
Books: No one book will be followed. Here is a selection, in no particular order, which
might be useful.
S.S. Chern, W.H.Chen & K.S.Lam: Lectures on Differential Geometry, World Scientific,
1999.
C. Isham: Modern Differential Geometry for Physicists. World Scientific, 1989.
I. Madsen, J. Tornehave: From Calculus to Cohomology, CUP, 1997.
S.Kobayashi, K.Nomizu: Foundations of Differential Geometry, Vol. I, Wiley, 1963.
M.Nakhara: Geometry, Topology and Physic, IOP, 1990.
M. Crampin & F.A.E. Pirani: Applicable Differential Geometry, Cambridge, 1986.
M.Spivak: A Comprehensive Introduction to Differential Geometry, Berkeley, 1979.

132

7CCMMS19 (CMMS29) Modular Forms

This module has been suspended for 2010/11

133

7CCMMS20 Algebraic Geometry


Lecturer:

Dr D Panov

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/
(or via links from the Kings web page)

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Three hours of lectures each week, together with a one-hour tutorial.
Aims and objectives:
The aim of this module is to introduce the basic notions of algebraic geometry including
algebraic varieties and algebraic maps between them. Along the way, students will
encounter many examples and will see how theorems in algebra can be used to prove
geometric results about algebraic varieties.

Brief outline of syllabus:


Affine and projective algebraic varieties, the Hilbert Nullstellensatz, the Hilbert basis
theorem, the Zariski topology, rational/algebraic maps between algebraic varieties, the
dimension of an algebraic variety, tangent spaces, singularities, the blowing up of the
plane at a point.
Assessment:
The full 100% of the mark is based on a two-hour written examination at the end of the
academic year.
Assignments:
Five exercise sheets will be handed out during the term and solutions will be posted on the
module webpage.

Books:
Algebraic Geometry: A First Course (by J. Harris)
Undergraduate Algebraic Geometry (by M. Reid)
Algebraic Geometry (only chapter I) (by R. Hartshorne)

134

7CCMMS31 (CM436Z) Quantum Mechanics II

Lecturer:

Dr N Gromov

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/


Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Two or three hours of lectures per week; some lectures can be used as tutorials and
question sessions.
Prerequisites:
Introductory quantum theory (as offered by the Maths or the Physics Department), some
understanding of special relativity, groups and symmetries, and of Newtonian mechanics.
Assignments:
There will be weekly assignments which all students should complete as far as possible.
Solutions will be distributed the week after.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by an examination in the summer examination period.
Aims and objectives:
The module deals with selected chapters from quantum mechanics, building upon the
notions introduced in introductory courses on quantum theory. Apart from discussing
fundamental examples like the hydrogen atom and new phenomena like spin, the module
also provides concepts and mathematical tools useful in more advanced areas like
quantum field theory.
Syllabus:
Main topics will include bound states of the Hydrogen atom; angular momentum, spin,
representations of SU(2); symmetries in quantum mechanics; relativistic quantum
mechanics (Dirac equation); perturbative methods.
Additional topics may include
scattering states in central force problems; Feynman path integrals.
Books, course material:
Copies of lecture notes will be distributed to the students, along with problem sheets and
solutions. Useful books are:
B.H. Bransden, C.J. Joachain, Quantum Mechanics
L.I. Schiff, Quantum Mechanics
E. Merzbacher, Quantum Mechanics
K. Hannabuss, An Introduction to Quantum Theory
R. Feynman, Lectures on Physics, vol. III

135

7CCMMS32 (CM438Z) Quantum Field Theory

Lecturer:

Dr D Martelli

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses/

Semester:

