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Front cover

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REDP-4815-00

IBM PowerVM
Getting Started Guide
Step by step virtualization configuration from
scratch to the first partition
IVM, HMC, and SDMC examples
provided
Advanced configurations
included

Ben Castillo
Brad Ford
Eduardo Otubo
Pavel Pokorn

ibm.com/redbooks

Redpaper

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International Technical Support Organization


IBM PowerVM Getting Started Guide
March 2012

REDP-4815-00

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Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in Notices on page v.

First Edition (March 2012)


This edition applies to IBM Virtual I/O Server versions 2.2.0 and 2.2.1, IBM Systems Director Management
Console versions 6.7.4.0, IBM Hardware Monitor Console
This document created or updated on January 16, 2012.
Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2012. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.

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Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
The team who wrote this paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Now you can become a published author, too! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Stay connected to IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Chapter 1. Introduction to PowerVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 Terminology differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
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3
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7

Chapter 2. Setting up using Integrated Virtualization Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9


2.1 Single VIOS setup using IVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.1.1 Install VIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.1.2 Create partition for client OS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.1.3 Configure VIOS for client network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.1.4 Configure VIOS for client storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.1.5 Install Client OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.2 Setting up a dual VIOS with IVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.3 Setting up NPIV Fibre Channel with IVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Chapter 3. Setting up using Hardware Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1 Single VIOS setup using HMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1 Create VIOS Partition Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2 Install VIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3 Create Client OS Logical Partition Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.4 Configure VIOS Partition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Dual VIOS setup using HMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1 Create dual VIOS partition profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2 Install VIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.3 Create Client OS Logical Partition Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4 Configure VIOS partitions for dual setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Setup virtual Fibre Channel using HMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Additional client partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Chapter 4. Setting up using the SDMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


4.1 Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.1 Create the Virtual Servers for VIOS1 and VIOS2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.2 Install VIOS1 and VIOS2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.3 Configure the TCP/IP stack in VIOS1 and VIOS2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.4 Create the SEA failover configuration using the SDMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.5 Configure storage devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.6 Create Virtual Server for client OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.7 Install client OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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4.1.8 Configure virtual Fibre Channel adapters using the SDMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


4.2 Single VIOS setup using the SDMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.1 Create VIOS Virtual Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.2 Install VIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.3 Create Virtual Server for client OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.4 Configure Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.5 Install client OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3 Dual VIOS setup using the SDMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.1 Create second VIOS Virtual Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.2 Install second VIOS using NIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.3 Configure second VIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 Setup virtual Fibre Channel using the SDMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.1 Configure client Virtual Server for NPIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.2 Configure Virtual I/O Server fro NPIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.3 Configure second VIOS for NPIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Chapter 5. Advanced Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


5.1 Adapter ID numbering scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 Partition numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3 VIOS partition and system redundancy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4 Advanced VIOS network setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.1 Using IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.2 Using IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.3 Multiple SEA configuration on VIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.4 General network considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5 Advanced storage connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6 Shared processor pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7 Live Partition Mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8 Active memory sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9 Active Memory Deduplication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.10 Shared storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consult
your local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area. Any
reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product,
program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not
infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the user's responsibility to
evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document. The
furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in
writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where such
provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION
PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of
express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made
to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make
improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time
without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM websites are provided for convenience only and do not in any
manner serve as an endorsement of those websites. The materials at those websites are not part of the
materials for this IBM product and use of those websites is at your own risk.
IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without incurring
any obligation to you.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their published
announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the
accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the
capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate them
as completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.
All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business
enterprise is entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrate programming
techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs in
any form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application
programs conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which the sample
programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore,
cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.

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Trademarks
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines
Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. These and other IBM trademarked terms are
marked on their first occurrence in this information with the appropriate symbol ( or ), indicating US
registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information was published. Such
trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A current list of IBM
trademarks is available on the Web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:
Active Memory
AIX
BladeCenter
GPFS
IBM
POWER Hypervisor
Power Systems

POWER6
POWER7
PowerHA
PowerVM
Power
POWER
Redbooks

Redpaper
Redbooks (logo)
System i
System p5
System Storage

The following terms are trademarks of other companies:


Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both.
Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside, Intel Inside logo, Intel Centrino, Intel Centrino logo, Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel
SpeedStep, Itanium, and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its
subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.
Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.

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Preface
IBM PowerVM virtualization technology is a combination of hardware and software that
supports and manages the virtual environments on POWER5-, POWER5+,POWER6 and
POWER7-based systems.
Available on IBM Power Systems, IBM BladeCenter servers as optional Editions, and
supported by the IBM AIX, IBM i, and Linux operating systems, this set of comprehensive
systems technologies and services is designed to enable you to aggregate and manage
resources using a consolidated, logical view. Deploying PowerVM virtualization and IBM
Power Systems offers you the following benefits:
Lower energy costs through server consolidation
Reduced cost of your existing infrastructure
Better management of the growth, complexity, and risk of your infrastructure
This IBM Redpaper publication is intended as a quick start guide to help you install and
configure a complete PowerVM virtualization solution on IBM Power Systems either using
Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM), Hardware Management Console (HMC), Virtual IO
Server (VIOS), or Systems Director Management Console (SDMC).
The paper is targeted to new customers who need instructions on how to install, configure
and bring up a new server in a virtualized environment in an easy and quick way.

The team who wrote this paper


This paper was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the
International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center.
Ben Castillo is a Technical Specialist working for the Emerging Technology Delivery team,
part of IBM Integrated Technology (ITD) in Australia. He has been working for IBM since
2000. He is an IBM Certified Advanced Technical Expert - IBM System p5. Bens expertise
consists of PowerVM, Power Systems, AIX, IBM PowerHA, and IBM GPFS. He is also
working on AIX global server builds for IBM ITD.
Brad Ford is an IBM Certified Technical Specialist and President of i400 Technology Inc., an
IBM Advanced Business Partner in Salt Lake City, Utah, specializing in IBM Power Systems
and IBM i. He has been working in the computer industry since 1973 specializing in hardware
and operating systems. Brad is one member of the team that writes the certification exams for
IBM i and Power Systems. When not busy with clients, Brad enjoys skiing and hiking in the
local Utah mountains.
Eduardo Otubo is a Software Engineer in Brazil. He has 10 years of experience with Linux
and Open Source. He has worked at IBM STG Linux Technology Center in Hortolandia, Brazil
for four years. Eduardo holds a degree in Computer Science from Universidade Estadual
Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho. His areas of expertise include Linux development for
virtualization on Power.
Pavel Pokorn is an IT Consultant at GC System a.s., an IBM Business Partner in the Czech
Republic. He has 7 years of experience in the Information Technology field. Pavel holds a
Master's degree in Information Technology from University of Defence in Brno. His areas of

Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.

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expertise include PowerVM, Power Systems, AIX, Data Protection, IBM System Storage
and Storage Area Network.
The project that produced this publication was managed by:
Scott Vetter is a Certified Executive Project Manager at the International Technical Support
Organization, Austin Center. He has enjoyed 27 years of rich and diverse experience working
for IBM in a variety of challenging roles. His latest efforts are directed at providing world-class
Power Systems Redbooks, white papers, and workshop collateral.
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
Don S. Spangler, Brian King, Ann Lund, Linda Robinson, Alfred Schwab, Richard M. Conway,
David Bennini
IBM US
Nicolas Guerin
IBM France

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Comments welcome
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Use the online Contact us review Redbooks form found at:
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Preface

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Chapter 1.

Introduction to PowerVM
Businesses are turning to IBM PowerVM virtualization to consolidate multiple workloads onto
fewer systems, increase server utilization, and reduce cost. PowerVM provides a secure and
scalable virtualization environment for AIX, IBM i, and Linux applications built upon the
advanced reliability, availability, and serviceability features and the leading performance of the
Power Systems platform.
This publication is intended for customers new to virtualization that are looking for a quick
guide to get their virtualized servers up and running without delving into too many details of
the architecture. It will guide you through the basic installation and configuration of each
technology involved with PowerVM, one chapter at a time: HMC, IVM, and SDMC.
Chapter 1 provides a short overview of the key PowerVM concepts, a planning model and
best practices to follow.
Chapters 2, 3, and 4 describe, in a step-by-step manner, how to configure your system using
Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM), Hardware Management Console (HMC), and
Systems Director Management Console (SDMC), respectively. All three chapters are logically
independent, you can read these three chapters in any order.
Chapter 5 has advanced tips and pointers to where to go once you have completed the initial
setup detailed here.

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1.1 Overview
The chapters 2, 3, and 4 are a step-by-step installation and configuration in a cookbook style
guide. You will find similar steps to accomplish the same task: From a factory fresh machine,
you will be able to install and configure virtual machines using an HMC, IVM, or SDMC, and
have a fully functional Logical Partition (LPAR.)
Note: The term logical partition, or LPAR, is used as a generic term in this document.
Other terms used include guest partition, partitions, and Virtual Servers. All these terms
refers to virtualized guest servers running their own operating systems.

Note: This document is not intended to deal with IBM BladeCenter.


All three managing systems are intended to manage virtualization on IBM Power Systems.
Table 1-1 show how they differ:
Table 1-1 Virtualization manager features

IVM

HMC

SDMC

Included in PowerVM

Manage Power Blades

Manage more than


one server

Hardware monitoring

Service agent call


home

Graphical Interface

Requires separate
server to run on

Run on virtualized
environments

Advanced PowerVM
features

High-end servers

(hardware
appliance only)

Low-end and midrange


servers

Server families
support

POWER5/POWER5+:
POWER6/POWER6+:
POWER7:

POWER5/POWER5+:
POWER6/POWER6+:
POWER7:

POWER5/POWER5+:
POWER6/POWER6+:
POWER7:

Redundant setup

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These are the basic steps you will find in all three chapters, but they will vary in order and
complexity from one managing system to another. They include:
1. Fresh out of the box: This paper will guide you through all the installation and configuration
from scratch. You can factory reset your machine if you wish, no previous configurations
needed.
Important: Please remember to perform a backup of all of your data before a factory
reset.
2. Depending on the case, install one or two Virtual IO Servers (VIOS). Redundant VIOS is
only supported by HMC, and SDMC.
3. Configure network and storage. This procedure may require some information provided by
your network and/or storage administrator.
4. Create the client LPAR.
By the end of each chapter you will have a fully functional PowerVM solution with one LPAR
ready to be used.

1.2 Planning
In this publication we use three sets of machines to describe all the installation and
configuration process with the three different managing systems, Figure 1-1 on page 4
presents the model, machine type, and managing system used.This guide suggests you do
some planning before starting to configuring your environment, including:
Check Firmware levels on Power Server and HMC or SDMC before you start.
Decide if you will use Logical Volume Mirroring (LVM) - in AIX LPARs - or Multipath IO
(MPIO1.) The examples in this paper uses MPIO.
Make sure your Fibre Channel switches and adapters are N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV2)
capable.
Make sure your network is properly configured.
Check the firewall rules on the HMC or SDMC.
Plan how much processor and memory you will assign to the VIOS for best performance.
Its important to plan the VIOS virtual adapter slot numbering scheme. This publication
uses the scheme shown in Figure 1-2 on page 4. SDMC offers you an automatic handling
of slot allocation.
Plan for two Virtual IO Servers (VIOS). We recommend that you use the dual VIOS
architecture so you can have serviceability and scalability.
Note: The dual VIOS architecture is only available when using the HMC or SDMC as
managers. You cannot use dual VIOS with IVM.

Multipath IO is a fault-tolerance and performance enhancement technique where there is more than one path
between the CPU in a computer system and its storage devices through buses, controllers, switches, and bridge
devices connecting them.
To virtualize Fibre Channel adapters PowerVM is using a subset of Fibre Channel standard called N_Port ID
Virtualization (NPIV.)

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HMC

SDMC

IBM System X

IBM System X

CR4 7042

CR4 7042

IVM
IBM Power 750

IBM Power 750

IBM Power 750

Model/Type: 8253/E8B

Model/Type: 8253/E8B

Model/Type: 8253/E8B

Figure 1-1 The hardware schema used in this paper

The dual VIOS setup offers serviceability to a PowerVM environment on the managed
system. It also provides added redundancy and load balancing of client network and storage.
The mechanisms involved in setting up a dual VIOS configuration use Shared Ethernet
Adapter (SEA3) failover for network and MPIO via shared drives on the VIOS partitions for
client storage. There are other mechanisms which can be employed but SEA failover for
networks and MPIO for storage provide for less configuring on the client partitions.
SEA failover and MPIO allow for serviceability as well as redundancy and load balancing with
the VIOS partitions. One VIOS can act a primary VIOS for networks and be a standby for
storage; while the other VIOS can act as standby for networks and be the primary for
storage.The flexibility afforded by using a dual VIOS setup caters to a wide range of client
requirements.

VIOS1
LPARID=1

101

11

102

12

111

11

112

12

VirtServer1
LPARID=10

VirtServer2
LPARID=11

21

101

22

102

21

111

22

112

21

XX1

22

XX2

VIOS2
LPARID=2

.
.
.
XX1

11

XX2

12

VirtServerXX
LPARID=12

Virtual Fibre Channel


Virtual SCSI

Figure 1-2 Virtual adapter slot numbering recomendation

A Shared Ethernet Adapter is a VIOS component that bridges a physical Ethernet adapter and one or more virtual
Ethernet adapters. For more information please refer to the online IBM documentation about Shared Ethernet
Adapters - http://ibmurl.hursley.ibm.com/2F2F

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Figure 1-2 is represented in Table 1-2 for VIOS1 which describes the relationship between
the virtual client adapter ID and virtual servers client adapter IDs. Similarly in Table 1-3 on
page 5 for VIOS2 describes the adapter ID allocation and its relationship to the virtual
servers client adapter IDs.
Table 1-2 VIOS1 adapter ID allocation
Virtual
Adapter

Server
Adapter ID

VLAN ID

Server
Adapter
Slot

Client
Partition/
Virtual
Server

Client
Adapter ID

Client
Adapter
Slot

Virtual
Ethernet

2 (used
default
allocation)

1 (used
default
allocation)

C2

All virtual
servers

N/A

N/A

Virtual
Etherneta

3 (used
default
allocation)

99 (default
for SDMC
only)

C3

N/A

N/A

N/A

Virtual
Ethernetb

N/A

N/A

VirtServer1

C2

Virtual
VSCSI

101

N/A

C101

VirtServer1

11

C11

Virtual
Fibre

102

N/A

C102

VirtServer1

12

C12

Virtual
Ethernetb

N/A

N/A

VirtServer2

C2

Virtual
VSCSI

111

N/A

C111

VirtServer2

11

C11

Virtual
Fibre

112

N/A

C112

VirtServer2

12

C12

a. This virtual Ethernet adapter is to be used as the control channel adapter (SEA failover
adapter)
b. This client virtual Ethernet adapter is not actually associated with a VIOS server. The VLAN
ID configured on the adapter is the link to the SEA adapter configuration.
Table 1-3 VIOS2 adapter ID allocation
Virtual
Adapter

Server
Adapter ID

VLAN ID

Server
Adapter
Slot

Client
Partition/
Virtual
Server

Client
Adapter ID

Client
Adapter
Slot

Virtual
Ethernet

2 (used
default
allocation)

1 (used
default
allocation)

C2

N/A

N/A

N/A

Virtual
Etherneta

3 (used
default
allocation)

99 (default
for SDMC
only)

C3

N/A

N/A

N/A

Virtual
VSCSI

101

N/A

C101

VirtServer1

21

C21

Virtual
Fibre

102

N/A

C102

VirtServer1

22

C22

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Virtual
Adapter

Server
Adapter ID

VLAN ID

Server
Adapter
Slot

Client
Partition/
Virtual
Server

Client
Adapter ID

Client
Adapter
Slot

Virtual
VSCSI

111

N/A

C111

VirtServer2

21

C21

Virtual
Fibre

112

N/A

C112

VirtServer2

22

C22

1.3 Terminology differences


IVM, HMC, and SDMC use Power Systems terminology which is sometimes different from
x86 terminology. Table 1-4 on page 6 lists terms used in Power Systems environments, maps
them to similar x86 terms, and provides a definition for the terms.
Table 1-4 Power Systems and x86 terms
Power terms

x86 term or concept

Definition

managed system

server or system

A physical server that contains physical


processors, memory, and I/O resources that is
often virtualized into virtual servers, which are
also known as client logical partitions.

management partition

virtual machine,
virtual server,
management
operating system,
VMWare Service
Console, or KVM
Host partition

The logical partition that controls all of the


physical I/O resources on the server and provides
the user interface from which to manage all of the
client logical partitions within the server. In this
case, the logical partition in which IVM is
installed.

client logical partition,


logical partition, or
virtual server

virtual machine or
virtual server

The collection of virtual or physical processor,


memory, and I/O resources defined to run the
client operating system and its workload.

Power Hypervisor

x86 hypervisor

The underlying software of VIOS that enables the


sharing of physical I/O resources between client
logical partitions within the server. In IVM
environments, the terms Virtual I/O Server and
Integrated Virtualization Manager are sometimes
used interchangeably.

1.4 Prerequisites
There are some prerequisites you should verify in order to get as close to an ideal scenario as
possible. Check that:
Your HMC or SDMC (the hardware or the virtual appliance) is configured, up, and running.
Your HMC or SDMC is connected to the new servers HMC port. We suggest either a
private network or a direct cable connection.
The TCP port 657 is open between the HMC/SDMC and the Virtual Server in order to
enable Dynamic Logical Partition functionality.

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You have IP addresses properly assigned for the HMC, and SDMC.
The Power Server is ready to power on.
All your equipment is connected to 802.3ad capable network switches with link
aggregation enabled. Refer to the Chapter 5: Advanced Configuration on page 77 for more
details.
Fibre Channel fabrics are redundant. Refer to Chapter 5: Advanced Configuration on page
77 for more details.
Ethernet network switches are redundant.
SAN storage for virtual servers (logical partitions) is ready to be provisioned.

Chapter 1. Introduction to PowerVM

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Chapter 2.

Setting up using Integrated


Virtualization Manager
IBM developed the Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM) as a server management solution
that performs a subset of the HMC and SDMC features for a single server, avoiding the need
for a dedicated HMC or SDMC server. IVM manages a single stand-alone server - a second
server managed by IVM has its own instance of IVM installed. With the subset of HMC and
SDMC server functionality, IVM provides a solution that enables the administrator to quickly
set up a server. IVM is integrated within the Virtual I/O Server product, which services I/O,
memory, and processor virtualization in IBM Power Systems.
There are many environments that need small partitioned systems, either for test reasons or
for specific requirements, for which the HMC and SDMC solutions are not ideal. A sample
situation is where there are small partitioned systems that cannot share a common HMC or
SDMC because they are in multiple locations.
IVM is a simplified hardware management solution that inherits most of the HMC features. It
manages a single server, avoiding the need for an independent personal computer. It is
designed to provide a solution that enables the administrator to reduce system setup time and
to make hardware management easier, at a lower cost.

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2.1 Single VIOS setup using IVM


This section will install a single instance of the VIOS and IVM on the server. This requires that
the server has either never been attached to an HMC or SDMC. If an HMC or SDMC has
been attached, the server must be reset to the manufacturing default. If you need to reset the
server to the manufacturing default configuration, please refer to the IBM Power Systems
Hardware Information Center or section 2.1 of Integrated Virtualization Manager on IBM
System p5, REDP-4061.
When not using either the HMC or the SDMC, VIOS takes control of all the hardware
resources. There is no need to create a specific partition for the VIOS. When VIOS is installed
using the default settings, it installs on the servers first internal disk controller and onto the
first disk on that controller. IVM is part of VIOS and activated when VIOS is installed without
an HMC or SDMC.

2.1.1 Install VIOS


This section is the only section on using the IVM where we can not use the graphical browser
interface. We must use a text-based interface to install and configure VIOS. The initial
installation and configuration of VIOS requires a serial ASCII console (a physical ASCII
terminal or a suitable terminal emulator) and cross-over cable connected to one of the two
serial ports on the server. These ports may be a DB9 or an RJ45 connector.
The following steps detail the steps necessary to install VIOS on the server:
1. Cable between the PC and the serial port (S1 or S2) on the server.
2. Configure the ASCII console to communicate at 19200 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop
bit, and Xon/Xoff protocol.
3. Ensure that the server is in normal mode from the front panel. (1 N V=N T) Refer to the
IBM Information Center for instructions on changing the startup mode.
4. Power on the server with the power-on (white) button on the front panel.
5. On the ASCII console, if presented with options to set this screen as the active console,
press the keys indicated on the screen.
6. If asked to accept license agreements or software maintenance terms, choose the option
to accept.
7. Wait for the first menu selection screen to appear as in Example 2-1. Press the 1 key as
soon as the word keyboard appears on the bottom of the screen. If you delay, the system
will attempt to start any operating system that may be loaded on the server.
Example 2-1 - SMS Boot Menu

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

1 = SMS Menu
8 = Open Firmware Prompt
memory

10

keyboard

IBM PowerVM Getting Started Guide

network

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

5 = Default Boot List


6 = Stored Boot List
scsi

speaker

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

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8. Select the language if necessary.


