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Tri-City Times

50

LAPEER

ST. CLAIR

MACOMB

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

142nd Volume - Issue No. 17

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Middle school
plan approved

Dollar
General
eyeing
Almont

Move will save Capac


school district $500,000
By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo provided

Discount store considering


downtown site for location
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Dollar General page 12-A

Team members, parents and spectators roar with delight when Spartronics pulled
an upset at the state championship in Grand Rapids earlier this month.

Lighting it up!
Spartronics robotics team is off to world competition
By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

IMLAY CITY Before


the sun was up this morning,
April 27, members of Imlay
City High Schools Spartronics
robotics team were headed
south, en route to the FIRST
Robotics World Championships
in St. Louis, Missouri.
Students, parents and coach
Don Heeke were due to depart
at 4 a.m. to reach their hotel in
mid-afternoon and prepare for
competition at the Edward
Jones Dome. Their robot is
already in the gateway city,
shipped there courtesy of
FedEx.
This is the second consecutive year the team has h a d
the distinction of qualifying
for worlds. They earned themselves a trip to the prestigious
competition after finishing
25th in state competitions earlier this month in Grand Rapids
for a final state ranking of 39
out of 411 teams.

Photo provided

ALMONT Plans are tentatively in the works for construction


of a new Dollar General store on
Main Street in downtown Almont.
Village Manager Sarah MoyerCale said the company, which has
not officially committed to the project, will present a site plan to the
villages planning commission on
Thursday, May 5.
If approved, Dollar General
could move forward with construction of a store on currently vacant
property at the northwest corner of
School and Main streets.
The property, once occupied by
Hurd Lock, is owned by Frank
Glinski; who reportedly has yet to
officially sell the property.
Several years ago, underground
contamination at the site was
removed by Michigan Dept. of
Environmental Equality through an
arrangement that allowed Glinski
to sell the property to the Village of
Almont for $1.
After the existing environmental concerns were mitigated, the
Village sold the property back to
Glinski at a cost of $1.
In recent years, the open field
had been used as a site for community events, including the Almont
Heritage
Festival,
Almont
Homecoming and the Spooky
Time Bash Halloween event,
sponsored by the Almont Downtown
Development Authority.
Nolan Miles, a spokesperson
for Dollar General, said Friday that

Patti Jo Stroman Haynes, Keegan Flowers, Mike


Brown, Austin Pankey, Alex Graver and Sarah
Hubbard make preparations in the pit before competition.
Competition was fierce
among the best robotics teams
from across Michigan during
the April 13-16 event at the
DeltaPlex Arena, Heeke said.
It was great to make it to
states. The kids brought their
A game, but everyone else
brought their A game too, he

recalled of the first day of


competition.
The contests medieval
theme had robots and their
operators competing in challenges that had them scaling
castle towers and crossing
Spartronics page 12-A

CAPAC The school board has given


their blessing to a restructuring plan that will
move sixth, seventh and eighth grades out of
the Middle School and turn it into a home for
the districts Virtual Program for the 2016-17
school year. Details as to how the move
would impact jobs have yet to be finalized.
Members voted unanimously at their
Thursday meeting without any discussion.
Many staff and members of the public were
present but no one spoke on the matter except
for Capac Education Association President
Kathy Kuretich who said, on behalf of the
union, we would like to offer our support...
and work with you to move the school district forward.
In previous weeks, Superintendent Steve
Bigelow presented his proposal to the board,
employee groups and the public and
President Mike Lentz praised the new administrator for doing a great job of informing
everyone.
As a result, Capac Elementary School
will house grades preschool through 6th and
Capac High School will be home to 7th
through 12th grades.
The restructuring is expected to save the
district $500,000 although Bigelow stresses
that number is a very rough estimate.
The Virtual Program, now housed in a
wing of the high school, has proved to be
extremely popular. Bigelow said that of midApril, it boasted 53 students.
Bigelow has said that once details about
jobs are known, he will inform staff immediately.
In other meeting business members:
approved a $4,310 bid to remedy a
drainage problem on the west side of the
cafetorium
approved a $13,900 bid to grade and
resurface the transportation lot
renewed a $32,000 contract with St.
Clair County RESA for human resources and
payroll services
recognized Monica Standel for completing training through and earning recognition
from the the Michigan Association of School
Boards.

Market time nears


By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

I M L AY C I T Y
Downtown
Development
Director
Dana
Walker
reminds that the 2016 Farmers
Market opens Thursday, May
5 with a Grand Opening from
1-6 p.m.
Walker notes some newcomers to the vendors list,
including: Ks Kreation Teas:
locally grown herbal teas;
Doug the Chipman: homemade potato chips; and
Memphis-based Sage Creek
Winery.
Walker explains that the
winerys participation is made
available by the passage of
Public Act 100 in 2013,
which allows for the issuance
of special permits to small
winemakers; which lets them
offer samples and to sell wine
at Michigan farmers markets.
Other vendors expected
to be returning on May 5 are:
Evergreen
Antiques,
Campbells Local Harvest,

Eds Apiary, Bonnies Royal


Oils, Our Daily Bread, Ken
Penzien
Farms
and
Greenhouse and Kathy Stine.
The market will again
participate in food assistance
programs that include: EBT,
Double UP Food Bucks, WIC
and Senior Fresh and the
acceptance of DEBIT cards.
Double Up Food Bucks will
begin opening day of the market, May 5.
Children 12 and younger
are invited to sign up for the
monthly Little Sprouts program to receive one free
Farmers Market item (fruit,
vegetable, baked goods and
more.)
This season well also
have special Crafter and
Artisan days every third
Thursday of the month, says
Walker. Special rates will be
offered to crafters and artisans. We would love to showcase handmade items and
original artwork including
photographs, paintings and

the like.
Walker says the market is
always looking for fruit and
vegetable growers, crafters,
antiques, art and more.
Vendor rates are $90 for
the season, and payment
plans are available, along
with a daily rate of $10,
which is reduced to $5 per
day after having paid $100.
Various special events
will take place during the
season to boost attendance
and appeal to the varied interests of attendees.
The Imlay City Farmers
Market is continuing its relationships with the Ruth
Hughes Memorial Library
and Goodwill Industries to
provide childrens activities
throughout the market season.
Interested parties may
email to: ddapromotions@
imlaycity.org or visit the
website at: www.icdda.com, Campbells Local Harvest is a popular fixture at the Imlay City Farmers Market,
or contact Walker at the Imlay which reopens Thursday, May 5, with a grand opening celebration from 1-6
p.m. The market runs throughout the summer and ends in October.
City Hall at 810-724-2135.

Team works!

Spirit of giving

A big network of volunteers turn


out to spruce up Almont,
...see page 3-A

Capacs St. Johns members


reach out to Flint residents,

...see page 11-A

File photo

Popular Farmers Market makes return to Imlay May 5th

Page 2-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Dispatch log . . .
Editors note: The following is a compilation of activity
and reports from area police
departments:

In St. Clair
County:

Police and emergency


responders responded to:
a domestic incident in the
400 block of N. Walker St. in
Capac on April 19
a property damage accident

at Kelly and Foley roads in


Mussey Twp. on April 19
a property damage accident
in the 15600 block of Imlay City
Rd. in Mussey Twp. on April 19
a neighbor dispute in the
100 block of S. Matteson St. in
Capac on April 23
a personal injury accident
in the 100 block of S. Main St. in
Capac on April 23
a property damage accident
in the 100 block of S. Main St. in
Capac on April 23

Police and fire briefs . . .


a disabled vehicle at the
eastbound I-69 Capac Rd. exit in
Mussey Twp. on April 23
a warrant arrest in the 3200
block of Capac Rd. in Capac on
April 23
a threats complaint in the
5600 block of Capac Rd. in
Mussey Twp. on April 24
report of a suspicious vehicle in the 13600 block of Kimball
Rd. in Berlin Twp. on April 24
a domestic incident in the
16000 block of W. Park St. in
Capac on April 24

a domestic incident at Mill


and Lester streets in Capac on
April 24
an animal complaint in the
15900 block of Dudley Rd. in
Lynn Twp. on April 25
report of a trespasser in the
7200 block of Capac Rd. in
Lynn Twp. on April 25
a property damage accident
at Capac and Imlay City roads in
Mussey Twp. on April 25
a harassment complaint in
the 100 block of E. Church St.
in Capac on April 25

ADMISSION
PRICES

BEFORE 6PM
All Seats Are $6.00

PG-13

Friday, April 29 & Saturday, April 30, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 & 9:40pm
Sunday, May 01, 1:00, 4:00 & 7:00pm
Monday, May 02 & Tuesday, May 03, 7:00pm

PG

Adults $8.00
Children 12
& under
$6.00
Senior Citizens
55 and older
$6.00

Wednesday, April 27 & Thursday, April 28, 6:45pm


Friday, April 29 & Saturday, April 30, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45 & 9:30pm
Sunday, May 01, 1:00, 4:00 & 6:45pm
Monday, May 02 & Tuesday, May 03, 6:45pm

Join Our Email Club

AFTER 6PM

Students with
Student ID
$7.00

www.RomeoTheatre.com SAVE $$$ GET COUPONS!

HOTLINE
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66120 Van Dyke In the Village Shopping Center

Editors note: The follow- to some of the youth who


ing is a compilation of activ- frequent the park.
ity and reports from area
police and fire departments.
Man injured in gun

Cardinal Field
damaged

DRYDEN Police are


still on the hunt for vandals
who targeted the pavilion at
Cardinal Field last month.
Chief Larry Pack said someone used a BB gun to shoot
the electrical service box and
a faucet was damaged.
Pack said officers talked

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Tri-City Times
Published weekly by Delores Z. Heim. Office:
594 N. Almont Ave. P.O. Box 278, Imlay City,
MI 48444. USPS No. 014440. Additional entry
application pending.
Subscriptions: $30 per year Lapeer & St.
Clair Counties; Out of Counties $32 per year,
Senior Citizens $27 per year In-County. Outof-State mailing $40 per year. Outside USA $60
per year. Single Copies 50.
Periodicals paid at Imlay City.
Postmaster please send address changes to
P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444.

accident

DRYDEN An Atwell
Street resident was hurt
Saturday night while cleaning
a gun. According to Chief
Larry Pack, the man was
cleaning his weapon around 7
p.m. when it accidentally
fired and bullet traveled
through his hand. The man
was taken to the hospital for
treatment of his wound.

STADIUM SEATING
For Showtimes &
Ticket Information
www.ncgmovies.com
or call

810-667-7469
1650 DeMille
Tuesday $5.00 All Day
For Most Movies

CASH PAID
for Old Gold
WE BUY
Silver Coins
Gem & Diamond
Specialist

Downtown, Imlay City


810-724-RUBY
Tue-Fri 10:30 - 5:30
Sat 10:30 - 3:00

Tuesday, May 3 thru Saturday, May 7

MAY 3 THRU MAY 7

ALL PROOF
AND MINT SETS

Tuesday, May 3 thru Saturday, May 7

Page 3-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Team works!

More than 60 volunteers give Almont a spring cleaning


By Tom Wearing

Boxey also noted the generous support for the


Community Clean-Up by the
Almont business community.
Support for this project
was given by local business
owners including: Ace
Hardware/Vinckier Foods,
CSB Bank, Charlie Browns,
Buccilllis Cakes, Kommunity
Kracker
Barrel,
First
Independent
Insurance
Agency and the Almont Car
Wash.
It takes a lot of involvement to make for a successful
community event, said
Boxey. Almont has a lot to
be proud of, as evidenced by
the passion and dedication
shown by everyone here
todayparticularly by the
future leaders of our community.
Sharing in the enthusiasm
was
Almont
Village
Councilman Tim Dyke, who
was joined during the cleanup
by his wife Cynthia, and son,
Noah, 12, a member of
Almont Boy Scout Troop 128.
It goes to show that a
little bit of effort by 60 people
can make a big difference in

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Village Manager Sarah


Moyer-Cale sweeps the
sidewalks along East St.
Clair Street on Sunday.
Boxey, who exhibited
some surprise to the largestever Clean-Up Day turnout,
urged the participants to fuel
up on free sandwiches and

Photo by Tom Wearing

Almont
DDADirector
Nancy Boxey gives
assignments to volunteers on Sunday.
soft drinks before heading out
to their respective assignments.
She informed Sundays
Almont YOMS and high school band members Chrystal Lopez, Victoria
attendees that just nine volunSalazar, Pablo Salazar, Donna Corrado, Charlotte Dunn, Dakota LaHaie and
teers showed up for the first
Isabelle Bourque celebrate a job well done after cleaning the DDAs banners.
YOMS-sponsored community cleanup three years ago.
our community, said Dyke.
This year we have 62
Anyone wishing to serve
civic-minded youth and adult
as a volunteer or make a
volunteers coming out to help
donation to Almonts Youth
make a difference in their
on Main Street (YOMS) pro2034 S. ALMONT AVE
community, said Boxey.
gram, is encouraged to conIMLAY CITY
This event has really blostact Nancy Boxey at the
somed into a full-scale comDDAoffice at 810-798- 8125.
munity effort.
Boxey acknowledged the
participation of representatives from YOMS, the Almont
High School Band, Orchards
Community Church, Almont
Boy Scouts, Almont Schools
staff and Sugar and Spice
Group, and CSB Bank; all of
whom pitched in to tackle the
numerous projects.
Specifically, the projects
included painting the band
stand at Almont Community
Park, landscaping and removal of obsolete sidewalk pavers, window washing of
downtown properties, trash
pick-up and sweeping, landscaping in front of the Almont
Village Offices and Four
County
Community
Foundation, along with ban- Clean-Up Day volunteers Stephanie Gow and Sara
ner cleaning and various other McKinney dig in, while Brayden (8) and Colin (5)
small projects.
McKinney assist by removing old brick pavers.

Noffert
Dental

Get in on the fun and win a Prize!

Photo by Tom Wearing

ALMONT Its taken a


few years, but the community
may have succeeded in building a coalition of young and
older residents willing to put
their hearts and backs into a
shared project.
On Sunday, April 24,
more than 60 youth and adult
volunteers took part in the 3rd
Annual Downtown Spring
Clean-Up Day, coordinated
by Almonts Youth On Main
Street (YOMS) organization.
Assembling at noon at
Fountain Park, the five-dozen
or so ready, willing and able
volunteers grabbed brooms,
rakes, shovels and paint
brushes before dispersing to
various locations assigned
them by DDA Director Nancy
Boxey.

Some surprises in last minute filings

Kalanquin to seek another term as sheriff, Courser challenges Turkelson


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

LAPEER Several candidates opted to file at the last


minute for their spot on the
August primary ballot.
According to records
from the Lapeer County
Clerks office, seven residents walked into their offices on April 19, with signed
petitions or the necessary fee
to run for public office.
One included Todd
Courser, the county's disgraced former state representative, who apparently hopes
to stay in the public eye. The
Republican has filed to run
for prosecutor. Also filing on
Tuesday, just before the deadline was Michael Sharkey,
the attorney who represented
Judge Byron Konschuh on
embezzlement
charges.
Those charges have since
been dismissed and Konschuh
is back on the bench. Sharkey

is also a Republican, meaning


there will be a three-way race
during the primary election
between Courser, Sharkey
and
incumbent
Tim
Turkelson. Democrat Phil
Fulks will be in contention
for the job come November.
Also getting in before the
4 p.m. deadline last Tuesday
was Sheriff Ron Kalanquin
who will seek another fouryear term as the countys top
law enforcement officer.
Kalanquin, the states longest
serving sheriff, has held the
job for 36 years.
Three other Republicans
had already thrown their hats
in the ringDave Eady,
Harry Lutze and Scott
McKenna.
Speaking of Eady, the
sheriffs candidate also took
last minute action to put his
name on the ballot a second
time, filing to retain his
District 5 seat on the County
Commission.

Margaret
Guerrero
DeLuca, who ran on the
Democrats ticket for the
82nd House seat earlier this
year during a special election,
will do it again in November.
Shell face off against her
former opponent and incumbent Gary Howell, a
Republican.
Two road commission
candidates also filed on deadline day. Jefferson Williams,
a Republican, is seeking a
partial term currently held by
Jim Novak, a fellow
Republican. Les Nichols will
seek a full term on the road
commission, currently held
by Republican Michael
Hemmingsen. The winner of
that contest will face
Democrat Howard Coon in
November.

Commissioner Joe Suma will


face a primary challenge.
Two fellow Republicans have
filed for the job tooRobert
VanDenBerg and Pierre King.
County commissioners
from the Tri-City area will
earn another two-year term
each without a challenge.
They include District Twos
Gary Roy, District Sixs
Linda Jarvis and District
Sevens Ian Kempf.
Treasurer Dana Miller,
Clerk Theresa Spencer and
Surveyor Richard Duthler Jr.
wont face challengers either.
Lori Gebhardt was the lone
candidate to file for the
Register of Deeds. Gebhardt,
who currently serves as chief
deputy, will succeed current
officeholder
Melissa
DeVaugh.

As our way of saying thanks to our


patients, we will be having monthly
drawings for great prizes. Every
appointment you keep gets you
automatically entered.

If you havent made your appointment yet, call today!

(810) 683-5516

Yo-Ho-Ho; Calling All Pirate Princesses

2016 Blueberry Pageant

Little Miss
Blueberry and Junior Miss
Blueberry
(Ages 5-7)
(Ages 8-10)

Pageant: Saturday, May 21

REGISTRATION NIGHT THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 2016


High School Auditeria 6 pm to 7 pm
All participants must reside in or attend school in the Imlay City School District.

Registration form, emergency contact form and the


non-refundable fee of $30 is due by Monday, May 2, 2016
and may be dropped off at the Imlay City Chamber of Commerce
office 150 N. Main Street, Imlay City -- 810-724-1361

To register online go to . . .
www.imlaycitymich.com

Registration forms also available at:


Imlay City Chamber Office
Tri City Times

Grand Opening Farm


ers
M
DOWNTOWN IMLAY CITY
a
Imlay City man sent to
THU rket
RSD
As previously reported,
incumbent
Drain

prison for deadly crash


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

LAPEER An Imlay
City man will spend a minimum of 18 months in prison
for a fatal February 2014
accident.
Last month, Joshua
Taylor pled guilty to one
count of drunk driving causing death for the singlevehicle crash that resulted in
the death of his passenger,
30-year-old Donald Tucsok.
Taylor was 24-years-old at
the time of the crash.
Assistant Prosecutor
Mike Hodges said the most

Taylor could spend in prison


is 15 years.
Taylor was arraigned in
January 2015 and released
on a $10,000 personal
recognizance bond. Hodges
said Taylors bond was
revoked in October when he
was arrested for drunk driving.
Hodges said the matter
was set to go to trial when
Taylor entered a guilty plea
on March 10.
According to investigators, Taylor was behind the
wheel of a southbound vehicle on M-53 near Caldwell

Road in Goodland Township


on February 7, 2014, when
he lost control of the car and
it rolled several times.
Tucsok was reportedly not
breathing when Imlay City
Police officers Tim Wolford
and Dave Rock arrived on
scene. They removed him
from the vehicle and began
life saving efforts until paramedics arrived on scene to
transport him to McLaren
Lapeer Region hospital. The
victim passed away five
days later at the hospital.
Taylor was not seriously
injured.

Thursday, May 5 1-6pm May - O AYS


ctober
Corner of Third and Main Streets

Buying Local Never Tasted So Good!


For more information visit www.icdda.com or call (810) 724-2135

Page 4-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

SALE

Free food, giveaways


at STE Open House
Tri-City Times Editor

ALMONT Enjoy a
free barbeque buffet and the
chance to pick up some door
prizes and giveaways while
checking out the happenings
at the former Almont Airport.
STE, a locally owned
truck equipment and outfitting company, is hosting a
grand opening and open
house from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
tomorrow (Thurs., April 28).
Along with the free barbeque, a variety of manufacturers reps will be on hand,
and visitors can take a look at
the custom work performed
by STE.
Their new 16-acre,

IN-STOCK ONLY
... including
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Doodling Outback
Embroidery, LLC
Female Owned & Operated
102 S. Main Street

CAPAC, MI 48014

810-395-8746

25,000 square foot facility is


located at the site of the former Almont Airport at 4310
Van Dyke (M-53), just north
of town.
Co-owners
Tony
Androsuk
and
Doug
Charbeneau have logged 27
years in the truck equipment
business, and opened STE
when they saw a need for
custom truck outfitting in the
area.
Among the outfitting
needs available at STE are
snowplows, flat beds, dump
bodies, lift gates and other
accessories including steps/
running boards, racks, auxiliary lighting and more.
Michigan-made products,
such as Boss plows, are


Photo by Catherine Minolli

20% Of f

By Catherine Minolli

Tony Androsuk and Doug Charbeneau are ready


to welcome visitors at Open House at STE on
Thursday, April 28.
among the offerings visitors
will find at STE.
Whether youre an individual looking to customize
your truck or ATV to meet
specific needs or a commercial business with a fleet,
STE specializes in outfitting
thats tailored for optimal
use.

STE has been operating in


the area since June of 2011.
They moved into their current location in February of
this year. STE provides 15
area jobs.
For more information call
810-724-2357 or visit www.
Southern-Truck.com.

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Page 5-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Featured performer
a standout flutist
Photo provided

Lydia Bender set to perform at Belle Valley concert

Shown above are members of John Philip Sousas flute section in the 1920s.

Salute of flute on tap

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY The
Belle Valley Community
Band has traditionally provided talented young musicians an opportunity to hone
their talents and skills playing

Belle Valley Community Band to perform May 1


By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY The
Belle Valley Community
Band (BVCB) will salute the
flute during their Sunday,
May 1 concert at Imlay City
High School.
Under the direction of coconductors Christine Dodge
and Andy Schmid, the band
will present Its About
Time, starting at 3 p.m. in
the high school gymnasium.
The musical offerings
from first part of the program
will be The Pearl Fishers
Overture by Georges Bizet,
followed by Pageant by
Vincent Pershetti and Dave
Brubecks Its About Time,
conducted by Andy Schmid.
The first portion of the
concert will conclude with a
stirring rendition of Amazing
Grace, featuring the bands
brass ensemble.
The
BVCB
Brass
Ensemble includes: trumpets:
Steven Burns, Scott Pries and
Michael Swanger; horns:
Blake Menzing, Mitchell
Wise and Jaki Woodley; trom-

The BVCB will feature


both its flute and horn
sections at Sunday, May
1 concert at the ICHS.
bones: Dave Coon, Kevin
Lahaie and Jeff Schlautman:
and tuba: Andy Schmid.
Following a brief intermission, guest conductor
Scott Pries will direct Cecile
Chaminades Concertino for
Flute and Band, featuring a
flute solo by Lydia Bender.
The performance continues with Christine Dodge taking the baton and leading the
band through At Mornings

First Light by Davis


Gillingham; Instant Concert
by Harold L. Waters;
Pastime: A Salute to Baseball
by Jack Stamp; and John
Philip Sousas Stars and
Stripes Forever.
As part of the program,
the band plans to acknowledge longtime members
Vickie Reintjes and the lateBarbara Twiss, both of whom
contributed 20 years of dedicated service to the band.
The concert is free to the
public, though goodwill donations are welcome.
Any donations will be
applied to instrument repairs
and the purchase of new
music.
At the end of the concert,
attendees are invited to join
the band in the high schools
cafeteria for refreshments and
friendly conversation.
For further information
about the Belle Valley
Community Band, contact
BVCBPresident Art Smith or
BVCB Secretary/Treasurer
Don Davenport at: bellevalleyband@yahoo.com.

Most incumbents go unchallenged


face challengers in elections
later this year.
According to the St.
ST. CLAIR COUNTY Clair County Clerks office,
Most county and town- no one filed to run against
ship representatives wont Sheriff Tim Donnellon,

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

I N M E M O RY O F R I C H A R D K E L L E R

s
Keller
9th
l
Annua

Maple Festival

April 30th & May 1st 9am to 5pm


6209 Bordman Rd Almont, MI
6 miles north of Romeo and 2 1/2 miles
west of Van Dyke. Follow the signs!

FREE ADMISSION! FREE PARKING! FREE FUN!

Keller Syrup
Products
810-798-8695
WOOD
SCULPTURE
DEMONSTRATIONS

MULCH
Saturday,
Saturday,
S
t d

April 3rd
30th
May
Only
y
Only

Prosecutor Mike Wendling,


Clerk Jay DeBoyer, Drain
Commissioner Bob Wiley,
Treasurer Kelly RobertsBurnett or Surveyor Charles
Kooball Republicans.
Local county commissionersGreg McConnell
representing District 1 and
Dave Rushing representing
District 6are also unchallenged in their bid for twoyear terms.
At the township level,
Randy Schultz will challenge incumbent Mussey
Township Supervisor Mike
Lauwers in the Republican
primary. In Lynn Township,
three Republicans are seeking the treasurers job
incumbent Gary Drain,
Virginia Bensinger and current
trustee
April
Jedrzejczak. Only one candidate, incumbent Arthur
Miller, has filed to fill two
trustee seats.
In Berlin Township, all
incumbent office holders
will each earn another fouryear term without a challenge.

year, Lydia has performed in


the Wayne State University
Honors
Band,
Central
Michigan University Honors
Band,
University
of
Michigan-Flint
Honors
Band, Eastern Michigan
University Honors Band;
along with the Michigan
School Band and Orchestra
Associations District 3
Honors Band.