First

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours a week. There are no tutorials for this course.
Prerequisites:
Classical mechanics, basic quantum mechanics, basic special relativity. Some familiarity
with linear algebra and calculus.
Assessment:
The course will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignment:
Homework will be assigned during the course. Difficulties with the material will be
explained.
Aims and objectives:
To provide basic foundational material in quantum field theory.
Syllabus:
Relativistic quantum mechanics: Klein-Gordon equation; Dirac equation. Classical field
theory: Lagrangian; Hamiltonian; Noether theorems; Energy momentum tensor. Free field
theory: Quantisation of scalar field; Fock spaces; Normal ordering; Time ordering;
Feynman propagator. Interactions: perturbation; Wicks Theorem; Feynman diagrams;
regularization; renormalization.
Books:
It will be helpful to read parts of the following texts:
M. Maggiore, A Modern Introduction to Quantum Field Theory, Oxford University Press
M. E. Peskin and D.V. Schroeder, An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory, Westview
Press
C. Itzykson and J.-B. Zuber, Quantum Field Theory, McGraw-Hill
S. Weinberg, The Quantum Theory of Fields, Vol 1, Cambridge University Press

136

7CCMMS34 (CM435Z) String Theory and Branes

Lecturer:

Professor PC West

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses


Semester:

Second

Teaching Arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week
Prerequisites:
The module assumes that the students have an understanding of special relativity and
quantum field theory. In addition the student should be familiar with General Relativity.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two-hour written examination at the end of the academic
year.
Assignments:
During the lectures problems will be given and complete solutions will be made available. It
is crucial that students work through these problems on their own.
Aims and Objectives:
The main aim of the module is to give a first introduction to string theory which can be
used as a basis for undertaking research in this and related subjects.
Syllabus:
Classical and quantum dynamics of the point particle, classical and quantum dynamics of
strings, brane dynamics including D-branes and more advanced topics. .
Reading List:
The lecture notes taken during the lectures are the main source. However, some of the
material is covered in:
Green, Schwarz and Witten: String Theory 1, Cambridge University Press.
B. Zwiebach: A First Course in String Theory, Cambridge University Press.
Becker, Becker and Schwarz, String Theory and M-Theory, Cambridge University Press.
E. Kiritsis, String theory in a Nutshell, Princeton University Press.

137

7CCMMS38 (CM433Z) Advanced General Relativity

Lecturer:

Professor PC West

Web page: http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses


Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week
Prerequisites:
Students should be familiar with Special Relativity, Classical Lagrangian mechanics and
had some previous introduction to General Relativity. Students with no previous exposure
to General Relativity should take Spacetime Geometry and General Relativity
(7CCMMS334b/CM334Z). Note that both modules cannot be taken in the same year.
Assessment:
The module will be assessed by a two hour written examination in May/June.
Assignments:
During the lectures problems will be given and complete solutions will be made available. It
is crucial that students work through these problems on their own.
Aims and objectives:
This module provides an account of General Relativity aimed so that a student can follow
current research in this as well as related areas of theoretical physics.
Syllabus:
Review of manifolds and their tensor fields; metrics, the Riemann and Ricci tensors,
covariant derivatives and geodesics. Einstein's field equations and Lagrangian formulation.
Black holes including their causal structure and more advanced topics.
Reading List:
The lecture notes taken during the lectures are the main source. There are many good
books on General Relativity and in particular try
D'Inverno, Introducing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, Clarendon Press.
Hawking and Ellis, The Large Scale Structure of Space-time, C.U.P.
S. Weinberg, Graviation and Cosmology, Wiley.
Adler, Bazin, and Schiffer, Introduction to General Relativity,McGraw-Hill,
R. Wald, General Relativity, University of Chicago Press.

138

7CCMMS41 Supersymmetry and Gauge Theory

Lecturer:

Professor N Lambert

Web page:

http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/courses

Semester:

Second

Teaching arrangements:
Two hours of lectures each week
Prerequisites:
No formal requirements but students should be familiar with quantum field theory, special
relativity as well as an elementary knowledge of Lie algebras.
Assessment:
The courses will be assessed by a two hour written examination at the end of the
academic year.
Assignments:
During the lectures problems will be given and complete solutions will be made available. It
is crucial that students work through these problems on their own.
Aims and objectives:
This course aims to provide an introduction to two of the most important concepts in
modern theoretical particle physics; gauge theory, which forms the basis of the Standard
Model, and supersymmetry. While gauge theory is known to play a central role in Nature,
supersymmetry has not yet been observed but nevertheless forms a central pillar in
modern theoretical physics.
Syllabus:
Maxwells equations as a gauge theory. Yang-Mills theories. Supersymmetry. Vacuum
moduli spaces, extended supersymmertry and BPS monopoles.
Books:
The lecture notes taken during the lectures are the main source but see also
D. Bailin and A. Love: Supersymmetric Gauge Field Theory and String Theory, Taylor and
Francis.
L. Ryder: Quantum Field Theory, Cambridge University Press
P. West: Introduction to Supersymmetry, World Scientific
P. Freund, Introduction to Supersymmetry, Cambridge University Press

139

Projects
The BSc Project Option 6CCM345a (CM345C)
Third year BSc students may elect to do a project. The topic must be of a generally
mathematical nature and the project must be supervised by a member of staff. Students
are advised to discuss this option and obtain the agreement of a member of staff to act as
supervisor before the beginning of their third year. A project title, outline and supervision
plan must be agreed with the supervisor and a form submitted, signed by the supervisor,
to Dr N Gromov by Monday 11 October 2010. Registration is not complete until this has
been done.
The results of the project must be submitted, as a dissertation of 5,000-10,000 words, to
the project supervisor by 16.00 on Wednesday 23 March 2011. Two copies are required.
The dissertation will be examined by the project supervisor and a second examiner, the
latter to be appointed by the Chair of the Board. The two examiners will also conduct an
oral examination of the candidate.
A rough guide to the general areas in which members of staff may be willing and available
to supervise projects in 2010/2011 is as follows:
Algebra / Number Theory
DJ Burns, FI Diamond, PL Kassaei
Analysis / Differential Equations
AB Pushnitski, Y Safarov, E Shargorodsky.
Geometric Analysis
SG Scott
Geometry
D Panov, AN Pressley, K Rietsch, G Tinaglia
Disordered Systems and Neural Networks
A Annibale, E Katzav, I Prez Castillo, PK Sollich.
A list of the possible projects will be published on the module page. Students should feel
free to approach members of staff with topics from other areas. A document Information
for Students on the Project Option is available from the module web page giving further
details.

The MSci Project 7CCM461a (CM461C)


All fourth year MSci students are required to complete a project on a mathematical topic.
This involves writing a report of between 5,000 and 10,000 words, and giving a 20 minute
seminar to staff and fellow students. The project counts as a full unit, which makes it a
very important part of the final year. Each student will have a supervisor; the supervisors
task is to advise, not to direct the project, but students should feel free to consult as
necessary, and in particular are advised to show the supervisor a draft of the report at an
early stage. The choice of supervisor is by agreement between the student and the
member of staff. A list of the possible projects will be published on the module page.

140

At registration in the Department, each fourth year student will be given a form on which to
state the topic and provisional title of his or her project. This must be signed by the
supervisor and returned to Dr N Gromov by Monday 11 October 2010. Registration is
not complete until this has been done.
There will be informal seminars during the revision period at the beginning of the second
semester. While it is not expected that the projects will be near completion at that point,
students should be able to give at least an account of the background and an indication of
what they hope to accomplish. The deadline for submission of projects is 16.00
Wednesday 23 March 2011.

141

With Management programmes


The information provided below is for students on the following programmes:

BSc Computer Science with Management (with a year abroad/in industry)


BEng/MEng Engineering with Business Management (with a year in industry)
BSc Maths with Management & Finance
BA French with Management

Modules
Semester 1

4CCYM129 - Organisational Behaviour


5CCYM212 - Marketing
6CCYM325 - Business strategy & Operations Management
Semester 2