9. Enter the Service Processor password for the admin user account. The default password is
admin. If the default password does not work, and you do not have the admin password,
you will have to contact hardware support to walk through signing on with the CE profile.
10.Insert the VIOS installation media in the CD/DVD drive.
11.To boot from the CD/DVD drive: Select Boot Options (5), Install/Boot Device (1),
CD/DVD (3), List All Devices (9) and choose the right CD/DVD device from the list.
(Probably the last device at the bottom of the list.) Select media type from the list.
12.Select Normal Mode Boot and Exit from the SMS menu.
13.Select the console number and press Enter.
14.Select the preferred language.
15.When prompted with the Installation and Maintenance menu, select option 1 to start with
default settings.As other screens are presented, select the default options each time.
16.A progress screen shows Approximate% Complete and Elapsed Time. This installation
should take between 15 minutes and an hour to complete.
When installation is complete sign on and accept the license agreements:
17.Sign on as padmin and when prompted, change the password to something secure.
18.If prompted to accept the license agreement or to accept the software maintenance
agreement, accept these agreements and continue.
19.After receiving the $ prompt use the license -accept command to accept the license
agreement.
To attach VIOS to the external Ethernet and configure TCP/IP follow these steps:
20.Use the lsdev -vpd | grep ent command to list all Ethernet adapter ports. For our
installation, we have plugged the Ethernet cable into the top port of the 4 port Ethernet
card in slot C4 of the CEC. Our lsdev listing is shown in Example 2-2 below.
Example 2-2 Output from lsdev -vpd | grep ent command

ent0
ent1
ent2
ent3
ent4
ent5
ent6
ent7

U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C6-T1
U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C6-T2
U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C6-T3
U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C6-T4
U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C4-T1
U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C4-T2
U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C4-T3
U78A0.001.DNWKGPB-P1-C4-T4

4-Port
4-Port
4-Port
4-Port
4-Port
4-Port
4-Port
4-Port

10/100/1000
10/100/1000
10/100/1000
10/100/1000
10/100/1000
10/100/1000
10/100/1000
10/100/1000

Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX

In Example 2-2 above, the top port (T1) of the Ethernet card in slot 4 (C4) of the CEC
drawer (P1, serial number DNWKGPB) is assigned to ent4.
21.Use the cfgassist command and select VIOS TCP/IP Configuration. Then select the
appropriate en# interface related to the adapter port chosen in the previous steps. In our
case it is interface en4 related to adapter port ent4.
Note: Each ent# has an associated en# and et# (her # is the same number). So in our
example ent4, en4 and et4 are all related to the same Ethernet port on the card. Always
use the en# entry for assigning TCP/IP addresses.

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22.On the VIOS TCP/IP Configuration screen enter TPC/IP configuration values for the
VIOS connectivity as shown in Example 2-3:
Example 2-3 - VIOS TCP/IP Configuration panel

VIOS TCP/IP Configuration


Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
*Hostname
*Internet ADDRESS (dotted decimal)
Network MASK (dotted decimal)
*Network INTERFACE
Default Gateway (dotted decimal)
NAMESERVER
Internet ADDRESS (dotted decimal)
DOMAIN Name
Cable Type

[Vios]
[172.16.22.10]
[255.255.252.0]
en4
[172.16.20.1]
[ ]
[ ]
[tp]

Initializing the Ethernet may take a few minutes to complete.


23.Attempt to ping the internet address set for VIOS from your PC. (172.16.22.10 in the
example above.)
24.Open a browser on your PC and attempt to connect to URL HTTPS://internet-address.
(HTTPS://172.16.22.10 in the example above)
Check Point: Do not proceed until you can get the browser to connect. Not all Windows
browsers will work with IVM. We suggest you use Microsoft Internet Explorer version 8
or earlier or Firefox 3.6 or earlier. You must also enable pop-ups in the browser.

Note: From this point forward all the configurations will be done from the browser
window.
25.Using a browser, sign on to VIOS using the padmin profile and the password set earlier.
26.Check for updates to VIOS by clicking Updates from the Service Management section of
the left hand panel.
VIOS is now installed and ready for client partitions. At this time, VIOS owns all the hardware
in the server and can either supply virtual adapters to the various client partitions, or can give
up control of a hardware adapter or port for assignment to the client partition.

2.1.2 Create partition for client OS


For consistency with the sections on using the HMC and SDMC to create partitions (virtual
servers), we will create one partition without storage and network bridging. These features
will be added to the partition in sections 2.1.3, Configure VIOS for client network on page 13
and 2.1.4, Configure VIOS for client storage on page 14. Follow these steps to create the
partition:
1. Click View/Modify Partitions from the left hand panel and then Create Partition from the
Partition Details section of the right hand panel.
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2. Select the next number for the partition ID, give the partition a name and select the
operating system environment for the partition. Click Next.
3. Enter an appropriate amount of memory for the partition. Click Next.
4. Enter the amount of processing power for the partition and select shared or dedicated
processor mode. Click Next.
Note: The amount of memory and processing power to assign to the client partition will
depend on the available resources in the server and on the anticipated workload of the
client partition.
5. If installing AIX or Linux, unselect the Host Ethernet Adapter ports on the top half of the
screen. Use the pull down menu on the first Ethernet adapters for the partition and select
which virtual Ethernet this adapter will be on. In most cases the default values will suffice.
Do not worry about the warning message that the Ethernet is not bridged at this time. We
will bridge these ports later as we assign them to a partition. Click Next.
6. Click None for the storage assignment at this time. We will go back to add disk later. Click
Next.
Note: If the storage selection panel is blank at this point, you may be using a browser
that is not supported by the IVM. Try another browser or an earlier version of your
browser.
7. If installing AIX or Linux, skip the virtual fiber connections and click Next.
8. Confirm that 1 virtual optical device (CD/DVD) is selected at this time. Click Next.
9. The final summary screen shows the settings for this partition. If nothing needs to be
corrected click Finish and VIOS will finish creating the partition environment.

2.1.3 Configure VIOS for client network


Before we can assign virtual Ethernet to the individual partitions we need to enable VIOS to
bridge the physical virtual Ethernet ports.
1. Click View/Modify Host Ethernet Adapters from the left hand panel.
2. Select the physical Ethernet port and then click the Properties button above the listing.
3. Select the Allow virtual Ethernet bridging box and verify the performance
characteristics at the bottom of the screen. Change the setting as necessary and click the
OK button at the bottom of the screen.
The VIOS internal ethernet is now enabled to bridge the physical Ethernet and the virtual
Ethernet ports and ready to connect to the partition.
4. Click View/Modify Virtual Ethernet from the left hand panel. This will show you the four
virtual Ethernets and which partitions are connected to which virtual Ethernet. Notice the
red asterisks (*) next to the virtual Ethernet on the first partition indicating these are
enabled for bridging.
5. Selecting the tab at the top of the screen to switch to the Virtual Ethernet Bridge view.
This shows which physical Ethernet port is connected to which virtual Ethernet ID.
6. Select the pull down menu for Virtual Ethernet ID 1.
7. Select the appropriate physical interface to bridge. Notice the card slot and port numbers
that match the physical card and port on the back of the server unit.

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8. Click the Apply button.


Repeat these steps to bridge and configure additional virtual Ethernet IDs if needed.

2.1.4 Configure VIOS for client storage


At this point you should decide how to assign storage (virtual or physical) for this partition.

Virtual Disk Assignment


You are going to create a storage pool, assign physical disks to the storage pool, create
virtual disks from the storage pool, and assign the virtual disks to the individual partition.
Important: For better performance you should separate the storage pool for client
partitions from the rootvg storage pool.
You should consider disk protection (raid5 or raid6) at the physical disk layer at this time. If
you are going to assign internal disk, they should be raided using the diagmenu commands
from the character based VIOS console before creating virtual disks. Refer to section 4.2.5 of
Integrated Virtualization Manager on IBM System p5, REDP-4061for detailed instructions.
After you have set up disk protection as necessary, continue with creating virtual disks:
1. Click View/Modify Virtual Storage from the left hand panel.
2. Click the Storage Pool tab at the top of the right hand panel.
3. Click the Create Storage Pool tab.
4. Enter a name for this storage pool. Leave the default of Logical volume based selected.
You may leave the Assign as default storage pool box checked to make creating logical
volumes easier in later sections.
5. Select as many of the physical volumes from the listing at the bottom of the screen as
needed to size the storage pool.
6. Click OK when finished.
Note: You may receive an error message about the disk having previously been assigned
to another storage pool. You should correct the assignment if you have made a mistake, or
check the box force physical volume addition at the bottom to continue.
Return to the Storage Pool tab to see the size of the storage pool that was created. This pool
is now ready to divide into individual virtual disks.
Performance hint: Guest partitions operate differently if they are presented with various
numbers of disks and sizes. For instance, IBM i performs better if presented with more than
4 disk units (virtual or physical). Take this into consideration when dividing the storage pool
into virtual disks.
7. Click View/Modify Virtual Storage from the left hand panel.
8. Click the Virtual Disks tab, and then the Create Virtual Disk button from the window.
9. Select a naming convention for the virtual disk names. Enter the first name in the Virtual
disk name window.

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10.Select the appropriate storage pool to get the storage from and select the amount of
storage to assign to the virtual disk. Be careful to change the MB (megabytes) to GB
(gigabytes) as appropriate for your size selection.
Caution: Sizing the disk is dependent on the operating system you want to install ad
the anticipated workload. For instance the first virtual disk must meet the minimum disk
size for the operating system being loaded. You should consult the IBM Information
Center for specific disk size requirements.

Note: You may assign this single virtual disk to your partition at this time, or create all
the virtual disks and assign them to the partition at one time later.
11.Click OK when finished.
When finished creating the first virtual disk, it will show up in the Virtual Disk screen.
Continue repeating steps 7 through 11 to create additional virtual disks for your partition at
this time.
The final step is to assign the virtual disk to the logical partition:
12.Click the View/modify Virtual Storage from the left hand panel.
13.Click the Virtual Disk tab, and check all the virtual disk units to be assigned.
14.Click the Modify partition assignment button.
15.Click the partition from the pull down menu and click OK to finish.
You are now finished with assigning virtual storage to the client partition and can now install
the client operating system in section 2.1.5, Install Client OS on page 15.

Physical Disk Assignment


Assigning the physically attached disk is very similar to assigning physical disk to a storage
pool. To assign the physical disks:
1. Click View/Modify Virtual Storage from the left hand panel.
2. Click the Physical Volumes tab from the right hand panel.
3. Select the physical volumes to be assigned with the check box to the left.
4. Click the Modify partition assignment button.
5. Select the partition from the pull-down menu.
6. Click OK to finish.
Continue with the installation of the client operating system in the next section.

2.1.5 Install Client OS


The last step is to install the client operating system on the partition. These steps will vary if
you are installing AIX, IBM i, or Linux.
You must first decide if you will be installing from the physical media in the CD/DVD drive of
the server or from image files uploaded into the VIOS environment. In either case, the VIOS
server will not switch to the next CD/DVD image when the client operating system requests it.
You will have to manually change the CD/DVD or change the file assigned to the virtual
optical drive.
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Here is an example of installing IBM i from the physical media.


You will need IBM System i Access for Windows installed on a PC to configure the LAN
console for accessing the partition during installation of IBM i. See the IBM Information
Center for detailed information on installing and configuring the LAN console.
To begin the install, assign the physical CD/DVD drive to the partition:
1. Click the View/Modify Virtual Storage from the left hand panel.
2. Click the Optical/Tape tab on the right hand panel.
3. If necessary, expand the Physical Optical Devices section.
4. Select the cd0 device and click the Modify partition assignment button.
5. Select the partition from the pull-down menu and click OK.
The physical CD/DVD drive in the server now belongs to that partition.
Next, we will select the IPL type for the IBM i partition and verify other partition settings.
6. Click the View/Modify Partitions from the left hand panel. In the right hand panel check
the partition and use the More-Tasks pull down menu and click properties.
7. Change the IPL type to D (IPL from CD/DVD) and change the keylock position to Manual.
8. Place the I_Base_01 CD in the CD/DVD drive of the server. Click OK at the bottom of the
screen.
9. Select the partition again and use the Activate button to start the partition IPL.
Progress Note: In the case of IBM i, if the partition gets to the C600-4031 reference
code, the partition is operating normally and looking for the LAN console session.
If the i partition reaches reference code A600-5008, the partition was unsuccessful in
contacting the console session and you will need to troubleshoot the LAN Console
connectivity. Make sure you bridged the proper VLAN ports and the Lan console PC is
on the same subnet as the bridged Ethernet port.
Once you reach the language selection screen on the console, the installation of IBM i
proceeds the same as installing on a stand-alone server. Continue with Dedicated Service
Tools functions to add the disk to the ASP and loading the operating system.
At this point you have installed and configured VIOS and at lease one client partition. The
following sections expand on this basic installation with more advanced features.

2.2 Setting up a dual VIOS with IVM


At this time VIOS does not support dual VIO installations on the same physical server without
the use of either a Hardware Maintenance Console (HMC) or a System Director Management
Console (SDMC).

2.3 Setting up NPIV Fibre Channel with IVM


Fiber connected storage can be assigned to partitions either through assigning the physical
storage attached to them to a particular partition (see Physical Disk Assignment on
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page 15) or creating virtual Fibre Channel adapters and assigning the virtual adapter to the
partition.
Best Practices: Use the internal disk for the installation of VIOS, mirroring the rootvg
volumes. Use external SAN storage for the installation of client operating systems. This will
position the client partitions for use of partition mobility later.
To configure N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV) attached storage, we must create the virtual fiber
adapters to generate the Worldwide Port Name to allow the configuration and assignment of
the storage. To configure the virtual fiber adapters:
1. Click the View/Modify Partitions from the left hand panel.
2. Select the partition with the check box and then click Properties from the More Tasks pull
down menu.
3. Click the Storage tab.
4. Expand the Virtual Fiber Channel section.
5. If an interface is not shown, click Add to create the first interface. Select the first interface
listed (listed as Automatically Generated) and select the proper physical port from the
pull-down menu.
6. Click OK to complete the generation of Worldwide Port Names for this interface.
7. Return to the partition storage properties (steps 1, 2, and 3 above) to display the
Worldwide Port Numbers. Record these numbers for configuring the fiber attached
storage.
Once the operating system is installed and the NPIV attached storage is provisioned, the
storage should be directly assigned to the partitions operating system. VIOS will have no
knowledge of the storage. You should use the normal procedures for adding newly attached
storage to the operating system (AIM, IBM i or Linux.)
Now that you have finished install with the Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM), you can
increase RAS of the configuration using the advanced topics in Chapter 5, Advanced
Configuration on page 77.

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Chapter 3.

Setting up using Hardware


Management Console
The HMC first appeared managing Power4 Systems at a dedicated partition level where
administrators assigned whole CPUs, memory and physical adapters to partitions. The HMC
has progressed with the Power Systems virtualization from the early days of virtualization to
its current form with micropartitioning, virtualization of adapters, processors, and memory.
One of the most notable benefits HMC has over IVM is that multiple HMCs can manage a
single Power System and a single HMC can manage multiple Power Systems. A redundant
HMC setup is recommended for enterprise Power Systems.
Other differences are outlined in Table 1-1 on page 2. This chapter highlights the use of the
HMC to set up a virtualized environment on a Power System. The chapter provides a step by
step guide to first setting a single VIOS partition environment then details setting up a dual
VIOS partition and utilizing NPIV.
Before you progress through the sections in this chapter ensure you meet the following:
You are familiar with Chapter 1, Introduction to PowerVM on page 1; take note of section
1.4, Prerequisites on page 6.
HMC is installed with the latest applicable updates and is configured.
Your system is connected and visible to the HMC.
Your system status is in the Standby or Operating state.

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3.1 Single VIOS setup using HMC


Using a single VIOS in your managed server environment presents a basic setup utilizing
PowerVM via a HMC.
For the purpose of the exercise, the following adapters are cabled on the system for the
deployment of a single VIOS setup:
The first port of U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2 Quad 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express
Adapter.
The first port of U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2 Fibre Channel Serial Bus for virtual SCSI.
The second port of U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2 Fibre Channel Serial Bus for virtual Fibre
(NPIV).
For placement of your cards refer to the Adapter Placement Guide of the system you are
working on.
The basic network setup in a single VIOS environment is using the Shared Ethernet Adapter
(SEA) where a single physical Ethernet adapter is bridged to a virtual Ethernet adapter. The
virtual Ethernet adapter configured for bridging is set for one VLAN, VLAN ID 1 to be used on
the client partitions. The virtual adapter IDs for the virtual Ethernet adapters is using the
default adapter IDs allocated by the HMC.
The basic storage setup in a single VIOS environment is using (Multi Path I/O) MPIO where
the disks are configured on the VIOS partition and mapped entirely to a client partition via
virtual SCSI. The virtual adapter IDs for virtual SCSI are using the scheme in Table 1-2 on
page 5.
We are demonstrating the use of user defined adapter IDs and HMC derived adapter IDs;
either way is acceptable. You may have your own adapter ID scheme or use the default
adapter ID allocations provided by the HMC.
Section 5.1, Adapter ID numbering scheme on page 78, has more details on adapter ID
numbering.

3.1.1 Create VIOS Partition Profile


To create a VIOS Partition Profile, do the following:
1. Logon to the HMC as hscroot or with a user ID which has similar access.
2. Navigate to the Servers window panel:
Systems Management Servers
3. Select your managed system in the window frame on the right by selecting the checkbox,
circled red in Figure 3-1 on page 21.

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Figure 3-1 HMC window displaying the system in the work panel

4. Click the button which appears at the end of your managed system to open the popup
menu and click the following:
Configuration Create Logical Partition VIO Server
Figure 3-1 shows the popup menus to create the VIOS partition.
1. In the Create Partition window, specify your partitions name, and click Next.
Partition Name:

VIOS1

2. In the Partition Profile window, enter your Profile name and click Next.
Profile Name:

Normal

3. In the Processors window, ensure Shared is selected and click Next.


4. In the Processor Settings window, enter:
Desired processing units: 0.2
Maximum processing units: 10
Desired virtual processors: 2
Desired maximum processors: 10
Select the Uncapped checkbox.
Update Weight setting to 192.

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Note: The processor settings allow for the lowest utilization setting for the VIOS of 0.2
(Desired processing units) but scalable up to 2 processing units (Desired virtual
processors) if necessary. The higher weighting provides the VIOS priority over the other
logical partitions. This is detailed in depth in IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction
and Configuration, SG24-7940.
5. In the Memory Settings window, enter:
Minimum Memory:
1GB
Desired Memory:
4GB
Maximum Memory:
8GB
6. In the I/O window, select the checkboxes of:
The RAID or SAS controller where the internal disks are attached to (disk controllers
for the VIOS internal drives).
The Ethernet adapter (newer adapters are described as PCI-to-PCI Bridge) where it
has been cabled to the network.
The Fibre Channel adapter attached to the SAN fabric.
Click Add as desired and click Next.
Figure 3-2shows the adapters selected.

Figure 3-2 I/O adapter selection

7. In the Virtual Adapters window, update the Maximum virtual adapters setting.
Maximum virtual adapters: 1000
Note: There is flexibility for you to plan your own adapter numbering scheme. The
Maximum virtual adapters setting needs to be set in the Virtual Adapters window to
allow for your numbering scheme. The maximum setting is 65535 but the higher the
setting, the more memory the managed system reserves to manage the adapters.

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8. To create a virtual Ethernet adapter for Ethernet bridging, in the Virtual Adapters window
as shown in Figure 3-3 on page 23:
a. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter Ethernet Adapter
b. In the Create Virtual Ethernet Adapter window, select the Use this adapter for Ethernet
bridging checkbox and click OK.
c. The virtual Ethernet adapter is created and appears in the Virtual Adapters window.
Information: When creating the virtual Ethernet adapter we accepted the default
settings for Adapter ID, Port VLAN ID and Ethernet Bridging Priority (Trunk Priority).
These settings are customizable for a range of planning designs or standards.

Figure 3-3 Creating the virtual Ethernet adapter

9. For single VIOS partition setup, skip to step 10. For dual VIOS partition setup, continue to
create a virtual Ethernet adapter for SEA failover, in the Virtual Adapters window:
a. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter Ethernet Adapter
b. In the Create Virtual Ethernet Adapter window, update:
Port Virtual Ethernet: 99
c. Click OK. The virtual Ethernet adapter is created and appears in the Virtual Adapters
window.
10.To create the virtual SCSI adapter, in the Virtual Adapters window:
a. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter SCSI Adapter
b. In the next window, select the Only selected client partition can connect checkbox.
Update the following fields:
Adapter: 101
Client partition: 10
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Client adapter ID: 11


Click OK to accept settings.
c. The virtual SCSI adapter is created and appears in the Virtual Adapters window.
Information: For the client partition we are beginning at partition ID 10 (reserving
Partition IDs 2-9 for future VIOS or infrastructure servers). For the adapter ID we chose
101 as a numbering scheme to denote the partition and virtual device #1. As for the
Client adapter ID, 11 is chosen as the first disk adapter for the client partition.
11.The Virtual Adapter window appears with virtual adapters you created as shown in
Figure 3-4. Click Next.

Figure 3-4 Virtual Adapters window with virtual Ethernet and virtual SCSI adapter defined

12.For the remaining windows click Next until you reach the Profile Summary window.
13.On the Profile Summary window, verify your settings and click Finish.
14.Click your managed system to view the VIOS partition profile you created.
At this point, you have completed the creation of a logical partition (virtual server) for the
VIOS installation.