TOBEY CONSTRUCTION, LLC


Fully Insured Licensed Builder

Asphalt Removal Concrete Ripout & Replacement


Pool House and Barn Demolition
Porch Replacement Smaller Jobs Welcome

Call Today 810-560-3677

Lydia Bender
alongside more experienced
instrumentalists.
Such will be the case on
Sunday, May 1, when Imlay
City High School flutist Lydia
Bender is the featured soloist
on
Cecile
Chamiades
Concertino for Flute and
Band.
Directing the band on
Concertino will be Imlay
City High School Band
Director, Scott Pries, who has
been Lydias teacher for the
past seven years.
Lydia is currently the
flute/piccolo section leader

Talk to us!

TRI-CITY AREA
Have a story idea, news tip
or opinion?
Our readers are the fuel
that keeps us going from
week to week. The Tri-City
Times welcomes your
input, tips and ideas.
Share your thoughts
and concerns by writing to
the editor, P.O. Box 278,
Imlay City, MI 48444, or
email to
tct@pageoneinc.com.

OPEN FRIDAY, APRIL 29


Gardening with you for over 30 years!!

We Are So Excited
To See You Back!!!

Fri
Sat. 9; 9am-5pm

IMLAY CITY
McDONALDS

MIDNIGHT
tct@pageone-inc.com
TO 5 AM
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BUY
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for
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No phone orders.
Now is the Time for

Jumbo Spruce & Pine


Seedlings
Theyre going fast!

3903 Van Dyke, Almont


(at corner of Dryden Rd.)

Starting May 1st

with the Imlay City High


School Marching Band, while
holding first chair flutist
status in the Wind Ensemble
and is first chair French
horn player in the concert
band.
She additionally performs
in the Imlay City/Capac Mutt
Jazz Band and the Imlay City
High School Jazz Band.
During the current school

(810) 798-2525

OPEN DAILY! Mon.-Sat. 8am-7pm; Sun. 9am-6pm www.americantreeinc.com

Egg McMuffin or
Sausage McMuffin
w/Egg
(mix or match)

Big Mac
10 Piece Nugget
Quarter Pounder w/Cheese
Filet-O-Fish

Imlay City
McDonalds
810.724.0688

Page 6-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Earth Fair makes


return to Goodells

Tree
huggin

Family friendly event is April 29-30

Photo by Lori Arnissi

Almont Middle
Schools Sugar &
Spice group
members, Emelia
Alber, Chloe
Hunger and
Rachel Trisler,
take a break from
Sundays community cleanup to
hug this giant
tree on West St.
Clair Street in
front of Almonts
Burley Park.

Spring iS Here!
2016 RAM 1500 SLT CREW CAB 4X4

Bob Riehl

General Manager

ASK
ABO
UT
OUR
LIFE
T
IM
E
POW
ER
WAR TRAIN
R
ON S ANTY
EL
VEHIC ECT
LES

Chris Byrnes

New Car Manager

MSRP $46,770 Stk# L-16D466

Sale Price

FRIENDS & FAMILY:


START-UPS DUE $21979/MO.
LEASE
$
1,999 DOWN $12909/MO.
LEASE
EMPLOYEE LISTING:
START-UPS DUE $14925/MO.
LEASE
$
1,999 DOWN $6756/MO.
LEASE

Tim Wilcox

Commercial Truck
Manager

Lionel Guerra

Commercial Vehicle
Sales

30,938

By Maria Brown

Tom Patten

Used Sales Manager

MSRP $28,290 Stk# L-16K167


Premium Cloth Bucket Seats, 9-Speed Automatic Transmission, 2.4-Liter I4 MultiAir Engine

$1,999 DOWN $9981/MO.


FRIENDS & FAMILY: START-UPS DUE $17924/MO.
LEASE
LEASE
$
71/MO. $
EMPLOYEE LISTING: START-UPS DUE 165 LEASE 1,999 DOWN $7929/MO.
LEASE

Bob Lesko
Sales

19,991

$
Sale Price

2016 Chrysler Town & Country Touring-L

Dave Wilson
Sales

MSRP $38,340 Stk# L-D16M128


Leather-Trimmed Bucket Seats, 3.6L V6 24-Valve VVT Engine, Flex Fuel Vehicle

$1,999 DOWN $16972/MO.


FRIENDS & FAMILY: START-UPS DUE $25927/MO.
LEASE
LEASE
$1,999 DOWN $11746/MO.
EMPLOYEE LISTING: START-UPS DUE $19982/MO.
LEASE
LEASE

Rob Piccirilli

26,913

Sales

$
Sale Price

2016 Jeep Compass Latitude FWD

Scott Feehan
Sales

MSRP $26,135 Stk# L-16E021


Leather-Trimmed Bucket Seats, Air Conditioning w/Auto Temp Control, Remote Start System

$1,999 DOWN $3972/MO.


FRIENDS & FAMILY: START-UPS DUE $12425/MO.
LEASE
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61/MO. $
EMPLOYEE LISTING: START-UPS DUE 107 LEASE 1,999 DOWN $2408/MO.
LEASE

Shannon Lane

16,755

Sales

$
Sale Price

2016 Jeep Patriot Latitude 4x4

John Barton
Sales

MSRP $28,430 Stk# L-D16Y013


Leather-Trimmed Bucket Seats, ParkView Rear Back-Up Camera, Remote Start System

$1,999 DOWN $12932/MO.


FRIENDS & FAMILY: START-UPS DUE $18985/MO.
LEASE
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$
49/MO. $
EMPLOYEE LISTING: START-UPS DUE 177 LEASE 1,999 DOWN $10928/MO.
LEASE

Brad Curtis
Sales

19,445

$
Sale Price

2015 Model Year SpecialS

MSRP $36,585 Stk#L-15J008


Leather-Trimmed Bucket Seats, 300 Premium Group,
8-Speed Automatic Transmission, 3.6L V6 24-Valve VVT Engine

23,566

Sales

Bill Hilliard
Sales

DEMO

Mark Moody
Sales

24,976

Keith Semaan
Sales

2015 Dodge Charger SE RWD

MSRP $28,990 Stk# L-15B030


8-Speed Automatic 8HP45 Transmission, 3.6L V6 24-Valve VVT Engine

Employee Sale Price Friends & Family

19,852

Meredith Dubbs
Sales

20,870

Reed Gordon

2015 Dodge Journey RT

MSRP $33,485 Stk#L-D15Z138


Navigation/Back up camera, Leather interior, Dual Exhaust

9,000
23,970

Sales

DEMO

Save Over $

Deb Ruth

Business Manager

Sale Price $

Pictures may not reflect actual vehicle. Chrysler Employee and Friends/Family public prices stated. Sale Price includes all available factory incentives, does NOT include special offers (TDM) from the factory that are available to a select group of qualified people and does NOT include military rebate. Sale and lease payments include
loyalty & pull ahead factory incentives. Not everyone qualifies. Payments are based on the sale price, A+ or Tier 1 credit rating. Buy payments and sale prices are plus tax, title, plate, and destination. * Zero down lease payments are plus tax, title, plate, destination, and requires security deposit waiver and must qualify for S/A
Tier 1 credit. Lease payments are based on 10,000 miles per year for 24, 36, 39 mos. Lease term. Prior purchases/leases excluded, must take delivery out of stock by 4-30-16, see sales associate for details. Advertised specials in this ad are good for at least 48 hours after the printed date unless stated differently in the ad, but
could go longer. Call or come into our Lapeer location. Availability is limited.

1515 Lapeer Rd.


(M-24) at I-69, Lapeer

877-394-2634
888-518-1442
www.jimriehl.com

PORT HURON A
39-year-old Capac man will
spend no less than six years
in prison for producing and
possessing child pornography.
Last week, Judge Michael
West sentenced Michael
Aleck on seven separate
charges.
Hell spend six to 20
years in prison for producing
pornography, 32 months to
four years on three counts of
possession of child sexually
abusive material, six to 15
years for one count of second
degree criminal sexual conduct and six to 20 years for
use of a computer in the commission of a crime.
Aleck also pled guilty to
two counts related to an
October 2015 domestic violence case in which he allegedly attacked a Capac police

Jim Sadik

Business Manager

Get Approved

NOW!

www.wepreapprove.com

Jacob Podgorski

Business Development
Specialist

Rachel Walls

Business Development
Specialist

officer. West handed down


sentences of four to 10 years
on an assault by strangulation
charge and 16 months to two
years for the assault of a
police officer.
All sentences will be
served concurrently.
As part of an agreement
reached last month, Aleck
pled guilty to seven charges
and four others were dismissed.
Michigan State Police
launched an investigation
into Alecks activities last fall
after some of his former computer equipment, abandoned
at a residence in Almont, was
sold and found to have disturbing images. Police then
executed search warrants at
his current residence, seizing
a computer and other media
storage files. He was formally arraigned on the charges
on December 15. Police say
the incidents date back to
May 2015.

Scholarship offered
from bar association
Deadline is May 6th for students
applying for $2,000 in assistance
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Employee Sale Price Friends & Family

Ty Schmidt

at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday


only.
Monarch
Butterfly
House - Experience the joy of
walking among live butterflies and enjoy their beauty as
they fly inside a screened
enclosure and even hand feed
the butterflies. Sponsored by
the Master Gardeners of St.
Clair County. Friday and
Saturday.
Celebrate
Michigan
Magic Show - Enjoy an energetic, entertaining tour of the
Great Lake State through the
Celebrate Michigan! show
where kids get to be part of
the show. The show is at 12
p.m. Saturday.
Earth Fair is sponsored
by
the
Environmental
Education Network, consisting of county and local agencies, individuals, and nonprofit groups committed to
environmental education in
St. Clair County.
Visit www.EarthDayFair.
com for a complete list of
event details. For more information about Earth Fair, contact Sheri Faust at the St.
Clair
County
Health
Department at (810) 9875306 or earthfair@stclaircounty.org.

Aleck gets 6-20 years


for pornography charges
Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

2016 Jeep Cherokee Latitude 4X4

2015 Chrysler 300 Limited

ST. CLAIR COUNTY


The 14th annual Earth
Fair will be at Goodells
County Park on Friday, April
29 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
on Saturday, April 30 from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission,
parking, and activities are
free.
Earth Fair is one of
Michigans largest Earth Day
celebrations. It is a two-day
festival designed to showcase
healthy and green living in
food, energy, transportation,
clothing, home, gardening
and more. By blending
together earth-friendly demonstrations,
workshops,
exhibits and artisans, Earth
Fair empowers thousands of
visitors to take action on
behalf of our planet every
year.
Some highlights of this
years fair include:
Tree & Shrub Sale - The
St. Clair Conservation
District will be selling a variety of flowering trees, conifers and shrubs on Friday and
Saturday.
Birds of Prey Show The Howell Nature Center is
bringing live birds of prey
and a bald eagle for this
45-minute show. Shows are

LAPEERCOUNTY
For the 11th consecutive year,
the Lapeer County Bar
Association is offering a
$2,000 scholarship to a highachieving Lapeer County
high school senior with an
interest in pursuing a lawrelated career.
Scholarship coordinator
Cailin Wilson said applications and information regarding eligibility requirements
are now available through
any Lapeer County high
schools counselors office.
They are also available at the
Lapeer County Prosecutors
Office, located at 255 Clay
Street in downtown Lapeer.
May 6 deadline nears
Completed applications
must be received by Friday,
May 6 for review by the

Lapeer
County
Bar
Association
Scholarship
Committee.
Selection criteria will
include academic achievement, extracurricular activities, community involvement
to include either volunteer
work or work experience; and
financial need.
All applications will be
reviewed by the Lapeer
County Bar Association.
Scholarship finalists will
be contacted for interviews to
take place Tuesday, May 17.
Wilson noted that this
year, in addition to receiving
scholarship money, the scholarship recipient and a guest
will be invited to attend the
Lapeer
County
Bar
Associations annual banquet
in June.
For questions of further
information, contact Cailin
Wilson at 810-667-0326.

e
b
i
r
c
s
b
Su
Today!

724-2615

Page 7-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Vintage films shown Thursday


CAPAC This Thursday, April 28, the Capac
Historical Society invites the public to view vintage film
reels that captured scenes from the 1957 Capac Centennial,
area farm scenes and more. The films came from Hazel
Higgins estate.
The nights events begin at 6 p.m. with a potluck dinner, followed by the viewing. There is no fee to attend.

Free Photo Shoots for the


Blueberry/Toddler Contest!
May 7th, 10th & 11th

StudioE
Photography

Photos by Nick Pugliese

Receive 3 proofs to
review & choose
your favorite.

Teaming up for planet Earth

2016 Contest Theme Little Pirates


Babies 3 months to 24 months.
Toddlers from 2-4 years.

Call Erin at 721-7444


or email Erin@VisitStudioE.com
to book your childs session.

Members of Imlay City High Schools Spartronics FIRST Robotics Team gather at the Kroger plaza to
clean up debris from the area in commemoration of Earth Day on Friday, April 22 (above). Team mentors Gosia Borek and Jessica Scott lend a hand (lower, left) as does Kroger Customer Service Manager
Julie South (right).

Check out our website . . .


www.tricitytimes-online.com
Tri-City Times

Work ongoing at bridges on I-69


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo by Ian Kempf

TRI-CITY AREA
Earlier this month, crews
started work on the underside
of several overpass bridges
along I-69 including Lake

George and Lake Pleasant


roads. Motorists can expect
single-lane closures on eastbound and westbound I-69
from Lake Pleasant Road to
Wilder Road while the work
is going on.

Mayor Walt Bargen presents proclamation and


plaque to retired wastewater plant supervisor Rick
Stier and his wife, Pat, last Tuesday, April 19.

The Michigan Department of


Transportation said additional
lane closures can be expected
later this year while crews
continue work on other structures, including the top side
of the bridges. MDOT will
notify the public in advance
of the work. In all, improvements will be made to 11
bridge structures as part of
this project.
The public is also advised
to keep in mind that crews
working under the bridge
may not be visible to motorists as they drive through this
work zone.
The projects estimated
completed date is September.

SERVERS & COOKS


APPLY ONLINE . . .

by going to bigboy.com
When applying, select the
IMLAY CITY LOCATION.

HW-35-2

Your Hometown

MarketPlace

SCHULTZ FIREARMS

Gun Sales New, Used, Consignment & Online Auction

City commission lauds CPL CLASSES AVAILABLE


Call for Schedule & Details
Rick Stier for 28 years
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY City
commissioners on Tuesday,
April 19, acknowledged longtime employee Rick Stier for
a job well done.
Stier, who recently retired
as the citys wastewater treatment plant supervisor, was
presented with a proclamation for his 28 years of service to the City of Imlay City.
Stier submitted his resignation effective March 31,
2016 and has been succeeded
as plant supervisor by Pat
Rankin.
In a proclamation read
aloud by Mayor Walt Bargen,
Stier was recognized for his
distinguished, dedicated
and excellent service to the
citizens of Imlay City, which
he provided with integrity
and professionalism.
We present this procla-

mation to Rick Stier as a


token of our appreciation,
Bargen said, and extend
best wishes to him and his
family in all future endeavors.
Stier was hired by the city
on April 11, 1988.
Sewer project on tap
In another matter, the
commission approved a proposal from Spicer Group for
final design and construction
costs for phase 1 of a street
reconstruction project from
First Street to Second Street.
The city plans to reroute
sanitary sewer lines from
Almont Avenue to an existing
sewer line on First Street, for
the purpose of abandoning
the old collapsing sanitary
sewer main that crosses the
easement from First Street to
Second Street.
The preliminary cost estimate for the project is
$125,000.

ICCS Benefit Auction is May 21


IMLAY CITY Imlay City Christian School is
hosting its 6th Annual Benefit Auction on Saturday, May
21 at Castle Creek Golf Club in Lum. The doors open at
4:30 p.m. for silent and live auction action as well as
appetizers and World Cuisine offered throughout the
night. Tickets are on sale at the school for $25 each or $30
at the door. Call or email the school at 810-724-5695 or
icchristianschool@yahoo.com for more information.

810-395-7773

ALLENTON
C8O10L-3L9I5S-2I2O43N

$10
GAS CARD
With Any Vehicle
Repairs
(Coupon Required)

MASSAGE MEMBERSHIPS
Starting at $45 for a One-hour Massage

Stop in or Call for Details


We offer Therapeutic Massage, Acupuncture,
Cranial Sacral, Lymphatic Drainage, Facials, Waxing,
Body Wraps, Reiki, Aromatherapy, and Rain Drop Therapy

406 E. Fourth Street, Imlay City, MI 48444

810-721-0990 www.bnaturalsllc.com


810-395-2602

Residential Automobile

Windshield Replacement
Screen Repair Window Repair &Replacement
15041 Downey Rd. Capac, MI 48014

Pizza Broasted Chicken


Seafood Ribs

(Old M-21)

$5

LUNCH
SPECIALS

11AM-2PM

INCLUDES BROASTED POTATOES OR FRENCH FRIES AND SMALL DRINK

Life Home Car Business

CHRIS S. WAGNER
Churchill Insurance Agency

COD, CHICKEN, WING DINGS, PULLED PORK,


SUBS, SANDWICHES, PITAS, AND MORE!
1935 S. CEDAR IMLAY CITY WWW.EATBIGJOES.COM

800-865-6981

NO COUPON NECESSARY! CALL AHEAD! PICK-UP WINDOW!

243 East Third Street Imlay City, Michigan 48444

810-724-9000

Tri-County Bank

Visit us online at www.tri-countybank.com Member FDIC

Fronney's Family Foods


Capac810-395-8113

Bus: 810-724-6218 Fax: 810-724-3418

Imlay City
Big Boy
1949 S. Cedar & I-69
810-724-3664

www.bigboy.com for more information

Page 8-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Our Opinion

From our readers...

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Community policing
Ebeling Dairy stories/photos wanted
effective and appreciated

ast weeks Tri-City Times reiterated the


valuable service local law enforcement
provides in an effort to keep our area relatively safe and crime-free. Just because the
Tri-City area is more rural than urban,
immunity from crime is not guaranteed. Recent
headlines and stories weve covered throughout the years reflect just that: lawlessness
exists, regardless of geography.
Thanks to the outstanding training,
instincts, professionalism and compassion
yes, compassionof Imlay City police officers, two serious offenders were removed from
the streets and recently sentenced to prison for
the crimes they committed.
An alert Imlay City Police Officer, Jeffrey
Kronz, followed his instincts and pulled over
career criminal James Wasson, who last week
pleaded no contest to multiple felony counts of
home invasion. Wasson made national headlines when an 11-year-old North Branch girl
confronted him with a shotgun as he attempted
to rob her home. Kronzs actions led to
Wassons arrest, and ultimately to evidence
that he was involved in two other home invasions in Lapeer County. He subsequently confessed to five other incidents in the county.
When the Capac BP was robbed at gunpoint
earlier this year, Imlay City Police Sgt. Tim
Wolford talked the suspectRobert Johnson
Jr.into turning himself in. The case was
resolved because of a combined effort of law
enforcement agencies, including Capac PD, the
St. Clair County and Lapeer sheriffs departments and Imlay City police. Wolfords experience, compassion and professional handling of
Johnson, who admitted to a substance abuse
problem, resulted in a peaceful resolution of a
serious crime.
But police work isnt strictly about thwarting and/or solving crimes. Throughout the
years weve covered hundreds of stories where
local police officers have saved lives and
solved crimes. Theyve volunteered their time
for community events, mentored youths and
lent a hand to the elderly when needed. At a
time when the profession is under the microscope, our pages continue to reflect the immeasurable value of local law enforcement and the
outstanding, professional service they provide
every single day.
Thank you to the men and women in blue
(and brown) in Almont, Capac, Dryden, and
Imlay City, and in the counties of Lapeer and
St. Clair. We appreciate all that you do.

As I drove south out of


Almont and crossed the
bridge over the Clinton River,
there were two empty lots
where Fred and Edna
Duggans home and welding
business used to stand. There
wasnt anything special about
the house and the welding

building that had been sitting


empty for several decades.
However, prior to the early
1950s the welding building
housed the Ebeling Dairy
where the local dairy farmers
would bring their milk in milk
cans to be processed.
As president of the

m in total observation
mode and theres been
much to observe lately so
here goes...
What do John Quincy
Adams, Oliver Wendell
Holmes, Samuel Alito and
Francis Ford Coppola have
in common with my nephew,
Edward Frank Abranovich?
Phi Beta Kappa, thats what!
Not-so-little little
Eddie, who is now 64 and
22-years-old, is graduating
with many
honors
from
Albion
next
month. He
recently
learned
that he
made the
Phi Beta

Kappa

grade, and
while
were not the least bit surprised (because hes brilliant)
we are, as my dad used to
say tickled and beside
ourselves with his grand
accomplishment. Yes Im
biased, but it matters not
because hell have all those
colorful chords around his
neck at graduation time. A
double major in history and
religious studies, his intelligence is dazzling, and we are
really, really proud...
...Im not sure if proud is
the word Id use regarding
the next observation.
Pleased might be a better
fit regarding the Michigan

Appeals Court decision


regarding the DUI in driveway case. A Northville man
was charged with operating
while under the influence
when police observed him
backing his car from his
garage to his driveway and
then pulling it back in. Police
were called to the home by
neighbors, who didnt like
the loud music that was blaring from the car.
Police have a lot of
power and thats great, but
its even better that two of
the three Appeals Court judges agree theyre not allowed
to police us while on our
own private property. As for
the neighbor thing, well, the
years on this job have shown
me how horrible that can be,
what with disputes and pets
and fights and whatnot. Im
very fortunate. My neighbors
are great...
Great is definitely
NOT the word Id use when
it comes to Todd Coursers
announcement that hes seeking the Lapeer County
Prosecutors job. Hilarious,
maybe; confounding, perhaps; ridiculousfor sure,
but definitely not great.
Telling and ironic
work. Telling that a man
seeking a local office serving
residents of a specific community gets the word out by
texting his intentions to
everyone but the local media.
Ironic that Courser has
repeatedly (and obnoxiously)
criticized government, yet
seems rabidly obsessed with

the museum is open.