4CCYM110 - Economics
5CCYM210 - Accounting
6CCYM339 - Human Resource Management
Please note that these modules are not run by your department nor by the Management
Department, therefore if you have any queries regarding the above modules please use
the contact details listed below.
Timetables
Information regarding the timetables for all with management modules can be found on
line at www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/nms/current/ug/management. Any changes that are made
to the timetable and any revision lectures will be listed on this web page.
E-learning
For most modules you will find lecture notes and aids via the Colleges e-learning system
(www.kcl.ac.uk/elk). You will be asked to submit your coursework via this system and any
class changes and important information related to your management modules will be
posted here. It is your responsibility to make sure you have access to the correct modules
and that you check it regularly for any announcements.
Attendance
Attendance at lectures and tutorials is compulsory and is monitored. You will be sent
warnings if your attendance is unsatisfactory and you may not be permitted to sit the
examination. Regular attendance is essential if you are to keep abreast of the material
being taught.

142

Submission of Coursework
You will be informed by your lecturer of the time and place to submit your coursework.
Unless specifically told otherwise, you should submit coursework online via the
Kings e-learning service by 17:00 on the day of the deadline. Please ensure you
have access to the correct modules and assignments in e-learning well before the
deadline (www.kcl.ac.uk/elk)
If you need to request an extension to a coursework deadline you must follow the
procedure outlined under Mitigation, Extension requests & EDR2 Requests in your School
handbook. Please read the information given carefully before submitting an Extension
Request Form, which should be handed in to your department.
If you miss the deadline then you will no longer have access to submit the coursework
online and must follow the procedure outlined under Mitigation, Extension requests &
EDR2 Requests in your School handbook. Any work submitted after the deadline MUST
be accompanied by a Mitigating Circumstances Form, and handed in to Lucy Ward (see
contact details below). Coursework should not be submitted directly to the lecturer in a
lecture, tutorial or at any other time, unless they have requested this in addition to the
online submission
Staff
Dr Norman Borrett - Director of Studies
6CCYM325 - Business strategy & Operations Management
Email: norman.borrett@kcl.ac.uk
Ms Mia Pranoto
4CCYM129 - Organisational Behaviour
6CCYM339 - Human Resource Management
Email: mia.pranoto@kcl.ac.uk
TBC
Visiting Lecturer
5CCYM210 - Accounting
Email: carl.dixon@tvu.ac.uk
Mr Jon Kitto
Visiting Lecturer
5CCYM212 - Marketing
Email: jon@kitto.co.uk
Dr John Simister
Visiting Lecturer
4CCYM110 Economics
Email: john.simister@kcl.ac.uk
Mrs Lucy Ward
General Administrative Queries
Room S1.31
Email: Lucy.Ward@kcl.ac.uk
Tel: 020 7848 2267

Further information, timetables and any updates related to these modules will be available
on line at: www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/nms/current/ug/management

143

4CCMY129 - Organisational Behaviour


Lecturer:

Mia Pranoto

Module Code: 4CCMY129

Exam - C/W ratio: 80 20


Semester:

Module credit value: 15

First

Examined: May/June

Aims and Objectives


The course aims to introduce students to problems and issues involved in the effective
management of organisations. It highlights behaviours, structure and processes that are part of
organisational life.
On completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand and explore the how, what, why and when of OB as viewed and practised by
managers
Consider the relationship between individuals and organisational systems
Explore interpersonal influence and group behaviours for effective management
Analyse organisational structure and design that influence organisational effectiveness
Evaluate alternative social science theories used in practice
Outline Syllabus
The Field of Organisational Behaviour; Work Motivation Theory; Design of Reward and Motivation
Systems; Design of Work; Group Processes and Teamworking; Organisational Processes Decision Making and Communication; Leadership and Management Style; Management Control;
Power and Authority; Conflict - Management and Resolution; Organisational Structure and Design;
Organisational Culture and Performance; Organisational Development and Change; Human
Resource Management - Policies and Practices.
Coursework:

One 1500 word essay

Course Structure:

20 hours lectures

9 hours tutorials

Assessment:

80% written examination

20% coursework

Recommended Reading
Robbins, S. and Judge, T. (2007) Organizational Behaviour, 12th edition FT Prentice-Hall
(compulsory)
Fincham, R. and Rhodes, P. (2005) Principles of Organizational Behaviour, 4th edition Oxford
Press
Huczynski, A. and Buchanan, D. (2004) Organizational Behaviour: An Introductory Text 5th edition
FT Prentice Hall
Kreitner, R., Kinicki, A. and Buelens, M. (2002) Organisational Behaviour, 2nd European Edition
McGraw Hill.
Osland, J. S., Kolb, D. A. and Rubin, I. M. (2001) Organisational Behaviour: An Experiential
Approach, 7th Edition Prentice-Hall.