3.1.2 Install VIOS


There are several methods to install VIO Server:
By DVD
By the HMC using the installios command
By NIM (Network Installation Manager)

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Install via DVD


The installation steps in this section details the use of VIOS software on DVDROM.
1. Navigate to the Servers window panel:
SystemsManagement Servers <your system>
2. Select the VIOS partition in the window frame on the right by selecting the checkbox.
3. To activate the VIOS partition, click the button which appears at the end of your managed
system to open the popup menu and click the following:
Operations Activate profile
4. In the Activate Logical Partition window, click Advanced to open the advanced options
window.
5. In the advanced options window, click SMS from the Boot mode drop down menu, and
click OK.
6. Back in the Activate Logical Partition window, click OK to activate the VIOS partition.
7. Open a terminal window to the VIOS partition and observe the VIOS partition being
booted into the SMS Main Menu.
8. Chapter 2.1.1, Install VIOS on page 10, details the installation via DVD. Follow step 10
on page 11 to step 19 on page 11.
The VIOS is ready to be configured for client network and storage service.
For client storage the World Wide Port Number (WWPN) can be extracted from the Fibre
Channel adapter interface and given to the SAN Administrator for zoning. The command to
extract the WWPN is as follows:
lsdev -dev fcs0 -vpd | grep Network Address
Example 3-1shows the WWPN for Fibre Channel adapter port fcs0. To obtain the WWPN for
fcs1 run the command but replace fsc0 with fcs1.
Example 3-1 WWPN of fcs0 Fibre Channel adapter port
$ lsdev -dev fcs0 -vpd | grep "Network Address"
Network Address.............10000000C99FC3F6

To use the installios feature on the HMC you need TCP/IP details for the VIOS partition:
VIOS TCP/IP address.
The subnet mask of the VIOS TCP/IP network.
The VIO network gateway TCP/IP address.

Install using installios via HMC


The following installation steps use the installios command on the HMC console command
line interface:
1. Insert the VIOS media into the HMC DVD drive. (If there are multiple media, insert the first
DVD).
2. Log on to the HMC command line interface with an ASCII terminal emulator. (SSH to the
TCP/IP address of the HMC.
3. Enter installios on the command prompt.
4. Select your system from the list of systems connected to the HMC.
5. Select the VIOS partition you are conducting the installation on.
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6. Select the VIOS partition profile.


7. Press Enter to accept /dev/cdrom as the default source of the media.
8. Enter the VIOS TCP/IP address.
9. Enter the VIOS subnet mask.
10.Enter the VIOS TCP/IP gateway.
11.Enter auto for the VIOS adapter speed.
12.Enter auto for the VIOS adapter duplex.
13.Enter no to not configure the TCP/IP address on the VIOS after installation.
14.Select the open TCP/IP address of the HMC.
Note: At least two adapters are shown with TCP/IP addresses where one address is for
the HMC open network and the other is the private network to your systems Flexible
Service Processor (FSP) port.
15.After the HMC retrieves the Ethernet adapter details based on the VIOS partition profile
configuration, select the Ethernet adapter port that is cabled in section 3.1, Single VIOS
setup using HMC on page 20.
16.Press Enter to accept en_US as the language and locale defaults.
Note: Alternatively, if en_US is not your default language and locale, enter the
language and locale you regularly use.
17.A window should appear with the details you selected. Press Enter to proceed using the
details you have provided.
18.Review the License Agreement details. At the end of the License Agreement window enter
Y to accept.
19.If the installation media spans multiple DVDs you will be prompted to change DVDs and to
enter c to continue.
Using the details that you provided, the HMC uploads the software from installation media
to a local file system within the HMC. Network Install Manager On Linux (NIMOL) features
on HMC are used to network boot the VIOS partition and network install the VIOS
software.
20.Open a terminal window to the VIOS partition.
21.After the VIOS installation is completed and the VIOS partition boots up with login prompt,
enter padmin user ID to login.
22.When prompted, change the password to something secure.
23.Enter a to accept the VIOS software maintenance terms and conditions.
24.Enter the license -accept command to accept the VIOS license agreement.
25.To list the physical Fibre Channel adapters on the VIOS, enter the lsnports command.
Example 3-2 shows the Fibre Channel adapter ports configured on VIOS1. As we
explained in section 3.1, Single VIOS setup using HMC on page 20, the first port (T1) is
planned for virtual SCSI and the second port (T2) is planned for virtual Fibre Channel
which is explained later in this chapter.
Example 3-2 Fibre Channel Adapter port listing on VIOS1
$ lsnports

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name
fcs0
fcs1

physloc
U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2-T1
U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2-T2

fabric tports aports swwpns


1
64
64
2048
1
64
64
2048

awwpns
2046
2048

26.For client storage the World Wide Port Number (WWPN) can be extracted from the Fibre
Channel adapter interface and given to the SAN Administrator for zoning. The command
to extract the WWPN is as follows:
lsdev -dev fcsX -vpd | grep Network Address
Example 3-3 shows the WWPN for Fibre Channel adapter port fcs0. To obtain the WWPN
for fcs1 run the command but replace fsc0 with fcs1.
Example 3-3 WWPN for fcs0 Fibre Channel Adapter port
$ lsdev -dev fcs0 -vpd | grep "Network Address"
Network Address.............10000000C99FC3F6

The VIOS is ready to be configured for client network and storage service.

Install using NIM


Using NIM to install VIOS and other installations is well documented in NIM from A to Z in AIX
5L, SG24-7296 redbook. Refer to the redbook if you are unfamiliar with NIM and you wish to
use NIM to install the VIOS software and other client partition software.
This is brief outline for a VIOS NIM installation:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Register the VIOS partition as a NIM machine object.


Create an installation NIM resource object for the VIOS software.
Create a NIM resource object to be able to boot using the VIOS software.
Allocate the NIM resources you created to your VIOS partition NIM machine object.
On the HMC, boot the VIOS partition using the network interface.

If a NIM server is not available and you wish to use NIM to build a PowerVM environment on
your system, you do the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Build the VIOS partition using either DVD or installios.


Build the first client partition as an AIX NIM server.
If you plan to build a second VIOS partition, build the second VIOS using NIM.
Deploy any Linux or AIX client partitions using NIM.

3.1.3 Configure VIOS Partition


Configure VIOS for client network
1. Logon to the VIOS terminal window by opening a console session.
2. To list the Ethernet devices configured on the VIOS to show the logical name relationship
to the physical device details, run lsdev -vpd | grep ent, see Example 3-4.
Example 3-4 Listing of VIOS Ethernet devices
$ lsdev -vpd | grep ent
ent4 U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C2-T1
ent0 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2-T1
ent1 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2-T2
ent2 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2-T3
ent3 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2-T4

Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)


4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express
4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express
4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express
4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express

Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter

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In Example 3-4, ent0 (U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2-T1) is the physical Ethernet adapter port


cabled. The U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2 Ethernet adapter is the adapter selected in
Figure 3-2 on page 22. Adapter ent4 (U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C2-T1) is the virtual
Ethernet adapter shown in Figure 3-4 on page 24.
Note: For the virtual ethernet adapter U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C2-T1, the V in V1
indicates it is a virtual adapter and C2 indicates it is a slot with adapter ID 2 as shown in
step 11 on page 24.
If you plan to use 802.3ad Link Aggregation have your respective adapters cabled and the
network switch ports configured for 802.3ad Link Aggregation. To create the Link
Aggregation adapter enter,
mkvdev -lnaggr <entX> <entY> -attr mode=8023ad
or using cfgassist:
a. Enter cfgassist on the command line.
b. Select the Devices Link Aggregation Adapter Add a Link Aggregation
Adapter menu options.
c. In the Target Adapters field, enter the physical network adapters (spaces between
each physical network adapter).
d. In the ATTRIBUTES field, enter mode=8023ad.
To list all physical Ethernet adapters and EtherChannel adapters available for creating an
SEA, enter ledev -type ent4sea
3. Create the SEA adapter which bridges the physical adapter and the virtual adapter,
where:
ent0 is the physical adapter found in step 2 (use EtherChannel adapter if one has been
created for the SEA configuration.
ent4 is the virtual adapter found in step 2.
1 is the Port VLAN ID of ent4 where we had accepted the default Port VLAN ID
allocation.
mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 1
In Example 3-5, the SEA virtual network devices are created:
ent5 is an Ethernet network adapter device.
en5 is a standard Ethernet network interface where TCP/IP addresses are assigned.
et5 is an IEEE 802.3 Ethernet network interface.
Example 3-5 Create SEA interface
$ mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 1
ent5 Available
en5
et5

4. Configure the TCP/IP connection for the VIOS with details provided by the network
administrator. Example 3-6, is a sample provided for this exercise.
Example 3-6 Sample network parameters
The following details are provided:
network ip address: 172.16.22.15
network subnet: 255.255.252.0
network gateway: 172.16.20.1

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mktcpip -hostname vios1 -interface en5 -inetaddr 172.16.22.15 -netmask


255.255.252.0 -gateway 172.16.20.1
or via cfgassist:
a. Enter cfgassist on the command line.
b. Select the VIOS TCP/IP Configuration menu item.
c. Select en5 which is the SEA interface created in step 3 and press Enter.
d. Enter the TCPIP details in Example 3-6.
Note: Interface en5 is the SEA adapter created in 3 on page 28. Alternatively, an
additional virtual adapter may be created for the VIOS remote connection, or
another physical adapter may be used (it will need to be cabled) for the TCP/IP
remote connection.
TCP and UDP port 657 must be open between the HMC and the VIOS. This is a
requirement for DLPAR (using RMC protocol).

Configure VIOS for client storage


You may encounter a scenario where the SAN Administrator has allocated a group of disks
but there only one disk is planned for the client partition. For the purpose of this exercise the
SAN administrator has allocated the disk with LUN ID:
60:0a:0b:80:00:11:46:32:00:00:92:78:4e:c5:0f:0b.
The following steps configure and map the disks to the client partition:
5. List any Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol devices that are configured on the VIOS,
enter lsdev | grep fscsi.
In Example 3-7, fscsi0 and fscsi1 are the Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol devices
configured on VIOS1. Their attributes are to be updated to allow for dynamic tracking and
fast failover (applicable for multi Fibre Channel adapter VIOS).
Example 3-7 List of Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol devices on VIOS1
$ lsdev | grep fscsi
fscsi0
Available
fscsi1
Available

FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol Device


FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol Device

6. Update the Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol devices attributes listed in step 5 to
enable dynamic tracking and fast failover, enter:
chdev -dev fscsi0 -attr dyntrk=yes fc_err_recov=fast_fail
chdev -dev fscsi1 -attr dyntrk=yes fc_err_recov=fast_fail
Note: If the Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol device is busy, append the flag -perm
to the command to update the VIOS database only. The attributes are not applied to the
device until the VIOS is rebooted. For example:
chdev -dev fscsi0 -attr dyntrk=yes fc_err_recov=fast_fail -perm

Recomendation: The fast_fail and dyntrk setting is useful in a multi-Fibre Channel


adapter setup or dual VIOS setup. The fast_fail setting allows I/O to immediately fail if
the adapter detects link events such a lost link between the Fibre Channel adapter and
SAN switch port. The dyntrk setting allows the Virtual I/O Server to tolerate cabling
changes in the SAN.
7. To configure the disks on the VIOS, enter cfgdev.

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8. List the disks on the VIOS partition and to show what type of disk, enter lsdev -type
disk.In Example 3-8, VIOS1 lists 2 internal SAS disks and 6 DS4800 disks.
Example 3-8 List disks with its type on VIOS1
$ lsdev -type disk
name
status
hdisk0
Available
hdisk1
Available
hdisk2
Available
hdisk3
Available
hdisk4
Available
hdisk5
Available
hdisk6
Available
hdisk7
Available

description
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk

9. To confirm the SAN LUN ID on VIOS1, enter lsdev -dev hdiskX -attr | grep -i -E
reserve|unique_id for each of the disks listed in step 8 on page 30 until the correct disk
is found with LUN ID provided by the SAN administrator. Example 3-9 shows the hdisk
which the SAN administrator had assigned. Note also, the SCSI reserve policy has been
set with single_path and this setting will need to be updated with no SCSI reserve locks.
The LUN ID is embedded in the unique_id string for hdisk6, beginning with the 6th
character.
Example 3-9 Disk attributes of hdisk6
$ lsdev -dev hdisk6 -attr | grep -E "unique_id|reserve"
reserve_policy single_path Reserve Policy
True
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000114632000092784EC50F0B0F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp Unique
device identifier
False

Information: Disks using EMC PowerPath, IBM SDDPCM, and IBM SDD drivers also
have their LUN IDS embedded in the unique_id string. Use their supplied commands to
show the LUN IDS in a more readable format. Refer to their respective manuals to
obtain the disks complete with LUN IDS.
EMC disks appear with hdiskpowerX notation and SDD disks appear with vpathX
notation. Use their disk notations with the lsdev command sequence instead of hdisk.
Other disk subsystems may use different fields to set their SCSI reserve locks. Use the
lsdev command sequence without the pipe to grep, i.e. lsdev -dev sampledisk -attr.
10.To deactivate the SCSI reserve lock on the disk, in this case hdisk6, enter:
chdev -dev hdisk6 -attr reserve_policy=no_policy
Note: Ignore this step if the disks are using SDDPCM and SDD drivers as the SCSI
reserve locks are already deactivated. For EMC disks and disks using native MPIO it is
necessary to deactivate the SCSI reserve locks.
The SCSI reserve lock attribute differs among disk subsystems. The IBM System
Storage SCSI reserve lock attribute is reserve_policy as displayed in Example 3-9.
The attribute on EMC disk subsystem is reserve_lock.
If you are unsure of the allowable value to use to deactivate the SCSI reserve lock, the
following command will provide a list of allowable values, in this case: lsdev -dev
hdisk6 -range reserve_policy

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11.To determine the virtual adapter name of the virtual SCSI adapter created in step 10 on
page 23, enter:
lsdev -vpd | grep Virtual SCSI
In Example 3-10, the virtual SCSI adapter with server Adapter ID C101 is vhost0 to use in
the next step.
Example 3-10 List of Virtual SCSI devices
$ lsdev -vpd | grep "Virtual SCSI"
vhost0
U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C101 Virtual SCSI Server Adapter

12.The MPIO 1 setup is used to map whole LUNS to client OS partitions. To map hdisk6 to
CLIENT1, enter:
mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost0.
where:
hdisk6 is the disk found in step 9 on page 30.
vhost0 is the virtual server SCSI adapter with adapter ID 101 created for CLIENT1,
found in step 10 on page 30.
In Example 3-11, the Virtual Target Device (VTD) vtscsi0 is created.
Example 3-11 Create disk mapping to client partition
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost0
vtscsi0 Available

13.To check mapped devices to vhost0, enter:


lsmap -vadapter vhost0
In Example 3-12, the vhost0 virtual SCSI adapter shows one disk mapped, where hdisk6
is mapped to the vtscsi0 device.
Example 3-12 vhost0 disk mapping
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost0
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost0
U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C101
0x0000000a
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
Mirrored

vtscsi0
Available
0x8100000000000000
hdisk6
U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2-T1-W202200A0B811A662-L5000000000000
false

3.1.4 Create Client OS Logical Partition Profile


We are creating a client partition using the following:
Partition ID: 10
Partition Name: CLIENT1
Profile Name: Normal
Processing Units: 0.2
Virtual Processors: 4
Virtual Ethernet adapter using the default adapter ID allocation: 2
Virtual SCSI adapter using adapter ID: 11

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The following procedure creates an AIX or Linux partition, however the steps can also be
applied to create an IBM i partition. Navigate to the Servers window panel:
1. Select your managed system in the window frame on the right by selecting the checkbox.
2. Click the button which appears at the end of your managed system to open the popup
menu and click the following:
Configuration Create Logical Partition AIX or Linux
3. In the Create Partition window, specify your partitions ID and name, and click Next.
Partition ID:
Partition Name:

10
CLIENT1

4. In the Partition Profile window, enter your Profile name and click Next.
Profile Name:

Normal

5. In the Processors window, ensure Shared option is selected and click Next.
6. In the Processor Settings window, enter:
Desired processing units: 0.4
Maximum processing units: 10
Desired virtual processors: 4
Desired maximum processors: 10
Select the Uncapped checkbox.
7. In the Memory Settings window, enter:
Minimum Memory:
Desired Memory:
Maximum Memory:

1GB
16GB
24GB

8. In the I/O window, click Next.


9. In the Virtual Adapters window, update the Maximum virtual adapters setting:
Maximum virtual adapters: 50
10.To create virtual Ethernet adapters, in the Virtual Adapters window:
a. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter Ethernet Adapter
b. In the Create Virtual Ethernet Adapter window, click OK.
c. The virtual Ethernet adapter is created and appears in the Virtual Adapters window.
11.To create the virtual SCSI adapter, in the Virtual Adapters window:
a. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter SCSI Adapter
b. In the Create Virtual SCSI Adapter window, select the Only selected client partition can
connect checkbox. Update the following:
Adapter: 11
Server partition: 1
Server adapter ID: 101
Click OK to accept settings
c. The virtual SCSI adapter is created and appears in the Virtual Adapters window.
12.For a single VIOS setup, skip to step 13. For a dual VIOS setup, create an additional
virtual SCSI adapter to map to VIOS2 virtual server SCSI adapter:
a. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter SCSI Adapter
b. In the next window, select the Only selected client partition can connect checkbox.
Update the following:

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Adapter: 21
Server partition: 2
Server adapter ID: 101
Click OK to accept the settings
c. The virtual SCSI adapter is created and appears in the Virtual Adapters window.
13.The Virtual Adapter window appears with virtual adapters you created. Click Next.
14.For the remaining windows click Next until you reach the Profile Summary window.
15.On the Profile Summary window, click Finish.
16.Click your managed system to view the partition profile you created.

3.2 Dual VIOS setup using HMC


The benefit of a dual VIOS setup is that it promotes Redundancy, Accessibility and
Serviceability (RAS). It also offers load balancing capabilities for MPIO and for multi SEA
configuration setups.
The differences between a single and dual VIOS setup are:
The additional VIOS partition
The additional virtual Ethernet adapter used as the SEA Control Channel adapter per
VIOS
Setting the trunk priority on the virtual Ethernet adapters used for bridging to physical
adapters in an SEA configuration
The Trunk Priority determines which virtual adapter is to be the primary adapter in an SEA
failover setup.
On the client partition, no additional virtual Ethernet adapters are required. However, an
additional client virtual SCSI adapter is required because there is a one to one mapping to the
server virtual SCSI adapter.
Note: Each VIOS is configured with a server virtual SCSI adapter for the client partition.
If you are planning to update from a single VIOS setup to a dual VIO setup, DLPAR
operations can be utilized to avoid interfering with the operations of a deployed VIOS or client
partition.
The dual VIOS setup expands on the single VIOS setup. The following steps to creating a
dual VIOS setup is using the adapter ID allocation is Table 1-2 on page 5 for VIOS1 and
Table 1-3 on page 5 for VIOS2.
If you have completed the single VIOS setup and are looking to change to a dual VIOS setup
keep the adapter IDs as consistent as possible.
You may have your own adapter ID scheme you want to use or use the default adapter ID
allocations.

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3.2.1 Create dual VIOS partition profiles


Follow these steps to create partition profiles for VIOS1 and VIOS2:
1. Skip to step 4 on page 34 if the VIOS1 partition does not exist. Update the VIOS1 partition
profile to add the virtual Ethernet adapter for SEA failover:
a. Via the DLPAR method, select the client partition by selecting its checkbox.
b. Click the button which appears at the end of your client partition to open the popup
menu and click the following: Dynamic Logical Partitioning Virtual Adapters
c. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter Ethernet Adapter...
d. In the Create Virtual Ethernet Adapter window, update:
Port Virtual Ethernet: 99
e. Click OK. The virtual Ethernet adapter is created with Adapter ID 3 and appears in the
Virtual Adapters window along with virtual Ethernet for bridging with Adapter ID 2 and
server virtual SCSI adapter with Adapter ID 101 as shown in Figure 3-5.

Figure 3-5 Virtual Adapters window showing virtual adapters created

f. Click OK to dynamically add the virtual Ethernet adapter.


2. To save the DLPAR updates to VIOS1 to its profile, click the button which appears at the
end of your client partition to open the popup menu and click the following:
Configuration Save Current Configuration
Note: DLPAR is reliant on the RMC connectivity between the HMC and VIOS1. If
DLPAR fails use steps a on page 41 to steps i on page 41 as a reference to create the
virtual Ethernet adapter for SEA failover.
3. In the new window, Save Partition Configuration, click OK. Go to step 5 to create the
VIOS2 partition profile.
4. To create the VIOS1partition profile, follow the steps in section 3.1.1, Create VIOS
Partition Profile on page 20.
5. To create the VIOS2 partition profile, follow the steps in section 3.1.1, Create VIOS
Partition Profile on page 20.

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Important Changes to VIOS2:


The priority of the virtual Ethernet adapters used for bridging must be different. By
default VIOS1 is created with a priority of 1. For VIOS2, when the virtual Ethernet
adapter used for bridging is being created in step 8 on page 23, the priority is set to
2.
For VIOS1 and VIOS2, ensure the virtual Ethernet adapters used for SEA failover in
step 9 on page 23 are created with the same Port VLAN ID. This is essential for inter
VIOS communication.
For VIOS2, ensure the virtual SCSI adapter in step 10 on page 23 is created with a
different client adapter ID than VIOS1:
Adapter: 101
Client partition: 10
Client adapter ID: 22

Important:
For virtual Ethernet adapters to be used as SEA failover adapters:
The Port Virtual Ethernet ID (also known as VLAN ID) must be consistent for VIOS1
and VIOS2.
The Port Virtual Ethernet ID must not be a known VLAN ID on the network.
The virtual Ethernet adapter must not be configured for IEEE 802.1Q
The virtual Ethernet adapter must not be bridged to a physical adapter.
6. VIOS1 and VIOS2 should appear in your system server listing. Their partition profiles are
ready to use for the installation process.