We will store the stories
and photos at the museum,
and write the story of the
dairy and include it in our
next book.
Sincerely,
James R. Wade Sr.
Almont

DHS classes thank supportive businesses


The Dryden High School
Classes of 2018 and 2020
would like to thank the following businesses who helped
to make the recent Pancake
Breakfast fundraiser a success:
The Book Shelf, Booms
Stone Co., Burkes Flowers,

Castle Creek Golf Club,


Center for the Arts of Greater
Lapeer, Detroit Tigers, Detroit
Red Wings, Disney Theme
Parks, The Great Escape
Room: Royal Oak, The Hair
Co., Hotel Royal Oak, Lapeer
County Bank & Trust Co.,
Lapeer
Country
Club,

Leelanau Peninsula Wine


Trail, Lesley Elizabeth, Inc.,
Mandy J. Florist & Gifts,
Mark Ridleys Comedy
Castle, Massage Green Spa:
Lapeer, Village at Grand
Traverse Commons, and
Ziebart International.
A special thank you goes

to those who volunteered at


and attended the fundraiser
and supported our classes. We
appreciate your support; we
couldnt do it without you!
Sincerely,
Dryden High School
Classes of 2018 and 2020
Dryden

Imlay police chief grateful for generosity


On Thursday, April 21, I
was having a late lunch at
New China Buffet when a
wonderful family chose to
pay for my lunch. This was
really unnecessary (your
tax dollars really do pay my

salary), however it is so
heartwarming to know in
this day and age that
people still appreciate and
care about their police officers.
In the short time since

becoming the Imlay City


Chief of Police, I have
found the people of Imlay
City to be some of the
nicest, hardworking people
who truly care about
their community and neigh-

bors. Thank you so much


for welcoming me in to
your community with open
arms.
Chief Scott Pike
Imlay City Police Dept.
Imlay City

Please join in Cancer Bash and Relay for Life


With the exception of a
sad fire story, I was grateful
for a good news front page
and more, in last weeks
April 21 edition. Our world
today can be so depressing,
it helps to focus on the
happy!
I also felt encouraged the
last few weeks by several
positive reports on the cancer front: statistics of cancer
deaths dropping in certain

areas; new therapies gaining


success; more research findings of important links
between lifestyle changes
and recovery and prevention. It was especially pleasing to hear about one
researcher working hard to
collaborate with others in
the field to share the knowledge, dollars and time to
study the same issues.
Meanwhile, wishing and

praying for a positive outcome, yet another friend has


announced her cancer diagnosisand this is why I
continue to Relay for Life.
Please join me on June 11 at
Eastern Michigan State
Fairgrounds to honor and
remember our friends, family and neighbors.
Until then, watch for our
many pre-event fundraisers
around Lapeer County, such

as the Cancer Bash Glow


Dash walk/run family event
on Friday April 29, 5-9 p.m.
at Ponds & Prairies Trail at
Chatfield School in Lapeer.
More information online at
www.relayforlife.org/lapeercountymi.
Sincerely,
Yvonne Wilson
Promotions Lead
Relay for Life 2016
Imlay City

Sports clich proves true for GOP


Editors note: The following guest column was submitted by John Lengemann of
Imlay City. A longtime resident and practicing attorney
in Imlay City, Lengemann is
active in local municipal and
civic organizations.
n old sports clich is
snatching defeat from
the jaws of victory. I am
fearful that is what the
Republican Party is headed
for in this presidential elec-

the real Donald Trump? Im


not sure if he really knows. It
seems he changes from minute to minute as he shoots
from the lip. He is quite
adept at calling his opposition names such as lyin
Ted or crooked Hillary,
but when it comes to defining his policies it seems all
we get is I made a great
company and made lots of
money, Im going to make
America great again, and I
know how to make a good
deal unlike the current political leaders who make only
terrible deals.
Exactly what would his
landing a job in it. If only I
trade policy be? No one
could be inoculated against
knows. What would be his
ever having to type his name
foreign policy regarding
again. But alas, it may
Israel/Palestine, the Ukraine,
require a controlled burn of
the Baltic states, Syria,
my keyboard. Ill give him a
Lebanon, the spread of radicall about it right away, since
cal Islam, Iraq, the nuclear
hes already proven how
threat of North Korea, and
adept he is at that...
the expansionist actions of
Speaking of control, I
Dial 911 for glitter con- China? No one has the
have been experiencing an
slightest idea of what his
trol.
ongoing issue with a female
approach would be or if he
raccoon who was determined what I was saying.
has even given a passing
to have her babies somethought to those issues.
Oh, I get it now. It was
where around my house. A
Exactly how would he
a raccoon problem! You
hollow in the old maple tree needed Critter Control! I
deport the 11 million illegals
used to serve as the perfect
thought you were saying you in view of the law that
birthing place. Now that the had to get glitter control,
requires a judicial hearing
tree exists no more, it has
before deportation? How
she said.
caused quite an uproar in the And by gosh, she may be would he provide those hearraccoon maternity ward.
right! Im no raccoon but my ings and at what cost over
After being kicked out of talon-like claws do have glit- what time frame? So far, no
my attic, the determined
answers.
ter all over them. No confumother-to-be scoped out my sion there. Though Id never What exact steps would
chicken coop before ultihe take to screen immigrants
consider myself a girly girl,
mately chewing a tree-holto assure that they are not
like it or not, my gender is
low-shaped hole in the soft
members of terrorist organishowing...
cedar wood of my barn to
zations?
...Speaking of gender,
find a cozy place up in the
He states he will rebuild
rafters to deliver her young. lately when I walk past the
our military. How? And how
restroom in our production
As much as Itried, she
will he pay for it?
was not to be dissuaded and department Im curious about What is his plan to
just when I thought I got her something.
reduce the national debt or
We have a mens room
out before she gave birth, I
better still, does he think the
and a womens room in
discovered I was wrong last
national debt is a problem?
another part of the building.
Sunday. I was telling my
We dont know.
The production area restfriends about the situation
His candidacy is a disaswhile we were at the Traffic rooms sign reads Unisex.
ter for the Republican Party.
Is that the old-fashioned
Jam in Detroit, noting that I
Unfortunately the Grand
word for gender neutral?
ended up calling Critter
Poobas of the party have
Should Ipost a new sign on
Control. Whether it was the
been the genesis of this
background noise in the res- the door? If I did, would it
disaster. Despite making
cause an uproar? Just another campaign promises, begintaurant or her intimate
knowledge of my inexplica- observation Im pondering as ning in 2010 and continuing
the week ticks by...
ble attraction to all things
in 2012 and 2014, that if
Email Catherine at
sparkly, Meghann was
Republicans gained control
momentarily confused with
cminolli@pageone-inc.com.
of the House of

tion. It appears that Donald


Trump will be the nominee.
If that turns out to be the
case I suspect his defeat will
be a virtual certainty. What
group of voters hasnt he
offended with his thoughtless
remarks and rude behavior?
The Democratic Party
likely has in the can hours of
commercials showing The
Donald saying one thing,
contradicting it and then contradicting it again. Who is

Observations big and small this week

Almont
Community
Historical Society, I would
like to collect stories and any
photos regarding the Ebeling
Dairy. Readers can mail them
to me at the museum (P.O.
Box 635, Almont, MI 480031067) or drop them off on
Saturdays from 1-4 p.m. when

Representatives and then the


Senate they would adopt legislation that would either roll
back the policies of Obama
and then if vetoed the veto
would be an issue to go to
the electorate with. Instead it
was business as usual and little was done. The bloated
budget was adopted, there
was no challenge to Obamas
legislating via executive
orders and there was no use
of the budget to control the
behavior of the President.
Whether true or not,
many voters, myself included, feel that the party leaders
have no concern for the
views and interests of the
bulk of the common folk
except when it is election
time. Then butter wouldnt
melt in their mouths as they
give us the mushroom treatment.
So, along comes Donald
Trump who was perceptive
enough to recognize the huge
amount of discontent and
dissatisfaction among the
folks and immediately played
on it to his advantage. Other
candidates, failing to recognize the cleverness of Trump,
attacked him personally to
their great dismay and defeat.
Now it appears the
Republican Party is stuck
with him and those same
party leaders who ignored
the electorate in favor of
their white wine friends on
the Beltway cocktail circuit,
are now bemoaning the likelihood of Trumps nomination as the Republican Party
candidate.
Hillary Clinton is a terrible candidate and will be a
terrible president. Bernie
Sanders is worse. Had the
Republican Party used just
an ounce of common sense
theyd have a candidate that
would be a shoo-in. Hillarys
negatives are terrible, but
Trumps are worse. At this
point I dont see a remedy. If,
at the convention, Trump
doesnt have enough votes to
win on the first ballot and
someone else, it matters not
who, is nominated my guess
GOP page 10-A

e was born in Milan,


Ohio in 1847 but by
1854, at age seven, Thomas
Alva Edison had moved with
his family to Port Huron,
Michigan. It was here that
Edison began his lifelong
interest in
science
and business ventures.
After
attending
public
school for
three
Rick Liblong
months, he
was home
schooled by his mother. At
age 11, he developed an
appetite for knowledge, reading books on a wide range of
subjects. Edison continued a
process of self-education and
learning that would serve
him throughout his life. He
especially loved the science
books she used. He did nearly every experiment that he
found in print. Some with
disastrous results, having
started fires more than once.
But his mother kept encouraging him though she made
him move his home laboratory into the basement.
Since there were no
video games yet, most
12-year-olds of his day liked
to play with their friends, go
fishing or engage in other
forms of fun but Edison was
industrious, inquisitive and a
born businessman. In order
to buy his chemicals and
other supplies, Edison, then
known as Al, convinced
the Grand Trunk Railroad,
which had a line running

All the Liblong day..

from near his house in Port


Huron to Detroit and back, to
let him sell newspapers,
candy and other sundries
aboard the train. With each
days headlines coming into
the train depot by telegraph,
young Tom started his own
newspaper, the Grand Trunk
Herald. That was the first of
what would be a lifetime of
business ventures. He eventually founded 14 companies,
including General Electric.
Over time, Edison had to
hire other Michigan kids to
help him sell his wares to
train passengers. The conductor even let him set up a
small laboratory in the baggage car. But when he started
a fire that destroyed the car,
he was banned from the train
and had to sell his papers at
the various stations along the
route.
Young Edison saved a
3-year-old from being run
over by an errant train, and
the childs father rewarded
him by teaching him to operate a telegraph. Though hard
of hearing at an early age, he
was able to hear the distinct
clicks of the telegraph. By
age 15, he was employed as
a telegraph operator and for
the next five years, Edison
traveled throughout the
Midwest as a telegrapher,
subbing for those who had
gone to the Civil War. In his
spare time, he read widely,
studied and experimented
with telegraph technology,
and became familiar with
electrical science.
In 1866, he moved to
Kentucky to work for the
Associated Press on the night

Edison story is too long and


complex to be completely
related here. But most of us
know that Edison held many
U.S. Patents (1,093) and that
among the most famous and
important of his inventions
are the phonograph, the first
time the human voice was
recorded, and could be
played back, and the incandescent light bulb that turned
Young Thomas Edison night into day. Both of those
shift which left him plenty of inventions and many, many
others were born at Edisons
time for his experiments. In
laboratory at Menlo Park,
1868, he came back
Michigan to help his parents New Jersey.
in their time of need but then The phonograph was
invented in 1877 and was the
left the state for good.
first to be able to reproduce
Edisons boyhood home
the recorded sound. It recordwas located along the St.
ed sound onto a tinfoil sheet
Clair River about a mile or
so south of the train depot. It wrapped around a rotating
cylinder. A stylus responding
no longer stands, having
to sound vibrations produced
been destroyed by fire after
the Edisons had moved. An a groove in the foil. Edison
demonstrated the device by
archaeological dig discovrecording, in his own voice,
ered some lead type that
Edison had used for printing Mary had a little lamb
and played it back to the
his newspaper.
However, the train depot astonishment of people.
Thereafter, he was known as
that Edison worked from
the Wizard of Menlo Park.
between 1859 and 1863 is
still standing, almost directly On October 21, 1879, in
under the Blue Water Bridge, his lab, Edisons lightbulb
burned continuously for
in Port Huron and is now a
museum. It was built in 1858 more than thirteen hours. The
by the Grand Trunk Railway, following bulbs lasted for 40
hours and Edison and his
and trains connecting here
team worked hard to light the
carried people and freight
laboratory and his home with
between Port Huron and
Detroit, Point Edward/Sarnia several of the new light bulbs
(Ontario), and other destina- for Christmas. On New
Years Eve, Christie Street in
tions, linking Port Huron to
Menlo Park became the
the rest of the world. The
museum contains many arti- worlds first street to be lit
facts and the story of Edison by incandescent light bulbs
with the help of a power sysin Michigan and elsewhere
tem designed by Edison. By
(www.phmuseum.org).
the summer of 1880, Edison
The entire Thomas

The garden is
a great teacher

garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience


and careful watchfulness; it
teaches industry and thrift;
above all, it teaches entire
trust.
Gertrude Jekyll
Mom, you need to
prune the wisteria, my
youngest daughter said.
My husband shot me a
glance where I stood at the
kitchen
counter
dressing
our salad.
He had
made the
same
astute
observation before

our family
arrived for
Easter
brunch.
They knew I knew the wisteria needed pruning. They
also knew a knee injury
slowed me down.
I spied the feral, tangled
vines four feet deep atop the
pergola, tempted to offer my
daughter and husband pruning shears. I know, I said
instead. We enjoyed our
meal in peace.
Years ago, a Master

Honest Living . . .

Gardener warned me about


wisteria sinensis, that its
woody grip and weight
would eventually bring
down the iron support. This
member of the pea family,
Fabaceae, is a high-maintenance girl and requires pruning from early spring
through fall. Temperamental,
you never know when a wisteria will bless its keeper
with bloom.
Usually, Mother Nature
is to blame. Her late April
frosts more often than not
wither our wisterias swelling buds to dust. I could cry
when that happens. You must
cover a budding plant with a
lightweight cloth to protect it
from ice crystals. Thats not
going to happen here.
One fine day in May
2013, I chanced to look upon
the structure and promptly
went giddy at masses of
cone-shaped buds. My farm
staff gathered to celebrate
the occasion. Just what stars
lined up in biodynamic synchronicity to produce such a
show, well never know.
One on the north and
south side, the wisterias first
bloomed May 2010, winding
to span twenty-five feet of
the arbors iron ribs.

Wisteria graces garden in all of her glory.


According to experts, the
stems must grow horizontal
for five years before theyre
allowed to grow vertical and
bloom.
Some flowers transformed into slender, green
seedpods that twisted when
they dried and eventually
burst open. The seeds rooted.
Some roots grew the width
of the pergola. Like a fairy
tale, tendrils twined the legs
of tables and chairs within
the leafy tunnel.
Ideally, I shouldve hard
pruned our plants after we
stored the pergolas furniture
last September. Rather, I preserved my vegetable garden
and harvested the grape
arbor. In October, we flew to
California for our grandsons
twelfth birthday. With so
much life to live, the wisterias could wait.

They did, with vengeance. Methodically, from


the lilac tree at the west end,
to the oak at the east, I
climbed a ladder and pulled
vines from the trees branches; pruned dead and green
wood that spiraled from
thick trunks through the trellis. The piles of castaways
made a fine, crackling fire.
Dear Reader, the oak and
lilac tree breathe easily
again. The wisteria sisters
splay their new girlish figures. They wont bloom this
year for I sacrificed their
fruit in pruning.
As Ms Jekyll learned, I
shall be patient and watch
carefully. Prune when able. I
trust entirely Natures fickle
habits.
Email Iris at
irisleeu@sbcglobal.net.

Its the insides that matter

rowing up in a mostly
white neighborhood, my
opportunities to mix with
other races as a child were
minimal. But when I did
meet someone of a different
race, I took the opportunity
to befriend them and was
curious about their culture. I
experienced a lot.
I watched live martial
arts and tried cold coffee for
the first time with my
Japanese friend Jane, and
how to flat iron hair before it
was all the rage, with my
African-American friend
Wanda. I wept when my
Pakistani friend Anna died at
the age of 12 from a debilitating disease that knows no
prejudice. I was best friends
with Erika (and still am)
whose dad is full-blooded
Mexican and mother is
Scandinavian.

As an
adult, Ive
worked at
companies
in which I
was the
only white
person,
and also in
which

being a

Christian
was the
minority,
and I partnered with a
Muslim to open a retail business back in the 90s.
Different races and religions
never bothered me. My
Jewish friend who used to be
my boss is still my friend.
Although we dont agree on
religion, we respect one
another and have found common interests in other areas.
Ive learned a lot about

Thomas Edison Depot Museum in Port Huron

Edison and his phonograph.


had perfected the incandescent bulb enough to be able
to produce and sell it in large
quantities.
After Edison moved his
operations to larger facilities
in West Orange, New Jersey,
now a National Historic
Park, the Menlo Park lab fell
into disrepair. Henry Ford, a
great admirer of Edison, constructed a replica of the lab
at Greenfield Village in
Dearborn, Michigan where it
remains today open to visitors year-round. The Henry
Ford Museum and Greenfield
Village are known together

as The Edison Institute.


Edison himself visited the
site with Ford and President
Herbert Hoover in 1929 on
the 50th anniversary of the
lightbulb. The great inventor
died on October 18, 1931.
Imagine a world without
Thomas Alva Edison. Henry
Ford said, The American
spirit of endeavor as represented by Thomas Alva
Edison is the real wealth of
the nation,
And that spirit was nurtured right here in Michigan.
Email Rick at
rick.liblong@cox.net.

Academic All-Star
Photo by Iris Lee Underwood

Photo provided

Photo provided

Wizard of Menlo Park had Michigan roots

Page 9-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

people that are not defined as


white. But the biggest lesson I have come away with
having learned is that most
people by nature and at their
very core are inherently
good-hearted, no matter their
religion, skin tone, or culture. There are good people
and there are a few bad people, it matters not what their
physical appearance is, what
matters is what is in their
heart and soul.
Recently, I took to my
Facebook page to call out to
my friends, of all races and
religions to be careful not to
fall into the trap of divisiveness that the media keeps
throwing out there. Be kind,
take an extra moment to help
out another human being.
These concerns have been
weighing on my heart for a
while now. How can we

unite the races, get rid of the


fear? How can I help? Ive
wondered.
Sunday I attended service
at Gateway Assembly in
Imlay City and was pleasantly surprised to see some
guests from a black church in
Midtown Detroit. Theyve
come to ask for help, they
see a quickly growing population of white millennials
(hipsters) in Detroit and they
want to know how to reach
out to them with the word of
Jesus. The plan is to help
them integrate the white
community with their black
church. What a fantastic idea
to help unite the races in the
name of God. And I was
shown a way I can help
The Lord works in mysterious ways.
Email Paula at
paulaparisot@gmail.com.

McKenna Rudd

Senior ~ Dryden High School


McKenna is the daughter of
Bobby and Michele Rudd.
She has a 3.843 GPA.
Her hobbies include sports,
shopping, jetskiing and boating.
McKenna likes listening to the
music of Chance The Rapper and
Fleetwood Mac and her favorite
author is J.R.R. Tolkien.
If theres one thing she could change about school, it
would be the lunch program.
In her wildest dream, McKenna would travel the
world, skydive and have 100 puppies.
The person she most admires is her mother.
McKenna believes that the biggest challenge facing her
generation is the impact social media has on body
image and self esteem.
Her career goal is to graduate from college with as little debt as possible and become a physicians assistant.
McKenna participates in volleyball, basketball, track
and field, golf and is a National Honor Society member.

Academic All-Star
Emily Levy

Senior ~ Dryden High School


Emily is the daughter of
Margaret Parker and Robert Levy.
She has a 3.66 GPA.
Her hobbies include bowling,
gaming and traveling.
Emily likes listening to the
music of Bastille and her favorite
author is John Green.
If theres one thing she could change about school, she
would like to see courses and extracurricular activities
comparable to larger districts.
In her wildest dream, Emily would live somewhere out
west, do a lot of traveling and live my life to the fullest.
The person she most admires is her mother because
she did a remarkable job raising me to be the best I
possibly could.
Emily believes that the biggest challenge facing her
generation is the exponential growth of technology
which, she feels, is starting to hinder learning more than
help it.
Her career goal is to major in psychology and work
with children and teenagers with cognitive and development impairments.
Emily participates in varsity bowling and is a National
Honor Society and Students Against Destructive
Decisions club member.

Page10-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Dear Pope Francis


is charming book

Photo Provided

heres a wonderful little


book out there called
Dear Pope Francis. The
book, from Loyola Press
(2016), is a compilation of
letters culled from the 259
collected by Managing
Editor Tom McGrath with
the help of dozens of volunteers.
Letters from children
from 26 countries, six continents, and
written in
State DAR Chair Christine Richman, Good Citizens Zachary Fritz, Daniel Rutkowski, Alexandrea
14 lanShephard, Ryan Rich, and Judge Laura Barnard pose for photo at DAR tea. Not pictured are Good
guages,
Citizens Ryan Waddy of Capac and Ansley Orr of North Branch.
were chosen for the
collection.
The children sent
On Thursday, April 21, a Rich of Marlette High School; including
the
Science ous youth sports teams. All their most
special tea was held at the Alexandrea Shephard of Olympiad,
Business are involved in their local pressing

Lapeer County Historic Brown City High School; Professionals of American churches.
questions,

Courthouse in Lapeer to Ansley Orr of North Branch Social Studies Academic The Honorable Judge accompahonor six area high school High School; and Ryan Team, Eagle Scouts, Robotics Laura Barnard was the speak- nying
students as DAR (Daughters Waddy of Capac High School. Team, FFA, and 4-H club. er for the evening. She pre- them with wonderful fullof the American Revolution) Daniel Rutkowski was Band was well represented by sented many interesting facts color illustrations. The letGood Citizens.
selected as the chapters rep- a drum major, two percus- regarding the history of the ters appear in the languages
Chosen by their individu- resentative for the state level sionists, and a guitarist. old courthouse and then in which they were written,
al schools, each senior must of scholarship competition.
Sports included football, spoke eloquently about the and even in their original
exhibit the character traits of Their biographical infor- hockey, track, and soccer.
responsibility everyone must penmanship. But then they
service, dependability, lead- mation
included
three Community
service take to be a good citizen. are typed up in English as
ership, and patriotism.
National Honor Society pres- included volunteering at Also in attendance was well.
The 2016 DAR Good idents, class president, stu- senior centers and soup kitch- Christine
Richman
of Did you agree with how
Citizens
are:
Daniel dent council president, and ens, raising money for the Bloomfield Hills, the DAR the pope answered the quesRutkowski of Ubly High quiz
bowl
captain. homeless, working on a state chairman of the Good tions? someone asked me.
School; Zachary Fritz of Membership in many organi- nature trail, serving as a camp Citizen committee. Parents of Not a hundred percent
Lapeer High School; Ryan zations was represented, counselor, and coaching vari- the students also attended.
of the time, I admitted.
But then, sometimes I dont
even agree with me! I open
up this newspaper the same
day the rest of you do, and
read this column the same
day you do. Sometimes I
have to say to myself, I said
WHAT? In the same column
as I said THAT? Makes it
sound like I believe THIS,
which of course I dont! Or
DO I? So, the answer is no,
I didnt agree with him quite
all the time. But the book
lends itself very well to dialog and discussion; and to
borrow from those famous
words by Anne of Green
Gables: There is SO much
room for the scope of the
imagination.
There are letters from
Borland Elementary School 5th graders STEP up for emergency preparedness in Imlay City.
Albania to Zimbabwe and
countless countries in
between, including one from
a set of nine-year-old twins
from the Netherlands. One
of my personal favorites is a
IMLAY
CITY
Hagey, Lori Dick, Mike gram. Fifth grade teachers good choices.
Borland Elementary School Powers, Amber Schapman received STEP lesson mate- Michigan began offer- picture of a soccer game
has just finished its year- and Dave Spence, along rials and supplies to assist ing STEP in the 2011-2012 being played just outside the
long participation in the with Borland Principal Dr. with teaching the curricu- school year, teaching more Vatican. An eight-year-old
Student Tools for Emergency Dina Tallis submitted an lum. Additionally, Officer than 350 students. It has
Planning (STEP) program. application to the Michigan Joe DeLuca visited all 5th continued to grow statewide
STEP came to the ele- State Police to apply for the grade classrooms for his with more than 6,400 5th
mentary school at the begin- program.
annual TEAM lessons graders learning the imporning of the 2015-2016, In late November, which also contributed to tance of safety and pre- from page 8-A
when 5th grade teachers Borland heard that they topics in the STEP program paredness during the 2014- is most Trump supporters
will just stay home and sit on
Eva Buckner, Jenny Buhl- were accepted into the pro- such as safety and making 2015 school year.
their hands. That will hand
the election to Hillary. It will
also likely hand control of
the Senate to the Democrats
and will result in the appointmation, Skyline Executive Henry asks that those and facilities are also avail- ment of Supreme Court judgBy Tom Wearing
Director Matt Henry and interested in attending the able for retreats, conferenc- es who are far left liberals
Tri-City Times Staff Writer
his staff will host an Open open house to please es, reunions, weddings and which will give the court a
ALMONT If youre House at the grounds on RSVPonline or call 248- band camps.
far left liberal bent for the
looking for an ideal camp- Sunday, May 1 from 2-6 644-2043.
For further details about next 25 years. It will also
ing experience for kids ages
Available
camps summer camps and other move our nation closer and
7-15, consider the Skyline p.m.

Those
attending
the
include:
overnight
camping,
activities at Skyline Camp closer to a socialist democraCamp &
Retreat Center,
event
will
enjoy
a
free
barmini-camps
for
first-timers,
& Retreat Center, visit the cy in the image of many of
located at 5650 Sandhill
beque,
hayrides,
games
and
and
special
needs
camps.
website at: www.skyline. the European nations despite
Road in Almont.
Skylines campgrounds org or call 810-798-8240.
the clear evidence that such a
If youd like more infor- tours of the facility.

Photo provided

DAR Good Citizens honored in Lapeer

Borland students STEP up

GOP:

Skyline to host open house Sun., May 1st

from China is asking Pope


Francis why he likes playing
soccer. The pope explains
that he never plays serious
matches because hes never
really learned the art of the
game, and because he does
not have nimble feet. Why
he DOES like the game, he
goes on to tell eight-year-old
Wind, is because to play soccer, you must play together
as a team, and look for the
good of everyone without
thinking of your personal
gain or showing off. Then he
adds, It ought to be that
way with the church too.
I cant begin to tell you
how charming the book is.
For under $20, parents and
grandparents, especially
those of you who share the
popes doctrinal views, will
want this to read with your
children. One of my friends
suggested that it would make
a wonderful confirmation or
first communion gift.
It is available at The
Bible Book Store near the
corner of 3rd and Almont
Avenue in Imlay City. If
you, like me, are one of a
dying breed of folks who
enjoy turning pages more
than you like to read via
electronic devices, youll
also want to check out the
rack of 90% off books. I
walked out with seven books
for something like ten dollars!
Unbelievable! I made a little
note in the few minutes I
was in the store of titles
which caught my eye. Here
are a few: Turmoil in the
Toy Box, Pat Boones
Devotional Book, God
Behind the Seem (Ruth and
Esther), The Jerusalem Root
of Romans (Shulam),
In-Laws, Finding
Contentment, Too Close Too
Soon, High-Maintenance
Relationships (Les Parrott),
The Voice in the Wilderness,
The NIV Application
Commentary for the Book of
Mark, The Family Puzzle.
Do the math! Do yourself a favor! Stock up on
gifts. Contribute to silent
auctions. Shop locally and
help a small business owner
by keeping your dollars in
your community.
Email Willene at
willenetanis@aol.com.
form of government does not
work.
At this point I see no
favorable outcome for the
Republican Party. If Trump is
nominated Hillary will likely
kick his rear. If Trump is not
nominated many Republicans
will stay home and Hillary
will still be elected. There are
no good options at this point.
This was a year when the
Republican Party, had it
reflected the views of the
voters, could have maintained control of Congress
and elected a Republican
president. Instead, it will
snatch defeat from the jaws
of victory.

