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Syllabus

Stakeholder Relations, Spring 2015


Chiara Valentini

The course is structured around 6 lectures + 5 tutorials.


This course is based on journal articles available in the reading list in Blackboard and book chapters available online and in the
course bookshelf at Nobel Parken library.
For this course, use APA style (American Psychology Association) for citations of references. Information on APA style:
http://www.library.cornell.edu/resrch/citmanage/apa

WEEK TYPE OF
CLASS
6

Lecture
(2hs)

TOPICS

READINGS

CLASS ACTIVITIES

Course intro

Obligatory readings:

Lecture + class activities

Stakeholder definition
& history

[1] Sellnow et al., 2013

Students are expected to:

[2] Bowen & Rawlins, 2013


[3] Friedman & Miles, 2006, Ch. 2
[4] Preble, 2005

1. read the assigned material prior to


the class
2. interact with lecturer on the subject
discussed in the class

Additional readings (not obligatory):


[33] Donaldson & Preston, 1995
[34] Phillips et al., 2003
1

[35] Laplume et al., 2008


7

Lecture
(3hs)

Stakeholder theories I

Obligatory readings:

Lecture + class activities

Stakeholder
identification and
prioritization

[5] Hill & Jones, 1992

Students are expected to:

[6] Mitchell et al., 1997


[7] Grunig, 2013
[8] Sedereviciute & Valentini, 2011

1. read the assigned material prior to


the class
2. interact with lecturer on the subject
discussed in the class

Additional readings (not obligatory):


[36] Rawlins, 2006
[37] Saling, 2013
[38] Heath, 2013

Tutorial
(3hs)

Employees and
consumers as
stakeholders

[9] Fitchett, 2005

Group activities

[10] Carroll & Buchholtz, 2007, Chap. 17

Students are expected to:

Additional readings (not obligatory):


[39] Hollenbeck & Zinkhan, 2006

1. make presentations of reading


material and ask questions (see
guidelines)

Group 1: presentation paper [9]


Opponent: Group 2

2. work in groups for a class activity


(see guidelines) based on the papers
[9], [10], lecture material and
questions provided by the lecturer
2

Lecture
(3hs)

Stakeholder theories II

Obligatory readings:

Lecture + class activities

Stakeholder activism

[11] Rowley & Moldoveanu, 2003

Students are expected to:

[12] Frooman, 1999


[13] Mattingly & Greening, 2002
[14] Bliss, 2002

1. read the assigned material prior to


the class
2. interact with lecturer on the subject
discussed in the class

Additional readings (not obligatory):


[40] Luoma-aho & Vos, 2010
10

Tutorial
(3hs)

NGOs and citizens as


stakeholders

Obligatory readings:

Group activities

[15] van Huijstee & Glasbergen, 2008

Students are expected to:

[16] Doh & Guay, 2006

1. make presentations of reading


material and ask questions (see
guidelines)

Group 2: presentation paper [15]


Opponent: Group 3

2. work in groups for a class activity


(see guidelines) based on the papers
[15], [16], lecture material and
questions provided by the lecturer
11

Lecture
(3hs)

Stakeholder theories
III
Normative
perspectives

Obligatory readings:

Lecture + class activities

[17] Donaldson & Dunfee, 1994

Students are expected to:

[18] Bowie, 1998


[19] Wicks et al., 1994

1. read the assigned material prior to


the class

[20] Argandoa, 1998

2. interact with lecturer on the subject


3

discussed in the class


Additional readings (not obligatory):
[41] Evan & Freeman, 1993
[42] Burton & Dunn, 1996
12

Tutorial
(3hs)

Investors as
stakeholders

Obligatory readings:

Group activities

[21] Wen, 2009

Students are expected to:

[22] Goranova & Ryan, 2014


Additional readings (not obligatory):
[43] Rehbein et al., 2004

1. make presentations of reading


material and ask questions (see
guidelines)

Group 3: presentation paper [21]


Opponent: Group 4

2. work in groups for a class activity


(see guidelines) based on the papers
[21], [22], lecture material and
questions provided by the lecturer
13