3.2.2 Install VIOS


The two VIOS partitions can be installed using the options in 3.1.2, Install VIOS on page 24.

3.2.3 Configure VIOS partitions for dual setup


This section describes how to configure the partitions for a dual VIOS configuration.

Configure VIOS for client network


Skip to step 7 on page 36 if you have a newly installed VIOS partition that has not been
configured.
If you have configured VIOS1 as a single VIOS setup and it is to be updated to serve in a dual
VIOS setup do the following:
1. Logon to the VIOS1
2. To configure the virtual Ethernet adapter created in step 1 on page 34 on VIOS1, enter
cfgdev.
3. To list the virtual Ethernet devices configured on VIOS1, enter lsdev -vpd | grep Virtual
| grep ent
Example 3-13 show the output of the command on VIOS1. Device ent6 is the SEA failover
virtual Ethernet adapter created in step 1 on page 34.

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Example 3-13 VIOS1 virtual Ethernet adapters


$ lsdev -vpd | grep Virtual | grep ent
ent6
U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C3-T1 Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
ent4
U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C2-T1 Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)

4. To query which ent device is the SEA adapter, enter lsdev -type sea. Example 3-14
shows the output for VIOS1.
Example 3-14 List the SEA adapters configured on VIOS1
$ lsdev -type sea
name
status
ent5
Available

description
Shared Ethernet Adapter

5. To update the SEA adapter to add SEA failover functionality, enter:


chdev -dev ent5 -attr ctl_chan=ent6 ha_mode=auto
where:
ent5 is the SEA adapter in step 4.
ent6 is the SEA failover virtual Ethernet Adapter in step Example 3-13.
6. To configure the VIOS2 partition, continue with step 7.
7. Logon to the VIOS terminal window.
8. To list the Ethernet devices configured on the VIOS showing the logical name relationship
to the physical device details, run lsdev -vpd | grep ent, see Example 3-4 on page 27.
Example 3-15 Listing of Ethernet devices on the VIOS
$ lsdev -vpd | grep ent
ent5 U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V2-C3-T1
ent4 U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V2-C2-T1
ent0 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C3-T1
ent1 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C3-T2
ent2 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C3-T3
ent3 U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C3-T4

Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)


Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express
4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express
4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express
4-Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express

Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter

In Example 3-4 on page 27, ent0 (U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2-T1) is the physical Ethernet


adapter port cabled. The U78A0.001.DNWHZS4-P1-C2 Ethernet adapter is the adapter
selected in Figure 3-2 on page 22. Adapter ent4 (U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C2-T1) is the
virtual Ethernet adapter shown in Figure 3-5 on page 34. Adapter ent5
(U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V2-C3-T1) is the virtual Ethernet adapter shown also in Figure 3-5 on
page 34.
If you plan to use 802.3ad Link Aggregation have your respective adapters cabled and the
network switch ports configured for 802.3ad Link Aggregation. To create the Link
Aggregation adapter enter,
mkvdev -lnaggr <entX> <entY> -attr mode=8023ad
or using cfgassist:
a. Enter cfgassist on the command line.
b. Select the Devices Link Aggregation Adapter Add a Link Aggregation
Adapter menu options.
c. In the Target Adapters field, enter the physical network adapters (spaces between
each physical network adapter).
d. In the ATTRIBUTES field, enter mode=8023ad.

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To list all physical Ethernet adapters and EtherChannel adapters available for SEA, enter
lsdev -type ent4sea
9. Create the SEA Adapter which bridges the physical adapter and the virtual adapter,
where:
ent0 is the physical adapter found in step 8 (use EtherChannel adapter if one has been
created for the SEA configuration.
ent4 is the bridging virtual adapter found in step 8.
1 is the Port VLAN ID of ent4.
ent5 is the SEA failover virtual adapter found in step 8 on page 36.
mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 1 -attr ctl_chan=ent5
ha_mode-auto
In Example 3-16.the SEA virtual network devices are created:
ent6 is an Ethernet network adapter device.
en6 is a standard Ethernet network interface where TCP/IP addresses are assigned.
et6 is an IEEE 802.3 Ethernet network interface.
Example 3-16 Create SEA interface
$ mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 1 -attr ctl_chan=ent5
ha_mode=auto
ent6 Available
en6
et6

10.Configure the TCP/IP connection for the VIOS with details provided by the network
administrator. Example 3-17 is a sample provided for this exercise.
Example 3-17 Sample network parameters
The following details are provided:
network ip address: 172.16.22.15
network subnet: 255.255.252.0
network gateway: 172.16.20.1

mktcpip -hostname vios1 -interface en6 -inetaddr 172.16.22.15 -netmask


255.255.252.0 -gateway 172.16.20.1
or via cfgassist:
a. cfgassist VIOS TCP/IP Configuration
b. Select en5 which is the SEA interface created in step 3 on page 28 and click Enter.
c. Enter the TCPIP details in Example 3-17.

Configure VIOS for client storage


You may encounter a scenario where the SAN Administrator has allocated a group of disks
but there only one of the disks is planned for the client partition. For the purpose of this
exercise the SAN administrator has allocated disk with LUN ID:
60:0a:0b:80:00:11:46:32:00:00:92:78:4e:c5:0f:0b.
The following steps configure and map the disks to the target client partition:
11.List any Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol devices that are configured on the VIOS,
enter lsdev | grep fscsi,
In Example 3-18, fscsi0 and fscsi1 are the Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol devices
configured on VIOS1. Their attributes are updated to allow for dynamic tracking and fast
failover (applicable for multi Fibre Channel adapter VIOS).

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Example 3-18 List of Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol devices on VIOS1
$ lsdev | grep fscsi
fscsi0
Available
fscsi1
Available

FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol Device


FC SCSI I/O Controller Protocol Device

12.Update the Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol device attributes listed in step 5 on
page 36 to enable dynamic tracking and fast failover, enter:
chdev -dev fscsi0 -attr dyntrk=yes fc_err_recov=fast_fail
chdev -dev fscsi1 -attr dyntrk=yes fc_err_recov=fast_fail
Note: If the Fibre Channel adapter SCSI protocol device is busy, append the flag -perm
to the command to update the VIOS database only. The attributes are not applied to the
device until the VIOS is rebooted. For example,
chdev -dev fscsi0 -attr dyntrk=yes fc_err_recov=fast_fail -perm
13.To configure the disks on the VIOS, enter cfgdev.
14.List the disks on the VIOS partition and to show what type of disk, enter lsdev -type
disk.In Example 3-19, VIOS1 lists 2 internal SAS disks and 6 DS4800 disks.
Example 3-19 List disks with their type on VIOS1
$ lsdev -type disk
name
status
hdisk0
Available
hdisk1
Available
hdisk2
Available
hdisk3
Available
hdisk4
Available
hdisk5
Available
hdisk6
Available
hdisk7
Available

description
SAS Disk Drive
SAS Disk Drive
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk
MPIO DS4800 Disk

15.To confirm the SAN LUN ID on VIOS1, enter lsdev -dev hdiskX -attr | grep -i -E
reserve|unique_id for each of the disks listed in step 8 on page 36 until the correct disk
is found with LUN ID provided by the SAN administrator. Example 3-20 shows the hdisk
which the SAN administrator had assigned. Note also, the SCSI reserve policy has been
set with single_path and this setting will need to be updated with no SCSI reserve locks.
The LUN ID is embedded in the unique_id string for hdisk6
Example 3-20 Disk attributes of hdisk6
$ lsdev -dev hdisk6 -attr | grep -E "unique_id|reserve"
reserve_policy single_path Reserve Policy
True
unique_id
3E213600A0B8000114632000092784EC50F0B0F1815
FAStT03IBMfcp Unique
device identifier
False

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Information: disks using EMC PowerPath, IBM SDDPCM, and IBM SDD drivers also
have their LUN IDS embedded in the unique_id string. Use their supplied commands to
show the LUN IDS in a more readable format. Refer to their respective manuals to
obtain the disks complete with LUN IDS.
EMC disks appear with hdiskpowerX notation and SDD disks appear with vpathX
notation. Use their disk notations with the lsdev command sequence instead of hdisk.
Other disks subsystems may use different fields to set their SCSI reserve locks. Use
the lsdev command sequence without the pipe to grep, i.e. lsdev -dev sampledisk
-attr.
16.To deactivate the SCSI reserve lock on the disk in this case is hdisk6, enter:
chdev -dev hdisk6 -attr reserve_policy=no_policy
Note: Ignore this step if the disks are using SDDPCM and SDD drivers as the SCSI
reserve locks are already deactivated. For EMC disks and disks using native MPIO it is
necessary to deactivate the SCSI reserve locks.
The SCSI reserve lock attribute differs among disk subsystems. The IBM System
Storage SCSI reserve lock attribute is reserve_policy as displayed in Example 3-9.
The attribute on EMC disk subsystem is reserve_lock.
If you are unsure of the allowable value to use to deactivate the SCSI reserve lock, the
following command will provide a list of allowable values, in this case: lsdev -dev
hdisk6 -range reserve_policy
17.To determine the virtual adapter name of the virtual SCSI adapter created in step 10 on
page 23, run:
lsdev -vpd | grep Virtual SCSI
In Example 3-21, the virtual SCSI adapter with server Adapter ID C101 is vhost0 to use in
the next step.
Example 3-21 List of Virtual SCSI devices
$ lsdev -vpd | grep "Virtual SCSI"
vhost0
U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C101 Virtual SCSI Server Adapter

18.The MPIO setup is used to map whole LUNS to client OS partitions. To map hdisk hdisk6
to CLIENT1, enter:
mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost0
where:
hdisk6 is the disk found in step 9 on page 30.
vhost0 is the virtual server SCSI adapter found in step 10 on page 30.
In Example 3-22, the Virtual Target Device (VTD) vtscsi0 is created.
Example 3-22 Create disk mapping to client partition
$ mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost0
vtscsi0 Available

19.To check mapped devices to vhost0, enter:


lsmap -vadapter vhost0

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In Example 3-23, the vhost0 virtual SCSI adapter shows one disk mapped, where hdisk6
is mapped to the vtscsi0 VTD device.
Example 3-23 Disk mapping for vhost0
$ lsmap -vadapter vhost0
SVSA
Physloc
Client Partition ID
--------------- -------------------------------------------- -----------------vhost0
U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C101
0x0000000a
VTD
Status
LUN
Backing device
Physloc
Mirrored

vtscsi0
Available
0x8100000000000000
hdisk6
U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2-T1-W202200A0B811A662-L5000000000000
false

20.Repeat steps 7 on page 36 through 19 on page 39, to configure the VIOS2 partition. For
step 7 on page 36, ensure you logon to the VIOS2 terminal window.

3.2.4 Create Client OS Logical Partition Profile


Create the client partition profile using section 3.1.4, Create Client OS Logical Partition
Profile on page 31.
Alternatively, if the client partition profile already exists and you wish to configure an
additional virtual SCSI adapter, this can be done in two ways:
Add the virtual SCSI adapter via DLPAR and then save the current configuration
overwriting the current profile (the client partition must be running and have RMC
connectivity to the HMC):
a. Select your client partition checkbox.
b. Click the button which appears at the end of your client partition to open the popup
menu and click the following: Dynamic Logical Partitioning Virtual Adapters
c. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter SCSI Adapter
d. In the Create Virtual SCSI Adapter window, select the Only selected client partition can
connect checkbox. Update the following:
Adapter: 22
Server partition: 2
Server adapter ID: 101
e. Click OK to accept the settings.
f. Click OK to dynamically add the virtual SCSI adapter.
g. Click the button which appears at the end of your client partition to open the popup
menu and click the following: Configuration Save Current Configuration
h. In the new window, Save Partition Configuration, click OK.
i. Click Yes to confirm the save.
Update the client partition profile to add the additional virtual SCSI adapter; then
shutdown the client partition (if it is running) and activate the client partition.
Note: Shutting down the client partition and then activating it causes the client partition
to re-read its profile. A partition reboot does not re-read the partition profile.

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a. Click the button which appears at the end of your client partition to open the popup
menu and click the following: Configuration Manage Profiles
b. Click the profile to update.
c. Click the Virtual Adapters tab.
d. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter SCSI Adapter
e. In the next window, select the Only selected client partition can connect checkbox.
Update the following:
Adapter: 22
Server partition: 2
Server adapter ID: 101
f. Click OK to accept settings.
g. Click OK to save the profile.
h. Run the shutdown command on the client partition.
i. After the client partition appears with the Not Activated state, activate the client
partition.

3.3 Setup virtual Fibre Channel using HMC


Virtual Fibre Channel allows disks to be assigned directly to the client partitions from the SAN
storage system. With virtual SCSI, the disks are assigned to the VIOS partition before they
are mapped to a virtual SCSI adapter.
The preference is to still use virtual SCSI for client partition operating system disk, and use
virtual Fibre Channel for the data. The reasons for using virtual SCSI for client partition
operating system disks are:
When the disks are assigned VIOS first, they can be checked before having them mapped
to a client. Whereas using virtual Fibre Channel this cannot be determined until the client
partition is loaded from an installation source.
Operating systems such as AIX and Linux have their kernels running in memory. If serious
SAN issues are being experienced, the VIOS will first detect the problem and sever the
link to the client partition. The client partition will halt abruptly reducing any risk to data
corruption. With operating systems using virtual Fibre Channel or physical Fibre Channel,
the partition will remain running for a period. During that period the client partition is
susceptible to data corruption.
Operating system disks using virtual SCSI are not reliant on external device drivers
whereas operating system disks using virtual Fibre Channel are. When it comes to
upgrading the external device drivers, the client partitions would need to follow special
procedures to upgrade.
There is a one-to-one relationship between a server virtual Fibre Channel adapter and a
client virtual Fibre Channel adapter.
For a single VIOS setup, the VIOS is configured with one virtual Fibre Channel adapter and
the client partition is configured with one virtual Fibre Channel adapter mapped to each other.
For a dual VIOS setup, each of the VIOS servers is configured with one virtual Fibre Channel
adapter and the client partition is configured with two virtual Fibre Channel adapters mapped
to each of the VIOS virtual Fibre Channel adapters.

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The virtual Fibre Channel adapters can be added to existing partition profiles similarly to the
virtual SCSI adapters described in 3.2.4, Create Client OS Logical Partition Profile on
page 40.
Use the DLPAR method in previous sections to add the server virtual Fibre Channel adapter
to the VIOS and the corresponding client virtual Fibre Channel adapter to client partition.

Update the VIOS partition profile


1. On the HMC, select the VIOS1 partitions checkbox.
2. Click the button which appears at the end of the client partition to open the popup menu
and click Dynamic Logical Partitioning Virtual Adapters as shown in Figure 3-6 on
page 42.

Figure 3-6 Create virtual adapter using DLPAR

3. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter Fibre Channel Adapter.


4. In the Create Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter window, enter the following:
Adapter: 102
Client partition: 10
Client adapter ID: 12
Click OK to accept the settings.
5. Click OK to dynamically add the virtual Fibre Channel adapter.

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6. Click the button which appears at the end of your client partition to open the popup menu
and click Configuration Save Current Configuration as shown in Figure 3-7 on
page 43.

Figure 3-7 Save current configuration to a profile

7. In the Save Partition Configuration window, click OK.


8. Click Yes to confirm the save, overwriting the existing profile.

Update the client partition profile


9. On the HMC, select the client partitions checkbox.
10.Click the button which appears at the end of your client partition to open the popup menu
and click Dynamic Logical Partitioning Virtual Adapters.
11.Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter Fibre Channel Adapter.
12.In the Create Virtual Fibre Channel Adapter window, enter the following:
Adapter: 12
Server partition: 1
Server adapter ID: 102
Click OK to accept settings
13.The Virtual Adapter window appears with the virtual Fibre Channel adapters created as
shown in Figure 3-8 on page 44. Click OK to dynamically add the virtual Fibre Channel
adapter.

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Figure 3-8 The client Virtual Adapter window

14.Click the button which appears at the end of your client partition to open the popup menu
and click Configuration Save Current Configuration.
15.In the new window, Save Partition Configuration window, click OK.
16.Click Yes to confirm the save.

Mapping virtual Fibre Channel adapters on VIOS


17.Log on to the VIOS partition.
18.To list the physical Fibre Channel adapters on the VIOS, enter the lsnports command.
In Example 3-24, fcs0 is the first adapter port zoned for allocation of disks for virtual SCSI
and fcs1 is the second adapter port zoned for NPIV. This is planned in section 3.1, Single
VIOS setup using HMC on page 20.
Example 3-24 List of physical Fibre Channel adapter ports on VIOS
$ lsnports
name
fcs0
fcs1

physloc
U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2-T1
U5802.001.0087356-P1-C2-T2

fabric tports aports swwpns


1
64
64
2048
1
64
64
2048

awwpns
2046
2048

19.To configure the virtual Fibre Channel adapter added via DLPAR in step 4 on page 42,
enter the cfgdev command.
20.To list the virtual Fibre Channel adapters, enter:
lsdev -vpd | grep vfchost
In Example 3-25 on page 45, one virtual Fibre Channel adapter is listed with an adapter
slot ID of 102 (C102) created in step 4 on page 42 called vfchost0.

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Example 3-25 List of virtual Fibre Channel adapters on the VIOS


$ lsdev -vpd | grep vfchost
vfchost0
U8233.E8B.061AB2P-V1-C102 Virtual FC Server Adapter

21.To map the client virtual Fibre Channel adapter to the physical Fibre Channel adapter
zoned for NPIV, enter:
vfcmap -vadapter vfchost0 -fcp fcs1
Note: You can map multiple client virtual Fibre Channel adapters to a physical Fibre
Channel adapter port. Up to 64 client virtual Fibre Channel adapters can be active at
one time per physical Fibre Channel adapter.
22.To verify the virtual Fibre Channel mapping for vfchost0, enter:
lsmap -vadapter vfchost0 -npiv
or to list all virtual Fibre Channel mapping on the VIOS, enter:
lsmap -all -npiv
23.If you have a dual VIOS setup, repeat step 1 on page 42 through step 21 for VIOS2.
Ensure the client partition adapter IDs are unique.

3.4 Additional client partitions


If you have additional client partitions to add then the following steps needs to be completed:
Create the virtual VSCI and virtual Fibre Channel adapters on the VIOS, described in step
step 1 on page 42 through step 8 on page 43. Repeat again for the other VIOS if you have
a dual VIOS setup.
Create the client partition profile, described in section 3.1.4, Create Client OS Logical
Partition Profile on page 31.
Note: Add virtual Fibre Channel adapters if required.
Configure the VIOS server virtual SCSI adapter mapping to the client virtual SCSI
adapter, described in step 13 on page 38 through step 19 on page 39. Repeat again for
the other VIOS if you have a dual VIOS setup.
Configure the VIOS server virtual Fibre Channel adapter mapping to the client virtual
Fibre Channel adapter, described in step 17 on page 44 through step 23. Repeat again for
the other VIOS if you have a dual VIOS setup.

3.5 Summary
In this chapter you have created either a single or dual VIOS environment for client partitions.
For setting up the virtual network we used default options for the virtual Ethernet adapter IDs
and VLAN IDs; for virtual SCSI and virtual Fibre Channel we used specific adapter IDs.
The use of specific adapter IDs or default adapter IDs is entirely your choice. Chapter 5,
Advanced Configuration on page 77 discusses the advantages of using specific adapter IDs
which would fall under your own adapter ID numbering scheme. The chapter also discusses
other advanced configurations such as setting redundant adapters for your network and
storage setup.
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Chapter 4.

Setting up using the SDMC


The IBM Systems Director Management Console (SDMC) provides system administrators the
ability to manage IBM Power System servers as well as IBM Power Blade servers. The SDMC
organizes tasks in a single panel that simplifies views of systems and day-to-tay tasks. The
SDMC is also designed to be integrated into the administrative framework of IBM Systems
Director.
The SDMC can automatically handle the slot allocation of virtual adapters for the user. With
the SDMC the user can choose to either let the SDMC manage the slot allocations, or use the
traditional manual mechanism to allocate the virtual adapter IDs.
The first part of this chapter explains how to easily create the dual VIOS configuration and let
the SDMC manage slot allocations for all the virtual adapters. This first part is covered in
chapter 4.1, Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 48.
The second part of this chapter guides you through the steps outlined in Chapter 1,
Introduction to PowerVM on page 1. This part sets up a similar configuration as the first part
also using the SDMC and following the scheme for virtual adapter ID numbers described in
chapter 4.1, Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 48.
Configuration steps described in this part of the chapter are:
1. PowerVM setup with single VIOS: this part gives you a running PowerVM solution and
Virtual Server1 prepared for installation of the client operating system. This setup is
described in chapter 4.2, Single VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 57.
2. PowerVM setup with an additional VIOS: this part describes how to add Redundancy,
Accessibility and Serviceability (RAS) using a second VIOS. This setup is described in
chapter 4.3, Dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 65.
3. PowerVM setup with virtual Fibre Channel functionality: this part describes how to
configure virtual Fibre Channel adapters on the Virtual Server. This setup is described in
chapter 4.4, Setup virtual Fibre Channel using the SDMC on page 72.

Virtual Server is the SDMC terminology for a virtualized guest server running its own operating system.

Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.