Tri-City Times Online

TO BETTER SERVE OUR READERS!


With local breaking news, reader polls, online
classifieds, online subscriptions, photo gallery,
sports, local events and much more!

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Page 11-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Remembering the gift

Capac congregation puts faith into action for Flint


CAPAC More than
3,000 pounds of water, collected in the small town of
Capac, has been delivered to
the big city of Flint, courtesy of
St. Johns Lutheran Church
and community members.
Earlier this month, members of St. Johns transported
the bottled water from the
church, which served as a local
collection site, to Salem

Lutheran Church. Both St.


Johns and Salem belong to the
ELCAEvangelical Lutheran
Church in America.
Parishioners and local residents brought bottled water to
the church and additional funds
were used to purchase two full
pallets of water from Kroger.
St. Johns also contributed
$300 toward the cost to replace
water lines at Salem Lutheran,
said Council President Allen
Hollenbeck. Monetary donations were received from the

Obituaries

Berville Lions and St. Johns


Friends in Christ group.
According to Salems Facebook
page, replacing the pipes in the
church will cost tens of thousands of dollars.
Student volunteers from
Michigan State University and
the University of MichiganFlint were on hand to help St.
Johns members unload the
water but it didnt stay at the Pastor Sarah Flatt, Randy Mayer, Shay Schaefer, Malea Hoover, Henrik Hoover,
church for long. Salem serves Conner Robinson, Reilly Provins, Abigail Emmi, Adam Schaefer, Cole
as a distribution site for bottled Robinson and Adam Schadt with a portion of the water collected at St. Johns.
water.
Volunteers were distrib- need, even when theyre in a
uting it as we were unloading neighboring community, like
it...putting it right into peo- Flint.
ples vehicles, Hollenbeck We live out our faith in
said.
many waysremembering the
They filled a pickup truck gift of the Holy Spirit we
for one resident who said he receive through water is a comwas picking up water for four mon part of our lives. So hostNorfolk, ND, and five sons:
bands, Edward Grassel, and of his neighbors.
ing a water drive for Flint
Robert Grassel of Marlette,
David McDonald; her son,
St. Johns Pastor Sarah seemed like a tangible and conMI, Roy (Anna) Grassel of
Ricky McDonald; Brothers: Flatt said it can be hard to vincing way to put our faith
New Haven, MI, Raymond
Ross Donnelly and John
know how to help others in into action, she said.
(Rowena) McDonald of
Donnelly.
Marlette, MI, Ronald
The funeral was held on
McDonald of Punxsutawney, Saturday, April 23, 2016 at
PA and David (Kelly)
Muir Brothers Funeral Home
McDonald of Punxsutawney, Of Imlay City, 225 N. Main
PA; her two sisters: Louise
Street, Imlay City, MI.
Case and Beverly Verellen;
Deacon Tom Yezak officiatand three brothers: Louis
ed. Burial followed in Mt.
ST. CLAIR COUNTY of pills have been collected.
Donnelly, Ken Donnelly and Calvary Cemetery, Imlay
The biannual National Sheriff Donnellon asks
Pat Donnelly. Gloria is also
City, MI.
Drug Take Back Day will that you bring in your
survived by 18
Funeral arrangement
Grandchildren and by sever- were made by Muir Brothers take place this Saturday, April unwanted, unused or expired
30th. The St. Clair County pills either in their original
al Great-Grandchildren.
Funeral Home Of Imlay
Sheriffs Office will once container or a baggie. Just
Predeceased by her husCity.
again team with the U.S. come inside the lobby of the
Drug Enforcement Agency Sheriffs Office, dump the
(DEA) for the event. Citizens pills from their container into
can bring in their unused, the container provided. Pills
expired and unwanted pills at are the only medication that
the Sheriffs main office, will be accepted. No liquids,
located at 1170 Michigan inhalers or syringes can be
Road in Port Huron Township taken. Once the pills are colfrom 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.
lected, they will be turned
This has been a great
event for everyone involved, over to the DEA for disposal.
said Sheriff Tim Donnellon. Residents may also turn
People are able to prop- in pills at the Sheriffs Office
erly dispose of unwanted during normal business hours,
pills, which in turn means Monday through Friday from
they are not going to end up 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.
in our water supply or in the For more information on
the Drug Take Back Day, go
wrong hands.
This will be the 11th time to the Drug Enforcement
grandfather Monroe
the Sheriffs Office has Administrations website at
26, 2016 at the Funeral
Murphy of Dryden and
teamed up with the DEA to www.dea.gov , or contact the
Home where Dr. Gary R.
many aunts and uncles,
collect pills. Over the past ten Sheriffs Office at 810-987Glanville officiated. Burial
cousins and friends.
events, more than 900 pounds 1754.
was at Davis Cemetery.
He was preceded in
Memorial donations may be
death by his beloved mother made to the family for a
Connie in 2011 and he will
trust for Johns daughter
be joining her at Davis
Delaney.
Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted
The Funeral Service
to the Roth-Muir Funeral
was held on Tuesday, April
Home-Romeo.
Photo by Maria Brown

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

~ Gloria Jean McDonald, 82 ~


Gloria Jean McDonald,
age 82, of Marlette died
Monday, April 18, 2016 at
Covenant Health Care of
Saginaw, MI. Mrs.
McDonald was born April
27, 1933 in Almont, MI. She
is the daughter of the late
Louis and Sylvia (Clifford)
Donnelly.
She had been a homemaker; raising her family.
Gloria enjoyed bingo, computer games (such as POGO)
and crocheting.
She is survived by two
daughters: Rena Boadway of
Marlette, MI and Karen

Dispose of unused,
expired drugs on Sat.

(Dwayne) Reeves of

~ John Franklin Murphy, III, 33 ~


John Franklin Murphy,
III, 33, known by many as
Murf left us abruptly on
Thursday, April 21, 2016 at
the age of 33. He was born
June 10, 1982, the son of
John F. and Connie J.
(Cockerill) Murphy in Mt.
Clemens. John resided in
Imlay City and grew up in
Almont where he graduated
from Almont High School
in 2000.
His love and passion
was spending time with his
father hunting, fishing,
snowmobiling and many
other outdoor activities. In
2013 his new passion
arrived with the birth of his
daughter Delaney. John and
his father were members of
the Michigan Walleye Tour
and Master Walleye Circuit.
John caught and still holds

the record for largest fish, a


13.26 pound walleye in the
Detroit River/Lake Erie on
April 22, 2006 in the
Master Walleye Circuit and
still holds the record and
recently took 3rd place in
largest fish, 11 pounds in
the Master Walleye Circuit
tour in Trenton.
For those who knew
John, knew him as a teddy
bear who had so much love
for everyone he knew. He is
truly going to be missed by
many.
John is leaving behind
his wife Tiffany Murphy,
beloved daughter Delaney,
step daughter Sage, loving
father John (Christina) F.
Murphy of Imlay City,
beloved sister Stacey (Jerry)
McBee of Armada, brother
Nathan Schocke of Capac,

Community Calendar

Wednesday, April 27th

~ Hubert Noble Jr, 67 ~


Hubert Noble Jr, 67, of
Warren MI, formerly of
Imlay City, or as he was
called by his Family and
Friends, Junior left this
world on April14, 2016 in
Warren, MI.
Hubert was born
November 1, 1948 in
Breathitt, Co., KY to Hubert
Noble Sr, and Dorthia
(Hollon) Noble.
He leaves to cherish his
memory: two children,
Kenneth Noble (Debbie) of
Flint, MI and Cheryl Lloyd
of Warren MI, three grandchildren: James Noble and
Fiance Daniel Knirs, Ryan

Lloyd and Angela Lloyd,


two great-grandchildren:
Faith Lloyd and Rosalyn
Olson, one brother, Ollie
Jim Noble (Rebecca
Sue) of Hazard KY, five
sisters: Louise Young of
Lexington KY, Opal Harlow
of Pontiac MI, Cora Gregory
of OH, Mary Tyson of
Washington, MI and Patricia
(Phillip) Arnold of West
Branch, MI, a sister-in-law,
Miriam Noble of Pontiac
MI. Many nieces, nephews,
aunts, uncles and cousins.
Hubert was preceded in
Death by his parents, Hubert
Noble Sr, and Dorthia

(Hollon) Noble, four grandparents: James Noble and


Charity (Murrell, Noble,
Combs) Mullins, and

Mansfield and Elizabeth


(Hensley) Hollon, one stepgrandfather: Morton Mullins,
one brother: Kelly Noble,
two nephews, one niece and
a host of other loved ones.
There will be no funeral.
He will be buried next his
parents in Imlay City
Cemetery.
Hubert touched many
lives, he was a very kind
man and loved telling jokes
and making people laugh
while drinking a nice cold
beer.
He will be deeply missed
by his big family and many
friends.

~ Betty Jane Wargo, 85 ~


Betty Jane Wargo, 85, of
Attica, MI died Saturday,
April 23, 2016 after an
extended illness at
Devonshire Retirement
Village of Lapeer, MI. Betty
Jane Peck was born March
20, 1931 in Alton, IL. She is
the daughter of the late
Ralph and Myrtle
(Anderson) Peck. She grew
up in Flint, MI. Betty Jane
was a graduate of Highland
Park High School. She married Joseph Wargo on March
19, 1949 in Flint, MI. Joseph
Wargo died in 2013.
Betty Jane was a home
maker. She enjoyed reading,
spending time with her fami-

ly and taking family vacations to Oscoda.


She is survived by three
daughters: Cheryl Jerrim of
Grand Blanc, MI, Cathy
(Harry) Chylinski of
Washington Twp., MI and
Annamarie (Richard)
Williams of Chandler, IN;
one son: James (Amy)
Wargo of Attica, MI. Betty
Jane is also survived by
seven grandchildren: Leland
Wargo, Joe Jerrim, Tony
Jerrim, Sean (Tammy)
Washburn, Ryan (Nataley)
Wargo, Kent Wargo, Elaina
Wargo.; and by seven greatgrandchildren.
Betty Jane was preceded

in death by: her husband:


Joseph Wargo in 2013; her
sons: Stephen Wargo in 1980
and Michael Wargo, just
recently in 2016; a brother:
Nelson Peck; and a sister:
Geneva Blattert.
The funeral services
were held Tuesday, April 26,
2016 at Muir Brothers
Funeral Home of Imlay City,
225 N. Main Street, Imlay
City, MI. Deacon Tom Yezak
officiated. Burial will be in
Imlay Township Cemetery,
Imlay City on Wednesday
morning, April 27th.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Muir Brothers
Funeral Home of Imlay City.

Lapeer Area Citizens Against Domestic


Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. in
the Lapeer Court House for personal protection order clinic. For info 810-2460632.

Friday, April 29th

Wednesday, May 4th

Lapeer Area Citizens Against Domestic


Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. in
the Lapeer Court House for personal protection order clinic. For info 810-2460632.

Dryden Historical Society meets 1:00


p.m. at Dryden Township Hall.

Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold


Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.

Thursday, May 5th

Monday, May 2nd

Friday, May 6th

Tuesday, May 3rd

Saturday, May 7th

Almont/Dryden Lioness Branch Club


meets 7:00 p.m. at the Lions Hall, 222
Water Street in Almont.

Imlay City Senior Center Euchre


Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open 4:30
p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

Imlay City VFW Post 2492 will meet


7:00 p.m. at the Post Hall (behind the
Tri-City Times)
Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold
Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.

Imlay City VFW Auxiliary 2492 will


meet 2:00 p.m. at the Post Hall (behind
Tri-City Times)

Tuesday, May 10th

Imlay City Senior Center Euchre


Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open 4:30
p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

How to use our Community Calendar


The Tri-City Times Community Calendar is a weekly schedule
of events for churches, clubs, local meetings, and civic
organizations. If you have an item for the Community
Calendar call our office at 810-724-2615. Deadline for all
calendar items is noon Monday prior to publication date.

Please be sure to sign our


online register book at muirbrothersfh.com.

To share one of these obituaries with a friend or a loved-one


VISIT US ONLINE AT:

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Page 12-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Almont renews marijuana moritorium


No medical marijuana permits/licenses to be issued in village
By Nicholas Pugliese

Tri-City Times Contributing Writer

ALMONT Village
council members on Tuesday,
April 19th, voted to renew
the moratorium on issuing
permits and/or licenses needed to legally grow and sell
medical marijuana. The
council passed a similar mor-

atorium three years ago.


The unanimous vote
solidified a six month moratorium, with an option for a
three month extension. In
effect, the moratorium forbids anyone living within the
jurisdiction of the Village of
Almont from acquiring the
necessary permits to legally
dispense medical marijuana.

Similar moratoriums are in


effect in several towns and
villages in Lapeer county,
and most allow for adaptation to changes at the state
level, should those changes
occur.
The council cited the
vague nature of the Michigan
Medical Marihuana Act
(MMMA) of 2008 as reason
to establish the moratorium.
According to council members, the Act generated as
many questions as it did
answers regarding the legal
growth and sale of marijuana, and while the Act never
explicitly mentions dispensaries, the moratorium estab-

lishes a prohibition on their


existence.
Amazingly, or not amazingly, the legislation has
never managed to address
any regulation in regards to
dispensaries, which obviously is sorely needed, Council
President Steve Schneider
said. The Michigan Medical
Marihuana Act doesnt
address the issue at all.
The Council sees the
moratorium as a way to protect the public health, safety,
and welfare of Village residents, and that by establishing the moratorium members
hope to allow the Village
time to consider the matter of

medical marijuana cultivation on a local level.


There is going to be on
the ballot, Im sure, the issue
of legalizing marijuana for
recreational
purposes,
Schneider said, and if that
passes, that will change the
whole ball game.
While attitudes toward
marijuana for both medical
and recreational use have
shifted to a more favorable
light on a national level,
Almont council members
hope the moratorium will
allow for the necessary time
to assess attitudes and beliefs
regarding the issue at a local
level.
While the moratorium
prohibits the issuance of per-

mits needed to legally cultivate and dispense marijuana


within village zoning ordinance, the MMMA already
allows for individuals to do
so with proper state licenses.
The Councils moratorium
will have no effect on those
already licensed by the state
to grow and cultivate medical marijuana. The MMMA
of 2008 allows caregivers to
grow up to six plants for
themselves and six patients.
If somebody wants to
grow it, and they have the
state right, and the permit
from the state, we cant regulate someone who wants to
grow it in their own home,
Councilman Rick Lauer
said.

Metal and Soul to stay busy


By Tom Wearing

Spartronics: In St. Louis!


Even the kids couldnt
believe what transpired.
We were all like did
that really just happen?
Heeke said with a laugh.
Unfortunately, their winning ways ended in the quarterfinals.
Often it comes down to
equipment issues and our
joystick failed, Heeke said.
There wasnt much time
to prepare for Worlds but
members spent time last
week securing sponsorships
and funding to help pay for
their trip. Heeke said two of
their newest supporters
include Vintech Industries
and Milnes Chevrolet.

Photo by Tom Wearing

from page 1-A


moats, among other things.
We did really well on
Friday, Heeke said of the
27 member squad.
Saturday dawned with
the octofinals which saw
16 alliancesteams of
threecompete.
Thats
when things got really interesting.
Spartronics, members of
the 16th seed, defeated the
#1 seed in dramatic fashion.
The first match, we
lost. The next match, we
won...everything
just
worked and the third match,
we won. Thats when the
stadium went crazy, he
said.

Photo provided

Drive team members Mike Brown, Keegan Flowers


and Matthew Dahn were all smiles after success at
state competition.

CAPAC Capac High


Schools Metal and Soul
robotics team took part in the
recent FIRSTRobotics State
Championships
at
the
DeltaPlex Arena in Grand
Rapids.
Team mentor Janet Antilla
reports the team earned a
spot at the state competition
after receiving the Chairmans
Award at their first district
competition at Kettering
University in March.
Antilla says The Michigan
State Championship competition brought together the
best-of-the-best to compete
for a limited number of slots
for the National Robotics
Championship in St. Louis on
April 27-30.
Antilla notes the Capac
team slid up and down in the
ranking during the event, but Metal and Souls drive team mugs for the camera during a break at their recent
members were able to tackle a competition. Though the team did not qualify for the National competition in
few easily fixable issues; end- St. Louis, they finished as winners in the eyes of many, including themselves.
ing up ranked 73rd out of 102
teams in attendance.
much FIRST Robotics has
The team worked hard changed my life and helped
and played hard being one of me improve my grades and
the fastest to tackle the GPA, Shelby says.
defenses on the field, Antilla Metal and Soul arrived in
says. They were a shining Grand Rapids ranked 128th
example of teamwork all out of 411 Michigan teams
weekend.
and finished ranked 99 out of
Team member Jaclyn 411.
Radford, a senior at Capac Being in the top 24 perHigh School, offered her cent of teams in the state is
assessment of the teams per- quite an accomplishment,
formance.
Shelby added.
We all came together Antilla notes that while
and acted like a teamlike Metal and Soul will not
everyone wanted to be there, advance to the Nationals in
Jaclyn says. And even St. Louis, the team is looking
though we didnt win any- towards the off season and all
thing, everyone still held our of its accompanying activiheads high,
ties.
Capac team member Shelby Newman poses for a
We still won the best We will once again be
photo with FIRSTRobotics President Don Bossi
thing possible, she contin- participating in Maker Faire
during recent state competition in Grand Rapids.
ues. We won valuable life Detroit, the Lapeer and Capac
lessons, such as teamwork, Relays for Life, a road cleanleadership and the ability to up and more outreach activifind a family in friends.
ties, says Antilla.
For
Sophomore
Shelby more information on the
Newman scored another win team, its activities and how
for the team; having had the If you wish to support the
opportunity to meet FIRST team through a donation, conRobotics President Don tact Metal and Soul Mentor
Janet Antilla at: janet.antilBossi.
I told him (Bossi) how la@gmail.com.
Photo provided

Photo provided

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Looking east toward Van Dyke (M-53), this is the property Dollar General is looking at for possible construction of a new store in the Village of Almont.

Dollar General: Retailer eyeing downtown Almont


from page 1-A
the company is in the due
diligence phase of the process and anticipates that a
decision will not be forthcoming for several months.
We're interested in adding a new location to Lapeer
County, said Miles, but
have not committed to doing
so yet. Based on our current
timeline, I anticipate a decision will not be made on this
project until mid-summer.
Miles said the company
identifies locations which

offer customers easy and


convenient shopping choices.
We know
convenience is a major factor
in our customers' shopping
decisions, and we generally
serve customers within a
three to five mile radius, or
10 minute drive, he said.
We also take demographic
trends, competitive factors,
traffic patterns and community concerns into consideration.
Miles added that the store
would likely employ a 6-10

person staff, depending on


the individual needs of the
store.
Alternate event location
In the event the project
moves forward more quickly
than anticipated, village officials may need to consider
another location for the 2016
Almont Heritage Festival in
late June.
One of the locations
drawing strong consideration
is the village-owned parking
lot behind downtown businesses on the west side of

Main Street; formerly occupied by the old fire hall and


water tower.
Through the cooperation
of the Village and Downtown
Development Authority, the
location has undergone recent
upgrades, and has the added
benefit of being directly
across the street from Burley
Park on West St. Clair Street.
Burley Park is the location of the traditional
Memorial Day festivities
sponsored annually by the
Almont American Legion.

Township gears up for


action at new ball fields
By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

ALMONT TWP. In
anticipation of the upcoming
sports season, the township is
taking steps to ensure their
balls fields, newly purchased
from the school district, are
ready for athletes and their
families.
At their April 11 meeting, board members approved
a bid from Northwood
Contracting for $4,800 to
install a water line for the
concessions stand. The fields
sit immediately north of the
former elementary school.
Currently, the stand gets its
water from the vacant school
building but that structure
has since been sold.
Supervisor Paul Bowman

said the project will let the


township tap into the water
main on Church Street. They
hope the work can be complete within a couple of
weeks.
In other township business:
the board gave the fire
department permission to
spend up to $5,000 for the
purchase of six security cameras to be installed in the fire
hall.
members
approved
spending up to $10,000 in
architect fees for proposed
renovations of the current
township/village hall and
construction of the new
police station, a cost they
intend to share with the village once it receives council
approval.

Page 13-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Hobbyists help clothe babies


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo by Janice Ramelot

CAPAC What may be


just a hobby for some is an
opportunity to give for local
knitters.
Recently, about 30 baby
items, handmade by local
women, were donated to the
25th Anniversary Community
Baby Shower, hosted by

Henry Ford Hospital. Giving


of their time and talents were
members of the Capac Library
Monday Night Knitters, participants in a Wednesday
Night Knitters group that
meets at Kate Wordens home
in Allenton and a knitting
club started by Worden at The
Village Rehabilitation Care
Community in Armada.
Were glad to do this.

Some of the handmade items given to new babies


through Henry Ford Hospitals Community Baby
Shower.

These women have been so


gracious, Worden said during a recent gathering at the
Capac Library.
Often these knitting
groups receive donated yarn
in various amounts so making
baby-sized items is a practical
task, Worden notes.
This is the first time local
knitters contributed to the
Henry Ford event in Detroit
which is sponsored by the
Detroit Chapter of the
National Association of
Negro
Business
and
Professional Womens Clubs,
Inc.
Monday Night Knitter
Janice Ramelot attended on
behalf of the local group, noting that they were among
dozens of community groups
and corporate sponsors who
showered gifts of all kinds
from car seats and cribs to
clothes and diaperson
babies and their families
within the Henry Ford
Community.
Local knitters have previously sent handmade baby
items to Covenant Hospital in
Saginaw.
Generous knitters include:
Kate Worden, Carol Bracey,
Carol Goike, Char Ellis, Jan
Krauss, Janice Ramelot,

Photo by Maria Brown

Capac knitting club donates items to hospital

Monday Night Knitters at the Capac Library have given of their time and talents for new babies and their families. Pictured are Char Ellis, Lyla Kegler,
Joni Welch, Janice Ramelot, Lori Howe, Carol Bracey, Janet Krauss and Kate
Worden.
Janice Wieg, Lyla Kegler,
Mykala Woods, Lori Howe,
Shirley Nieman, Shirley
Woods, Marie Schlump,
Barb Malburg, Sharon Zoar,
Linda Coleman and Joni
Welch.
New participants are
always welcome to join the
Monday Night Knitting group
which meets at the Capac
Library from 6-8 p.m. each
week.

Garage Sale Frenzy returns May 19-21


By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

ALMONT A springtime tradition continues the


weekend of May 19-21, when
the Village of Almont hosts
its 2016 Garage Sale
Frenzy.
Village and Township res-

idents are invited to participate in the communitywide


garage sale by registering
online at: villageofalmont.org
or by stopping by the Almont
Village/Township offices on
Howland Road.
The $10 registration helps
fund
Almonts
next
Homecoming Festival.

Event coordinator Gloria


Howe said interest is already
growing in anticipation of the
event.
A lot of people look forward to this event, said
Howe. Weve had people
calling about it and some
have already signed up.
Howe said the registra-

Photos provided

TRI-CITY AREA
Do you or a family member have a recent accomplishment or milestone
youd like to share and
celebrate with the community?Then send us the
details and we will gladly
help you share the news
on our Announcements
page.
Send submissions
to tct@pageone-inc.com
or Tri-City Times, P.O.
Box 278, Imlay City, MI
48444.
Have
questions?
Contact us at (810) 7242615.

Creating joy
The Village Rehabilitation and Care Community hosted its second annual
Youth Art Show on March 26, featuring art created by students from Armada
and Almont middle and high schools. The artwork was displayed throughout the halls of The Village Commons, a recently opened independent living
complex, as well as the assisted living areas. Cash prizes were presented
for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. First place winner Sydney Clay of Armada High
School shows winning piece to Lorrie Worden, executive director of The
village Assisted Living (above, left); 2nd place winner Brianne Gryspeerd of
Almont High School displays her piece as Worden looks on (above right);
Katrina Dufort, community liaison for The village and 3rd place winner
Rachel Clough of Armada High School pose for photo (lower left); and
Clough, Village Commons resident Marie Schlump and Clay pose for photo
(lower right). For more information about The Village Rehabilitation and
Care Community in Armada call 586-784-5322.

THE CLASSIFIEDS ARE THE CATS MEOW.

Area shoppers know the Classifieds are the purr-fect place


to find a bargain. In the Classifieds, you can track down deals on
everything from collectibles to cuddly kittens. Its easy to place an ad or
find the items you want and its used by hundreds of area shoppers every day.
Go with your instincts and use the Classifieds today.

810-724-2615

Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Tri-City Times
CLASSIFIEDS

Sponsored by:
WEINGARTZ WARRIORS

RELAY for LIFE 2016


THIRD ANNUAL GOLF OUTING
We are looking for golf teams to raise donations
to win the fight against cancer!

tion deadline, which ensures


inclusion on the 2016 Garage
Sale Frenzy map, is
Wednesday, May 11 at 4 p.m.
We encourage everyone
wishing to have sales at their
homes to get signed up early,
Howe concluded.