144

4CCMY110 Economics
Lecturer:
Dr. John Simister
Exam - C/W ratio: 80 20
Semester:
Second

Module Code No: 4CCMY110


Module credit value: 15
Normally examined: May/June

Aims and Objectives


The aims of the course are to:
Explain consumer behaviour, and behaviour by firms, and government economic policies;
Provide students with the fundamental analytical tools to tackle economic problems.
On completion of the course, students should be able to:
Identify issues (such as unemployment) which are central to economics;
Apply techniques and concepts in the course, to the analysis of economic problems;
Discuss effects of economic policy on economic variables, and its role in improving welfare.
Outline Syllabus
Consumer behaviour
Supply and demand
Perfectly competitive markets
Monopoly
Pollution and other externalities
Production and consumption as parts of a single system
The multiplier effect
The labour market (unemployment; trade unions; the minimum wage).
Welfare economics: the market and the state (market failure, poverty and inequality).
Development in the Third World
Coursework:

One assessed essay.

Course Structure:

20 hours lectures

10 hours tutorials.

Assessment:

80% written examination

20% coursework.

Recommended Reading
Compulsory
Joseph E. Stiglitz and Carl E. Walsh Economics
Supplementary
David Begg, Stanley Fischer and Rudiger Dornbusch Economics
Richard Lipsey and Alec Chrystal Economics
Michael Parkin, Melanie Powell and Kent Matthews Economics
John Sloman Economics

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5CCMY210 - Accounting
Lecturer:
TBC
Exam - C/W ratio: 80 20
Semester:
Second

Module Code: 5CCMY210


Module credit value: 15
Normally examined: May/June

Aims and Objectives


The aims of this course are to:
Provide an introduction to management and financial accounting and the types of information
each provides.
Examine basic financial issues faced by managers in business organisations and use
accounting data in order to assist managerial decisions.
Enable interpretation of the financial performance and position of organisations through an
understanding of the accounting concepts and procedures used in preparing financial
statements.
On completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the functions of accounting in business organisations and distinguish between
management and financial accounting.
Locate sources of financial data relevant to business organisations and utilise the information
in written reports and analyses.
Explain the issues relating to cost classification and apply the procedures of absorption and
marginal costing in allocating and apportioning overhead costs and in performing basic breakeven analysis.
Identify and describe different types of business organisations and their principal sources of
financing.
Identify and explain the purpose of financial statements for limited companies.
Prepare from a trial balance the Profit and Loss Account and Balance Sheet for a limited
company, including calculations for depreciation of fixed assets and provisions for losses on
stock and debtors.
Explain the accounting concepts and conventions, which are used in the preparation of
financial statements.
Calculate and use basic accounting ratios to evaluate the financial performance and position of
business organisations.
Outline Syllabus
Limited companies and their financing; reporting financial position: the Balance Sheet; reporting
operating performance: the profit and loss account; accounting treatment of fixed assets;
interpretation of financial statements; introduction to management accounting and cost
classification; marginal costing and break-even analysis; overheads and absorption costing;
budgetary planning and control; standard costing and variance analysis.
Coursework:

Written Report (1,500 words)

Course Structure:

10 three hour lecture/workshops

Assessment:

80% written examination

20% coursework

Recommended Reading
Dyson, John R. Accounting for Non-Accounting Students (Seventh Edition), Prentice Hall (ISBN
978-0-273-70992-0)

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5CCMY212 - Marketing
Lecturer:
Jon Kitto
Exam - C/W ratio: 80 20
Semester:
First