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4.1 Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC


This part of the chapter describes how to easily create a PowerVM dual VIOS configuration
using the IBM Systems Director Management Console (SDMC) using the functionality of the
SDMC to automatically handle the allocation of slot numbers for virtual adapters. The final
configuration uses these functions of the PowerVM:
Virtual SCSI adapters to provide the disk for Virtual Server operating system.
Virtual Ethernet adapters to provide LAN connectivity to Virtual Server for client OS.
Highly available virtual Ethernet connection using Shared Ethernet Adapter failover
functionality.
Virtual Fibre Channel adapters to provide disk for Virtual Server (for data storage).
All the virtual SCSI adapters and the virtual Fibre Channel adapters are dual to both VIOSes.
This enables using multiple paths to the virtualized disks in the client operating system.
To implement guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC follow these steps:
1. Section 4.1.1, Create the Virtual Servers for VIOS1 and VIOS2 on page 48.
2. Section 4.1.2, Install VIOS1 and VIOS2 on page 50.
3. Section 4.1.4, Create the SEA failover configuration using the SDMC on page 52.
4. Section 4.1.4, Create the SEA failover configuration using the SDMC on page 52.
5. Section 4.1.5, Configure storage devices on page 53.
6. Section 4.1.6, Create Virtual Server for client OS on page 54.
7. Section 4.1.7, Install client OS on page 55.
8. Section 4.1.8, Configure virtual Fibre Channel adapters using the SDMC on page 55.
Before you proceed on in this chapter make sure you have finished these steps:
Check prerequisites in Chapter 1, Introduction to PowerVM on page 1.
The SDMC is installed and configured.
Host is already discovered and visible to the SDMC.
Your host is in Started state.

4.1.1 Create the Virtual Servers for VIOS1 and VIOS2


This part of chapter 4.1, Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 48 describes
how to create the Virtual Servers for the dual VIOS configuration. Two Virtual Servers will be
created, one for VIOS1 and the second for VIOS2.
To create the Virtual Servers log into the SDMC environment. If the Home page is not
automatically displayed, click Home from the left hand panel. From the Home page, locate
the host on which to create the Virtual Server. Select the checkbox to the left of the host, then
click Actions System Configuration Create Virtual Server as shown in Figure 4-1 on
page 49.

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Figure 4-1 Creation of the Virtual Server in the SDMC

Follow these steps to create the Virtual Server for VIOS1:


1. On the Name screen enter the following values and then click Next.
Virtual Server name: VIOS1(You can enter any name you want)
Environment:
VIOS (from the pull down menu)
Leave the default values for other fields.
2. On the Memory screen select the Dedicated for Memory Mode checkbox (if present) and
enter an appropriate amount of memory in the Assigned memory field. Use 4 GB of
memory. Click Next.
Note: The amount of memory your VIOS needs depends on the functionalities of VIOS
you will use. We recommend to start with 4 GB of memory and periodically monitor the
memory usage on VIOS.
3. On the Processor screen select Shared for Processing Mode. In the Assigned Processors
field enter 1 for a single shared processor. Click Next.
Note: We recommend to start with 1 shared processor and periodically monitor the
CPU on VIOS.
4. On the Ethernet screen, expand the Virtual Ethernet part. By default the wizard creates
two virtual Ethernet adapters. The first virtual Ethernet adapter is using adapter ID 2 and
VLAN ID 1. The second virtual Ethernet adapter is using adapter ID 3 and VLAN ID 99.
The second virtual Ethernet adapter is used for control channel between two VIOSes in
dual VIOS configurations and the Shared Ethernet Adapter failover configuration. More
details about control channel and dual VIOS configuration for virtual Ethernet is in the IBM
PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940 publication.
Select the checkbox to the left of the first adapter (ID 2) and then click Edit. In the Virtual
Ethernet - Modify Adapter screen select the Use this adapter for Ethernet bridging
checkbox and enter 1 in the Priority field. The explanation of the priorities can be found in
the IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940 publication.
Click OK to confirm changes to the first Ethernet adapter. Confirm the Ethernet screen
using the Next button.

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5. Skip the Virtual Storage Adapter screen the Next button. As the client Virtual Servers are
added and assigned storage the console will automatically create the virtual SCSI or
virtual Fibre Channel server adapters.
6. On the Physical I/O Adapters screen select checkboxes to the left of the Location Code
and Description of the needed adapter. These are the physical adapters and controllers
used later to virtualize devices to the Virtual Server for client OS. To be able to use all
functionalities described in this publication you need to select:
One SAS or SCSI disk controller (controller for internal disk drives).
One Ethernet adapter (Ethernet adapter for connection to LAN).
One Fibre Channel adapter (Fibre Channel adapter for connection to SAN and a virtual
Fibre Channel configuration).
In our case we selected these physical adapters:
U78A0.001.DNWKF81-P1-T9 RAID Controller
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7 Quad 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express Adapter
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3 Fibre Channel Serial Bus
The RAID Controller selected also has the physical CD/DVD drive connected.
Recommendation: We recommend you check the physical location codes of your
adapters and that you are sure you use the correct adapters for your Virtual Server.
Sometimes the description can be misleading (for example the PCI-to-PCI bridge can
be the Ethernet adapter).
Confirm Physical I/O Adapters screen using the Next button.
7. Verify information on the Summary screen and confirm the creation of the Virtual Server
using the Finish button.
To create the Virtual Server for VIOS2 follow the same steps and change these values:
The name for Virtual server in step 1 to VIOS2 (Make sure that you choose the
Environment:VIOS).
In step 4 change the priority of virtual Ethernet adapter to 2. The Use this adapter for
Ethernet bridging checkbox must be also selected.
Select different adapters and controller in step 6. We selected these adapters:
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C2
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C5

PCI-E SAS Controller


Quad 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express Adapter
Fibre Channel Serial Bus

A more detailed description of the possible options during Virtual Server creation wizard is in
redbook IBM Systems Director Management Console: Introduction and Overview,
SG24-7860.

4.1.2 Install VIOS1 and VIOS2


This part of chapter 4.1, Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 48 describes
steps to install VIOS1 and VIOS2 into the previously created Virtual Servers. There are three
ways to install VIOS:
Install VIOS from VIOS DVD media using the allocated physical DVD drive.
Install VIOS from the SDMC command line using the installios command. The
installios command has a progressive wizard that guides you through the installation
process.

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Install VIOS using the IBM Network Installation Manager (NIM).


To install VIOS1 follow the steps in chapter 4.2.2, Install VIOS on page 60.
To install VIOS2 follow the steps in chapter 4.3.2, Install second VIOS using NIM on
page 66.
You can also use the installios command from the SDMC command line to install both
VIOS1 and VIOS2.

4.1.3 Configure the TCP/IP stack in VIOS1 and VIOS2.


This part of the chapter describes how to assign management IP addresses to VIOS1 and
VIOS2.
This configuration is done from the terminal console of the VIOS Virtual Servers. To open the
console to VIOS1 Virtual Server, log on to the SDMC environment. From the Home page
locate the host which contain the VIOS1 Virtual Server and click the name of the host to open
the Resource Explorer window. Check the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server VIOS1,
then click Actions Operations Console Window Open Terminal Console. Then
enter the password for the SDMC account.
To configure TCP/IP on VIOS1 follow these steps on VIOS1 console:
1. To find the device name of the physical Ethernet adapter ports use the
lsdev -vpd | grep ent | grep -v Virtual command as shown in Example 4-5 on
page 61.
Example 4-1 Listing of physical Ethernet adapter ports on VIOS
$ lsdev
Model
ent0
ent1
ent2
ent3

-vpd | grep ent | grep -vi Virtual


Implementation: Multiple Processor, PCI bus
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T1 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T2 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T3 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T4 4-Port 10/100/1000

Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX

PCI-Express
PCI-Express
PCI-Express
PCI-Express

Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter

Select the correct Ethernet port from the listed ports that is to be used for the LAN
connection and has the Ethernet cable plugged in. The interface device name of this
physical adapter port is used in the next step (In our case it is en0).
2. Use the cfgassist command and select VIOS TCP/IP Configuration. Then select the
appropriate interface device name from the previous step.
3. On the VIOS TCP/IP Configuration screen enter TPC/IP configuration values for VIOS
connectivity. For these values consult your network administrator. See Example 2-3 on
page 12 for TPC/IP configuration values example. After entering the needed values for
TCP/IP configuration press Enter. You should see the output Command: OK. Then press F10
(or press the ESC and 0 sequence).
To configure TCP/IP on VIOS2 follow the same steps on VIOS2 console, properly changing
the IP configuration in step 3.
Note: From this point on you can use ssh to connect to VIOS1 and VIOS2.

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4.1.4 Create the SEA failover configuration using the SDMC


This part of chapter 4.1, Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 48 describes
how to set up the Shared Ethernet Adapter (SEA) failover configuration. Simply said, the
Shared Ethernet Adapter in the VIOS terminology is a bridge that connects the physical
Ethernet adapter to the virtual Ethernet adapter. In normal operations the virtual Ethernet
connection for the client Virtual Server will be provided via VIOS1. The failover capability
enables the automatic failover to VIOS2 in case of a needed restart of VIOS1 (for example
after a VIOS update).
To create the SEA failover configuration log into the SDMC environment. If the Home page is
not automatically displayed click Home from the left hand panel. From the Home page, locate
the host on which to configure the SEA failover configuration. (This is the same host that was
used in the previous chapters.) Select the checkbox to the left of the host, then click
Actions System Configuration Virtual Resources Virtual Network Management
to open the Virtual Network Management screen. This process will create the SEA adapter
configuration on both VIOS1 and VIOS2. Follow these steps to create SEA failover
configuration for your host:
1. To start the configuration click Create SEA.
2. Enter appropriate values as shown in Figure 4-2 and click OK.

Figure 4-2 The SEA failover configuration using the SDMC

The SDMC automatically creates the SEA adapters on both VIOS1 and VIOS2. The
SDMC will also configure the control channel as a part of this step. The virtual Ethernet
adapter with the highest VLAN ID is used for the SEA control channel.
3. You can confirm the created SEA on the Virtual Network Management screen. You should
see two created SEA adapters. each with a different priority as shown in Figure 4-3.

Figure 4-3 View the Shared Ethernet Adapter from the SDMC

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4.1.5 Configure storage devices


This part of the chapter describes how to configure the storage devices on VIOS1 and VIOS2.
SAN LUN will be used for installation of the client OS. First you need to connect the VIOS
Virtual Server to the SAN and then provide the necessary information to the storage
administrator. Once the storage administrator provisions the needed SAN LUN, map this SAN
LUN over the virtual SCSI adapter to Virtual Server for client OS using the SDMC.
To attach VIOS1 to a SAN and configure storage follow these steps on VIOS console:
1. To find the Fibre Channel adapters owned by VIOS1 enter the lsdev -vpd | grep fcs
command.
The number of Fibre Channel adapters can vary. You will receive a list similar to this:
fcs0
fcs1

U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3-T1
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3-T2

8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter


8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter

In our case we used the Fibre Channel port fcs0 for LUN masking the SAN LUNs for the
installation device of the client operating system.
2. Find the World Wide Port Name (WWPN) address for the fcs0 device using the lsdev
-dev fcs0 -vpd | grep Address command. Your output will be similar to this:
Network Address.............10000000C9E3AB56
3. Repeat the step 1 and 2 on VIOS2.
4. Provide the location codes and the WWPN addresses from the previous steps for both
VIOS1 and VIOS2 to your storage administrator. At this time your storage administrator
will provision your necessary SAN LUN. The storage administrator should make the LUN
masking that VIOS1 and VIOS2 both see the same SAN LUN. The storage administrator
should also give you the SAN LUN ID of the disk for client OS installation. For this
exercise, the SAN administrator has allocated disk with LUN ID
60:0a:0b:80:00:11:46:32:00:00:92:75:4e:c5:0e:78 and size 25 GB.
5. After the storage administrator provisions the storage, run the cfgdev command on VIOS1
and also VIOS2 command line to discover any new devices.
Before SAN LUN can be virtualized and provisioned to the Virtual Server for client OS, you
need to change the behavior of locking the SCSI reservation of the physical disk (here SAN
LUN). You dont want VIOS to lock the SCSI reservation (to be prepared for dual VIOS
configuration). You need to do the following steps on both VIOS1 and VIOS2. To change the
behavior of locking SCSI reservations follow these steps:
1. Log on to the VIOS console and list the physical disks attached to your VIOS using the
lsdev -type disk command as shown in Example 4-2.
Example 4-2 Listing of physical disk devices on VIOS

$ lsdev -type disk


hdisk0
Available
hdisk1
Available
hdisk2
Available
hdisk3
Available
hdisk4
Available
hdisk5
Available
hdisk6
Available
hdisk7
Available
hdisk8
Available
hdisk9
Available

SAS
SAS
SAS
SAS
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO

Drive
Drive
Drive
Drive
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800

Array
Array
Array
Array
Array
Array

Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk

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In the output you can see that there are four internal disks (SAS hdisk0 to hdisk3) and six
external disks from the IBM DS4800 (MPIO hdisk4 to hdisk9).
2. To confirm SAN LUN ID on VIOS, execute the
lsdev -dev hdisk4 -attr | grep unique_id command. Example 4-3 on page 54 shows
the output with highlighted LUN ID.
Example 4-3 Listing disk LUN ID on VIOS

$ lsdev -dev hdisk4 -attr | grep unique_id


unique_id 3E213600A0B8000114632000092754EC50E780F1815

FAStT03IBMfcp PCM

Repeat the above command to find the physical disk with the correct LUN ID you received
from the storage administrator. The device name for the provisioned external disk used in
the next steps is hdisk4.
3. To change the behavior of locking SCSI reservations use the
chdev -dev hdisk4 -attr reserve_policy=no_reserve command.
You need to do the previous steps on both VIOS1 and VIOS2. Make a note of the correct
device names of the SAN LUN on both VIOS1 and VIOS2 and use these device names in the
next chapter to virtualize them to the Virtual Server for client OS.
Note: You can find that the names of devices on VIOS1 are not the same as on VIOS2.
The reason for this may be that VIOS2 has a different number of internal disks.

Note: If you use a storage subsystem from a different vendor the reserve_policy
attribute can have a different name. For example if you use EMC Powerpath drivers to
connect LUNs from the EMC storage subsystem you need to use the reserve_lock
attribute and the value no instead.

Recommendation: We recommend you make the disk configuration of both VIOS1


and VOS2 the same. This makes management of a dual VIOS configurations easier
and less prone to administrator mistakes.

4.1.6 Create Virtual Server for client OS


This part of chapter 4.1, Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 48 guides you in
creating the Virtual Server for client OS. The created Virtual Server for client OS will be fully
virtualized. The Virtual Server for client OS will have the virtual SCSI adapters (most likely for
operating system disk) and a virtual Ethernet adapter to connect to the LAN. The Fibre
Channel adapters (for data disks) will be added in following chapters.
Log on to the SDMC environment and from the Home page locate the host on which the
Virtual Server for client OS will be created. This is the same host used in chapter 4.1.1,
Create the Virtual Servers for VIOS1 and VIOS2 on page 48. Check the checkbox to the left
of the host, then click Actions System Configuration Create Virtual Server. Follow
these steps in the wizard to create the Virtual Server for client OS:
1. On the Name screen enter the following values and then click Next:
Virtual Server name: VirtServer1
Environment:
AIX/Linux

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2. On the Memory screen select the Dedicated for Memory Mode checkbox (if present) and
enter an appropriate amount of memory for this Virtual Server in the Assigned memory
field. Then click Next.
3. On the Processor screen select Shared for Processing Mode. In the Assigned Processors
field enter 1 (you can change this value so it reflects your needs). Click Next.
4. The Ethernet screen wizard by default creates two virtual Ethernet adapters. Only the first
virtual Ethernet adapter (with VLAN ID 1) will be used for a network connectivity. Select
the checkbox to the left of the second adapter (ID 3) and then click Delete.
5. If the Storage selection screen appears, select the Yes, Automatically manage the virtual
storage adapters for this Virtual Server optionbox. You can provision the Virtual Disks,
Physical Volumes, or virtualize the Fibre Channel adapters here. Select the checkbox to
the left of the Physical Volumes. Click Next.
Note: The virtual Fibre Channel adapters will be configured in the next chapter.
6. In the Physical Volumes part of the screen select the physical disk to virtualize to the
Virtual Server for client OS. These are the same disks that you were changing SCSI
reservation policy on in chapter 4.1.5, Configure storage devices on page 53. You can
also check the Physical Location Code column to find the correct physical disk.
Important: Make sure you select the appropriate physical disk on both VIOS1 and
VIOS2.
7. On the Optical devices screen in the Physical Optical Devices tab select the checkbox to
the left of the cd0. This will virtualize the physical DVD drive to the Virtual Server for client
OS. Confirm the Optical devices screen using the Next button.
8. On the Physical I/O Adapters screen dont select any physical I/O adapters. Client OS will
be installed on the disk connected using the virtual SCSI adapter and all other devices are
virtualized.
9. Verify the information on the Summary screen and confirm creation of the Virtual Server
using the Finish button.

4.1.7 Install client OS


At this point the Virtual Server for client OS is fully virtualized and ready to install a client
operating system. The Virtual Server for client OS now owns:
The virtual disk for operating system installation (This is the provisioned SAN LUN).
The virtual CD/DVD drive that can be used to install the client operating system.
The virtual Ethernet adapter for connection to your LAN.
An installation of a client operating system is not within the scope of this document. To install
a client operating system follow instructions provided by the installation guide for your
operating system.

4.1.8 Configure virtual Fibre Channel adapters using the SDMC


This part of chapter 4.1, Guided dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 48 guides you
through configuring the virtual Fibre Channel for the Virtual Server for client OS. This
functionality is using a portion of the Fibre Channel standard called N_Port ID Virtualization

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(NPIV). The virtual Fibre Channel adapters have the WWPN generated automatically by the
SDMC.
From this point we assume that the client operating system is already installed and there is a
TCP/IP connectivity between the SDMC and the client operating system. With this
assumption it is possible to add the second virtual SCSI adapter dynamically. This function of
PowerVM is called dynamic logical partitioning (DLPAR).
To create virtual Fibre Channel adapters for the Virtual Server for client OS log into the SDMC
environment and from the Home page, locate the host which contains VirtServer1 Virtual
Server. Click the host name to open the Resource Explorer window. Check the checkbox to
the left of the Virtual Server (VirtServer1), then click Actions System Configuration
Manage Virtual Server. To create virtual Fibre Channel adapters for the Virtual Server for
client OS follow these steps.
1. From the left menu click Storage Devices.
2. In the Fibre Channel part click Add.
3. The Add Fibre Channel screen shows the physical Fibre Channel adapters that support
N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV). Select the physical Fibre Channel adapter that you want
to virtualize to the Virtual Server for client OS. In our case we selected the physical Fibre
Channel adapter with device name fcs1 for both VIOS1 and VIOS2. Click OK.
Note: The physical Fibre Channel adapter with device name fcs0 was already used in
chapter 4.1.5, Configure storage devices on page 53 to provision the SAN LUN.
4. Click Apply.
Now it is necessary to update the configuration profiles of VirtServer1, VIOS1, and VIOS2. To
update the profile on VirtServer1 Virtual Server log on to the SDMC environment. Follow
these steps:
1. From the Home page locate the host which contain the VirtServer1 Virtual Server and
click on the name of the host to open the Resource Explorer window.
2. Check the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server VirtServer1, then click Actions
System Configuration Save Current Configuration.
3. Select the Overwrite existing profile checkbox and select the OriginalProfile profile.
4. Confirm screen using the OK button.
5. Confirm the Save Profile screen using the Yes button.
Repeat these steps for VIOS1 and VIOS2 to update their configuration profiles.
At this point you have a running Virtual Server with these virtualized configurations:
One virtual CPU from the Shared Processor Pool (This can be adjusted dynamically to
meet your needs).
4 GB of memory (This can be adjusted dynamically to meet your needs).
One virtual Ethernet adapter with high-available failover mode.
Two virtual SCSI adapters for the operating system disk. This disk use two paths - one
path to VIOS1 and second path to VIOS2.
Two virtual Fibre Channel adapters, likely for connecting the SAN LUNs for data. Each
virtual Fibre Channel adapter is provided by a separate VIOS.
Example 4-4 shows devices from the Virtual Server running the AIX operating system.
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Example 4-4 List of the virtual devices from AIX

# lsdev -Cc adapter


ent0
Available Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
fcs0
Available C5-T1 Virtual Fibre Channel Client Adapter
fcs1
Available C6-T1 Virtual Fibre Channel Client Adapter
vsa0
Available LPAR Virtual Serial Adapter
vscsi0 Available Virtual SCSI Client Adapter
vscsi1 Available Virtual SCSI Client Adapter
# lsdev -Cc disk
hdisk0 Available Virtual SCSI Disk Drive
# lspath
Enabled hdisk0 vscsi0
Enabled hdisk0 vscsi1

4.2 Single VIOS setup using the SDMC


This part describes how to create a PowerVM Virtual I/O Server (VIOS) configuration using
the IBM Systems Director Management Console (SDMC). In this chapter the configuration
with one VIOS and one Virtual Server for client OS is configured. The second VIOS is added
in 4.3, Dual VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 65. This chapter configures the Virtual
Server for client OS with:

Virtual CPU from the Shared Processor Pool.


Appropriate amount of the memory.
Virtual disk for operating system installation.
Virtual CD/DVD drive that can be used to install the client operating system.
Virtual Ethernet adapter for connection to your LAN.