Send us your
announcements

COME JOIN US FOR A


FUN GOLF-OUTING

SUNDAY MAY 15, 2016


1:00PM Shotgun Start

CASTLE CREEK GOLF COURSE


810-724-0851 Lum, Michigan

Two Divisions Two Winners


Teams must be a foursome consisting of two
men and two women.
or
First 10 Men Teams
Cash prizes will be awarded based on number of teams
Cost is $60.00 per golfer/$240.00 per team
Includes 18 holes, Cart, Hot Dog on Turn,
Dinner and Skins
Dinner only ticket $10

To register your team contact:


Mike Hunter (810)724-1131
Jeff Weingartz (810)724-0119
Bob Weingartz (810)796-2126

IMLAY CITY SPARTAN


BENEFIT GOLF OUTING
FOUR MAN SCRAMBLE
Saturday June 11th
Tee Off at 9:00 am

Castle Creek Golf Club


Proceeds go to the promotion and benefit
of the Imlay City Wrestling & Football programs

$45 PER PERSON

Includes Golf, Hot dog at turn and Prize Raffles


Cash payout based on teams entered

NAME OF TEAM:
*

*
Send to: CASTLE CREEK GOLF CLUB
5191 Lum Road, Attica Michigan 48412

For More Information Contact


Keil Jorgensen at kjorgensen@pageone-inc.com or
Steve Lestage at slestage@icschools.us

Page 14-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Town Talk

For Senior Citizens


Gentle yoga, Wednesdays
from 1-2 p.m. at the Imlay
City Senior Center. Practice
led by Dina Miramonti,
RYT.
Dinner and an evening of
card playing with friends,
50/50 raffle and prizes of
high and low for each table
every 3rd Monday at the
Washington Senior Center,
57880
Van
Dyke,
Washington Township, MI
48094, from 4-8 p.m. Call
the center for further
details, 586-752-6543.
Swing Dance Lessons
offered at the Port Huron
Senior Center, 600 Grand
Avenue in Port Huron,
every Tuesday from 7:30-9
p.m. and the 1st and 3rd
Thursday of the month
from 7:30-9 p.m. with
instructors Lyle Malaski &
Kristina Morton. Call 810984-5061 for more information.

Bring a sack lunch, beverages provided. Senior


stretch exercise on Tuesdays
10-11 a.m. Potluck luncheons will be served the
4th Tuesday of every month
at noon. Call 810-395-4518
for details.

Church, 27 Elk Lake Rd., is


open from 2-4 p.m. the 2nd
and 4th Monday of each
month. Proof of residency
and need required.

the Family Literacy Center


today to reserve your seat at
810-664-2737 and for more
information on dates and
times.

The Capac Community


Food Pantry, 114 S. Main
Street, is open each
Wednesday from 1-3 p.m.
Please call LOVE, INC. at
810-245-2414 in advance to
ensure your food voucher
will be received before you
stop in to shop. Any questions, please call Sherrie
Cramton at 810-395-1905.

Play groups available. Free


6 week sessions. At these
FREE 90 minute playgroups
children will participate in a
storytime, developmentally
appropriate games and
crafts, learn new skills, and
enjoy a snack and social
time with other children.
Parents will have the chance
to talk to other adults with
same-age children. Register
now for the next session!
Numerous locations and
dates available. For more
information and to sign up
call the Family Literacy
Center at 810-664-2737.

Pickleball at the Imlay City


Senior Center is no longer a
drop in class. If you are
interested in participating,
please call the center at 810724-6030. Stay fit & active
with this fun racquet sport
that is simple, free and easy
to play.
The Capac Kitchen serves
free meals every Tuesday
Ryan Smith, a certified from 4:30-6 p.m. at Zion
alcohol and drug counselor United Methodist Church.
will be available at the
Imlay City Seniors Center Free meals for people in
on the 4th Thursday of need are offered at the
every month from 9 a.m.-12 North Branch Senior Center
on Monday and Thursday
p.m.
evenings from 5:30-7 p.m.
Call 810-441-0322 for more
information.

Free Meals, Food

St. Pauls Lutheran Church


Food for Families kitchen
is open to the public for
free, hot meals every
Monday and Wednesday
from 4-5:30 p.m.

This Heart Loves Food


Pantry is open the 1st
Saturday of each month
from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at
Gateway Assembly Church,
Council
on
Aging 2796 S. Van Dyke Rd., Imlay
Membership is open to indi- City.
viduals 18 and older. The
Capac Senior Center is Dryden Area Food For
open 8:30-4:30 weekdays. Families free dinner is
We offer a variety of activi- served on the 2nd Tuesday
ties such as fitness and craft of each month from 4:30classes, a book review 6:00 p.m. at St. Cornelius
group, cards and bus trips. Church, 3834 Mill Street
Call Lori at 395-7889 for (north of the light in
more information.
Dryden). No proof of income
is required. Come and enjoy
Almont and Dryden area a home cooked meal with
senior citizens meet the 2nd us.
Tuesday of the month at 12
p.m. at the Almont Lions The Attica United Methodist
Hall, 222 Water St., for a Church will be holding a
potluck and program. Call free community meal on the
798-8210 for more informa- 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each
tion.
month from 4:30-6:30 p.m.
For more information
Adults 55 and over are please call 810-724-0690 or
invited to Berlin Twp. visit www.atticaumc.org.
Senior Center to play cards
from noon-3 p.m. the 2nd The Attica Food Bank at
Wednesday of every month. the Attica United Methodist

Orchards Cupboard Food


Pantry is open the 3rd
Saturday of every month 9
a.m.-noon. Food distributed
at 74903 McKay Rd., Bruce
Twp., 586-336-4673. www.
orchardsonline.org

Museums
The Capac Historical
Society is now open to visitors daily from 1-3 p.m. and
1-4 p.m. on Sundays. Call
810-395-2859 for more
information.
The Imlay City Historical
Museum is now open for the
2016 season on Saturdays
from 1 to 4 p.m. Stop by and
view new exhibits and learn
more about Imlay Citys
wonderful history. For more
information call 810-7241904.

Youth Events
Ready, Set, Go! Workshop.
This is a FREE workshop
for 3-5 year olds & parents/
caregivers! Enjoy fun projects that will develop your
childs skills and prepare
them for school! Children
also enjoy a snack, story
time, and a free book! Call

Attica Methodist has a free


Christian Play Group on
Mondays from 10-11:30
a.m. on school days, featuring preschool Bible stories,
a snack, interactive songs,
crafts, and games. Parents
are required to be with their
children during the group.
Space is limited. For details/
reservations call Pam
Holihan at 810-724-6941.

Widowed Friends invites all


widowed to join us for
breakfast and friendship in
a safe setting every 2nd and
4th Monday of the month at
9 a.m. at Seros, 925 Gratiot
in Marysville. For more
information about our
group, call Julie at 810-3880868.

The Imlay City Christian


School is holding a fundraiser for TAFFY (Tuition
Assistance Fundraising For
Youth). Come join us for
euchre the 2nd Saturday of
each month at 7 p.m. at the
Imlay City Christian School,
7197 E. Imlay City Rd. in
Imlay City. For more inforLapeer County Families mation, call 810-724-5695.
Against Narcotics group
meets the second Tuesday of
the month at Faith Christian
Fellowship, 69 W. Nepessing
St. in Lapeer. Call 810-6670119 for more information West
Berlin
United
or email faithchrist09@aol. Methodist Church, 905
com.
Holmes Rd., Allenton will
TOPS 620 Lapeer weight- hold a Spring Rummage
loss group meets Tuesday Sale on Friday & Saturday,
nights at the Hunters Creek April 29 & 30 in the church
Mobile Home Park Club fellowship hall from 9 a.m.
House, 725 DeMille Rd. in to 5 p.m.
Lapeer. Weigh-in from
6-6:30 p.m., meeting from First Congregational Church UCC
Spring RUMMAGE SALE
6:30-7:30 p.m. For more Congregators
Part of Garage Sale Mania
information, call 810-664- Thursday & Friday, May 5 and 6 ONLY
7579.
275 Bancroft St., Imlay City 9am to

Craft Shows/Bazaars
Rummage Sales

17-1

Editors note: Due to space


constraints announcements
will be posted one week in
advance of the event. Notices
must be received in writing
by noon Monday prior to the
publication date.

Corner of 5th and Bancroft 4:30pm

TOPS 888 (Take Off Pounds A little bit of everything for everyone.
Sensibly) meets Wednesdays
at the 25 Pine Ridge Dr. in
Lapeer. Weigh-in at 8:30
a.m., 9:30 a.m. meeting.
Call Linda at 810-245-3955
Registration for the Fall or Phyllis 810-395-7035 for Wheelin Team 457 hosts
Gun and Knife Show,
2016/Spring 2017 Youth more information.
Soccer will be Tues. May 10, For those that have experi- Saturday May 14 from 9
Thurs. May 12 and Wed., enced the death of a loved a.m.-5 p.m. at Deerfield
May 25 at the Imlay City one, a support group is Twp. Hall, 30 Burnside Rd.
Middle School from 6-8 available facilitated by a North of Lapeer. Vendor
p.m. Early Bird pricing is trained United Hospice contact info: Ray Brown Charlie
from May 5-25. For more Service (UHS) bereavement 989-225-9259,
Woods
586-808-2244.
information visit www. volunteer. Marlette Regional
ayso1278.com
or
our Hospital, 2770 Main Street Euchre Nights at Avoca
Facebook page ayso1278.
in Marlette, hosts this sup- Community Hall, 5396
port group the 1st Friday of Kilgore Road in Avoca are
each month at 10 a.m. in the held on the 3rd Saturday of
Administration Conference the month until May. A light
Room. For more informa- meal is included. Cash prizFOR WIDOWED MEN & tion, call 800-635-7490 or es and door prizes will be
WOMEN. Lunch-Cards- visit www.marletteregional- given, and a grand prize to
Freindship. Join us every hospital.org
the player with highest
3rd Tuesday of each month
monthly scores at the end of
from 11:45 a.m.-4:00 p.m. at
the season. Registration
Cavis Pioneer Restaurant,
begins at 6:30 p.m. and play
5600 Lapeer Rd. in Kimball Mom to Mom Sale, Sunday, begins at 7 p.m.
Twp. 48074 (located approx. May 22, 2016. 10 a.m.-4
15 Miles S.W. of Port Huron. p.m., American Legion Hall, The Flea Market held each
No RSVP necessary. For 1701 W. Genesee St., Lapeer, Sunday at the Lapeer
more information call MI 48446. Email to Center Building, 425 County
Joanne K. at 810-324-2304. RESERVE A TABLE. Center Rd. in Lapeer, will
This activity is sponsored by Benefits ALS of Michigan be open from 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Widowed Friends, a peer and American Cancer Up to 50 booths inside and
support group www.wid- Society Email: shop4acure- outside sell a huge variety of
items. This event is sponowedfriends.org.
mom2mom@hotmail.com. sored by the Lapeer Center
Building, and there is no
admission charge. For info
on space rentals, contact
Logan at 810-347-7915. For
general information on the
Flea Market or food service
by Peacock Alley Catering
call 810-664-2109 or email
lapeercenter@charter.net.

Other

Support Groups

Fundraisers

c
AREA UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCHES
Attica
U.M.C.

27 Elk Lake Road, Attica, MI

(810) 724-0690

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m


Attica Food Bank: Serving those
in need in Attica Twp, 2-4 pm,
2nd and 4th Monday
Rev. Ron Rouse
www.atticaumc.org
15

Capac Zion
U.M.C.
14952 Imlay City Rd., Capac

(ELCA)

200 North Cedar (M-53)


Imlay City, MI

Church School - 10:00 am - All Ages


Worship Service - 10:30 am
Sunday School: 9:15 am
Junior Church During Worship Service
Several Bible Studies During the Week
Office Hours:
Tuesday-Thursday 8:30 am - 12:00 noon
Nursery Provided
15

Imlay City
U.M.C.

Corner of 4th St. & Almont Ave.


(Across from the Library)
www.imlayumc.org
9:15 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship
Nursery Available
Jr. Church for K-5th grade
Rev. Marcel Allen Lamb
15

810-724-2702

Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.


Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Pastor Alan Casillas

15

Capac First
U.M.C.

Imlay City
C.R.C.

810-724-4315

15

Dryden
U.M.C.

Sacred Heart
Catholic Church

810-796-3341

Weekday Masses

Come Grow With Us!

15

700 Maple Vista, Imlay City

810-724-1135

586.336.4673

Weekend Masses

Sat. 5 pm
Sun. 9 am - English
11 am - Spanish
Reconciliation 1/2 hr. before each Mass &4pm Sat.
15

Father Paul Ward

15

Imlay City
Church of Christ

670 N. Van Dyke


Imlay City, MI 48444
Sunday Service
Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am
Morning Worship 11:00am
1st Sunday of the
Month Evening Service 2:30pm
Wednesday Bible Classes (all ages) 7:00pm

905 Holmes Rd. - Allenton, MI


Corner of Almont Road

810-395-2409

810-724-3306

15

COME WORSHIP WITH US!

John Barker, Minister

15

PASTOR KEN RENARD

Sunday 2:30 pm
Tuesday 7:00 pm
Friday Youth 7:00 pm

firstapostolichome.com

Sunday Mornings
10:30 am

15

COME & MAKE A


DIFFERENCE WITH US! 15

Wayne Boyd, Pastor

881 Van Dyke - 810-798-8888


Sunday Bible Classes: 9:45 am
Worship Services
10:30 am & 6:00 pm
Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 pm
fbc@airadvantage.net
Live Webcasting Sunday all worship services
over Sermonaudio.com/fbcalmont 15
Proclaiming the Sovereign Grace of God

GATEWAY
ASSEMBLY

15

2720 Winslow Road


Imlay City, MI 48444

1 Mile South of I-69 Overpass


Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Wednesday Prayer & Praise 7:30 pm

Phone: 810-724-6999

15

ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH


(ELCA) 109 E. Kempf Court Capac, MI

(810) 395-7557

Phone: 810-724-8110
Pastor Jeffrey S. Krist

810-417-0265 cbcimlay.org
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Service 10:45 am
Evening Service 6:00 pm
Wednesday Service 7:00 pm

Light of Christ
Community
Church

Almont
First Baptist Church

Supervised child care during all services

Adult & Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Children's Church during service.

Free tutor training for people who would like to help


others in our community
improve English skills.
Volunteer basis. Please call
for orientation before training at 810-664-2737.

6835 Weyer Road Imlay City, MI48444

2796 S. Van Dyke Road - Imlay City


Morning Worship - 8:55 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night - 6:45 p.m.

74903 McKay Rd., Romeo

M-T-Thurs-Fri 8 am Wed. 10 am
First Sat. 8 am

West Berlin
U.M.C.

Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.


Rev. Curtis Clarke

email: nlcc@newlifechristian.net
www.newlifechristian.net
Pastor Tim Martin
Sunday 10 a.m. Service 15

395 N. Cedar (M-53)


www.imlaycitycrc.org
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Youth Ministry
MOPS Program
Community Mens & Womens
Bible Studies

206 W. Mill, Capac, MI


Senior Pastor:Rev. Lisa Clark
Worship Service 9:00 a.m.
Jr. Church 9:30 a.m.
Office Hours: TuesdayThursday 8:30 a.m. - 12 noon
Everyone Welcome
810-395-2112
15

Pastor Patricia Hoppenworth


Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
EVERYONE WELCOME!

859 N. Van Dyke Road


Imlay City, Michigan 48444

4411 Newark Road


Attica, MI 48412

810-724-1200

5394 Main Street - Dryden

Church 810-395-2112

Senior Pastor:Rev. Lisa Clark

810-724-0687

St. Pauls
Lutheran Church

15

Monday - Friday: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Sunday 10:00 a.m.


Sunday School
9:00 a.m. September thru May
Staffed Nursery During Worship 15

Christ Evangelical First Congregational Church


Lutheran Church
United Church of Christ
1970 S. Almont Ave., Imlay City
at corner of Newark Rd.

275 Bancroft - Imlay City


(Corner of 5th Street)

810-724-7855

810-724-6207

Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Worship 7:00 p.m.

Pastor

Ralph O. Stuebs
Cell-(567) 674-0438

Come to the WELS

St. Nicholas
Catholic Church
4331 Capac Road
Capac, MI 48014

810-395-7572

www.stnicholascapac.com

15

Sunday School &Morning Adult Group 9:30 a.m.


Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Rev. Dr. Renee C. Jackson
No matter who you are or where you are
on lifes journey, you are welcome here!15

Holy Redeemer
Lutheran Church
4538 Dryden Rd. Dryden, MI

810-796-3951
www.lutheransonline.com/holyred

8:00 am - BIBLE CLASS


Weekday Masses:
9:30 am - WORSHIP
Wednesday & Friday 8:30 a.m. 11:00 am - SUNDAY SCHOOL & BIBLE CLASS
Weekend Masses:
ALL WELCOME!!!
Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Steven Helms
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15
Christian Preschool Available
15

Free hearing and vision


screens for children of preschool age are available at
the Lapeer County Health
Department. To schedule an
appointment please call
810-667-0448 or 810-2455549.
Volunteer for the Habitat
for Humanity of Lapeer
County at the office.
Interested parties can call
810-664-7111 and speak to
Carolyn, Cheryl or Pete at
810-660-7823.
Capac Pharmacy is teaming
with Support Million Hearts
by offering in-pharmacy
blood pressure screenings,
136 North Main St. in
Capac, Tuesdays, 9 a.m.- 6
p.m. Everyone is invited to
come and have their blood
pressure read for free.

Club News
201 E. St. Clair, Almont, MI
810-798-8855
Sr. Pastor: Keith Langley

Sunday Worship Service at 10:15 a.m.


Nursery available and Jr. Church
for ages 3 thru 5th grade
Jr./Sr. High Youth Group ~ Sundays 6-8pm
Kidz 4 Christ ~ Wednesdays 6-7:30pm
Pre-School - 5th grade
15

St. John The


Evangelist
Catholic Church
872 Capac Rd.
Allenton, MI 48002

810-395-7074

www.stjohnsallenton.com

Weekday Masses:
Thursday & Friday 8:30 a.m.
Weekend Masses:
Saturday - 6:00 p.m.
Sunday - 9:00 a.m.
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15

The Imlay City American


Legion Post 135 meets the
2nd and last Wednesdays of
the month at 7:30 p.m. The
post is located at 212 E.
Third Street. Contact them
at 724-1450 or americanlegionpost135@frontier.com.
The Evening Star Quilt
Guild meets the last
Wednesday of each month
at the Davison Senior
Center, 10135 Lapeer Rd. in
Davison. Meetings start at
6:30 p.m. and doors open at
6:00 p.m. For more information, call Lisa, 810-3587294.

Page 15-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Rural Lifestyles

goods aisle are in order.


I consulted an expert
Christine Venema, an educator with Lapeer Countys
Michigan State University
Extension officesolicited
feedback from friends
through social media and riffled through my own cabinets to determine just what
tools were necessary to turn
produce from the garden (or
farmers market) into tasty
food. Heres what resulted
from our collective exercise:
Blender: My friends
Erin and Alison, who both
have young kids, put this at
the top of their lists and I
wasnt surprised. Getting the
blender out to make smoothies is a task my four-year-old
rarely passes up. Kids love
the sweet, creamy tastes and
moms like the fact that they
can sneak healthy things like
spinach and kale inside.
Alison said its the only way
her girls will consume leafy
greens like that.
Venema said blenders and
food processors are good for
making hummus, pureeing
soups and chopping things
like cabbage for salads too. I
concur with the soup option.

TRI-CITY AREA
Rising levels of atmospheric
carbon dioxide have reduced
protein in goldenrod pollen, a
key late-season food source
for North American bees, a
Purdue University study
shows.
Researchers found that
the overall protein concentration of goldenrod pollen fell
about one-third from the onset
of the Industrial Revolution
to the beginning of the 21st
century.
Previous studies have
shown that increases in carbon dioxide can lower the
nutritional value of plants
such as wheat and ricestaple crops for much of the
global human population
but this study is the first to
examine the effects of rising
CO2 on the diet of bees.
Bee food is less nutritious than it used to be, said
Jeffrey Dukes, study coauthor and professor of forestry and natural resources
and biological sciences.
Our findings also suggest that the quality of pollen
will continue to decline into
the future. Thats not great
news for bees.
Native bee species and
honeybees rely on flowering
plants for energy and nutrition. While nectar is the primary energy source for bee
colonies, pollen is the sole
source of protein for bees.
Pollen is essential for the
development of bee larvae
and helps maintain bees
immunity to pathogens and
parasites.
Goldenrod, a common
North American perennial
that blooms from late July
through October, offers bees
some of the last available pollen before winter. Bees that
overwinter must store sub-

stantial amounts of pollen to


rear their winter young.
Declines in pollen protein
could potentially threaten bee
health and survival and weaken bees ability to overwinter
on a continental scale, said
Jeffery Pettis, study co-author
and research entomologist
with the U.S. Department of
Agricultures Agricultural
Research Service (USDAARS).
A poor diet sets bees up
for failure, he said.
Previous research shows
bees have shorter lifespans
when fed lower quality pollen.
The researchers noted,
however, that this study only
assessed pollen protein levels
and did not look at the impact
of protein reductions on bee
health and populations.
Our work suggests there
is a strong possibility that
decreases in pollen protein
could contribute to declines
in bee health, but we havent
yet made that final link, said
Dukes, who is also director of
the Purdue Climate Change
Research Center housed in
Discovery Park.
Dukes collaborated with a
team led by USDA-ARS
researchers to examine protein levels in historical and
experimental samples of
goldenrod pollen. They found
that pollen protein levels
dropped about a third in samples collected from 18422014, a period during which
the amount of carbon dioxide
in the Earths atmosphere rose
from about 280 parts per million (ppm) to 398 ppm. The
greatest drop in protein
occurred during 1960-2014, a
time when atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rose dramatically.
A 2-year controlled field

Garden Variety

Rising CO2 levels reduce


protein in pollen sources

Ive tried out recipes that


were just okay in their
chunky form but fabulous
when pureed until smooth.
Grater: When the zucchini influx hits your kitchen
in mid-summer, youll be
glad to pull out a hand grater
and shred that stuff to make
bread, fritters or send it to
the freezer for future use.
My friend Erin says she uses
hers to turn cauliflower into
a white rice stand in, a little
trick thats pretty popular
these days among people
watching their carbohydrate
intake. Another relatively
new tool that falls into this
category is the spiralizer.
Again, home cooks use this
to turn zucchini or summer
squash into a substitute for
spaghetti noodles.
Paring knife and chefs
knife: Maybe its not fair to
choose just two because a set
of good knives is essential
but in my kitchen, these two
are more often in the dish
drain than the knife block. I
have four paring knives but
its never enough when there
are apples to peel, strawberries to top or green beans to
trim. A chefs knifeessen-

Blender or processorwhatever variation of this tool you prefer, it comes in


handy when turning fresh fruits and vegetables into healthy snacks and
meals.
tially the bigger version
of a paring
knifegets a
lot of use
when I make
stir fry or
have herbs
that need
Chris
chopping. A
Venema
chefs knife
doesnt work so well unless
you have its companion....
Cutting board: This is
far from being a gadget but
this also gets a lot of use in
our home. My friend Carla

Purdue Agricultural Communication/Tom Campbell

m not typically taken


with gadgets but, on occasion, I think having certain tools might make life
easier or healthier. For a
while, I was convinced I
would eat
more salad
if I had a
salad spinner...one
of those
basket in
the bowl
things that
spins your
greens dry

after

washing
but my
check
book (or more accurately,
debit card) groaned at the
cost! Have you seen the price
of those things!?!
Its that time of year
when gardeners evaluate the
tools and supplies they have
for the coming growing season but if consuming more
fresh produce is one of your
top reasons for having a garden, now is also an ideal
time to take a kitchen inventory and determine if a few
purchases from the home

Photo by Maria Brown

Tools for turning garden


glory into kitchen cuisine

Bees rely on goldenrod pollen as a food source,


but it's less nutritious than it used to be, a Purdue
study finds.
experiment that exposed
goldenrod to a gradient of
carbon dioxide levels from
280 to 500 ppm showed strikingly similar decreases in pollen protein, Dukes said.
These data provide an
urgent and compelling case
for establishing CO2 sensitivity of pollen protein for
other floral species, the
researchers concluded in
their study.
Bees provide a valuable
service to U.S. agriculture
through pollination, contributing more than $15 billion
in added crop value each
year.
But a number of new and
mounting pressures are crippling colonies and endangering bee populations. These
threats include emerging diseases and parasites such as
deformed wing virus, Varroa
mites and Nosema fungi; a
lack of diversity and availability of pollen and nectar
sources; and exposure to a
wide variety of pesticides.
From 2006 to 2011, annual
losses of managed honeybee
colonies averaged about 33
percent per year, according to
the USDA-ARS.
Bees already face a lot
of factors that are making
their lives hard, Dukes said.
A decline in the nutri-

tional quality of their food


source going into a critical
season is another reason to
be concerned.
Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxidea
building block for plant sugarshave allowed many
plants to grow faster and bigger. But this growth spurt can
dilute plants total protein,
rather than concentrating it in
the grain, resulting in a less
nutritious food source.
Slowing the degrading
effects of rising carbon dioxide levels on plant nutrition
hinges on reducing carbon
emission rates from deforestation and burning fossil
fuels, Dukes said.
The impact of carbon
emissions on the nutritional
value of our food supply is
something people need to be
aware of. This issue isnt just
relevant to honeybees and
peopleit will probably
affect thousands or even millions of other plant-eating
species around the world. We
dont yet know how theyll
deal with it.
Researchers
from
Williams
College,
the
Smithsonian Institution and
the University of Maryland
also co-authored the study.
The work was funded by
the USDA-ARS.

said she likes to go old


school, pulling out a knife
and cutting board to prep
veggies for roasting.
A good supply of recipes: If you like to plant and
eat new or unique things
each season, be sure to have
a stack of recipes collected
from cookbooks, magazines
or online sources like
Pinterest that pique your
curiosity and spur you to do
some taste testing.
So what about the salad
spinner? Venema suggests
that the usefulness of tools
and gadgets out there has a
lot to do with volume of food
being cooked or prepped. A

salad spinner might be very


handy for a family of fourplus who eat big bowls of
the stuff but not so practical
if only one or two people
plan to have a plate of
greens.
No matter what tools you
grab to make health meals,
food safety should be a priority too, Venema reminds
us. Be sure to thoroughly
rinse, wash and sanitize your
knives, blenders, cutting
boards and graters to prevent
cross contamination.
Happy gardening and
eating!
Contact Maria at
mbrown@pageone-inc.com.