Lecture
(3hs)

Strategies for
stakeholder
management

Obligatory readings:

Lecture + class activities

[23] Freeman, 1984

Students are expected to:

[24] Rowley, 1997


[25] Friedman & Miles, 2006, Ch. 6
[26] Crane & Livesey, 2003
[27] Ragas, 2013

1. read the assigned material prior to


the class
2. interact with lecturer on the subject
discussed in the class

Additional readings (not obligatory):


[44] Neville & Menguc, 2006
4

[45] Johansen & Nielsen


[46] McCombs & Shaw, 1972
[47] Entman, 1993

14
15

No class
Tutorial
(3hs)

Government and
political actors as
stakeholders

Obligatory readings:

Group activities

[28] Oliver & Holzinger, 2008

Students are expected to:

[29] Buchholz & Rosenthal, 2004


Additional readings (not obligatory):
[48] Ihlen & Berntzen, 2007

1. make presentations of reading


material and ask questions (see
guidelines)

Group 4: presentation paper [28]


Opponent: Group 5

2. work in groups for a class activity


(see guidelines) based on the papers
[28], [29], lecture material and
questions provided by the lecturer

16

Tutorial
(3hs)

Media as stakeholders

Obligatory readings:

Group activities

[30] Deephouse & Heugens, 2009

Students are expected to:

[31] Carroll & McCombs, 2003

1. make presentations of reading


material and ask questions (see
guidelines)
5

Group 5: presentation paper [30]


Opponent: Group 1

2. work in groups for a class activity


(see guidelines) based on the paper
[30], [31], lecture material and
questions provided by the lecturer

16

Lecture
(2hs)

Conclusions and exam


preparation

Obligatory readings:

Lecture + class activities

[32] Mainardes et al., 2011

Students are expected to:

Additional readings (not obligatory):


[49] Steuer, 2006
[50] Fassin, 2008

1. read the assigned material prior to


the class
2. interact with lecturer on the subject
discussed in the class

List of readings
Stakeholder Relations, Spring 2015

Obligatory readings:

[1]

Sellnow, T. L., Ulmer, R. R., & Seeger, M. W. (2013). Stakes. In R. L. Heath (Eds), Encyclopedia of Public Relations, 2nd ed.
(vol. 2, pp. 875-877). London: Sage. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[2]

Bowen, S. A., & Rawlins, B. L. (2013), Publics. In R. L. Heath (Eds), Encyclopedia of Public Relations, 2nd ed. (vol. 2, pp. 760762). London: Sage E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[3]

Friedman, A. L., & Miles, S. (2006). Chap. 2: History and the nature of stakeholder theorizing (only pp. 18-30) In:
Stakeholders. Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press, Oxford. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE
LIBRARY DATABASE

[4]

Preble, J. F. (2005), Towards a comprehensive model of stakeholder management. Business and Society Review, 110(4):
407431.

[5]

Hill, C. J. & Jones, T. M. (1992), Stakeholders Agency Theory. Journal of Management Studies, 29(2), 131-154.

[6]

Mitchell, R. K., Agle, B. B., & Wood, D. J. (1997). Towards a theory of stakeholder identification and salience. Academy of
Management Review, 22(4), 853-886.

[7]

Grunig, J. E. (2013). Situational Theory of Publics. In R. L. Heath (Eds), Encyclopedia of Public Relations, 2nd ed. (vol. 2, pp.
834-836). London: Sage. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[8]

Sedereviciute, K., & Valentini, C. (2011): Towards a more holistic stakeholder analysis approach. Mapping known and
undiscovered stakeholders from social media. International Journal of Strategic Communication, 5(4), 221-239

[9]

Fitchett, J. A. (2005). Consumers as stakeholders: Prospects for democracy in marketing theory. Business Ethics: A
European Review, 14(1), 14-27.
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[10]

Carroll, A. B., & Buchholtz, A. K. (2007). Chap. 17: Employee stakeholders: Privacy, safety and health. In: Business & Society.
Ethics and Stakeholder Management (pp. 535-566). 6th ed., South-Western Cengage Learning. BOOK AVAILABLE AT
NOBEL PARKEN LIBRARY

[11]

Rowley, T. J., & Moldoveanu, M. (2003). When will stakeholder groups act? An interest- and identity-based model of
stakeholder group mobilization. Academy of Management Review, 28(2), 204-219.