Module Code No: 5CCMY212


Module credit value: 15
Normally examined: May/June

Aims and Objectives


The aims of this course are to:
Introduce students to fundamental and established theories of marketing and its role in a
business & social context.
Demonstrate how the elements of the marketing mix are combined to create a marketing plan.
Describe the key aspects of marketing management.
On completion of this course, students should be able to:
Relate knowledge gained to other elements of the business management course & to real
business situations.
Utilise the inputs necessary to develop and implement a marketing plan.
Reflect critically on marketing practices and consumer behaviour in the current business
environment.
Outline Syllabus
Introduction to marketing., the marketing environments, consumer behaviour, marketing
information & research, managing products & services, channels of distribution, marketing
communications, marketing planning, international marketing & ethics in marketing.
Coursework:

One 2,000 word report assignment with accompanying presentation

Course Structure:

20 hours lectures

10 hours seminars

Assessment:

80% written examination

20% coursework

Recommended Reading
Compulsory
Kotler P., Wong V., Armstrong G., and Saunders J. (2007) Principles of Marketing, 4th European
Edition, Pearson
Mason, C. and Perreault, W. (2001) The Marketing Game! (with Student CD ROM), Irwin
Supplementary
Blythe J. (2001) Essentials of Marketing, 2nd edition, FT/Prentice Hall
Enis B., Cox K., Mokwa M., (1990) Marketing Classics: A Selection of Influential Articles, 8th
edition, Prentice Hall International (library text)
Brassington, F. and Pettitt, S. (2004) Essentials of Marketing, Pearson

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6CCMY325 Business Strategy and Operations Management


Lecturer:
Norman Borrett
Exam C/W ratio: 80-20
Semester:
First

Module Code No: 6CCMY325


Module Credit Value: 15
Normally examined: May/June

Aims and Objectives


The main aims of the course are to:
Provide a through grounding in a range of corporate level business management topics to
complement the material covered in the specific management modules as part of the joint honours
with Management undergraduate degree programmes.
On completion of the course, students will have acquitted an in-depth knowledge of a variety of
corporate level general management techniques and applications to allow them to contribute to
and make operational management decisions immediately the enter industry and to understand
that operations of an organisation at strategic level.
Outline Syllabus
1) Business Strategy
2) Capital investment decision and corporate planning
3) Forecasting
4) Decision making theories and risk analysis
5) Product management, design and development
6) Quality, reliability and maintenance management
7) Legal and ethical considerations of management
8) Health and Safety and risk management
9) Intellectual property
10) Globalisation
Coursework:

3 pieces of written work, at 750 words each.

Course Structure:

36 hours lectures/tutorials

Assessment:

80% written examination

20% coursework

Recommended Reading
Mintzberg, H., Quinn, J. B., and Ghoshal, S. (1998a) The Strategy Process, Europe, Prentice Hall
Mintzberg, H., Ahlstrand, B., and Lampel, J. (1998b) Strategy Safari, London, Prentice Hall
Porter, M.E. (1980) Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analysing Industries and Competitors,
New York: Free Press
Wheelen, Thomas L. and Hunger, J David (2003) Strategic Management and Business Policy,
Ninth Edition, Prentice Hall
Lock, Handbook of Engineering Management, Heineman
Payne, Chelsom and Reavill, Management for Engineers, Wiley

Schermoerhorn, Management, Wiley

148

6CCMY339 Human Resource Management


Lecturer:
Mia Pranoto
Exam - C/W ratio: 80 20
Semester: Second

Module Code No: 6CCMY339


Module credit value: 0.5/15
Normally examined: May/June

Aims and Objectives


The aims of the course are to:

Extend the students understanding of the theory and practice of Human Resource
Management

Locate HRM within both the context of organisations and the field of contemporary
management theory and practice.

On completion of this course, students should be able to:

Evaluate the hard and soft approaches to HRM.

Evaluate the significance of people as a strategic resource and be able to outline the main
types of strategic models that have emerged.