New yield records set in 2015 for


Lapeer, St. Clair counties
TRI-CITY AREA Michigans corn and soybean
growers realized record state yields in 2015 and a new
report from the National Agricultural Statistics Service
reveals that records at the local county level were also
bettered once the harvest was tallied last fall.
According to the NASS Agriculture Across Michigan
March 2016 report, new corn average yield records were
set in both Lapeer (174.3 bushels per acre) and St. Clair
(160.9 bushels per acre) counties.
Lapeer County also put a new average yield in the
record books for soybeans, coming in at 50.2 bushels per
acre.
Our neighbors to the north came out on top for production in both crops. Huron County was number one in
corn, with 16.9 million bushels harvested in 2015 and the
highest average yield of 198.8 bushels per acre. Sanilac
was Michigans top producing county for soybeans with
6.4 million bushels harvested last fall. Tuscola County
registered the states highest average yield for beans
55.2 bushels per acre.

Weather
almanac
Lapeer station
Minimum temp.
29.7 on Saturday, 23rd
Maximum temp.
70.8 on Monday, 25th
Rainfall
.48 inches
Growing Degree Days
for corn development:
Current: 179
Forecast: 216

For the week of


April 19-25
Emmett station
Minimum temp.
29.3 on Sunday, 24th
Maximum temp.
67.1 on Monday, 25th
Rainfall
.22 inches
Growing Degree Days
for corn development:
Current: 153
Forecast: 174

Growing degree days are accumulated from


March 1 and forecast through May 2.
Weather data courtesy of Enviro-weather,
www.enviroweather.msu.edu

Visit www.tricitytimes-online.com for all your local news!


Also, visit the
Photo Gallery for
extra photos!

Tri-City TimesOnline

Page 16-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

November ballot shapes up in area


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

TRI-CITY AREA Six


candidates have filed for
Candice Millers seat in the
U.S. Congress.
Hoping to fill the 10th
District seat are Republicans
Tony Forlini, of Harrison
Township, Paul Mitchell of
Washington, Phillip Pavlov of
St. Clair, Alan Sanborn of
Shelby Township and David
VanAssche
of
Shelby

Township. Whoever wins that


five-way race will face off
against Democrat Frank
Accavitti Jr. of Grosse Pointe
Shores.
Addresses are provided
by candidates to the Secretary
of State.
The 10th District includes
all of Huron, Sanilac, Lapeer,
and St. Clair counties and a
northern portion of Macomb
County.
According to other filings

from the Secretary of States


office:
81st District State Rep.
Dan Lauwers, a Republican,
will face Democrat Stewart
Sternberg, of Algonac in
November. The 81st District
includes the western portion
of St. Clair County.
82nd District State Rep.
Gary Howell, a Republican,
will face Democrat Margaret
Guerrero
DeLuca,
in
Novembers general election

a rematch of the March


special election in Lapeer
County.
In St. Clair County, 31st
Circuit Judge Cynthia Lane
has a challenger in Robert
Crosby of Port Huron.
Lapeer County Circuit
Court Judge Nick Holowka
and St. Clair County District
Judge Michael Hulewicz
wont be challenged in their
bids for another six-year
term, each.

Blueberry Festivals Little Miss


and Jr. Miss registration
SIGN-UP . . . THURSDAY, APRIL 28

IMLAYCITY The call has gone out for pirate


princesses to take part in the 2016 BlueberryPageant.
Registration for Little Miss and Junior Miss
Blueberry takes place on Thursday (April 28) from 6-7
p.m. at Imlay City High School.
Registration is open to all girls from ages 5-10
years old and who attend Imlay City Schools.
Registration form, emergency contact form and the
non-refundable fee of $30 is due at registration.
Call the Imlay City Area Chamber of Commerce
office at 724-1361 for questions and further information.

Shop Almont!
Thank you for First Congregational Church of Almont
supporting
Thurs, April 28 and Fri, April 29 9am to 4pm
our local
Saturday, April 30 9am to Noon
businesses!
All proceeds go towards the Youth Mission trip.

ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE

Open 7:00 am 2:30 pm


7 Days a Week

141 South Main St.


Downtown Historical Almont
810-798-3308

201 E. St. Clair Street in Almont

Discover
Downtown
Almont
www.almontdda.com

GREENIAS
OUTDOOR POWER
3545 VAN DYKE ROAD
ALMONT, MI 48003
(10 miles North of Romeo)

(810) 798-0010

www.greenia.com
We Service
What We Sell!

We Also Sell and Service


These Popular Brand.

Serving the Four-county Area with Quality Equipment Since 1961

Summer Treats
In Almont At

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M-F 8am-5pm

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Tri-County Weve Got You Covered!


Bank
VINCKIER
Member FDIC

INSTALL SERVICE REPAIR ALL BRANDS


Garage Door Opener
Replacement Parts Remotes Keypads

Residential Commercial
New Construction Insurance Work
HIGH QUALITY AND AFFORDABLE PRODUCTS
AUTHORIZED LIFT MASTER AND AMARR DEALER
Over 25 Years of Experience!

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FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

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Visit us online at
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Marlette
989-635-0639

Fronney's Family FoodsCapac810-395-8113

FOODS

Hardware

10 pump
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Store Hours 7 Days a Week 7 am to 9 pm


Bridge Card - In Store Bakery - Hot & Cold Deli - Party Trays Fruit Baskets - Fax Service Available - Beer & Wine - Michigan
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Visit us at vinckierfoods.com

Page 17-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Comic Book Day returns to library


Free fun for all in Imlay on May 7
IMLAY CITY Its a
whole day full of comic book
craziness at the Ruth Hughes
Library in Imlay City! The
popular annual event, Free
Comic Book Day, returns on
Saturday May 7.
Stop by to choose a free
comic (one per person, while
supplies last). From superheros to Spongebob, steampunk
to Strawberry Shortcake,
Sonic the Hedgehog to the

Simpsons, there's something


for everyone and every taste.
Free comics are just the
start of the days activities.
Visitors who come in costume will each get a small
gift, and everyone can enter a
raffle for some comic themed
prizes. There will be props for
taking silly superhero themed
photos (bring your camera!)
Also on the agenda are crafts
and coloring, and the chance

to play Superfight, a hilarious


card game based on fights
between characters with super
powers and super problems.
New this year is a Comic
Drawing Tips and Tricks
booth: aspiring illustrators
can bring their drawings and
sketches from 10 a.m. to 12
p.m. and talk to the librarys
resident artist, Tarah Flicek.
Library Director Tracy
Aldrich says, Free Comic
Book Day is one of our favorite events at the library. We

enjoy sharing our love of this


unique storytelling format
with our visitors. Many people are surprised to learn that
far from being easy reading,
comic books can provide
opportunities for young readers to improve both verbal
and visual literacy, sequencing skills, and attention to
detail. Plus, they're just great
fun, no matter what your
age!
The
Ruth
Hughes
Memorial District Library is

located at 211 N.
Almont Ave. in
Imlay City. Call
810-724-8043
for more information,
or
check
the
library website at www.
r u t h hughes.
org.

Shop Almont!
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& GIFTS
137 N. Main St Almont, MI

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www.smithswaterproofing.com

Thank
you
for
supporting
our
local
businesses!

BLAKES
www.blakefarms.com

Blakes Winery
& Cider House

gREEnHOUSES OPEn!

Fresh Donuts
& CiDer!

Jams
+
We
now Carry
Local
Honey
Pond Supplies

FRUIT TREE,
PERENNIAL &
ANNUALS SALE!
Roses, Trees
& Shrubs

Fresh Asparagus
Picked Daily
3-12 ft. tREES! Visit
Our Garden
Over 1,000 Trees on Display

Large 8 yr. old apple trees!

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Black Hills Serbian Spruce


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Dryden students in The D


Seventeen students from Dryden High School were invited to the Detroit
Economic Club Meeting at Cobo Hall, Thursday, April 21st. The students
were able to meet and speak with John Noseworthy, M.D., President and
CEO of the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Noseworthy spoke with the students about
finding the right path for their lives. Priority Health and EHiM sponsored
the Dryden students. The students were chaperoned by school board
member Lori Angel and teacher Gari Hotton.

eading
Together

Not only is
the newspaper
informative for
you, its a great
learning tool for
kids. Here are
some simple tips
you can use to
help improve your
childs reading
skills at any age:

Read the newspaper to your child regularly.


Explain what youre reading and
encourage a discussion.
Read the newspaper together as a family.
Let children choose what they want to
read.
Encourage your children to read the
newspaper on their own.

Give your family the knowledge they need.


SUBSCRIBE TO:

Tri-City Times

P.O. Box 278 Imlay City, MI48444 (810) 724-2615

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE!

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Photos provided

Page 18-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Page 19-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Robotics team hosts Heritage 5-K


By Tom Wearing

Photo provided

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

A large group of runners sets off for Almont environs at


the start of the 2014 Almont Heritage Festival Run/Walk
to benefit the the schools robotics team.

ALMONT After a years hiatus in deference to Almonts 2015


Homecoming Celebration, the
Almont Heritage Festival makes
its return June 24-25.
In conjunction with the two-day
summer event, Almont High
Schools Shock and Awe-Sum robotics team (#4861) will host a 5-K
fundraiser the morning of Saturday,
June 25.
The 2016 Almont Heritage
Festival 5-K Run/Fun Walk kicks
off at 9 a.m., with all money raised
from registration fees and donations
used to benefit the robotics team.
Sharon Kuhn, a robotics team

mentor and coordinator of the 2016


Run Fun/Walk, said the event will
take participants on a scenic route
through the streets of Almont and its
surroundings.
During the event, Shock and
Awe-Sum coaches and students will
provide fun robot activities for children.
Kuhn said those wishing to take
part in the event may register online
or by mail.
Early registration (through
Thurs., June 9) is $20 per person and
guarantees a Heritage Festival 5-K
Run/Fun Walk t-shirt.
Late registration fees will rise to
$25, with race day registration to
begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, June 25.
Details and registration forms

Life Home Car Business

DONS AUTO
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800-865-6981

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243 East Third Street Imlay City, Michigan 48444

TODD GLASS
719 Van Dyke - Imlay City

Denny's

810-724-2480

www.ToddsGlass.com

NOW OPEN MONDAYS

Imlay City
Lube Center, Inc.
1824 South
Cedar Street
(M-53)

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724-7777

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NEW HOURS:

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front end & alignment services


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810-395-8486

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Jims Recycling

Monday-Friday 8:30am-6:15pm & Saturday 8:30am-3:15pm

SERVICE DEPARTMENT OPEN

810-724-3147

Domestic & Foreign Cars, Light Trucks, Vans & SUVs


Tires Brakes Air Conditioning Fuel Injection
Exhaust Front End Work Clutches Belts & Hoses
Starters & Alternators Cooling Flushes Water Pumps
Oil Changes Tune Ups Computer Diagnosics Batteries
and MORE!

$ 00

Imlay City

AUTO-TRUCK

can be found on www.runmichigan.


com, www.runsignup.com, www.
almontdda.com and on the teams
Facebook page at: Team #4961
Shock and Awe-Sum.
Then enjoy the festival
After the event, Kuhn encourages all participants to enjoy a day of
fun at the 2016 Almont Heritage
Festival, to include a classic car and
truck show, vendors, childrens
games and activities, live entertainment on Friday (Topper Most Beatles
Tribute Band) and Saturday (Joey
Vee Band) nights, and yet more
Shock and Awe-Sum Robotics activities and demonstrations.
For questions or more information, contact Sharon Kuhn at 586214-2949.

MOUNTING
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cyclin

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Page 20-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

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Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Sports

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Imlay girls out run BWAC rivals

Spartans victorious over two of leagues top squads


By Kevin Kissane

Almont drops two


one-run decisions
Raiders edged twice by
Yellowjackets in twinbill
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT

The
Almont varsity baseball team
lost a pair of matchups to host
Memphis in a non-league
doubleheader last Thursday.
In the opener, Memphis
pulled out a 5-4 victory over
Almont.
Brendan Ecker and Adam
Finn led Almont with a single
apiece.
Nick Pica, Dawson
Garabedian, Matt Schuster

and Finn accounted for


Almonts runs.
In the second game,
Memphis obtained a 6-5 triumph against Almont.
Finn (a single and a double), Keith Clark and Pica (a
double each) paced Almont at
the plate. Josh Ratzow and
DeBlauwe added a single
apiece for the Raiders.
Pica (two) plus Ecker, Finn
and Clark (one each) supplied
Almonts runs.
With the outcomes, Almont
now stands at 9-3 overall.

Imlay City downs


BWAC rival Yale
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City returned from Yale with
a pair of wins in a Blue Water
Area Conference varsity
baseball doubleheader on
Tuesday, April 19.
In the opener, Imlay City
picked up a 4-0 victory over
Yale.
Marcus Aguinaga (three
singles), Mike Nadrowski
(two singles) (Orlando
Ramirez (a home run, and
two intentional walks) led
Imlay City at the plate. Tyler
Livingston, David Hart and
Beau Barker (a single each)
supplied the remaining
Spartan basehits.

Nadrowski was Imlay


Citys pitcher of record. He
gave up one hit, struck out
eight and walked none en
route.
In the nightcap, Imlay
City registered a 9-2 triumph
against Yale.
Hart (a single and a double), Barker (two singles),
Ramirez (a double and an
intentional walk), Jacob
Lesniak, Nadrowski and
Livingston (a double apiece)
along with Aguinaga (a single) provided Imlay Citys
basehits.
Ramirez was the winning
Imlay City pitcher. He
allowed two hits, struck out
nine and issued four walks
along the way.

Spartans page 4-B

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Almont first baseman Zach Revoldt looks to force


out an opposing baserunner against Memphis last
Thursday.

TRI-CITY AREA
Imlay City bested host
Almont, 79-58, in a Blue
Water Area Conference girls
track matchup on Tuesday,
April 19.
Abby Schefka, long jump,
15 feet; Sophia Rosillo, shot
put, 30 feet 6 1/2 inches;
Olivia Gulino, discus, 83 feet
3 inches; Ericka Lathrop, 400
dash, 1:04.81; Sarah Evans,
800 (2:45.5) and 1600-meter
(6:03.49) runs; and Camylle
Velazquez-Fuentes, 3200 run,
13:23.9 led Imlay City with
individual event firsts.
The Imlay City 400 (Carly
Livingston,
Erika
Vanderploeg,
Elizabeth
Shirling and Schefka), 800
(Livingston, Lathrop, Schefka
and Shirling) and 3200-meter
(Evans, Vanderploeg, Lathrop
and
Velazquez-Fuentes)
relays wound up first as well.
They registered respective
clockings of 54.97 seconds,

Mallory Wetzel, of Imlay City, competes in the pole vault event during a meet
at Almont this past week.

Imlay tops Almont,


falls to Algonac

Spartans split BWAC duals


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAY CITY The


Imlay City boys track team
split a pair of Blue Water
Area Conference dual
meets on Tuesday, April 19.
Almont High School is
where the action unfolded.
Pitted against the hosts,
Imlay City posted an 82-60
win.
Garrett Shevnock (long
jump), Daniel Evard (800),
Raul Rodriguez (1600 and
3200-meter runs) led Imlay
City with individual event
firsts.
The Imlay City 400
(Jack
Forti,
Brandon
Goolsby, Bruce Bollini and
Cody Sich), 800 (Theo
Collison, Forti, Goolsby
and Bollini), 1600 (Robert
Pettit, Greg Michajlyszyn,
Brandyn Louwsma and
Evard) and 3200-meter
(Brandyn Louwsma, Jon
Louwsma, Rodriguez and
Evard) relays also prevailed.
Alec Giles (high jump
Imlay Citys Brandyn Louwsma picks up the pace and 300 hurdles), Jacob
during the 3200-meter relay race in a meet this past Battani (pole vault and 110meter hurdles), Michael
week.
Photo by Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Almonts Dante Dudek


sprints to the finish line.
McEwan (shot put and discus) and Fernando Santana
(200 and 400 dashes) supplied Almonts firsts.
Imlay City also squared
off versus league rival
Algonac that day, dropping
a 92-45 verdict.
TJ Reintjes (pole vault),
Ryan Johnson (shot put)
and Evard (800-meter run)
accounted for Imlay Citys
individual event wins.

Imlay City goes to


4-0 in BWAC play
By Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Imlay Citys Ali Harper pitches in a Blue Water Area Conference softball game at home.

IMLAY CITY
Imlay City turned back visiting Cros-Lex two times in
a Blue Water Area
Conference varsity softball
twinbill last Friday.
In the opener, Imlay
City notched an 8-1 win at
Cros-Lexs expense.
Kenady Kaufman led
Imlay City with a double
and a triple. Ali Harper (a
triple), Cassie Malhado (a
double) plus Cameron
Katkic, Rebecca Rodriguez,
Haley Medrano, Peighton
Roberts and Madison
Whitsett (a single apiece)
supported her performance.
Rodriguez was Imlay

Citys pitcher of record.


She allowed two hits, struck
out three and issued two
walks along the way.
In the second game,
Imlay City posted a 7-0 victory over Cros-Lex.
Rodriguez (two singles
and a double) plus Katkic
and Medrano (two singles
each) paced Imlay City
with multiple-hit efforts.
The remaining Spartan hits
went to Kaufman (a double) and Malhado (a single).
Harper was the winning
Imlay City pitcher. She
gave up two hits, retired
five on strikes and issued
no walks.
With the results, Imlay
City goes to 6-4 and 4-0.

Page 2-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Softball
Thursday, April 28
Mayville at Dryden, 4 p.m.
Burton Bentley at Almont,
4 p.m.
Lutheran North at Capac,
4 p.m.
Imlay City at Marine City,
4 p.m.
Friday, April 29
Capac at Harbor Beach,
4 p.m.
Monday, May 2
Dryden at North Huron,
4 p.m.
Tuesday, May 3
Almont at Armada, 4 p.m.
Yale at Capac, 4 p.m.
Imlay City at Algonac, 4 p.m.
Girls and Boys Track
Friday, April 29
Almont, Capac, Imlay City at
County Meet, North Branch,
3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 3
Dryden hosts a quad meet,
4 p.m.
Almont, Capac at Armada,
4 p.m.
Imlay City, Cros-Lex at Yale,

Almont claims
second at Invite

4:30 p.m.
Girls Soccer
Wednesday, April 27
Almont at Algonac, 4:30 p.m.
Cros-Lex at Imlay City,
4:30 p.m.
Capac at Richmond,
4:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 28
Landmark Academy at
Dryden, 5 p.m.
Friday, April 29
St. Clair at Imlay City,
4:30 p.m.
Monday, May 2
Almont at Cros-Lex, 4 p.m.
Armada at Capac, 4 p.m.
Yale at Imlay City, 4 p.m.
Dryden at Sandusky, 5 p.m.

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
The Almont, Imlay City and
Capac golf teams garnered
respective placings of second, fifth and eighth at a Blue
Water Area Conference
Invitational last Wednesday.
Castle Creek Golf Course
is where the action unfolded.
Richmond edged Almont,
171-172, for team honors that
day. They were followed by
Armada (178), Yale (187),
Imlay City (190), Algonac
(192), Cros-Lex (202) and

Golf
Thursday, April 28
Almont, Capac, Imlay City at
BWAC Invite, Rattle Run
Golf Course, 4 p.m.
Tuesday, May 2
Dryden at Ubly, 4 p.m.
Almont, Capac, Imlay City at
BWAC Golf Invite,
Richmond, 4 p.m.
Tennis
Wednesday, April 27
Goodrich at Imlay City,
4 p.m.
Thursday, April 28
Imlay City at Armada, 4 p.m.
Friday, April 29
Academy of Sacred Heart at
Almont, 4 p.m.
Marysville at Imlay City,
4 p.m.
Saturday, April 30
Imlay City at Lapeer, 10 a.m.
Monday, May 2
Almont at Yale, 4 p.m.
Imlay City at Flint
Southwestern, 4 p.m.

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Capac (227).
Hunter Brandt shot a 38
and Josh Sustarich carded a
40 to lead Almont. Jacob
Wendorf and Jack DeMara
added a 46 and a 48, respectively, to the Raiders cause.
For Imlay City, Austin
Bara was low with a 43. The
Spartans
also
counted
Jonathan
Keeleys
46,
Bradley Wheelers 48 and
Tucker Volmerings 53.
Aaron Dueweke paced
Capac with a 47. He was
backed by Ian Rennie and
Noah Laskowski (a 59 each)
along with Eric Ransom (62).

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Baseball
Thursday, April 28
Mayville at Dryden, 4 p.m.
Burton Bentley at Almont,
4 p.m.
Friday, April 29
Capac at Harbor Beach,
4 p.m.
Marlette at Imlay City, 4 p.m.
Saturday, April 29
Imlay City at North Branch
Invite, 9 a.m.
Monday, May 2
Dryden at North Huron,
4 p.m.
Tuesday, May 3
Armada at Almont, 4 p.m.

Golf

Call for Reservation

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Sports Schedule

Jack Demara tracks the flight path of his tee shot


last week in a match at Castle Creek.

Almont takes first


at BWAC Invite
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
Hunter Brandt shot a 40 for
nine holes as did Austin
Miller, leading the Almont
golf team to a first-place
finish last Friday at a Blue
Water Area Conference
Invitational.
Heather Hills is where
the action unfolded.
Almonts winning total
that day was 169. They were
followed by Cros-Lex and
Richmond (180 each), Imlay
City (188), Armada (190),

Yale (194), Algonac (195)


and Capac (212).
Josh Sustarich (44) and
Jack Demara (45) rounded
out Almonts top-four scorers.
For Imlay City, Tucker
Volmering and Jonathan
Keeley led the way with
44s. The Spartans also
counted a 48 from Garrett
Roberts
and
Connor
OBriens 52.
Ian Rennies 47 paced
Capac. He was backed by
Aaron Dueweke (49), Noah
Burgess (57) and Jared
Roosen (59).

Almont brings home a 10th


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT

The
Almont golf team placed 10th
out of 19 entries last Saturday
at the Bay City Western
Invitational.
Midlands 326 total set
the pace. They were followed
by Tawas (333), Frankenmuth
(344), Lapeer A (346),
Lakeland (347), Lapeer B
(351), Flint Powers and
Midland Dow (354 each),
Bay City Western A (357),

Almont (360), Oxford (361),


Essexville Garber (366),
Gladwin (367), Lutheran
North (369), Bay City
Western B (374), Saginaw
Heritage (395), Bay City
John Glenn (404) plus
Davison and Bay City Central
(410 apiece).
Austin Miller led Almont
with an 82 over 18 holes.
The Raiders also counted
Hunter Brandts 84, Josh
Sustarichs 94 and Jack
DeMaras 100.

House claims medalist honors


DRYDEN

The
Dryden golf team registered
a fifth-place finish last Friday
at the Ubly Invitational.
Ubly Heights Golf
Course is where the action
unfolded.
Sanduskys 374 total set
the pace. They were followed by Brown City and
Harbor Beach (381 each),
Elkton-Pigeon
BayPort
(381), Dryden (421), Cass

City (423) and Bad Axe


(431).
North Huron, Ubly,
Unionville Sebewaing Area
also competed but did not
field complete teams.
Jake House led Dryden
that day. House posted a
medalist round of 84 over 18
holes. The Cardinals also
counted Jake Fuersts 102,
Max Kages 107 and a 128
from Troy Antushevich.

Page 3-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Softball

Watson registers a school record


with 17 strikeouts in an encounter
By Kevin Kissane

ALMONT Almont
swept host Memphis in a
non-league varsity softball
doubleheader last Thursday.
In the opener, Almont
registered an 8-1 triumph
against Memphis.
Jaclyn Hellebuyck (a single, a double and a homer)
put up Almonts top offensive
numbers. She was backed by
Stacy Houghton (a single and
a homer), Kaleigh Creech (a
pair of doubles), Veronica
Watson and Sydney Marrone
(a single and a triple each)
plus Hannah Feys (a pair of
singles).
Watson was the winning Almonts Veronica Watson fires a strike to home
Almont pitcher. She allowed plate in a game versus Memphis last Thursday.
four hits and struck out a

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Athlete of the Week

school-record-setting 17 batters en route to the favorable


verdict.
In the nightcap, Almont
rolled to an 11-0 victory over
Memphis.
A group consisting of
Watson (two singles and a
double), Houghton (three singles), Creech (a double and a
homer) plus Hellebuck and
Feys (a pair of singles apiece)
paced Almont with multiplehit performances. The Raiders
also received hits courtesy of
Mickayla Benenati, Kristen
Stanek and Tyler Kautz (a
double each) along with
Sydney Marrone (a single).
Watson was Almonts
pitcher of record. She gave
up two hits, retired eight on
strikes and walked none.