[12]

Frooman, J. (1999), Stakeholder influence strategies. Academy of Management Review, 24(2), 191-205.

[13]

Mattingly, J. E., & Greening, D. W. (2002). Public interest groups as stakeholders. A stakeholder salience explanation of
activism. In J. Adriof, S. Waddock, B. Husted, & S. Sutherland Rahman (Eds.), Unfolding Stakeholder Thinking. Theory,
Responsibility and Engagement (pp.267-277). Sheffield, UK: Greenleaf Publishing. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE
THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[14]

Bliss, T. J. (2002). Citizen advocacy groups. Corporate friend or foe? In J. Adriof, S. Waddock, B. Husted, & S. Sutherland
Rahman (Eds.), Unfolding Stakeholder Thinking. Theory, Responsibility and Engagement (pp.251-265). Sheffield, UK:
Greenleaf Publishing. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[15]

van Huijstee, M., & Glasbergen, P. (2008). The practice of stakeholder dialogue between multinationals and NGOs.
Corporate Social Responsibility & Environmental management, 15(5), 298-310.

[16]

Doh, J. P., & Guay, T. R. (2006). Corporate social responsibility, public policy, and NGO activism in Europe and the United
States: An institutional-stakeholder perspective. Journal of Management Studies, 43(1), 47-70.

[17]

Donaldson, T. & Dunfee, T. W. (1994). Toward a unified conception of business ethics: Integrative social contracts theory.
Academy of Management Review, 19(2), 252-284.

[18] Bowie, N. E. (1998), A Kantian theory of capitalism. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics, 1, 37-60
[19]

Wicks, A. C., Gilbert, D. R. Jr. & Freeman, E. R. (1994), A Feminist reinterpretation of the stakeholder concept. Business
Ethics Quarterly, 4(4), 475-497.

[20]

Argandona, A. (1998). The stakeholder theory and the common good. Journal of Business Ethics, 17(1), pp. 1093-102.

[21]

Wen, S. (2009). Institutional investor activism on socially responsible investment: Effects and expectations. Business Ethics:
A European Review, 18(3), 308-333.

[22]

Goranova, M. & Ryan, L. V. (2014). Shareholder Activism: A Multidisciplinary Review. Journal of Management, 40(5), 12301268.

[23]

Freeman, R. E. (2010/1984). Chapter 5: Formulating strategies for stakeholders. In: Strategic Management. A Stakeholder
Approach (pp. 126-153). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. BOOK AVAILABLE AT NOBEL PARKEN LIBRARY

[24]

Rowley, T. J. (1997), Moving beyond dyadic ties: A network theory of stakeholder influences. Academy of Management
Review, 22(4), 887-910.

[25]

Friedman, A. L., & Miles, S. (2006). Chap. 6: Stakeholder management from the perspective of the organization (only pp.
160-176) In: Stakeholders. Theory and Practice. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE
THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[26]

Crane, A. & Livesey, S. (2003). Are you talking to me? Stakeholder communication and the risks and rewards of dialogue. In
J. Andriof, S. Waddock, S. Rahman and B. Husted (eds.), Unfolding Stakeholder Thinking 2: Relationships, Communication,
Reporting and Performance (pp. 39-52). Sheffield: Greenleaf. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY
DATABASE

[27]

Ragas, M. W. (2013). Chapter 15: Agenda-building and agenda-setting theory: Which companies we think about and how we
think about them. In C. E. Carroll (Ed.), Handbook of Communication and Corporate Reputation (pp. 153-165). Oxford:
Wiley-Blackwell. E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[28]

Oliver, C. & Holzinger, I. (2008). The effectiveness of political strategic management: A dynamic capability approach.
Academy of Management Review 33(2), 496-520

[29]

Buchholz, R. A., & Rosenthal, S. B. (2004). Stakeholder theory and public policy: How governments matter. Journal of
Business Ethics, 51(2), 143-153.