Before you proceed on in this chapter make sure you have finished these steps:
Check prerequisites in Chapter 1, Introduction to PowerVM on page 1.
The SDMC is installed and configured.
Host is already discovered and visible to the SDMC.
Your host is in Started state.
In this chapter you use commands that show locations of the hardware cards and adapters.
These location codes looks similar to this: DNWKGPB-P1-C4-T1. In the location code the
number after the C character indicates the card slot, the number after the T character is the
number of the port on the card, and the portion preceding the P character is the serial number
of the drawer. In this example, DNWKGPB-P1-C4-T1 means the first port on a card in slot C4 of
the drawer with serial number DNWKGPB. This location codes gives you information needed
to find the correct card and plug cables into the correct ports.
Note: The serial number of the drawer can be found on the front of the drawer under the
plastic cover.

4.2.1 Create VIOS Virtual Server


The first part of this chapter describes how to create the Virtual Server for running VIOS using
the SDMC environment.

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Log into the SDMC environment. If the Home page is not automatically displayed click Home
from the left hand panel. From the Home page, locate the host on which to create the Virtual
Server. Select the checkbox to the left of the host, then click Actions System
Configuration Create Virtual Server as shown in Figure 4-4 on page 58.

Figure 4-4 Creation of the Virtual Server in the SDMC

Follow these steps to create the Virtual Server for VIOS1:


1. On the Name screen enter the following values and then click Next:
Virtual Server name: VIOS1(You can enter any name you want)
Virtual server ID:
1
We follow the naming convention from chapter 1.2, Planning on
page 3 (default is the next partition number available).
Environment:
VIOS (from the pull down menu)
2. On the Memory screen select the Dedicated for Memory Mode checkbox (if present) and
enter an appropriate amount of memory in the in the Assigned memory field. Use 4 GB of
memory. Click Next.
Note: The amount of memory your VIOS needs depends on the functionalities of VIOS
you will use. We recommend to start with 4 GB of the memory and periodically monitor
the usage of memory on VIOS.
3. On the Processor screen select Shared for Processing Mode. In the Assigned Processors
field enter 1 for a single shared processor (from the Shared Processor Pool
DefaultPool(0)). Click Next.
Note: In background the value of Assigned Uncapped Processing Units is 0.1 by
default. We recommend to start with 1 shared processor and periodically monitor CPU
on VIOS.
4. On the Ethernet screen, expand the Virtual Ethernet part. By default the wizard creates
two virtual Ethernet adapters. The first virtual Ethernet adapter is using adapter ID 2 and
VLAN ID 1. The second virtual Ethernet adapter is using adapter ID 3 and VLAN ID 99.
The second virtual Ethernet adapter is used for control channel between two VIOSes in
dual VIOS configuration and is not really used in single VIOS configuration. More details
about control channel and dual VIOS configuration for virtual Ethernet can be found in the
IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940 publication.

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5. Select the checkbox to the left of the first adapter (ID 2) and then click Edit. In the Virtual
Ethernet - Modify Adapter screen select the Use this adapter for Ethernet bridging
checkbox and enter 1 in the Priority field. The explanation of the priorities can be found in
the IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940 publication.
Click OK to confirm changes to first Ethernet adapter. Confirm the Ethernet screen using
the Next button.
6. On the Virtual Storage Adapter screen enter 200 in the Maximum number of virtual
adapters: field. Then click Create Adapter and enter the following values:
Adapter ID:
Adapter type:
Connecting Virtual Server ID:
Connecting adapter ID:

101
SCSI
10
11

Numbers for virtual adapters and the Virtual Server ID come from the naming convention
in chapter 1.2, Planning on page 3.
Confirm the Create Virtual Adapter screen using OK and click Next.
7. On the Physical I/O Adapters screen select checkboxes to the left of the Location Code
and Description of the needed adapter. To be able to use all the functionalities described
in this publication you need to select:
One SAS or SCSI disk controller (controller for internal disk drives).
One Ethernet adapter (Ethernet adapter for connection to LAN).
One Fibre Channel adapter (Fibre Channel adapter for connection to SAN and a virtual
Fibre Channel configuration).
Note: If at any time the busy icon saying Working hangs, try to click another tab and
then come back to the previous window.
In our case we selected these physical adapters:
U78A0.001.DNWKF81-P1-T9 RAID Controller
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7 Quad 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express Adapter
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3 Fibre Channel Serial Bus
The RAID Controller selected has also the physical CD/DVD drive connected.
Recommendation: We recommend you check the physical location codes of your
adapters and that you are sure you use the correct adapters for your Virtual Server.
Sometimes the description can be misleading (for example the PCI-to-PCI bridge can
be the Ethernet adapter).
Confirm Physical I/O Adapters screen using the Next button.
8. Verify the information on the Summary screen and confirm the creation of the Virtual
Server using the Finish button.
A more detailed description of the possible options during Virtual Server creation wizard is in
redbook IBM Systems Director Management Console: Introduction and Overview,
SG24-7860.

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4.2.2 Install VIOS


This part of the chapter describes the steps to install VIOS into the previously created Virtual
Server. There are three ways to install VIOS into created Virtual Server, these are:
Install VIOS from VIOS DVD media using the allocated physical DVD drive.
Install VIOS from the SDMC command line using the installios command. The
installios command has a progressive wizard that guides you through the installation
process.
Install VIOS using the IBM Network Installation Manager (NIM).
In this chapter we are using the VIOS DVD media to install VIOS. Before you install VIOS
insert the VIOS installation media into the systems CD/DVD drive.
To install a VIOS into the previously created Virtual Server first log on to the SDMC. From the
Home page, locate the host on which the Virtual Server for VIOS was created and click on its
name. Select the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server name you created (VIOS1), then
click Actions Operations Activate Profile. On the Activate Virtual Server: VIOS1
screen click Advanced. Change Boot mode to SMS and click OK. Select the Open a terminal
window or console session checkbox and click OK.
The terminal console for VIOS1 opens. Enter your SDMC user ID and password to open the
console. After the terminal console windows is opened follow these steps to install VIOS.
1. If presented with options to set this as the active console, press the key indicated on the
screen.
2. Enter Select Boot Options (5), Select Install/Boot Device (1) and List all Devices (7).
Find the CD-ROM device in the list. You may need to scroll down using the N. Record the
number of the device and press Enter.
3. Select Normal Bode Boot (2) and Yes (1) to exit from the SMS menu.
4. Select the console number and press Enter.
5. Select the preferred language. To select English press Enter.
6. When prompted with the Installation and Maintenance menu, select the Change/Show
Installation Settings and Install (2) option to open installation settings screen.
7. Use the Disk(s) where you want to install (1) option to select the target installation
device (the target installation device is marked with >>>). Usually this is the first physical
disk device, so you can leave the default value. Use the Previous Menu (99) option.
8. Use the Select Edition (5) option to choose the correct PowerVM edition.
9. Start the installation using Install with the settings listed above (0) option. A progress
screen shows Approximate % Complete and Elapsed Time. If the installation process
ask you to insert the volume 2, do so and press Enter. This installation should take
between 15 minutes and an hour to complete.
When VIOS1 first comes up use the padmin username to log in. VIOS asks you to change the
password and accept software maintenance terms. After you change the password and agree
to the license enter the license -accept command.

4.2.3 Configure Virtual I/O Server


This chapter describes the steps to configure a virtual Ethernet and virtual storage (virtual
SCSI) for the client OS Virtual Server.

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Configure VIOS for client network


This part of the chapter describes how to connect the Virtual Server for a client OS to a LAN
network. It also assigns the management IP address to VIOS. Follow these steps on VIOS1
console:
1. To open the console to VIOS1 Virtual Server, log on to the SDMC environment.
2. From the Home page locate the host which contain the VIOS1 Virtual Server and click on
the name of the host to open the Resource Explorer window. This is the same host used in
4.2.1, Create VIOS Virtual Server on page 57.
3. Check the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server VIOS1, then click Actions
Operations Console Window Open Terminal Console.
4. To find the device name for the physical Ethernet adapter ports use the
lsdev -type ent4sea command. To find also the physical locations you can use the
lsdev -vpd | grep ent | grep -v Virtual command as shown on the Example 4-5.
Example 4-5 Listing of physical Ethernet adapter ports on VIOS
$ lsdev
Model
ent0
ent1
ent2
ent3

-vpd | grep ent | grep -vi Virtual


Implementation: Multiple Processor, PCI bus
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T1 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T2 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T3 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C7-T4 4-Port 10/100/1000

Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX

PCI-Express
PCI-Express
PCI-Express
PCI-Express

Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter

Select the correct Ethernet port from the listed ports that is to be used for the LAN
connection and has the Ethernet cable plugged in. In our case it is the device ent0. This
physical adapter port device name is used in the next steps as a value for the -sea
attribute.
5. Find the device name for the virtual Ethernet adapter port with adapter ID 2 use the
command:
lsdev -vpd | grep ent | grep Virtual | grep C2
The output should looks like this:
ent4

U8233.E8B.10F5D0P-V1-C2-T1

Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter

Explanation: The value C2 used in the previous command is related to adapter ID 2 of


the virtual Ethernet adapter created in chapter 4.2.1, Create VIOS Virtual Server on
page 57. You can also find this ID and the slot number in Table 1-2 on page 5.
The device name from the output is the virtual Ethernet adapter port. In our case it is
device ent4. This virtual adapter port device name is used in the next step as a value for
the -vadapter and -default attributes.
The virtual Ethernet adapter found in this step should use VLAN ID 1. Confirm VLAN ID
using the entstat -all ent4 | grep "Port VLAN ID" command. VLAN ID 1 is confirmed
by the output:
Port VLAN ID: 1
6. Create a virtual bridge (called Shared Ethernet Adapter in VIOS terminology) using the
mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 199 command as shown
on Example 4-6.
Example 4-6 Creating SEA on VIOS

$ mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 199


main: 86 Recived SEA events bytes 164

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ent6 Available
en6
et6
The created adapter is called a Shared Ethernet Adapter (SEA). In our case the SEA
device name is ent6. Make a note of the name of the created device. This SEA device
name is needed in the first part of chapter Configure second VIOS for client network on
page 68 for changing the attributes of the SEA on VIOS1.
Note: The Shared Ethernet Adapter is actually bridging a virtual and physical network
using VIOS. The Shared Ethernet Adapter functionality is usually refer to as SEA.
7. Run cfgassist and select VIOS TCP/IP Configuration. Then select the appropriate
interface device name from the previous step. In our case select en6.
8. On the VIOS TCP/IP Configuration screen enter TPC/IP configuration values for VIOS
connectivity. For these values consult your network administrator. See Example 2-3 on
page 12 for TPC/IP configuration values example. After entering the needed values for
TCP/IP configuration press Enter. You should see the output Command: OK. Then press F10
(or press the ESC and 0 sequence).
Note: From this point on you can use ssh to connect to VIOS1.

Configure VIOS for client storage


In the next section the disk is virtualized and provisioned to the Virtual Server for client OS.
SAN LUN will be used for installation of client OS. We first need to connect the VIOS Virtual
Server to SAN and then provide the necessary information to the storage administrator. Once
the storage administrator provisions the needed SAN LUN map this SAN LUN over the virtual
SCSI adapter to Virtual Server for client OS.
To attach VIOS to a SAN and configure storage follow these steps on VIOS1 console:
1. To find the Fibre Channel adapters owned by VIOS enter the lsdev -vpd | grep fcs
command.
The number of Fibre Channel adapters can vary. You will receive a list similar to this:
fcs0
fcs1

U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3-T1
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3-T2

8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter


8Gb PCI Express Dual Port FC Adapter

2. Find the World Wide Port Name (WWPN) address for the fcs0 device using the lsdev
-dev fcs0 -vpd | grep Address command. Your output will be similar to this:
Network Address.............10000000C9E3AB56
3. Provide the location code and the WWPN address from the previous steps to your storage
administrator. At this time your storage administrator will provision your necessary SAN
LUN. The storage administrator should also give you the SAN LUN ID of the disk for client
OS installation. For this exercise, the SAN administrator has allocated disk with LUN ID
60:0a:0b:80:00:11:46:32:00:00:92:75:4e:c5:0e:78 and size 25 GB.
4. After the storage administrator provisions the storage, run the cfgdev command to find any
new devices.
5. To list the physical disks attached to your VIOS run the lsdev -type disk command as
shown on Example 4-7.
Example 4-7 Listing of physical disk devices on VIOS

$ lsdev -type disk


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hdisk0
hdisk1
hdisk2
hdisk3
hdisk4
hdisk5
hdisk6
hdisk7
hdisk8
hdisk9

Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available
Available

SAS
SAS
SAS
SAS
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO

Drive
Drive
Drive
Drive
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800
DS4800

Array
Array
Array
Array
Array
Array

Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk

In the output you can see four internal disks (SAS hdisk0 to hdisk3) and six external disks
from the IBM DS4800 (MPIO hdisk4 to hdisk9).
6. To confirm the SAN LUN ID on VIOS, execute the
lsdev -dev hdisk4 -attr | grep unique_id command. Example 4-8 shows the output
with highlighted LUN ID.
Example 4-8 Listing disk LUN ID on VIOS

$ lsdev -dev hdisk4 -attr | grep unique_id


unique_id 3E213600A0B8000114632000092754EC50E780F1815

FAStT03IBMfcp PCM

If you have more disk devices, repeat the above command to find the physical disk with the
correct LUN ID you received from the storage administrator. The device name for the
external disk used in the next steps is hdisk4.
7. If dont plan to use a dual VIOS configuration skip this step. In this step you change the
behavior of locking the SCSI reservation on the physical disk device. You dont want VIOS
to lock the SCSI reservation (to be prepared for dual VIOS configuration). To change the
behavior of locking SCSI reservations use the
chdev -dev hdisk4 -attr reserve_policy=no_reserve command.
Note: If you use a storage subsystem from a different vendor the reserve_policy
attribute can have a different name. For example if you use EMC Powerpath drivers to
connect LUNs from the EMC storage subsystem you need to use the reserve_lock
attribute and the value no instead.
Now map the physical disk to the virtual SCSI adapter. This mapping can be done using the
SDMC interface or using the VIOS command line. Use the SDMC to create the mapping of
physical disk to the virtual SCSI adapter. Creation of this mapping using the VIOS command
is shown in chapter Configure second VIOS for client storage on page 70.
To create the mapping:
8. log on to the SDMC.
9. From the Home page locate the host which contain the VIOS1 Virtual Server. Check the
checkbox to the left of the host containing the VIOS1. Then click Actions System
Configuration Virtual Resources Virtual Storage Management.
10.In VIOS/SSP select VIOS1 and click Query.
11.Click Physical Volumes.
12.Select the checkbox to the left of the hdisk4 physical disk. This device name was found in
the previous steps.
13.Click Modify assignment.

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14.From the New virtual server assignment select the VirtServer1(10) and confirm using
the OK button.
15.Click Physical Volumes.
16.Select the checkbox to the left of the cd0 physical DVD drive.
17.Click Modify assignment.
18.From the New virtual server assignment select VirtServer1(10) and confirm using the
OK button.
19.Click Close.

4.2.4 Create Virtual Server for client OS


This chapter gives you the a guide on how to create the Virtual Server for client OS. The
created Virtual Server for client OS will be fully virtualized and will have the virtual SCSI
adapter and the virtual Ethernet adapters. chapter 4.4, Setup virtual Fibre Channel using the
SDMC on page 72 describes how to add virtual Fibre Channel adapters.
Log on to the SDMC environment and from the Home page locate the host on which the
Virtual Server for client OS will be created. This is the same host used in 4.2.1, Create VIOS
Virtual Server on page 57. Check the checkbox to the left of the host, then click Actions
System Configuration Create Virtual Server. Follow these steps in the wizard to create
the Virtual Server for client OS.
1. On the Name screen enter the following values and then click Next.
Virtual Server name: VirtServer1
Virtual server ID:
10 (Default is the next available ID)
Environment:
AIX/Linux
2. On the Memory screen select the Dedicated for Memory Mode optionbox (if present) and
enter an appropriate amount of memory for this Virtual Server in the Assigned memory
field. Then click Next.
3. On the Processor screen select Shared for Processing Mode. In the Assigned Processors
field enter 1 (you can change this value to reflect your needs). Click Next.
4. The Ethernet screen wizard by default creates two virtual Ethernet adapters. Only the first
virtual Ethernet adapter (with VLAN ID 1) will be used for a network connectivity. Select
the checkbox to the left of the second adapter (ID 3) and then click Delete.
5. If the Storage selection screen appears, select the No, I want to manage the virtual
storage adapters for this Virtual Server optionbox.
6. On the Virtual Storage Adapter screen enter 30 in Maximum number of virtual adapters:
field. Then click Create Adapter and enter the following values:
Adapter ID:
Adapter type:
Connecting Virtual Server ID:
Connecting adapter ID:

11
SCSI
VIOS (1)
101

Confirm Create Virtual Adapter screen using the OK button. Click Next.
7. On the Physical I/O Adapters screen dont select any physical I/O adapters. Client OS will
be installed on the disk connected using the virtual SCSI adapter. The virtual Fibre
Channel adapters are added in chapter 4.4, Setup virtual Fibre Channel using the SDMC
on page 72. Click Next.
8. Verify information on the Summary screen and confirm creation of the Virtual Server using
the Finish button.
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4.2.5 Install client OS


At this point the Virtual Server for client OS is fully virtualized and ready to install a client
operating system. The Virtual Server for client OS now owns:
The virtual disk for operating system installation.
The virtual CD/DVD drive that can be used to install the client operating system.
The virtual Ethernet adapter for connection to your LAN.
An installation of a client operating system is not within the scope of this publication. To install
a client operating system follow instructions provided by the installation guide for your
operating system.

4.3 Dual VIOS setup using the SDMC


This chapter describes the process of adding a second VIOS to the configuration from
chapter 4.2, Single VIOS setup using the SDMC on page 57. Adding a second VIOS gives
you a better Redundancy, Accessibility and Serviceability (RAS). This configuration also
increases the I/O bandwidth to your Virtual Servers for client OS.

4.3.1 Create second VIOS Virtual Server


To start the dual VIOS configuration you have to create a Virtual Server for the second VIOS
(VIOS2). To create Virtual Server for VIOS2 log on to the SDMC environment and from the
Home page, locate the host on which the Virtual Server for VIOS2 will be created. This is the
same host used in 4.2.1, Create VIOS Virtual Server on page 57. Check the checkbox to the
left of the host, then click Actions System Configuration Create Virtual Server and
then follow these steps:
1. On the Name screen enter the following values and then click Next:
Virtual Server name: VIOS2
Virtual server ID:
2
Environment:
VIOS
2. On the Memory screen select the Dedicated for Memory Mode optionbox (if present) and
enter an appropriate amount of memory in the Assigned memory field. Use 4 GB of
memory. Click Next.
Note: The amount of memory your VIOS needs depends on the functionalities of VIOS
you will use. We recommend to start with 4 GB of the memory and periodically monitor
the usage of memory on VIOS.
3. On the Processor screen select Shared for Processing Mode. In the Assigned Processors
field enter 1 for a single shared processor. Click Next.
Note: In background the value of Assigned Uncapped Processing Units is 0.1 by
default. We recommend to start with 1 shared processor and periodically monitor CPU
on VIOS.
4. On the Ethernet screen, expand the Virtual Ethernet part. By default the wizard creates
two virtual Ethernet adapters. The first virtual Ethernet adapter is using adapter ID 2 and
VLAN ID 1. The second virtual Ethernet adapter is using adapter ID 3 and VLAN ID 99.
The second virtual Ethernet adapter is used for control channel between two VIOSes in
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dual VIOS configuration. More details about control channel and dual VIOS configuration
for virtual Ethernet is in the IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration,
SG24-7940 publication.
5. Select the checkbox to the left of the first adapter (ID 2) and then click Edit. In the Virtual
Ethernet - Modify Adapter screen select the Use this adapter for Ethernet bridging
checkbox and enter 2 in the Priority field. The explanation of the priorities can be found in
the IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940 publication.
Click OK to confirm changes to the first Ethernet adapter. Confirm the Ethernet screen
using the Next button.
6. On the Virtual Storage Adapter screen enter 200 in the Maximum number of virtual
adapters: field. Then click Create Adapter and enter the following values:
Adapter ID:
Adapter type:
Connecting Virtual Server ID:
Connecting adapter ID:

101
SCSI
10 (you can select VirtServer1 (10))
21

Confirm Create Virtual Adapter screen using the OK button. Click Next.
7. On the Physical I/O Adapters screen select checkboxes to the left of the Location Code
and Description of the needed adapters. To be able to use all the functionalities described
in this publication you need to select:
One SAS or SCSI disk controller (controller for internal disk drives).
One Ethernet adapter (Ethernet adapter for connection to LAN).
One Fibre Channel adapter (Fibre Channel adapter for connection to SAN).
In our case we selected these physical adapters:
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C2
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C5

PCI-E SAS Controller


Quad 10/100/1000 Base-TX PCI-Express Adapter
Fibre Channel Serial Bus

Confirm the Physical I/O Adapters screen using the Next button.
8. Verify information on the Summary screen and confirm the creation of the Virtual Server
using the Finish button.
A more detailed description of possible options can be found in the publication IBM Systems
Director Management Console: Introduction and Overview, SG24-7860.

4.3.2 Install second VIOS using NIM


In this chapter we use the IBM Network Installation Manager (NIM) to install VIOS. You can
still use the installios command as described in chapter 4.2.2, Install VIOS on page 60.
Before you install VIOS2 prepare your NIM environment to enable a boot over Ethernet and
install the VIOS mksysb image. Because the installation of the second VIOS is over Ethernet,
a prerequisite is also a functional network connectivity between the NIM server and Virtual
Server for second VIOS. Detailed description of a NIM preparation is not within the scope of
this publication. Only the basic steps needed to be done on the NIM server side are
described.
You need to prepare these resources to be able to install VIOS using NIM:
The NIM mksysb resource of the VIOS installation media. This is the mksysb image of
VIOS. This resource can be generated from the mksysb image copied from the VIOS
installation media.