Analyse organisational structures and processes and be able to locate these within broad
categories e.g. flexible firm model.

Analyse and evaluate different types of involvement and participation at the workplace.

Identify the key issues in the effective management of pay.

Evaluate the case for training and development (T&D), recognise external factors which
influence T&D e.g. role of government.

Identify the importance of recruitment and selection as a function of the HRM process and
be able to evaluate the appropriateness of different methods commonly applied.

To understand and explain some of the reasons behind the changing nature of employee
relations from the perspective of the employee, management and trade unions.

Outline Syllabus
Work and employment; Industrial Relations; Personnel Management and HRM; The Various Forms
of HRM; Strategic HRM; HRM in Context: Management and Employee Objectives; Organisational
Culture; Employee Engagement and Commitment; Organisational Objectives and Outcomes;
Forms of Participation; HRM; Trade Unions; Statutory Regulation and the Employment
Relationship; HRM Policy, Procedures and Processes.
Coursework:

One 1,500 word essays

Course Structure:

20 hours lectures

9 hours tutorial

Assessment:

80% written examination

20% coursework

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9. SAFETY CHECK LIST


Please ensure that you have details of all the items listed below ask your supervisor.
You can either tick the box to show that you have been informed about the details, or make a note
for your information.
Please hand a copy of this form, when completed, to your Departmental Office.
NAME (please print):

Student ID:

SUPERVISOR:

Date:

Emergency Phone Number

2222

Health Centre Phone Number

020-7848 2613

Your Nearest Fire Extinguisher


Types of Fire Extinguishers
Your Fire Exit Route
Your Fire Assembly Area
Your Nearest First Aid Box
Your Nearest Spill-Kit
Names & Tel Numbers of First Aiders
Emergency Procedures
Lone Working
Smoking, Eating and Drinking
Lab Coats and Safety Spectacles
Tidiness
DSE use (working at a computer)

150

10. ETHICS IN MATHEMATICS


Ethics plays a role in virtually all aspects of human activity. Although use of the term often brings to
mind great issues involving human suffering, ethics are also at play in day to day life. We would
like to bring to your attention some ethical rules that we expect to be followed by all of our
students, graduates and staff throughout their mathematical careers. Perhaps the most important
role that ethics plays specifically for mathematics is simply that of honesty and integrity when
solving mathematical problems and proving theorems. Ultimately the truth in mathematics always
comes out (although it may take hundreds of years). Being caught in a position where you are
found to have mislead or fabricated evidence is considered a deeply serious breach of standards
and will have a very negative, if not devastating, effect on your reputation and career.
1. A mathematician shall never knowingly put forward incorrect statements or calculations and
claim that they are correct.
2. A mathematician shall always endeavour to determine which statements are true and which are
false by logically sound processes of deduction and proof.
3. A mathematician shall never attempt to mislead others as to the truth or falsity of a proposition.
4. When making statements a mathematician shall always be clear as to whether they are false,
believed to be true, or known to be true. In the later case a mathematician must be able to provide
direction as to where the proof of the statement can be found.
5. A mathematician shall always give appropriate credit to the work of others in accordance with
standard referencing and plagiarism protocols.
6. A mathematician shall not knowingly engage in research, or assist the research of others, which
is intended to cause public harm.

IMA Code of Conduct


In addition to the academic-related rules listed above there are many ethical standards that any
employee of a company or institute will be expected to uphold. In general these will depend upon
the nature of the job and the contract that the mathematician has with the employer. Below are a
set of rules that were obtained from the code of conduct for members of the Institute of
Mathematics and its Applications. It is offered as a guide to students as to what is likely to be
expected of them by their employers and is in line with codes of conduct for many professional
institutions.
A code of working conduct designed to cover all eventualities must necessarily be posed in
general terms expressing broad ethical principles. The rules proposed indicate the manner in
which mathematicians are expected to conduct themselves in a number of frequently-occurring
situations. In other situations, mathematicians are required to conduct themselves in accordance
with the principle that, in any conflict between a mathematician 's personal interest or the interests
of an employer or sponsor and fair and honest dealing with members of the public, duty to the
public must prevail.
1. A mathematician shall have regard to protection of the public interest as determined by criminal
and civil legislation.
2. A mathematician in the position of an employer, in addition to meeting the relevant regulations
and standards, shall set fair and reasonable terms and conditions of employment.