[30]

Deephouse, D. L., & Heugens, P. P. M. A. R. (2009). Linking social issues to organizational impact: The role of infomediaries
and the infomediary process. Journal of Business Ethics, 86(4), 541-553.

[31]

Carroll, C. E., & McCombs, M. (2003). Agenda-setting effects of business news on the publics images and opinions about
major corporations. Corporate Reputation Review, 6(1), 3646.

[32]

Mainardes, E. W., Alves, H., & Raposo, M. (2011). Stakeholder theory: issues to resolve. Management Decision, 49(2), 226252.

Additional readings (not obligatory):


[33]

Donaldson, T., & Preston, L. E. (1995), The stakeholder theory of the corporation: Concepts, evidence, and implications. The
Academy of Management Review, 20(1), 65-91

[34]

Philips, R. A., Freeman, R. E., & Wicks, A. C. (2003). What stakeholder theory is not. Business Ethics Quarterly, 13(4), 479502.

[35]

Laplume, A. O., Sonpar, K., & Litz, R. A. (2008), Stakeholder theory: Reviewing a theory that moves us. Journal of
Management, 34(6): 1152-1189.

[36]

Rawlins, B. L. (2006), Prioritizing Stakeholders for Public Relations. Institute for public relations, Miami, FL.

[37]

Saling, K. (2013), Social Network Analysis. In R. L. Heath (Eds), Encyclopedia of Public Relations, 2nd ed. (vol. 2, pp. 849850). London: Sage E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[38]

Heath, R. L. (2013), Network Theory. In R. L. Heath (Eds), Encyclopedia of Public Relations, 2nd ed. (vol. 2, pp. 603-605).
London: Sage E-BOOK VERSION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE LIBRARY DATABASE

[39]

Hollenbeck, C. R., & Zinkhan, G. M. (2006). Consumer activism on the Internet: The role of anti-brand communities.
Advances in Consumer

[40]

Luoma-aho, V., & Vos, M. (2010). Towards a more dynamic stakeholder model: acknowledging multiple issue arenas.
Corporate Communications: An International Journal, 15(3), 315-331.

10

[41]

Evan, W. M. & Freeman, R. E. (1993). A stakeholder theory of modern corporation: Kantian capitalism. In T. L. Beauchamp
and N. E. Bowie (eds.), Ethical Theory and Business (pp. 75-84). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. BOOK AVAILABLE AT
NOBEL PARKEN LIBRARY

[42]

Burton, B. K., & Dunn, C. P. (1996), Feminist ethics as moral grounding for stakeholder theory. Business Ethics Quarterly,
6(2), 133-147.

[43]

Rehbein, K., Waddock, S., & Graves, S. B. (2004). Understanding shareholder activism: Which corporations are targeted?
Business Society, 43(3), 239-267.

[44]

Neville, B. A., & Menguc, B. (2006). Stakeholder multiplicity: Toward an understanding of the interactions between
stakeholders. Journal of Business Ethics, 66(4), 377391.

[45]

Johansen, T. S., & Nielsen, A. E. (2011). Strategic stakeholder dialogues: a discursive perspective on relationship building.
Corporate Communications: An International Journal, 16(3), 204-217.

[46]

McCombs, M., & Shaw, D. L. (1972). The agenda-setting function of mass media. Public Opinion Quarterly, 36(2), 176-187.

[47]

Entman, R. M. (1993). Framing: Toward clarification of a fractured paradigm, Journal of Communication, 43(4), 51-58.

[48]

Ihlen, ., & Berntzen, . (2007). When lobbying backfires: Balancing lobby efforts with insights from stakeholder theory.
Journal of Communication Management, 11(3), 235-246.

[49]

Steurer, R. (2006). Mapping stakeholder theory anew: From the stakeholder theory of the firm to three perspectives on
businesssociety relations. Business Strategy and the Environment, 15(1), 5569.

[50]

Fassin, Y. (2008), The stakeholder model redefined. Journal of Business Ethics, 84(1), 113135.

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