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Note: If using VIOS 1.5.1 or higher, the mksysb file may be split into two parts. If this
the case you need to combine these two mksysb images to create one file.
The NIM Shared Product Object Tree (SPOT) resource. The SPOT resource is created
from the NIM VIOS mksysb resource.
The NIM bosinst_data resource. The bosinst_data resource is defined using the
bosinst.data file copied from the VIOS installation media.
The second VIOS (VIOS2) must be added to the NIM environment as a standalone machine.
Then initialize a VIOS2 installation from NIM using the prepared NIM standalone machine
and NIM resources.
Important: On the Install the Base Operating System on the Standalone Clients screen be
sure that the Remain NIM client after install attribute is set to NO. This will tell NIM not to
set up the TCP/IP configuration on newly installed VIOS so you can create an SEA in this
VIOS.
At this point your NIM environment should have all the needed resources prepared and an
installation of the second VIOS should be initialized from NIM.
For a detailed description how to prepare NIM to be able to install VIOS refer to the NIM
installation and backup of the VIOS document available at:
https://www-304.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=isg3T1011386#4
To install VIOS2 into the Virtual Server created in 4.3.1, Create second VIOS Virtual Server
on page 65 logon to the SDMC. From the SDMC Home page, locate the host on which the
Virtual Server for VIOS2 was created and click on its name. Select the checkbox to the left of
the Virtual Server name VIOS2, then click Actions Operations Activate Profile. On
the Activate Virtual server: VIOS2 screen click Advanced. Change Boot mode to SMS and
click OK. Select the Open a terminal window or console session checkbox and click OK.
The terminal console for VIOS2 opens. Enter your SDMC user ID and password to open the
terminal console and then follow these steps to install second VIOS.
1. If presented with options to set this as the active console, press the key indicated on the
screen.
2. Select Setup Remote IPL (Initial Program Load) (2).
3. Select the number of the port that is connected to the Ethernet switch and subnet used
during installation. In our case select Port 1:
3.

Port 1 - IBM 4 PORT PCIe 10/10

U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6-T1

00145ee726a4

4. Select IPv4 - Address Format 123.231.111.222 (1), BOOTP (1) and IP Parameters (1).
Enter the TCP/IP configuration parameters. We used these parameters:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Client IP Address
Server IP Address
Gateway IP Address
Subnet Mask

[172.16.22.13]
[172.16.20.40]
[172.16.20.1]
[255.255.252.0]

The Server TCP/IP Address address is the TCP/IP address of your NIM server.
5. Press the ESC key and then select Ping Test (3) and Execute Ping Test (1). You should
receive this message:
.-----------------.
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| Ping Success. |
`-----------------'
6. Press any key to continue and then press the ESC key five times to go to the Main Menu.
From the Main Menu enter Select Boot Options (5), Select Install/Boot Device (1),
Network (6) and BOOTP (1).
7. In the Select Device screen select the number of the port that is connected to the switch
and subnet used during installation. In our case we selected Port 1 (option 3):
3. - Port 1 - IBM 4 PORT PCIe 10/100/1000 Base-TX Adapter
(loc=U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6-T1 )
8. Select Normal Mode Boot (2) and Yes (1) to leave the SMS menu and start the
installation.
9. When prompted to define the System Console type a 1 and press Enter. The number you
need to type may be different for your installation.
10.To confirm English during install press Enter.
11.When prompted with the Installation and Maintenance menu, select the Change/Show
Installation Settings and Install (2) option to open the installation settings screen.
12.Use the Disk(s) where you want to install (1) option to select the target installation
device. Usually this is the first physical disk device, so you can leave the default. After you
select the target installation device use the Continue with choices indicated above (0)
option to go back to the main menu.
13.Use the Select Edition (5) option to choose the PowerVM edition.
14.Start the installation using the Install with the settings listed above (0) option. A
progress screen shows Approximate % Complete and Elapsed Time. This installation
should take between 15 minutes and an hour to complete.
When VIOS2 first comes up, use the padmin username to log in. VIOS asks you to change the
password and accept software maintenance terms. After you change the password and agree
to the license enter the license -accept command.

4.3.3 Configure second VIOS


This chapter describes how to configure the second VIOS to enable the Ethernet adapter
failover in Virtual Server for the client operating system. During normal operations the client
Virtual Server will have the Ethernet adapter provisioned by VIOS1. The Ethernet adapter in
the client Virtual Server will automatically switch to VIOS2 if VIOS1 is not operating, such as
during a restart or normal maintenance of VIOS1.

Configure second VIOS for client network


In the first part of this chapter you need to change the attributes of Shared Ethernet Adapter
(SEA) on the first VIOS (VIOS1) to support SEA failover.
Important: Make sure you are logged on the first VIOS in our case VIOS1.
To change the appropriate attributes log on to VIOS1 and do the following steps.
1. Open the console for VIOS1 using the SDMC. The process to open the terminal console
using the SDMC is described in chapter Configure VIOS for client network on page 61.

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2. Find the device name for the virtual port that will function as a control channel in the output
of the lsdev -vpd | grep ent | grep C3 command:
ent5

U8233.E8B.10F5D0P-V1-C3-T1

Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter

This is the second virtual Ethernet adapter with adapter ID 3 that was created by default in
chapter 4.2.1, Create VIOS Virtual Server on page 57. This device name is used in the
next step in the ctl_chan attribute. In our case it is the ent5 device name.
The virtual Ethernet adapter used in this step should use VLAN ID 99. Confirm the VLAN
ID using the entstat -all ent5 | grep "Port VLAN ID" command. VLAN ID 99 is
confirmed by the output:
Port VLAN ID:

99

3. Change the attributes of the SEA adapter on VIOS1 using the


chdev -dev ent6 -attr ha_mode=auto ctl_chan=ent5 command. In this command the
-dev attribute contains the SEA device name from chapter Configure VIOS for client
network on page 61. You can confirm the attributes of the SEA adapter on VIOS1 using
the lsdev -dev ent6 -attr command.
In the second part of this chapter configure the virtual Ethernet bridge (known as the SEA) on
the second VIOS (VIOS2) and also configure the management TCP/IP address for the
second VIOS. Follow these steps in VIOS2 console.
Important: Make sure you are logged on the second VIOS, in our case VIOS2.
1. To find device names for physical Ethernet adapter ports use the
lsdev -vpd | grep ent | grep -v Virtual command as shown in Example 4-5 on
page 61.
Example 4-9 Listing of physical Ethernet adapter ports on VIOS
$ lsdev
Model
ent0
ent1
ent2
ent3

-vpd | grep ent | grep -v Virtual


Implementation: Multiple Processor, PCI bus
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6-T1 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6-T2 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6-T3 4-Port 10/100/1000
U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C6-T4 4-Port 10/100/1000

Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX
Base-TX

PCI-Express
PCI-Express
PCI-Express
PCI-Express

Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter

Select one of the listed ports that is used for a LAN connection and has an Ethernet cable
plugged in. In our case it is device ent0. This physical adapter port device name is used in
the next steps as the value for -sea attribute.
2. To find the device name for the virtual port use the lsdev -vpd | grep ent | grep C2
command. The output is:
ent4

U8233.E8B.10F5D0P-V2-C2-T1

Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)

Explanation: C2 used in the previous command is related to the number of the adapter
created in chapter 4.3.1, Create second VIOS Virtual Server on page 65.
The device name from the output is the virtual Ethernet adapter port. In our case it is
device ent4. This virtual adapter port device name is used in the next step as a value for
the -vadapter and -default attributes.
The virtual port device name found in this step should use VLAN ID 1. Confirm VLAN ID
using the entstat -all ent4 | grep "Port VLAN ID" command. VLAN ID 1 is confirmed
by the output:
Port VLAN ID: 1
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3. Find the device name for the virtual port that functions as a control channel in the output of
the lsdev -vpd | grep ent | grep C3 command:
ent5

U8233.E8B.10F5D0P-V2-C3-T1

Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)

This is the second virtual Ethernet adapter with adapter ID 3 that was created by default in
chapter 4.3.1, Create second VIOS Virtual Server on page 65. This device name is used
in the next step in the ctl_chan attribute. In our case it is device name ent5.
The virtual Ethernet adapter found in this step should use VLAN ID 99. Confirm VLAN ID
using the entstat -all ent5 | grep "Port VLAN ID" command. VLAN ID 99 is
confirmed by the output:
Port VLAN ID:

99

4. Create a virtual bridge (called Shared Ethernet Adapter in VIOS terminology) using the
mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 199 -attr ha_mode=auto
ctl_chan=ent5 command as shown in Example 4-10.
Example 4-10 Creation of SEA on second VIOS

$ mkvdev -sea ent0 -vadapter ent4 -default ent4 -defaultid 199 -attr
ha_mode=auto ctl_chan=ent5
main: 86 Recived SEA events bytes 164
ent6 Available
en6
et6
Make a note of the name of the created SEA adapter and interface. In our case the device
name of interface en6.
Important: Mismatching SEA and the SEA failover could cause broadcast storms to
occur on the network and effect the network stability. See details in IBM PowerVM
Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940.
5. Run the cfgassist command and select VIOS TCP/IP Configuration. Then select the
appropriate interface device name from the previous step. In our case we selected en6.
6. On the VIOS TCP/IP Configuration screen enter TPC/IP configuration values for VIOS2
connectivity. For these values consult your network administrator. See Example 2-3 on
page 12 for TPC/IP configuration values example. After entering the needed values for
TCP/IP configuration press Enter. You should see the output Command: OK. Then press
F10 (or press the ESC and 0 sequence).
Note: From this time on you can use ssh to connect to VIOS2.
From the Ethernet point of view, the Virtual Server for client OS is already prepared for the
dual VIOS configuration. There is no need to make any changes to the Virtual Server for
client OS.

Configure second VIOS for client storage


Configuring the second VIOS to provision the same disk to the client Virtual Server provides
the client OS access to the same disk over two paths.
You need to add another virtual SCSI adapter to your Virtual Server for the client OS
(VirtServer1) to be able to use multipathing for the disk provided by both VIOSes.

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From this point assume that the client operating system is already installed and there is a
TCP/IP connectivity between the SDMC and the client operating system. With this
assumption it is possible to add the second virtual SCSI adapter dynamically. This function of
PowerVM is called dynamic logical partitioning (DLPAR).
Note: If the operating system in the client Virtual Server is not already installed and there
is no TCP/IP connectivity you have to change the configuration of Virtual Server Profile
and restart the Virtual Server (rebooting just the client the operating system in the Virtual
Server is not enough). This configuration is described in the IBM Systems Director
Management Console: Introduction and Overview, SG24-7860 publication.
To add the second virtual SCSI adapter to your Virtual Server VirtServer1 follow these steps:
1. Change the Virtual Server for client OS dynamically using these steps:
a. Log into the SDMC environment and from the Home page, locate the host which
contains VirtServer1 Virtual Server. This is the same host used in 4.2.4, Create Virtual
Server for client OS on page 64. Click on the host name to open the Resource
Explorer window. Check the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server (VirtServer1),
then click Actions System Configuration Manage Virtual Server.
b. Click Storage Adapters from the left menu.
c. Click Add to open the Create Virtual Storage Adapter window and enter the
following:
Adapter Id:
Adapter type:
Connecting virtual server
Connecting adapter ID

21
SCSI
VIOS2(2)
101

Confirm window with the OK button.


d. Click Apply to dynamically add the virtual SCSI adapter to the Virtual Server.
2. Now it is necessary to update configuration profile of VirtServer1. To update profile on the
VirtServer1 Virtual Server:
a. Log on to the SDMC environment.
b. From the Home page locate the host which contains the VirtServer1 Virtual Server and
click on the name of the host to open the Resource Explorer window. Check the
checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server VirtServer1.
c. Click Actions System Configuration Save Current Configuration.
d. Select the Overwrite existing profile checkbox and select the OriginalProfile profile.
e. Confirm screen using the OK button.
f. Confirm the Save Profile screen using the Yes button.
Now configure the second VIOS (VIOS2) to provision the disk to the Virtual Server for client
OS. To attach the second VIOS to a SAN and configure the storage follow these steps in
VIOS2 console.
1. Provide Fibre Channel card location codes and their World Wide Port Name (WWPN)
addresses to your storage administrator. The steps to find location codes and WWPN
addresses are described in chapterConfigure VIOS for client storage on page 62. At this
time your storage administrator should provide you the same SAN LUN (and its LUN ID)
that was provisioned and used in chapterConfigure VIOS for client storage on page 62.
2. After the storage administrator completes the provisioning, run the cfgdev command to
find new devices.
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3. To list the physical disks attached to your VIOS run the lsdev -type disk command.
Example 4-11 shows out system output form the lsdev command.
Example 4-11 Listing physical disks on VIOS

$ lsdev -type disk


hdisk0
Available
hdisk1
Available
hdisk2
Available
hdisk3
Available
hdisk4
Available
hdisk5
Available
hdisk6
Available
hdisk7
Available
hdisk8
Available
hdisk9
Available
hdisk10
Available
hdisk11
Available

SAS
SAS
SAS
SAS
SAS
SAS
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM
IBM

RAID
RAID
RAID
RAID
RAID
RAID
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO
MPIO

0 SSD Array
0 SSD Array
0 SSD Array
0 SSD Array
0 SSD Array
0 SSD Array
DS4800 Array
DS4800 Array
DS4800 Array
DS4800 Array
DS4800 Array
DS4800 Array

Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk

In the output you can see six internal disks and six external disks from the IBM DS4800
storage subsystem. Make sure that you find the correct physical disk device names as
explained in chapter Configure VIOS for client storage on page 62. In our case the
physical disk with LUN ID 60:0a:0b:80:00:11:46:32:00:00:92:75:4e:c5:0e:78 has the
device name hdisk6. This device name will be used in the next steps.
Note: You can see that the names of devices on VIOS1 are not same as on VIOS2. The
reason for this is that VIOS2 has more internal disks, and the external disk has a higher
number.

Recommendation: We recommend you make the disk configuration of both VIOS1


and VIOS2 the same. This makes management of a dual VIOS configuration easier and
less prone to administrator mistakes.
4. To change the behavior of locking SCSI reservations use the
chdev -dev hdisk6 -attr reserve_policy=no_reserve command.
5. To find the device name for the virtual adapter connected to Virtual Server for client OS
run the lsdev -vpd | grep vhost | grep C101 command. C101 is the slot number from
the Table 1-3 on page 5. In our case the output is:
vhost0

U8233.E8B.10F5D0P-V1-C101

Virtual SCSI Server Adapter

The device name for the virtual adapter will be used in the next step. In our case it is
vhost0.
6. Map the external disk to the Virtual Server for client OS using the
mkvdev -vdev hdisk6 -vadapter vhost0 command.

4.4 Setup virtual Fibre Channel using the SDMC


This chapter describes how to virtualize Fibre Channel adapters on both VIOSes and provide
virtual Fibre Channel adapters to the client Virtual Server. This functionality is using a method
of the Fibre Channel standard called N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV).

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4.4.1 Configure client Virtual Server for NPIV


This part of the chapter describes how to add virtual Fibre Channel adapters to the
VirtServer1 Virtual Server for client OS.
From this point assume that the client operating system is already installed and there is
TCP/IP connectivity between the SDMC and the client operating system. With this
assumption it is possible to add the virtual Fibre Channel adapters dynamically. This function
of PowerVM is called dynamic logical partitioning (DLPAR).
Log into the SDMC environment and from the Home page, locate the host that contains
VirtServer1 Virtual Server. This is the same host used in 4.2.4, Create Virtual Server for
client OS on page 64. Click on the name of the host to open the Resource Explorer window.
Check the checkbox to the left of the VirtServer1 Virtual Server name, then click Actions
System Configuration Manage Virtual Server. Follow these steps to add virtual Fibre
Channel adapters to VirtServer1 Virtual Server:
1. Click Storage Adapters from the left menu.
2. Click Add to open the Create Virtual Storage Adapter window and enter the following:
Adapter Id:
Adapter type:
Connecting virtual server
Connecting adapter ID

12
Fibre Channel
VIOS1(1)
102

Confirm the window with the Add button.


3. Click Add to open the Create Virtual Storage Adapter window and enter the following:
Adapter Id:
Adapter type:
Connecting virtual server
Connecting adapter ID

22
Fibre Channel
VIOS2(2)
102

4. Confirm the window with the Add button.


5. Click Apply to dynamically add virtual Fibre Channel adapters to VirtServer1.
Now it is necessary to update the configuration profiles of VirtServer1 Virtual Server. To
update the profile of VirtServer1 Virtual Server log on to the SDMC environment and:
1. From the Home page locate the host which contain the VirtServer1 Virtual Server and
click on the name of the host to open the Resource Explorer window.
2. Check the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server VirtServer1, then click Actions
System Configuration Save Current Configuration.
3. Select the Overwrite existing profile checkbox and select the OriginalProfile profile.
4. Confirm screen using the OK button.
5. Confirm the Save Profile screen using the Yes button.

4.4.2 Configure Virtual I/O Server fro NPIV


This part of the chapter describes how to add virtual Fibre Channel adapters to the first VIOS
(VIOS1).
Log into the SDMC environment and from the Home page, locate the host that contain the
VIOS1 Virtual Server. This is the same host used in 4.2.1, Create VIOS Virtual Server on
page 57. Click on the host name to open the Resource Explorer window. Select the checkbox
to the left of the VIOS1 Virtual Server name, then click Actions System Configuration
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Manage Virtual Server. Follow these steps to add the virtual Fibre Channel adapters to
VIOS1:
1. Click Storage Adapters from the left menu.
2. Click Add to open Create Virtual Storage Adapter window and enter the following:
Adapter Id:
Adapter type:
Connecting virtual server
Connecting adapter ID

102
Fibre Channel
VirtServer1(10)
12

Confirm the window with the Add button.


3. Click Apply to dynamically add the virtual Fibre Channel adapter to VIOS1.
4. On the VIOS1 command line run the cfgdev command to check for newly added devices.
5. On VIOS1 run the lsdev -type adapter | grep "Virtual FC" command to list virtual
Fibre Channel adapters as shown in Example 4-12.
Example 4-12 Listing virtual Fibre Channel adapters on VIOS1

$ lsdev -type adapter | grep "Virtual FC"


vfchost0
Available
Virtual FC Server Adapter
The device name vfchost0 is used in the next steps as the -vadapter attribute.
6. List the physical Fibre Channel ports and NPIV attributes using the lsnports command as
shown on the Example 4-13.
Example 4-13 Listing NPIV capable Fibre Channel ports on VIOS1

$ lsnports
name physloc
fcs0 U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3-T1
fcs1 U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C3-T2

fabric tports aports swwpns


1
64
64
2048
1
64
64
2048

awwpns
2046
2048

NPIV capable ports have number 1 in the fabric column. For Fibre Channel virtualization
select the physical port with the device name fcs1, this device name will be used in the
next steps to create the mapping. The physical port fcs0 was used for a SAN LUN
masking in chapter Configure VIOS for client storage on page 62.
7. Create the virtual Fibre Channel adapter to physical Fibre Channel adapter mapping. This
mapping can be done using the SDMC interface or using the VIOS command line. Use the
SDMC to create the mapping between the virtual Fibre Channel adapter and the physical
Fibre Channel adapter. Creation of this mapping using the VIOS command is shown in
chapter 4.4.3, Configure second VIOS for NPIV on page 75. To create the mapping log
on to the SDMC and:
8. from the Home page locate the host which contain the VIOS1 Virtual Server. Check the
checkbox to the left of the host containing the VIOS1.
9. Click Actions System Configuration Virtual Resources Virtual Storage
Management.
10.In VIOS/SSP optionbox select VIOS1 and click Query.
11.Click Virtual Fibre Channel.
12.Select the checkbox to the left of the fcs1 physical Fibre Channel port. This device name
was found in the previous steps.
13.Click Modify virtual server connections.
14.Select the checkbox to the left of the VirtServer1 Virtual Server name.
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15.Click OK.
Now it is necessary to update configuration profiles of VIOS1 Virtual Server. To update the
profile of VIOS1 Virtual Server log on to the SDMC environment. From the Home page locate
the host which contain the VIOS1 Virtual Server and:
1. Click on the name of the host to open the Resource Explorer window.
2. Check the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server VIOS1, then click Actions System
Configuration Save Current Configuration.
3. Select the Overwrite existing profile checkbox and select the OriginalProfile profile.
4. Confirm screen using the OK button.
5. Confirm the Save Profile screen using the Yes button.

4.4.3 Configure second VIOS for NPIV


This part of chapter describes how to add the virtual Fibre Channel adapter to second VIOS
(VIOS2).
Login to the SDMC environment and from the Home page, locate the host that contain the
VIOS2 Virtual Server. This is the same host used in 4.3.1, Create second VIOS Virtual
Server on page 65. Click on the host name to open the Resource Explorer window. Check
the checkbox to the left of the VIOS2 Virtual Server name, then click Actions System
Configuration Manage Virtual Server. Follow these steps to add virtual Fibre Channel
adapters to VIOS2:
1. Click Storage Adapters from the left menu.
2. Click Add to open the Create Virtual Storage Adapter window and enter the following:
Adapter Id:
Adapter type:
Connecting virtual server
Connecting adapter ID

102
Fibre Channel
VirtServer1(10)
22

Confirm window with the Add button.