151

3. A mathematician shall not improperly disclose any information concerning an employers


business nor that of any previous employer.
4. A mathematician shall inform an employer in writing of any potential conflict between personal
interest and faithful service to the employer.
5. A mathematician shall not accept remuneration in connection with services rendered to an
employer other than from the employer or with the employer's consent; nor shall a mathematician
of the department receive directly or indirectly any undeclared royalty, gratuity or commission, for
any article or process used in connection with employment if such royalty, gratuity, or commission
conflicts with the employer's terms and conditions of employment.
6. A mathematician shall not offer to provide or receive in return, any payment or commission or
otherwise as the inducement for the introduction of business from a client.
7. A mathematician shall not, except where specifically so instructed, handle clients' monies or
place contracts or orders in connection with work on which engaged when acting as an
independent consultant.
10. A mathematician called upon to give an opinion shall give an opinion that is objective and
reliable, shall have sought authorisation where this is appropriate, and have due regard to the
likely consequences of any such statement.
11. A mathematician shall only undertake service where as a mathematician, the required level of
competence is possessed.
12. A mathematician shall accept responsibility for personal work and for the work of subordinates
done under direction, seeking always to conform to recognised good practice including quality
standards.

152

11. INDEX
Absence............................................................................................................................14
Administrative Matters ....................................................................................................13
Assessment and Records Centre.....................................................................................5
August Resits...................................................................................................................35
BSc Project.....................................................................................................................140
BSc/MSci Mathematics........................................................................................41, 46, 48
BSc/MSci transfers ..........................................................................................................38
Calculators .......................................................................................................................29
Change of Degree Course...............................................................................................72
Class Tests.......................................................................................................................24
Code of Conduct ..............................................................................................................21
Contact Details...................................................................................................................3
Coursework ......................................................................................................................23
Departmental Information ...............................................................................................16
Departmental Office.........................................................................................................13
Disclaimer...........................................................................................................................6
Ethics in Mathematics ...................................................................................................151
Examination Regulations ................................................................................................27
Examination Results........................................................................................................34
French and Mathematics BA..........................................................................................66
Further information ...........................................................................................................5
IMA Code of Conduct ....................................................................................................151
Introduction......................................................................................................................10
Joint Honours Courses ...................................................................................................50
Mathematics and Computer Science BSc .....................................................................51
Mathematics and Computer Science MSci ....................................................................54
Mathematics and Philosophy BA ...................................................................................68
Mathematics and Physics BSc .......................................................................................56
Mathematics and Physics MSci ......................................................................................59
Mathematics and Physics with Astrophysics BSc........................................................63
MathSoc............................................................................................................................15
Mission Statement ...........................................................................................................12
Mitigating Circumstances ...............................................................................................30
Module/Course Unit Listing ............................................................................................72
MSci in Mathematics .......................................................................................................41
MSci Project ...................................................................................................................140
Plagiarism.........................................................................................................................39
Pop-In Tutorials ...............................................................................................................23
Preface................................................................................................................................5
Prizes ................................................................................................................................19
Programmes Of Study .....................................................................................................40
Progression......................................................................................................................35
Projects...........................................................................................................................140
Projects and Essays ........................................................................................................26
Safety Check List ...........................................................................................................150
Safety Procedures ...........................................................................................................19
Special Examinations Arrangements.............................................................................28
Staff/Student Committee .................................................................................................19
153

Structure of the Department ...........................................................................................11


Student Presentations.....................................................................................................25
Term dates........................................................................................................................12
The Link-up System.........................................................................................................14
Tutor System....................................................................................................................13
Walk-in Tutorials..............................................................................................................22
With Management programmes ..................................................................................142
Workload ..........................................................................................................................26

154