Imlay City senior baseball standout Orlando


Ramirez registered a
mound win, collected two
hits and drew three intentional walks against Yale
last week.
For his effort, Ramirez
earns our Boys Athlete of
the Week honor.

Be sure to pick up your t-shirt at the Tri-City Times office.

Almont sweeps BWAC foe Cros-Lex

ALMONT Almont
defeated host Cros-Lex twice
in a Blue Water Area
Conference varsity softball
doubleheader on Tuesday,
April 19.
In the opener, Almont
earned a 5-0 win against
Cros-Lex.
Kaleigh Creech (two sin-

gles and a double) Stacy


Houghton (a single and a
double) led Almont at the
plate. They were given assistance in the hitting department by Mickayla Benenati,
Tyler Kautz and Jaclyn
Hellebuyck (a single apiece).
Veronica Watson was
Almonts pitcher of record.

She allowed one hit, struck


out five and walked none en
route.
In the nightcap, Almont
pulled out a 4-3 victory over
Cros-Lex.
The duo of Watson (two
singles and a double) and
Houghton (three singles)
proved Almonts toughest

outs.
Abbey Johnson,
Hannah
Feys,
Kautz,
Benenati and Creech (a single each) supported their performances.
Watson was the winning
Almont pitcher. She gave up
eight hits, struck out eight
and issued two walks along
the way.

CAPAC Capac split a


non-league varsity softball
doubleheader versus visiting
Blue Water Area Conference

counterpart Armada on
Tuesday, April 19.
In the opener, Capac fell
by a 10-0 count to Armada.

Megan Orlando and


Megan Woods led Capac with
a single each.
In the second game,

Capac bounced back with a


5-2 victory over Armada.
Cassidy Loridon and
Shiloh Sharff (a single and a
double apiece) and Aubree
Smith (a pair of singles) paced
Capac with multiple-hit performances. Orlando (a double) plus Molly Montney,
and Alexys Anderson (a single apiece) also reached the
hitting column.
Anderson was Capacs
pitcher of record. She gave up
two hits, struck out seven and
issued four walks en route.

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Capac splits contests with Armada

Dryden falls twice to Kingston squad


DRYDEN The Dryden
varsity softball team dropped
a pair of road games with
Kingston last Thursday.
In the opener, Kingston
registered a 4-3 triumph
against Dryden.
MaryRose Clark, Alex

Curatolo, Claudya DeLand,


Kendall Lowe and Megan
Rinke (a single each) accounted for Drydens basehits.
In the second clash,
Kingston picked up an 11-2
win over Dryden.
DeLand (a single and a

double) and Amanda Lemke


(a pair of singles) put up
Drydens top offensive numbers. The Cardinals also
received a single courtesy of
Mia Sliman.
With the results, Dryden
now stands at 0-4 overall.

Almont junior softball


standout Veronica
Watson registered a
school record-setting 17
strikeouts in a win over
Memphis last week.
For her effort, Watson
claims our Girls Athlete
of the Week honor.

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Dryden salvages a twinbill split


DRYDEN The Dryden
varsity softball team halved a
doubleheader against visiting
Carsonville-Port Sanilac on
Monday.
In the opener, CarsonvillePort Sanilac notched a 16-4
victory over Dryden.
MaryRose Clark, Amanda
Lemke, Haley Primel, Megan
Rinke and Trace Ashmore led

Dryden with a pair of singles


apiece. Mia Sliman, Claudya
DeLand and Alex Curatolo
added a single each to the
Cardinals cause.
In the second game,
Dryden bounced back with a
10-8
triumph
against
Carsonville-Port Sanilac.
Sliman (two singles and
two doubles) proved Drydens

toughest out. She was backed


by Delaney Hull (two singles
and a double), Rinke (three
singles), Clark (a single and
a double), Ashmore (a double) along with Curatolo,
Lemke and Primel (a single
apiece).
With
the
decision,
Dryden now stands at 1-5
overall.

Boys Track

Raiders take third at Marlette


TRI-CITY AREA
The Almont, Imlay City and
Capac boys track squads
notched respective showings
of third, fourth and seventh at
the Marlette Invitational last
Friday.
Marlette (125 points) was
the meet champion. They
were followed by Cass City
(113 points), Almont (82.5),
Imlay City (60), Vassar (45),
Bad Axe (40), Capac and
North Branch (36 each),
Elkton-Pigeon BayPort (33),
Reese (32.5), Sandusky (21),
Unionville Sebewaing Area
(19), Mayville (17) and
Harbor Beach (three).
Alec Giles, high jump (5
feet 11 inches) and 300 hurdles (43.19 seconds); along
with Jacob Battani, pole
vault, 14 feet; led Almont
with firsts.
Fernando Santana, 200meter dash, 24.67 seconds;
provided the lone Almont
individual event third.
The Almont 3200 relay
of Jackson Brown, Brandon
Kuhn, Josh Phelps and Caleb
Ritchie took third as well.
They needed 9:20.68 to get
the job done.
Battani, 110-meter hurdles, 17.03 seconds; and
Michael McEwan, discus,
116 feet 2 inches; gave
Almont fourths.
Giles, 110 hurdles, 17.19
seconds; collected a fifth for
Almont.
Tom Lulgjuraj, high
jump, 5 feet 6 inches;

McEwan, shot put, 39 feet 2


inches; plus Phelps, 1600
(4:58.05) and 3200-meter
10:55.53) runs; generated
Almonts sixths.
Martin Saavarin, shot
put, 38 feet 1/2 inch; gave
Almont an individual event
seventh.
The Almont 400 (Joey
Candela, Dante Dudek, Tyler
Watt and Battani) and 1600
(Marcus Redman, Watt, Giles
and Santana) relays contributed sevenths as well. They
were timed in 49.17 seconds
and 3:56.27, respectively.
Brown, 3200-meter run,
11:28.7; added an eighth to
Almonts cause.
TJ Reintjes, pole vault,
12 feet 6 inches; and Daniel
Evard, 800 run, 2:10.81;
paced Imlay City with individual event seconds.
The Imlay City 3200meter relay of Brandyn
Louwsma,
Greg
Michajlyszyn,
Raul
Rodriguez and Evard wound
up second as well. They were
timed in 9:07.47.
Garrett Shevnock, long
jump, 17 feet 11 inches; and
Evard, 1600 run, 4:54.35;
collected Imlay Citys
fourths.
Reintjes, long jump, 17
feet 10 3/4 inches; Ryan
Johnson, discus, 114 feet 10
inches; and Rodriguez, 3200meter run, 10:50.44; furnished Imlay Citys individual event fifths.
The Imlay City 400

(Brandon Goolsby, Jack


Forti, Tim Ruolo and Cody
Sich) and 1600 (Theo
Collison, Evard, Louwsma
and Michajlyszyn) relays
registered fifths as well.
They were timed in 48.66
seconds and 3:50.86, respectively.
Imlay Citys 800-meter
relay of Forti, Collison,
Goolsby and Ruolo pulled up
sixth, thanks to a clocking of
1:42.3.
Louwsma, 800 run,
2:15.04; contributed the lone
Imlay City seventh.
Rodriguez, 1600-meter
run, 5:02.94; rounded out the
list of Imlay City placewinners with an eighth.
The 800 relay of Ian
Detroyer, Andrew Sams,
Brent Boers and Tyler Saez
led Capac with a first. It took
them 1:39.13 to accomplish
the feat.
Saez, 100-meter dash,
12.25 seconds; and Paul
Livermore, 110 hurdles,
17.01 seconds; gave Capac
individual event thirds.
The 400-meter relay of
Detroyer, Boers, Saez and
Sams pulled up third as well.
They were timed in 47.1 seconds.
Saez, 200 dash, 24.77
seconds; picked up the lone
Capac fourth.
Detroyer,
300-meter
hurdles, 45.59 seconds;
completed the list of
Capac placewinners with a
sixth.

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Page 4-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Baseball

Almont delivers
Cros-Lex a loss
Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT Almont
beat visiting Cros-Lex twice
in a Blue Water Area
Conference varsity baseball
doubleheader on Tuesday,
April 19.
In the opener, Almont
earned an 8-4 win against
Cros-Lex.
Brendan Ecker (a single
and a double) and Daniel
DeBlauwe (two singles) led
Almont with multiple-hit
performances. They were
backed by Austin Perkins,
Josh Ratzow, Adam Finn
and Zach Revoldt (a single
apiece).
Nick Terry and Nick

By Kevin Kissane

Pica shared the pitching


responsibilities for Almont
that day. They allowed seven
total hits, struck out three
and issued six walks.
In the second game,
Almont notched a 6-1 victory over Cros-Lex.
Matt Schuster (three singles) proved Almonts
toughest out. He was given
assistance in the hitting
department by Pica (a single
and a double) and Revoldt
(two singles).
Tyler
Zisler
was
Almonts pitcher of record.
He gave up five hits, struck
out six and walked one en
route.
With the results, Almont
goes to 9-1 and 4-0.

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

DRYDEN Dryden
handed Burton Bendle a 13-3
setback in a non-league varsity baseball contest last
Wednesday evening.
Whaley Park, in Flint, is
where the action unfolded.
John DelCampo (three
singles), Justin Knox (a single and a double) plus Brady

Photo by Kevin Kissane

By Kevin Kissane

Dryden trounces
Burton Bendle

Almonts Nick Pica fires a strike to home during a


game versus Cros-Lex this past week.

Dryden baseball rolls big over C-PS twice


By Kevin Kissane

team earned a pair of wins


against visiting CarsonvillePort Sanilac on Monday.
DRYDEN

The In the opener, Dryden


Dryden varsity baseball notched a 15-0 triumph
Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Imlay blanks Vassar, 11-0


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City beat host Vassar, 11-0, in
a non-league varsity baseball
game last Friday.
Jared Stryker went two
for two plus Tyler Livingston
and David Hart wound up
two for three each to lead
Imlay City. Marcus Aguinaga

and Jacob Lesniak (one for


one
apiece),
Andrew
Nadrowski (one for two) and
Mike Nadrowski (one for
four) supported their performances.
Andrew Nadrowski was
Imlay Citys pitcher of
record. He allowed one hit
over four innings, struck out
one and issued one walk.

against Carsonville-Port
Sanilac.
John DelCampo (a single and a double) plus
Justin Knox, Vince Angel
and Jared Czape (a pair of
singles apiece) led Dryden
at the plate. They were
backed by Brady Czape (a
double) along with Josh
Brodsky, Jake Hagemeister
and Ethan Rozanski (a single each).
Jared
Czape
was
Drydens pitcher of record.
He allowed two hits, struck
out seven and issued three
walks en route.
In the second contest,

Dryden registered a 15-0


victory over CarsonvillePort Sanilac.
DelCampo (two singles
and a triple), Jared Czape
and Hagemeister (two singles and a double apiece)
and Sean Riley (three singles) supplied the top
Dryden offensive numbers.
Bailey Knuth (a double)
plus Brady Czape and Knox
(a single each) also reached
the hitting column.
Hagemeister was the
winning Dryden pitcher. He
gave up three hits, retired
four on strikes and issued
one walk along the way.

Czape and Vince Angel (two


singles apiece) led Dryden at
the plate. Evan Pocius (a double) plus Jared Czape, Ethan
Hyatt, Ethan Rozanski and
Sean Riley (a single each)
supported their performances.
Riley was the winning
Dryden pitcher. He allowed
four hits, struck out 12 and
walked five over the fiveinning distance.

Dryden and Kingston


baseball gains split
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

DRYDEN

The
Dryden varsity baseball team
halved a pair of road contests
versus
Kingston
last
Thursday.
In the opener, Kingston
claimed a 6-0 win at Drydens
expense.
Jared Czape and Ethan
Rozanski led Dryden with a

single apiece.
In the second game,
Dryden bounced back to register a 4-3 victory over
Kingston.
Sean Riley and Bailey
Knuth paced Dryden with a
single each.
Czape was Drydens
pitcher of record. He allowed
three hits, struck out six and
issued no walks over the
four-inning distance.

Capac drops two games


CAPAC

Capac
dropped a pair of contests to
host Armada in a Blue Water
Area Conference varsity
baseball doubleheader
on
Tuesday, April 19.
In the opener, Armada
registered a 7-2 triumph
against Capac.
Jacob Parski (two singles
and a triple) led Capac at the

plate. The remaining Chief


hits went to Jason Tyson (a
double) along with Michael
Foster, Cody Harris and
Jeffrey Opificius (a single
apiece).
In the nightcap, Armada
claimed a 5-0 win over Capac.
Dakota Brecht and Jeffrey
Opificius (a single each) furnished Capacs basehits.

Girls Track

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Photo by Kevin Kissane

DRYDEN Dryden
girls track squad (188 points)
outscored Kingston (148),
Caseville (80) and Peck (34)
en route to a first-place showing at an invitational it hosted
last Friday.
Mia Sliman, high jump (4
feet 10 inches) and long jump

(13 feet 3 inches); Jodie


Adams, pole vault (6 feet)
and 300 hurdles (53.09 seconds); Rachel Vallad, shot put
(26 feet 8 inches) and discus
(93 feet 9 inches); Caitlyn
Hill, 400 dash, 1:10.72; and
McKenna Rudd, 800-meter
run, 2:45.47; paced Dryden
with firsts.
Kelli Schenkel, long
jump, 13 feet; Hannah Weiss,

McKenna Gierman passes the baton to Dryden


teammate Caitlyn Hill in the 800 relay race Friday.

100 hurdles, 19.46 secondes;


Hill, 200-meter dash, 29.8
seconds; and Alissa Hurd,
3200 run, 17:15.16; claimed
Drydens individual event
seconds.
The Dryden 400 (Kaylin
Norman, Sliman, Rudd and
Adams), 800 (McKenna
Gierman, Sliman, Norman
and Hill) and 3200-meter
(Hunter Hoffman, Kayleigh
Hudson, Emerson Waite and
Hurd) relays also took second. They generated respective clockings of 58.69 seconds, 2:03.06 and 13:50 en
route.
Schenkel, high jump, 4
feet 6 inches; Courtney Heike,
discus, 64 feet 6 inches; and
Gierman, 300 hurdles; provided Drydens individual
event thirds.
The Dryden 1600-meter
relay of Gierman, Hudson,
Hoffman and Waite notched a
third as well. They needed
5:26.47 to get the job done.
Rudd, high jump, 4 feet 4
inches; Weiss, long jump, 12
feet 5 inches; Hill, 100 dash,
14.56 seconds; and Adams,
100-meter hurdles, 20.62 seconds; had Drydens fourths.
Norman, 100 dash, 14.73
seconds; Gierman, 100-meter
hurdles, 20.66 seconds;
Weiss, 300 hurdles, 1:01.37;
and Hudson, 400-meter dash,
1:19.81; gave Dryden fifths.
Heike, shot put, 18 feet 5
1/2 inches; Hoffman, discus,
52 feet 8 inches; and Waite,
300 hurdles, 1:04.62; added
sixths to Drydens cause.

Capac girls drop BWAC dual meets


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

CAPAC The Capac


girls track team dropped a
pair of dual meets, falling by
respective scores of 93-27 to
Richmond and 113-18 to Yale
in a Blue Water Area
Conference meet on Tuesday,
April 19.
Megan Jamison, pole
vault, 8 feet 6 inches; and
Sara Herrera, 3200 run,

13:37; led Capac with individual event firsts versus


Richmond.
The Capac 800-meter
relay also prevailed. They
stopped the watch at 2:02.
Jamison, 200 dash, 29.33
seconds; Miller, 400-meter
dash, 1:13.48; and Scout
Senyk, 800 run, 3:11; provided Capacs seconds.
Jada Willis, 100-meter
dash, 16.63 seconds; Satomi
Echizenya, 200 dash, 30.99

seconds; and Annika Turonen,


400-meter dash, 1:24.1;
tacked on Capac thirds.
Jamison (200 dash) and
Herrera (3200-meter run) furnished Capacs firsts versus
Yale.
Capac had a pair of seconds. Jamison (pole vault)
and Miller (400 dash) supplied those.
Echizenya (long jump)
and Senyk (800-meter run)
added thirds to Capacs cause.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Dryden captures title

Almonts Grace Zimmerman looks to pass the baton to Mariah Smith in a


meet at home this past week.

Spartans: earn victories over top teams


from page 1-B
1:55.06 and 11:13.72 en
route.
Cameron Vaubel, high
jump, 4 feet 6 inches;
Livingston, pole vault, 8 feet
6 inches; Gulino, shot put, 26
feet 10 inches; Vanderploeg,
800 run, 2:49.2; VelazquezFuentes, 1600-meter run,
6:07.4; and Emerson OBrien,
3200 run, 14:35.53; provided
Imlay Citys seconds.
Jessica Bigger, high jump
(4 feet 6 inches) and 300meter hurdles (59.09 seconds); Hollie Rager, shot put
(26 feet 2 1/2 inches) and
discus (65 feet 10 inches);
Carlee Forsyth, 100 dash,
14.49 seconds; Gartley, 100meter hurdles, 20.06 seconds;
Shirling, 200 dash, 28.96 seconds; and Kayla Louwsma,
1600-meter run, 6:26.25;
added thirds to Imlay Citys
cause.
Kirsten Schapman, high
jump, 4 feet 8 inches; Aubrey
Battani, pole vault, 9 feet;
Mariah Smith, 100 dash,
13.86 seconds; Rebecca
Measel, 100 (17.98 seconds)
and 300-meter (49.88 seconds) hurdles; and Meredith
Rinke, 200 dash, 28.36 sec-

onds; furnished Almonts


individual event firsts.
The Almont 1600-meter
relay of Lizzie Rinke,
Meredith Rinke, Measel and
Schapman also prevailed.
They stopped the watch at
4:28.98.
Imlay City also defeated
Algonac, 71.5-65.5.
Livingston (pole vault),
Rosillo (shot put), Gulino
(discus), Evans (800 and
1600 runs) along with
Velazquez-Fuentes (3200meter run) supplied Imlay
Citys individual event wins.
The Imlay City 1600
(Schefka,
Livingston,
Vanderploeg and Lathrop)
and 3200 Evans, Vanderploeg,
Velazquez-Fuentes
and
Lathrop) took first as well.
Vaubel (high jump),
Schefka (long jump), Shirling
(shot put and 200-meter
dash), Bigger (300 hurdles),
Lathrop (400-meter dash),
Vanderploeg (800 run) and
Velazquez-Fuentes (1600meter run) gave Imlay City
outright seconds.
Mallory Wetzel (pole
vault) provided Imlay City
with a two-way tie for a second.
Bigger (high jump),

Gulino (shot put), Gartley


(discus along with the 100
and 300 hurdles) and OBrien
(3200-meter run) tacked on
thirds for Imlay City.
In the other dual meet
contested that day, Algonac
pulled out a 76-61 victory
over Almont.
Smith (high jump and
100 dash), Battani (pole
vault), Baylei Enos (shot put)
and Measel (300-meter hurdles) led Almont with individual event firsts.
The Almont 1600-meter
relay of Lizzie Rinke,
Meredith Rinke, Measel and
Schapman also emerged victorious.
Hannah King (discus),
Schapman (high jump and
800 run), Zimmerman (100meter dash), Meredith Rinke
(200 dash) and Lizzie Rinke
(400-meter dash) generated
Almonts seconds.
Almont also received
thirds from Ashley Santo
(shot put), Lexi Hunter (discus), Measel (100 hurdles),
Lizzie Rinke (200-meter
dash), Battani (300 hurdles),
Meredith Rinke (400-meter
dash) and Kaitlyn Sedorchuk
(3200 run).

Page 5-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Boys Track

Girls Track

Vallad sets school disc record at quad


DRYDEN The Dryden
girls track team claimed 15
top-four finishes at a North
Central Thumb League quad
meet hosted by Kingston on
Tuesday, April 19.
No team scores were
available from the meet.
Rachel Vallad headlined
for Dryden that day. She
unleashed a school recordsetting discus toss of 96 feet
8 1/2 inches en route to a

first.
Vallad,
shot put,
26 feet 4
1/2 inches;
Hannah
Weiss,
100-meter
hurdles,
18.99 seco n d s ;
J o d i e
Adams,
Vallad
300 hurdles, 55.16
seconds; and Caitlyn Hill,

400-meter dash, 1:13.21;


gave Dryden firsts as well.
Sliman, high jump (4 feet
6 inches) and long jump (12
feet 10 inches); Weiss, 300meter hurdles, 1:00.9; and
McKenna Gierman, 400
dash, 1:15.81; contributed
individual event seconds to
Drydens cause.
The Dryden 400-meter
(Mia Sliman, Kaylin Norman,
Adams and Kelli Schenkel),
800 (Gierman, Sliman,
Norman and Schenkel) and
1600 (Alissa Hurd, Emerson

Waite, Gierman and Weiss)


relays all furnished seconds.
They managed respective
efforts of no time available,
2:05.09 and 5:19.09 en route.
Schenkel, high jump (4
feet 6 inches) and long jump
(12 feet 10 inches); and
Waite, 400 dash, 1:02.66;
provided Dryden with thirdplace finishes.
Dryden also received
fourths from Gierman, 100meter hurdles, 20.34 seconds; and Hunter Hoffman,
800 run, 3:32.99.

Photo by Keviin Kissane

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Imlay City is second at Marlette


By Kevin Kissane

The Imlay City 800


(Ericka Lathrop, Abby
Schefka, Elizabeth Shirling
TRI-CITY AREA The and Livingston) and 3200
Imlay City, Almont and (Erika Vanderploeg, Schefka,
Capac girls track squads Lathrop and Velazquezposted respective finishes of Fuentes) relays took second
second, tied for fourth and as well. They were timed in
11th last Friday at the 1:56.57 and 11:17.88, respecMarlette Invitational.
tively.
When the final scores Jessica Bigger, high
were added up, Reeses 136- jump, 4 feet 6 inches; gave
point output set the pace. Imlay City a two-way tie for
They were followed by an individual event second.
Imlay City (101.7 points), Cameron Vaubel, high
Marlette (78.85), Almont jump, 4 feet 6 inches; and
and North Branch (73.85 Vanderploeg, 800-meter run,
each), Bad Axe (72.5), 2:48.8; supplied Imlay Citys
Sandusky (37), Elkton- individual event fourths.
Pigeon
BayPort
(33), The Imlay City 400 relay
Unionville Sebewaing Area of Livingston, Schefka,
(22), Vassar (12.5), Capac Shirling and Vanderploeg
(eight), Cass City (7.85) and notched a fourth as well.
Mayville (3.85).
They stopped the watch at
Camylle
Velazquez- 56.17 seconds.
Fuentes, 3200 run, 13:14.21; Shirling, shot put (30 feet
led Imlay City with a first.
5 1/4 inches) and 200-meter
Carly Livingston, pole dash (29.88 seconds);
vault, 9 feet; and Velazquez- Lathrop, 400 dash, 1:08.54;
Fuentes, 1600-meter run, Madison OBrien, 800-meter
6:07.75; provided Imlay City run, 2:53.39; gave Imlay
with outright individual City individual event fifths.
event seconds.
The Imlay City 1600
Tri-City Times Sports Editor

relay of Schefka, Lathrop,


Livingston and Vanderploeg
claimed a fifth on the strength
of 4:41.64 clocking.
Sophia Rosillo, shot put,
30 feet 2 1/2 inches; Mallory
Wetzel, 800-meter run,
2:59.26; and Emerson
OBrien, 1600 run, 6:34.32;
provided Imlay City with
outright sixths.
Cecilia Michael and
Wetzel rounded out the list
of Imlay City placewinners.
They were involved in a
seven way tie for a sixth,
thanks to a pole vault clearance of 6 feet.
Aubrey Battani, pole
vault, 10 feet; and Rebecca
Measel, 300-meter hurdles,
49.93 seconds; paced Almont
with firsts.
Mariah Smith, 100 dash,
14.3 seconds; and Lizzie
Rinke, 200-meter dash,
28.93 seconds; generated
Almonts individual event
seconds.
The Almont 400 relay of
Grace Zimmerman, Battani,
Rinke and Smith took second as well. It took them

Tennis

Almont defeats
Imlay City, 7-1
Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
Almont picked up a 7-1 victory over visiting Imlay City
in a Blue Water Area
Conference girls tennis clash
last Friday.
In individual action, Faith
Standfest fell by a 0-6, 0-6
top flight count to Grace
Whitney; Maria Bussone
obtained a 6-0, 6-2 triumph
against Natasha Stachowiak
at second singles; Oliva
Bussone netted a 6-2, 6-2 win
over Sommer Stoldt at third
singles; and Lauren Deppe
claimed a 6-2, 6-0 victory
against Hailey Campbell at

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT Almont
picked up a 7-1 victory over
visiting Armada in a Blue
Water Area Conference girls
tennis matchup on Tuesday,
April 19.
In individual action,
Faith Standfest earned a 6-3,
6-4 top flight win against
Katie Barr; Maria Bussone
furnished a 7-5, 6-1 victory
over Annika Prall-Stankewitz
at second singles; Olivia
Bussone notched a 6-0, 6-0
third flight triumph against
Nicole Barr; plus Lauren
Deppe posted a 6-0, 6-0 win
over Jordyn Sapp at fourth

Dryden wins twice at Kingston

fourth singles.
As far as doubles play
was concerned, Ryann
Coenen and Sam Justice furnished a 6-1, 6-3 top flight
triumph over Madalinn
Thibodeau and Drew Katkic;
Elizabeth Kerby and Marlee
Kinner managed a 6-4, 6-3
win against Kendra Blount
and Isabelle Downey at second
doubles;
Brianne
Gryspeerd and Nadia Manko
earned a 6-1, 6-0 third flight
victory over Kendall Sommer
and Agnes Krahn; plus Katie
Smith and Gabby Wright
posted a 6-0, 6-0 triumph
against Joelle Jones and
Trinity Cislo at fourth doubles.