3. Click Apply to dynamically add the virtual Fibre Channel adapter to VIOS2.
4. On the VIOS2 command line run the cfgdev command to check for newly added devices.
5. On VIOS2 run the lsdev -type adapter | grep "Virtual FC" command to list virtual
Fibre Channel adapters as shown in Example 4-14.
Example 4-14 Listing virtual Fibre Channel adapters on VIOS2

$ lsdev -type adapter | grep "Virtual FC"


vfchost0
Available
Virtual FC Server Adapter
Device name vfchost0 is used in the next steps as a -vadapter attribute.
6. List the physical Fibre Channel ports and NPIV attributes using lsnports command as
shown on the Example 4-15.
Example 4-15 Listing NPIV capable Fibre Channel ports on VIOS2

$ lsnports
name physloc
fcs0 U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C5-T1
fcs1 U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C5-T2

fabric tports aports swwpns


1
64
64
2048
1
64
64
2048

awwpns
2046
2048

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NPIV capable ports have number 1 in the fabric column. For Fibre Channel virtualization
select the physical port with the device name fcs1. The physical port fcs0 was used for the
SAN LUN masking in chapter Configure second VIOS for client storage on page 70.
7. Create the Fibre Channel virtualization using the vfcmap -vadapter vfchost0 -fcp fcs1
command.
8. Verify the virtual Fibre Channel mapping using the lsmap -all -npiv command as shown
in Example 4-16 on page 76. The status of the virtual Fibre Channel adapter should be
LOGGED_IN.
Note: Make sure that the client OS in Virtual Server VirtServer1 has checked for new
devices after adding devices in chapter 4.4.1, Configure client Virtual Server for NPIV
on page 73. In AIX use the cfgmgr command to check for newly added devices.
Example 4-16 Listing virtual Fibre Channel mapping on VIOS

$ lsmap -all -npiv


Name
Physloc
ClntID ClntName
ClntOS
------------- ---------------------------------- ------ -------------- ------vfchost0
U8233.E8B.10F5D0P-V2-C102
10 VirtServer1
AIX
Status:LOGGED_IN
FC name:fcs1
Ports logged in:1
Flags:a<LOGGED_IN,STRIP_MERGE>
VFC client name:fcs1

FC loc code:U5802.001.RCH8497-P1-C5-T2

VFC client DRC:U8233.E8B.10F5D0P-V10-C22

Now it is necessary to update configuration profiles of VIOS2 Virtual Server. To update the
profile of the VIOS2 Virtual Server log on to the SDMC environment and:
1. From the Home page locate the host which contain the VIOS2 Virtual Server and click on
the name of the host to open the Resource Explorer window.
2. Check the checkbox to the left of the Virtual Server VIOS2, then click Actions System
Configuration Save Current Configuration.
3. Select the Overwrite existing profile checkbox and select the OriginalProfile profile.
4. Confirm screen using the OK button.
5. Confirm the Save Profile screen using the Yes button.

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Chapter 5.

Advanced Configuration
This chapter describes additional configurations to a dual VIOS setup. The advanced setup
also addresses performance concerns over the single and dual VIOS setup as well as
detailing other advanced configuration practices.

Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.

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5.1 Adapter ID numbering scheme


In Chapter 3, Setting up using Hardware Management Console on page 19 and Chapter 4,
Setting up using the SDMC on page 47 we showed a combination of default adapter IDs
and specific adapter IDs. As this is a quick start guide, default adapter IDs were chosen.
If you are dealing with a large virtual server (client partition) environment, it is best to devise
an adapter ID numbering scheme. It makes managing your environment easier, particularly
when you have multiple SEA adapters, a host of virtual SCSI adapters, and virtual Fibre
Channel adapters to list and to configure them back to a network, virtual server, or to a VIOS.
An example of how adapter numbering schemes are used for complex environments is
illustrated in Table 5-1 for one VIOS. The table shows a two SEA adapter environment where
one SEA is hosting a VLAN ID of 20 and the other SEA is hosting a group of VLANs using
802.1Q. The table shows three virtual servers where VirtServer1 has 2 network interfaces,
the C11 adapter hosting VLAN 845, whereas VirtServer2 C11 adapter is hosting VLAN 865
and VirtServer3 C11 adapter is hosting VLAN 861.
Each of the virtual server is configured with 1 virtual SCSI adapter and 2 virtual Fibre
Channel adapters from VIOS1. A dual VIOS setup would show further virtual SCSI and virtual
Fibre Channel Adapters referencing unique adapter ID slots.
Table 5-1 VIOS1 adapter ID allocation schema example

78

Virtual
Adapter

Server
VLAN ID
Adapter ID

Additional Server
VLANs
Adapter
Slot

Client
Partition/
Virtual
Server

Client
Client
Adapter ID Adapter
Slot

Virtual
Ethernet

20

20

no
additional

C20

N/A

N/A

N/A

Virtual
Ethernet

21

845
865
861

C21

N/A

N/A

N/A

Virtual
Ethernet

22

98

no
additional

C22

N/A

N/A

N/A

Virtual
Ethernet

23

99

no
additional

C23

N/A

N/A

N/A

Virtual
Ethernet

N/A

20

N/A

C10

VirtServer1 10

C10

Virtual
Ethernet

N/A

845

N/A

C11

VirtServer1 11

C11

Virtual SCSI101

N/A

N/A

C101

VirtServer1 21

C21

Virtual Fibre 103

N/A

N/A

C103

VirtServer1 23

C23

Virtual Fibre 105

N/A

N/A

C105

VirtServer1 25

C25

Virtual
Ethernet

N/A

20

N/A

C10

VirtServer1 10

C10

Virtual
Ethernet

N/A

865

N/A

C11

VirtServer1 11

C11

Virtual SCSI111

N/A

N/A

C111

VirtServer2 21

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Virtual
Adapter

Server
VLAN ID
Adapter ID

Additional Server
VLANs
Adapter
Slot

Client
Partition/
Virtual
Server

Client
Client
Adapter ID Adapter
Slot

Virtual Fibre 113

N/A

N/A

C113

VirtServer2 23

C23

Virtual Fibre 115

N/A

N/A

C115

VirtServer2 25

C25

Virtual
Ethernet

N/A

20

N/A

C10

VirtServer1 10

C10

Virtual
Ethernet

N/A

861

N/A

C11

VirtServer1 11

C11

Virtual SCSI121

N/A

N/A

C121

VirtServer3 21

C21

Virtual Fibre 123

N/A

N/A

C122

VirtServer3 23

C23

Virtual Fibre 125

N/A

N/A

C123

VirtServer3 25

C25

5.2 Partition numbering


In both the HMC and SDMC chapters, the VIOS partitions are planned as partition ID 1 and 2
and the virtual servers start at partition ID 10. If you have additional infrastructure partitions (a
NIM virtual server, TSM virtual server, or additional VIOS partitions), then it is best for them to
be numbered between 3 and 9 so that they are grouped and viewed with the VIOS partitions.
When maintenance is done on a system the VIOS partitions are the first partitions to start up
and the last partitions to shut down.

5.3 VIOS partition and system redundancy


A redundant VIOS partition setup allows you to perform system maintenance on one VIOS
partition without affecting the virtual servers. System maintenance may be a reboot, update,
upgrade, or reinstallation of a VIOS partition.
On a VIOS partition level, redundancy can be added by introducing additional physical
adapters. For networks, combine additional Ethernet adapters with 802.3ad Link Aggregation
not only provides redundancy, it also provides throughput. For storage, using multiple Fibre
adapters with MPIO or supported MPIO device drivers (PowerPath for EMC storage and
SDDPCM for enterprise IBM System Storage) will provide the necessary redundancy,
throughout and also provide load balancing.
Redundancy can be applied to a system which spans multiple I/O drawers and multiple
Central Electronic Complexes (CEC) servers. Separate CEC loops can be created as detailed
in the systems product manual.
If you have a system which spans multiple I/O drawers and CECs, it is best to allocate the
adapters from different I/O drawers or CECs to a VIOS partition. You will have a highly
redundant setup if you have done so.

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5.4 Advanced VIOS network setup


In a VIOS partition, redundancy can be applied to its physical network connections by
combining multiple physical connections together to form a logical Ethernet device. This is
done using the network communication protocol of IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation (known to
network administrators as Link Aggregation Control Protocol - LACP).
Another network protocol which can be applied is IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagging (also known as
VLAN trunking). Traditionally, one network port hosted one VLAN. With 802.1Q, it now allows
multiple networks to be hosted on a single network port.
More information on the two network protocols is explained in IBM PowerVM Virtualization
Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940.

5.4.1 Using IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation


Figure 5-1 on page 81 shows the configuration of an SEA failover setup using dual VIOS with
additional Ethernet adapters. Each VIOS partition is configured with two physical Ethernet
ports on different Ethernet adapters. If an Ethernet adapter fails the external link is still active
with the port of the other Ethernet adapter.
The two Ethernet adapter ports are linked together to form a logical EtherChannel adapter.
Note: In this section, EtherChannel is used to describe a link aggregated adapter on VIOS
or AIX. This is not the same as CISCO Etherchannel.
Figure 5-1 on page 81 also shows each VIOS partition connected to a network switch. Linked
adapters in 802.3ad Link Aggregation configuration does not support spanning across
multiple network switches if the network switches are in a non virtualized state.
To configure a logical EtherChannel adapter, configure 802.3ad Link Aggregation settings on
the VIOS partition and on the network switches. Portfast is best activated on the network
switches to allow faster failover time.
The command syntax to create a Link Aggregation adapter between physical Ethernet
adapters entX and entY is:
mkvdev -lnaggr <entX> <entY> -attr mode=8023ad
Note: The 802.3ad setting must be set on the VIOS partition side and network switch end.
The Link Aggregation adapter will be non responsive if the setting is set on either side only.

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VIOS 1

en7
(if.)

Primary

VIOS 2

en7
(if.)

ent7
(SEA)

ent7
(SEA)

ent6
(inaggr)

ent4
(v irt.)

ent5
(virt.)

ent5
(virt.)

priority=1

ent0
(phy.)

ent 1
(phy.)

2-port Ethernet
adapter

ent2
(phy.)

Clien t Partiti on

Standby

ent4
(v irt.)

ent6
(inaggr)

en0
(if.)

priority=2

ent3
(phy. )

ent0
(phy.)

2-port Ethernet
adapter

ent1
(phy.)

ent2
(phy.)

2-port Ethernet
adapt er

ent3
(phy.)

ent0
(virt.)

2-port Ethernet
adapter

Hypervisor

Con trol
chann el
Default VL AN ID=99
Def ault VLAN ID =1

PVID= 1

PVI D= 1

Ethernet
switch 1

Uplink
VL AN=1

Ethernet
switch 2

Figure 5-1 Redundant SEA setup

5.4.2 Using IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagging


Enabling 802.1Q VLAN tagging is done on the virtual Ethernet adapters used for bridging to
the physical Ethernet adapters:
1. Access the Virtual Adapters window either from the manage profiles window of the VIO
partition, the DLPAR option, or during VIOS partition profile creation.
2. Skip to step 3 if virtual Ethernet adapter for bridging is not present in the Virtual Adapters
window. Select the virtual Ethernet adapter and in the Actions menu select Edit. Go to
step 4.
3. Click Actions Create Virtual Adapter Ethernet Adapter...
4. In the Create Virtual Ethernet Adapter window, select the IEEE 802.1q compatible adapter
option and enter the VLAN ID one at a time, clicking the Add button after each VLAN ID.
5. Click OK to update the virtual Ethernet adapter details in the Virtual Adapters window.
6. Click OK to save the information on the Virtual Adapters window.

5.4.3 Multiple SEA configuration on VIOS


The VIOS partition is not restricted to only one SEA adapter. It can host multiple SEA
adapters where:
A company security policy may advise a separation of VLANs so that one SEA adapter will
host secure networks and another SEA adapter will host unsecure networks.
A company may advise a separation of production, testing, and development networks
connecting to specific SEA adapter configurations.

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5.4.4 General network considerations


There are considerations regarding the use of IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation, 802.1Q VLAN
tagging, and SEA:
There is a maximum of 8 active ports and 8 standby ports in an 802.3ad Link Aggregation
device.
Each of the links in a 803.3ad Link Aggregation device should have their speeds set to a
common speed setting. For example, set all links to 1g/Full duplex.
A virtual Ethernet adapter is capable of supporting up to 20 VLANS (including the Port
Virtual LAN ID - PVID).
A maximum of 16 virtual Ethernet adapters with 20 VLANS assigned to each adapter can
be associated to an SEA adapter.
A maximum of 256 virtual Ethernet adapters can be assigned to a single virtual server,
including the VIOS partitions.
The IEEE 802.1Q standard supports a maximum of 4096 VLANS.
SEA failover is not supported in IVM as it only supports a single VIOS partition.

5.5 Advanced storage connectivity


There are two approaches to physically cabling additional Fibre Channel adapter ports in a
dual VIOS setup:
Each VIOS partition can have their Fibre Channel adapter ports connected to the same
SAN switch as illustrated in Figure 5-2.

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Client Partition
MPIO for data disks

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter
MPIO for OS disks

Client SCSI
Adapter

Client SCSI
Adapter

VIOS 1

VIOS 2

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

fcs0

Physical
FC Adapter 1

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

fcs1

fcs2

Server SCSI
Adapter

Server SCSI
Adapter

MPIO

MPIO

Physical
FC Adapter 2

fcs3

fcs0

2 port 8GB Fibre Adapters

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

Physical
FC Adapter 1

fcs1

fcs2

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

Physical
FC Adapter 2

fcs3

2 port 8GB Fibre Adapters

SAN
Switch 1

SAN
Switch 2

Physical Resources

SAN

Virtual Resources

Figure 5-2 MPIO setup where each VIOS partition is connected to one SAN switch

Each VIOS partition can have their Fibre Channel adapter ports connected to different
SAN switches as illustrated in Figure 5-3

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Client Partition
MPIO for data disks

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter

Client Fibre
Channel Adapter

MPIO for OS disks

Client SCSI
Adapter

Client SCSI
Adapter

VIOS 1

VIOS 2

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

fcs0

Physical
FC Adapter 1

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

fcs1

fcs2

Server SCSI
Adapter

Server SCSI
Adapter

MPIO

MPIO

Physical
FC Adapter 2

fcs3

fcs0

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

Physical
FC Adapter 1

2 port 8GB Fibre Adapters

fcs1

fcs2

Server Fibre
Channel Adapter

Physical
FC Adapter 2

fcs3

2 port 8GB Fibre Adapters

SAN
Switch 1

SAN
Switch 2

SAN

Physical Resources
Virtual Resources

Figure 5-3 MPIO setup where the VIO partitions are connected to the 2 SAN switches

The two approaches have their benefits and their drawbacks as highlighted in Table 5-2:
Table 5-2 Fibre Channel cabling scenarios
Scenario

VIOS Partition connected to 1


SAN switch, Figure 5-2 on
page 83

VIOS Partition connected to 2


SAN switches, Figure 5-3

SAN switch 1 is brought down


for maintenance.

VIOS1 is unavailable for


storage. The LUNS are
accessible via VIOS2.

Storage is available through


both VIOS partitions.

SAN switch 1 is misconfigured.

VIOS1 is affected. VIOS2 is


unaffected.

VIOS1 and VIOS2 are both


impacted and may lose
connectivity to the SAN.

Cabling issues

Easier to pinpoint cabling


problems as all connections on
VIOS1 are connected to SAN
switch 1; for VIOS2 all
connections are connected to
SAN switch 2.

Harder to manage cable issues


as VIOS1 and VIOS2 have
connections to both SAN switch
1 and 2.

Consider the approach which best serves your environment.

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5.6 Shared processor pools


Multiple Shared-Processor Pools (MSPPs) is a capability supported on POWER6 and later
servers. This capability allows a system administrator to create a set of micro-partitions with
the purpose of controlling the processor capacity that can be consumed from the physical
shared-processor pool.
This topic is explained in section 2.2.3 of IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and
Configuration, SG24-7940

5.7 Live Partition Mobility


PowerVM Live Partition Mobility allows for the movement of an active (running) or inactive
(powered off) partition from one server to another with no application downtime. This results
in higher system utilization, improved application availability, and energy savings. With
PowerVM Live Partition Mobility, planned application downtime due to regular server
maintenance can be a thing of the past.
PowerVM Live Partition Mobility requires systems with POWER6 or newer processors running
AIX or Linux operating systems and PowerVM Enterprise Edition. There is an entire redbook
for Live Partition Mobility, IBM PowerVM Live Partition Mobility, SG24-7460

5.8 Active memory sharing


IBM Active Memory Sharing (AMS) enables the sharing of a pool of physical memory
among AIX, IBM i, and Linux partitions on a single IBM Power Systems server Power 6 or
later, helping to increase memory utilization and drive down system costs.
The memory is dynamically allocated among the partitions as needed, to optimize the overall
physical memory usage in the pool. Instead of assigning a dedicated amount of physical
memory to each logical partition that uses shared memory (hereafter referred to as Shared
Memory Partitions), the IBM POWER Hypervisor constantly provides the physical
memory from the Shared Memory Pool to the Shared Memory Partitions as needed. The
POWER Hypervisor provides portions of the Shared Memory Pool that are not currently being
used by Shared Memory Partitions to other Shared Memory Partitions that need to use the
memory.
This topic is explained in section 2.4.2 of IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and
Configuration, SG24-7940

5.9 Active Memory Deduplication


Active Memory Deduplication is a virtualization technology that allows memory pages with
identical contents to be deduplicated in physical memory. This is designed to free up physical
memory positions so that more data can be held in memory at once.
Memory deduplication is intended to work in a shared memory environment. Therefore, it
works together with Active Memory Sharing which is a technology to allow multiple partitions
on a system to share a pool of physical memory, sometimes creating an over commitment of
this physical memory. Active Memory Deduplication increases the performance of Active
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Memory Sharing since the savings can be used to either lower memory over commitment
levels or to create room to increase logical partitions memory footprint.
Memory Deduplication is the topic of RedPaper REDP-4827.

5.10 Shared storage pools


A shared storage pool is a pool of SAN storage devices that can span multiple Virtual I/O
Servers. It is based on a cluster of Virtual I/O Servers and a distributed data object repository
with a global namespace. Each Virtual I/O Server that is part of a cluster represents a cluster
node.
The distributed data object repository is using a cluster filesystem that has been developed
specifically for the purpose of storage virtualization using the Virtual I/O Server. It provides
redirect-on-write capability and is highly scalable. The distributed object repository is the
foundation for advanced storage virtualization features, such as thin provisioning. Additional
features will be added in future releases. They will provide significant benefits by facilitating
key capabilities for emerging technologies such as cloud computing.
When using shared storage pools, the Virtual I/O Server provides storage through logical
units that are assigned to client partitions. A logical unit is a file backed storage device that
resides in the cluster filesystem in the shared storage pool. It appears as a virtual SCSI disk
in the client partition, in the same way as a for example, a virtual SCSI device backed by a
physical disk or a logical volume.
Shared storage pools are best described and configured in section 2.7.2 of IBM PowerVM
Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940

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4815bibl.fm

Related publications
The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a more detailed
discussion of the topics covered in this paper.

IBM Redbooks
The following IBM Redbooks publications provide additional information about the topic in this
document. Note that some publications referenced in this list might be available in softcopy
only.
IBM Systems Director Management Console: Introduction and Overview, SG24-7860
IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940
Integrated Virtualization Manager on IBM System p5, REDP-4061
IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration, SG24-7940
You can search for, view, download or order these documents and other Redbooks,
Redpapers, Web Docs, draft and additional materials, at the following website:
ibm.com/redbooks

Online resources
These websites are also relevant as further information sources:
PowerVM QuickStar by William Favorite <wfavorite@tablesace.net>
http://www.tablespace.net/quicksheet/powervm-quickstart.html
IBM i Information Center http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/eserver/ibm.html
NIM installation and backup of the VIO server https://www-304.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=isg3T1011386#4

Help from IBM


IBM Support and downloads
ibm.com/support
IBM Global Services
ibm.com/services

Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.

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Back cover

IBM PowerVM
Getting Started Guide
Step by step
virtualization
configuration from
scratch to the first
partition
IVM, HMC, and SDMC
examples provided
Advanced
configurations
included

IBM PowerVM virtualization technology is a combination of


hardware and software that supports and manages the virtual
environments on POWER5, POWER5+,POWER6 and
POWER7-based systems.
Available on IBM Power Systems, and IBM BladeCenter servers as
optional Editions, and supported by the AIX, IBM i, and Linux
operating systems, this set of comprehensive systems technologies
and services is designed to enable you to aggregate and manage
resources using a consolidated, logical view. Deploying PowerVM
virtualization and IBM Power Systems offers you the following benefits:
Lower energy costs through server consolidation

Redpaper

INTERNATIONAL
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
ORGANIZATION

BUILDING TECHNICAL
INFORMATION BASED ON
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE

Reduced cost of your existing infrastructure


Better management of the growth, complexity, and risk of your
infrastructure
This IBM Redpaper publication will drive through a quick start
guide to help you install and configure a complete PowerVM
virtualization solution on IBM Power Systems either using Integrated
Virtualization Manager (IVM), Hardware Management Console (HMC),
Virtual IO Server (VIOS), or Systems Director Management Console
(SDMC).
The paper is targeted to new customers who need first instructions on
how to install, configure and bring up the whole system on an easy and
quick way.

IBM Redbooks are developed


by the IBM International
Technical Support
Organization. Experts from
IBM, Customers and Partners
from around the world create
timely technical information
based on realistic scenarios.
Specific recommendations
are provided to help you
implement IT solutions more
effectively in your
environment.

For more information:


ibm.com/redbooks
REDP-4815-00