Almont defeats rivals, 7-1


By Kevin Kissane

Dryden second at own invite

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

DRYDEN The Dryden


boys track team generated
seven top-three individual
event showings at a North
Central Thumb League quad
meet hosted by Kingston on
Tuesday, April 19.
No team scores were
available from the meet.
Jeremy Roediger, high
jump, 5 feet 8 inches; and
Brenden Knuth, 3200-meter

Photo by Kevin Kissane

By Kevin Kissane

55.15 to accomplish the feat. Bailey Knuth, of Dryden, picks up the pace en
Measel, 100-meter hur- route to a first in the 3200-meter run.
dles, 18.12 seconds; provided Almont with a third.
Battani, 100 hurdles,
18.27 seconds; contributed
an individual event fourth
By Kevin Kissane
and Atkinson) relays wound
for Almont.
Tri-City Times Sports Editor
up second as well. They man The Almont 400 (Measel,
aged respective efforts of no
Rinke,
Smith
and DRYDEN

The time available and 12:57.28


Zimmerman) and 1600- Dryden boys track squad en route.
meter (Battani, Measel, pulled up second at an invita- Roediger, high jump, 5
Rinke and Smith) relays tional it hosted last Friday.
feet 2 inches; Bailey Knuth,
claimed fourth as well. They Peck topped the stand- long jump, 16 feet 4 inches;
were timed in 1:57.61 and ings with 161 points. They Peyerk, 400-meter dash,
were followed by Dryden
4:34.92, respectively.
1:00.34; generated Drydens
The 3200 relay of Olivia (141 points), Kingston (111) individual event thirds.
Hovis, Kayla Pia, Kaitlyn and Caseville (24).
Blake Porter, pole vault, The Dryden 1600 relay of
Sedorchuk and Hannah
Tyler Honnold, Cory Powell,
Szylowski wound up fifth 9 feet; Jeremy Roediger, long Bailey Knuth and Zwiez regwith a clocking of 12:22.12. jump, 16 feet 9 inches; and istered a third as well. They
Lexi Rogers cleared 6 Sam Peyerk, 100 dash, 12.37 stopped the watch at 4:13.66.
seconds; led Dryden with
feet en route to a seven-way
Latulippe, long jump (16
individual event firsts.
tie for sixth in the pole vault.
The Dryden 400-meter feet 3 inches) and 100-meter
Hovis, 1600 (6:37.24) relay of Ian Latulippe, dash (12.67 seconds); Peyerk,
and 3200-meter (14:39.27) Peyerk, Porter and Roediger 200 dash, no time available;
runs; added a pair of sev- took first as well. They were and Powell, 1600-meter run,
enths to Almonts cause.
5:37.03; furnished Drydens
timed in 50.72 seconds.
Sara Herrera led Capac Jarrad Adams, discus, fourths.
that day. Her 3200 run clock- 103 feet 6 inches; Roediger, Eric Johnson, shot put
ing of 13:24.63 proved sec- 110 hurdles, 20.49 seconds; (28 feet 5 inches) and discus
ond swiftest.
and Bailey Knuth, 1600- (74 feet 7 inches); along with
meter run, 5:26.3; gave Powell, 800 run, 2:39.48;
Dryden individual event sec- supplied Drydens fifths.
Cody Locke, shot put, 24
onds.
The Dryden 800 (Austin feet 7 inches; Honnold, 100Zwiez, Brenden Knuth, meter dash, 13.0 seconds;
Tyrus Atkinson and Adams) and Porter, 300 hurdles,
and 3200 (Austin Grondin, 51.68 seconds; added sixths
Scott Bristol, Brenden Knuth to Drydens cause.

Faith Standfest, of Almont, returns a shot last


Saturday at the Almont Invitational.

singles.
As far as doubles play
was concerned, Ryann
Coenen and Sam Justice netted a 6-4, 6-7, 7-5 top flight
victory against Elise Morgan
and
Taylor
Sawitzky;
Elizabeth Kerby and Sarah
Stroup obtained a 6-3, 6-3
triumph over Allie Resch
and Jessicas Scopas at second
doubles;
Brianne
Gryspeerd and Nadia Manko
generated a 6-0, 6-0 third
flight win against Lily Parol
and Jaime Koehl; plus Katie
Smith and Gabby Wright
provided a 6-0, 6-2 victory
over Rachel Zieman and
Mikayla Pisane at fourth
doubles.

ALMONT The
Almont girls tennis team
claimed a third-place finish
at an invitational it hosted
last Saturday.
Flint Powers Catholics
20-point total paced the field
assembled. They were followed by Ann Arbor Gabriel
Richard (13 points), Almont
(nine) and Clarkston Everest
(six).
Maria Bussone (second
singles), Brianne Gryspeerd
and Nadia Manko (third dou-

bles) plus Katie Smith and


Gabby Wright (fourth doubles) led Almont with seconds.
Olivia Bussone (third
singles), Lauren Deppe
(fourth singles) plus Marlee
Kinner and Elizabeth Kerby
(second doubles) provided
Almont with thirds.
Faith Standfest (first singles) plus Ryann Coenen and
Sam Justice (first doubles)
added fourths to Almonts
cause.

top flight count to Maddie


Fozo; Maria Bussone dropped
a 4-6, 5-7 verdict to Sara
Anthony at second singles;
Olivia Bussone netted a 3-6,
7-6, 6-3 third flight win
against Hannah Homsy; and
Lauren Deppe fell by a 0-6,
1-6 count to Gabby Cavataio
at fourth singles.

As far as doubles play


was concerned, Ryann
Coenen and Sam Justice
picked up a 7-6, 3-6, 7-6 top
flight victory over Grace
Drettmann and Therese
Drettman; Elizabeth Kerby
and Sarah Stroup notched a
3-7, 7-6, 6-4 triumph against
Siobhan Haggerty and Tamara

Ajjour at second doubles;


Brianne Gryspeerd and Nadia
Manko obtained a 7-6, 6-1
third flight win over Angelina
Pollizzi and Morgan Kelley;
plus Katie Smith and Gabby
Wright rolled to a 6-0, 6-1
victory against Kaitlyn Fox
and Brynne Reilly at fourth
doubles.

Almont garners a third place

Raiders nets win versus Grosse Pointe Woods Liggett


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT Almont
registered a 5-3 triumph
against Grosse Pointe Woods
University Liggett in a nonleague girls tennis encounter
last Wednesday.
In individual action, Faith
Standfest fell by a 0-6, 0-6

run, 11:54.06; led Dryden


with firsts that day.
Sam Peyerk provided
Dryden with three seconds.
He accomplished the feat versus 100 (11.89 seconds), 200
(25.42 seconds) and 400
(58.5 seconds) dash foes.
Cory Powell notched
Drydens other second,
thanks to an 800-meter run
clocking of 2:42.34.
Bailey Knuth, 1600 run,
5:25.44; added a third to
Drydens cause.

Capac split BWAC encounters


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

CAPAC Capac halved


a pair of Blue Water Area
Conference dual meets, earning an 80-53 win against host
Richmond and dropping a
109-28 verdict to Yale on
Tuesday, April 19.
Paul Livermore, pole
vault (12 feet) and 110-meter
hurdles (16.23 seconds); Ian
Detroyer, 300 hurdles, 46.38
seconds; Brent Boers, 400
dash, 1:02.48; Jeremiah
Crane, 800-meter run, 2:39;
plus Thomas Wheeler, 1600
(5:22.3) and 3200 run (12:17);
paced Capac with individual
event firsts versus Richmond.
The Capac 400, 800,
1600 and 3200 relays also
prevailed. They registered
respective clockings of 47.06
seconds, 1:40, 4:08 and 10:40
en route.
Livermore, long jump, 16
feet 7 inches; Tyler Saez, 100

(11.43 seconds) and 200meter dashes (23.77 seconds);


Josh Skarsvog, 800 run, 2:55;
along with Sean Taylor, 1600
(6:36.12) and 3200 (15:10)
runs furnished Capacs seconds.
Brent Boers, high jump (5
feet) and 200-meter dash
(25.35 seconds); plus Duncan
Muter, pole vault (7 feet)
along with the shot put (30
feet 6 1/2 inches), discus (73
feet 11 inches) and 800 run
(3:08); added thirds to
Capacs cause.
Livermore (pole vault)
and Saez (100-meter dash)
gave Capac individual event
firsts against Yale.
The Capac 400 relay
notched a first as well.
Livermore (110 hurdles)
and Detroyer (300-meter hurdles) claimed Capacs seconds.
Wheeler (3200 run)
tacked on a third to Capacs
cause.

Send us your sports


announcements . . .
tct@pageone-inc.com
or call 810-724-2615
or fax 810-724-8552

Page 6-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

ATTICA TOWNSHIP
Notice of Public Hearing
Attica Township Zoning
Board of Appeals

Notice is hereby given that the Attica Township Zoning Board of Appeals
will hold a public hearing on May 12, 2016 beginning at 6:30 PM, or as soon
thereafter as the agenda allows, at the Attica Township Hall, 4350 Peppermill
Road, Attica, MI 48412.
The purpose of the hearing is to receive public comments on a request
submitted by Jeremy and Sarah Homer to exceed the maximum overall height
of 22 feet allowable for accessory buildings on a property. The property in
question is located at 4440 Champion Drive, Attica, MI 48412.
A complete copy of the application for the proposed variance may be examined
at the Attica Township Hall, Monday through Friday, except holidays, from 9
a.m. to 12 noon.
Written comments may be sent to the Zoning Board of Appeals, at the
address above, prior to the hearing. Oral comments will be taken during the
hearing.
This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Michigan Public Act
110 of 2006, as amended.
Nancy Herpolsheimer, Clerk
Attica Township
17-1

IMLAY TOWNSHIP

Notice of Adoption Zoning Amendments


Imlay Township Planning Commission
Notice is hereby given that the Imlay Township Board adopted amendments to the Imlay Township Zoning Ordinance, at their regular meeting held
on Wednesday, April 20, 2016. The amendments are to Section 3.1.1 Agricultural District; Section 3.1.2 One-Family Residential; 3.1.3 Rural Estate Residential; and adding Section 4.64 Landscapers, Landscape Services and Similar
Home-Based Businesses of the Imlay Township Zoning Ordinance to incorporate standards and permit as accessory uses subject to administrative approval
by the Planning Commission.
A complete copy of the proposed amendment may be examined at the Imlay Township Hall, located at 682 N. Fairgrounds Road, Imlay City MI 48444,
on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, except holidays, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
complete Imlay Township Zoning Ordinance may also be viewed or downloaded at the Township website www.imlaytownship.org.
The effective date of this Zoning Ordinance Amendment will be May 4,
2016, 7 days after publication of this notice.
Elizabeth Makedonsky
Imlay Township Clerk
17-1


President Schneider called the
meeting to order at 7:30 p.m.
Councilmembers Dyke, Lauer, Love,
Peltier, Tobias & Schneider were present. Councilmember Steffler was absent.
Staff present were Manager MoyerCale, Clerk/Treasurer Keesler, Police
Chief Nael, WWTP Supt. Farley and
Building Official Israel.

The Council approved the agenda;
approved the consent agenda; tabled
Clauw property item on agenda until
next meeting; rejected the proposal from
Infrastructure Alternatives; approved 5
year service contract with Cummins
Bridgeway on the generators; approved
T.G. Priehs Paving Co. to complete
work on Mill St.; approved to put the
sidewalk work out for bids; approved to
send letter in regard to PA197 proposed
changes to Representative Howell and
Senator Green; approved to give
Manager Moyer-Cale authority to pay
for half of the building department software upgrade; gave Manager MoyerCale authority to apply for grant to
improve Burley Park & it was the consensus not to pay for school flags.

Discussion was held on W. St.
Clair parking lot; maintenance on
municipal building, medical marijuana
and ordinance enforcement.

The Council went into closed session for manager performance evaluation.

The meeting adjourned at 11:20
p.m.
Kimberly Keesler
Clerk/Treasurer
Steve Schneider
President

A complete copy of the minutes is
available in the Clerks Office during
regular business hours or at www.
almontvillage.org.
17-1

LYNN
TOWNSHIP

VILLAGE OF
ALMONT

VILLAGE OF
ALMONT

ALMONT VILLAGE
COUNCIL
REGULAR MEETING
APRIL 5, 2016
SYNOPSIS

Lynn Township is accepting applications for the position of Township


Assessor. Please send resume, cover
letter and salary requirements to Lynn
Township Clerk, 13995 Yale Road,
Lynn, MI 48097 by May 5, 2016.
Questions, call Supervisor Steve
Kalbfleisch 810-650-5657.
Annette Ferrett,
Clerk
16-2

MUSSEY
TOWNSHIP

REGULAR MEETING
APRIL 13, 2016


Supervisor Lauwers called the
meeting to order at 7:33 p.m. Mike

Schools of Choice in Lapeer County

ORDINANCE NO. 195



An ordinance to regulate the placement and maintenance of facilities and
equipment within public rights-of-way;
and to prescribe penalties for violations
thereof.

THE VILLAGE OF ALMONT
ORDAINS:

Section 1. Definitions.

Section 2. Permits.

Section 3. Regulations.

Section 4. Enforcement and

Penalties.

Section 5. Effective Date.

The undersigned President and
Clerk of the Village of Almont hereby
certify that this Ordinance was introduced at a Regular Meeting of the
Almont Village Council held on the 19th
day of April 2016 and was published in
the Tri-City Times on the 27th day of
April 2016.
Kimberly Keesler
Clerk
Steve Schneider
Village President

A complete copy of the above ordinance is available in the Clerk's office
during regular business hours or at
www.almontvillage.org.
17-1

VILLAGE OF
ALMONT

ORDINANCE NO. 196

17-1


An ordinance to regulate garage
sales and to prescribe penalties for violations thereof.

THE VILLAGE OF ALMONT
ORDAINS:

Section 1. Purpose.

Section 2. Definitions.

Section 3. Regulations.

Section 4. Enforcement and

Penalties.

Section 5. Effective Date.

The undersigned President and
Clerk of the Village of Almont hereby
certify that this Ordinance was introduced at a Regular Meeting of the
Almont Village Council held on the 19th
day of April 2016 and was published in
the Tri-City Times on the 27th day of
April 2016.
Kimberly Keesler
Clerk
Steve Schneider
Village President

A complete copy of the above ordinance is available in the Clerk's office
during regular business hours or at
www.almontvillage.org.
17-1

Home Repair
AFFORDABLE
HOME REPAIR

122 W. Washington, Downtown Romeo

586-752-2682

Capac, MI 30 Years Experience

586-651-5597

www.romeoaccountants.com

1-25-17

Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm,
Saturday &
Evenings By Appt.

CARPENTRY & REMODELING


SIDING ROOFING WINDOWS
KITCHEN & BATH HANDYMAN SERVICE
7-16-16

Heating &
Cooling
Commercial & Residential

R.E. BLANK
& ASSOCIATES

HEATING & COOLING SPECIALISTS


Service & Install, Financing Licensed & Insured

Yale Location 810-387-4452

FIDUCIAL BUSINESS CENTERS


Accounting Income Tax

724-6431

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370 North Cedar Street


Imlay City, 48444

AUTOMOTIVE

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C
ustom Lawn Care
COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

When the grass is high, we'll swing by!


FALL AND SPRING CLEAN-UP

MARK
Grass Cutting
Guaranteed
Edging Hedges to beat any 810-614-1119
rs
NICK
Leaf Clean-up
competito
price! 810.310-1477
Rolling of Lawns
Snowplowing
The most reliable lawn service in town!

Automotive
PARSCHS

Lawn Care
06-29-16

ORDINANCE NO. 180.1


PLANNING COMMISSION
ORDINANCE
AMENDMENT

Accounting &
Tax Preparation

Tractor Repair

M bil

GARYS
TRACTOR REPAIR

SERVICE & REPAIR


BRAKES
AIR CONDITIONING
MUFFLERS TUNE-UPS
STRUTS
COOLING SYSTEMS
EXHAUST SHOCKS
ELECTRICAL
COMPUTER ANALYSIS
TIRES
COMPUTER BALANCING
FUEL INJECTION SERVICE

Farm/Lawn/Snowblower
Pick-up & Delivery
25 years Exp.
586-457-4649
5-4-16

810-724-6630

Outdoor
Equipment
TFN

The Village of Almont is currently soliciting bids for sidewalk repair and
replacement projects. Information regarding these projects can be obtained
from the Almont DPW at (810) 798-8655 between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and
3:30 p.m. on regular business days. Bid documents may also be obtained on the
home page of the Villages website at www.almontvillage.org. Bids must be
submitted to the Village of Almont at 817 N. Main; Almont, MI 48003 no later
than 1:00 p.m. on May 3, 2016 at which point bids will be opened. The Village
retains the right to reject any and/or all bids submitted to it (or portions thereof)
and to accept any alternative cost proposals submitted for its consideration.
16-2

VILLAGE OF
ALMONT


An Ordinance to amend the Village
of Almont Planning Commission
Ordinance 180, dated April 7, 2009,
pursuant to Michigan Public Act 22 of
2008 to amend membership and appointment to the planning commission.

THE VILLAGE OF ALMONT
ORDAINS:

Section 4 of the Village of Almont
Planning Commission Ordinance No.
180, dated April 7, 2009, is respectively
amended to read in its entirety as follows:

Section 4. Membership and
Appointment.

The Planning Commission shall
consist of seven (7) members. Members
shall be appointed by the Village
President with the approval of the
Village Council. One of the Planning
Commission members shall be an exofficio member who shall also be a
member of the Village Council and one
of the Planning Commission members
shall be an ex-officio member who shall
also be the Village President. Vacancies
occurring for any reason shall be filled
for the remainder of the unexpired term
by appointment of the Village President
with the approval of the Village Council.
All members, including the ex-officio
members, shall have full voting rights.
The membership of the Planning
Commission shall be representative of
important segments of the community,
such as industry, natural resources, recreation, education, public health, government, transportation and commerce.
No employee of the Village, other than
the ex-officio members, shall be a member of the Planning Commission.

The undersigned President and
Clerk of the Village of Almont hereby
certify that this ordinance was adopted
at a Regular Meeting of the Almont
Village Council held on the 19th day of
April 2016 and was published in the TriCity Times on the 27th day of April
2016. This Ordinance Amendment shall
take effect immediately upon publication.
Kimberly Keesler
Clerk
Steve Schneider
President

A complete copy of the above ordinance is available in the Clerk's office
during regular business hours or at
www.almontvillage.org.
17-1

VILLAGE OF ALMONT
NOTICE

Lauwers (Supervisor), Sheila McDonald


(Clerk), Marsha Libkie (Treasurer), and
Bruce Downey (Trustee) were present.
Monica Standel (Trustee) was absent.
Four guests were present. Motions were
passed to: approve the March 9th minutes as presented, utilize the 2 miles of
Limestone that the county is requiring
payment of $5000 from the Township to
be the first mile of Sullivan and Imlay
City Roads just east of Capac Road,
have the same amount of Limestone as
gravel (125 loads) that the township had
last year, pay the April bills, accept the
treasurers report as presented, adjourn
the meeting at 8:35 p.m. A complete
copy of the minutes can be obtained at
the Mussey Township office during regular business hours or viewed on our
website: www.musseytownship.org
Sheila McDonald, Clerk
17-1

5-18-16


The meeting was called to order at
7:00 p.m. by Supervisor Ochadleus.
Present were: Clerk Herpolsheimer,
Treasurer Mason and Trustees Madeline
and Lacey. Absent: None

The minutes of March 10, 2016
were approved as presented.

The treasurer report showed a new
balance of: General Fund $666,510.33,
and CDARS savings $201,980.05; Fire
Millage $92,373.01, CDARS savings
$50,495.00; Fire Escrow $73,871.90,
CDARS savings $50,495.00. Public
Safety $125,848.27, CDARS savings
$50,495.00.

Police Report - 215 calls in March
with 119 handled by Township deputies.
Public Time - Lapeer County
Commissioner Dave Eady introduced
himself as a candidate for Lapeer
County Sheriff and gave a brief history
of his resume.

Old Business - Supervisor
Ochadleus gave a report on the museum
progress. He is working on outside
lights and posts for the library and township hall bathroom remodeling.

New Business - Budget workshop
will be April 27th at 10:00 am at the
Township Hall.

Moved and seconded to rezone

Jarvis reported that Equalization is


going to put together a chart showing the
values since 2007, James Novak was
appointed to fill the vacancy on the
Road Commission, a renewal of the
millage for Suncrest will be on the
August ballot, and Al Ochadleus was
appointed to the Valley Area Agency on
Aging (VAAA) to represent Lapeer
County.

Board - There was discussion
about removing dead trees along the
roadways in the township. Moved and
seconded to approve the request for
Loving Hands Clinic to make Attica
Township Hall available for a one time
use to provide a free medical information program for residents. Roll call
vote, all ayes, motion carried.

Public - Chief Warford stated that
the Attica Fire Department is backing
Dave Eady for Lapeer County Sheriff.

Review and pay the bills - Moved
and seconded to pay the bills: General
Fund - $55,354.82, and Fire Fund $5,632.51, Public Safety - $8,333.71
Total for bills $69,321.04. Roll call vote
taken, all ayes, motion carried.

Meeting adjourned at 7:50 p.m.

A complete copy of the minutes is
available at the Attica Township Hall.
Nancy Herpolsheimer
Attica Township Clerk
17-1

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5-18-16

ATTICA TOWNSHIP
BOARD MINUTES OF
APRIL 14, 2016

parcels 44-003-010-006-40 and 44-003010-006-09 from R-1 to B-2. Roll call


vote taken, all ayes, motion carried.
DTE energy has plans to trim trees in
Attica Township in 2016.

Moved and seconded to approve
the new Noise Ordinance to take effect
thirty days after it is published in the
paper. Roll call vote taken, all ayes,
motion carried.

Fire - Chief Warford reported that
they are ready for grass fires and the
house fire they had since last month has
resulted in the home being condemned
by Construction Code.

Park - Manager Madeline reported
that he is getting quotes to resurface the
track and there was discussion on filling
cracks in the track.

Planning Commission - Planning
Administrator Lemons reported that
Clearzoning is working on an application for use for private and commercial
kennels, they are still working on the
Master Plan, and there will be three
Public Hearings at the May Planning
Commission meeting.

Attorney - Attorney Gildner reported that he has been working on the noise
ordinance and the performance bond
ordinance.

Ambulance - The next meeting is
April 21st and that the Ambulance
Board voted at a special meeting to put
a .59 mills, five year millage request on
the August ballot.

Commissioner - Commissioner

STIHL EXMARK HUSTLER


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9-14-16

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TOWNSHIP

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&
EQUIPMEN
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8-3-16

Legal Announcements

Business
Directory

Frame & Frameless Shower Enclosures


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PUBLISHED
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ALSO ONLINE!
Call the Tri-City Times between the
hours of 8 am and 5 pm, Monday
thru Friday at 810-724-2615 or
Fax us at 810-724-8552 or email
us at tct@pageone-inc.com

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Classif ieds

Page 7-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Tri-City Times Classifieds also


Online! Buy, Sell or Trade at
www.tricitytimes-online.com
810-724-2615

Autos

Garage Sale

Apartment For Rent

Help Wanted

2001
FORD
TAURUS,
134K,
V6,
AUTOMATIC,
TRANSMISSION
LEAKS,
NEWER FRONT TIRES, GOOD
BRAKES, GOOD BATTERY,
STARTS GOOD. $400. 810417-2249. A-16-5
...................................................
2004 SATURN ION - black with
grey interior, original owner.
$2500 or best offer. 586-2120929. A-16-2
...................................................
1989 LINCOLN TOWN CAR,
showroom condition, stored winters, a beautiful car! $4,200.00
or best offer. Call 810-660-7469.
A-1-CAT
...................................................

Mom to Mom Sale

STUNNING & MODERN ONE


BEDROOM APT with Granite
counter tops, hardwood floors,
and deluxe appliance pkg
Almont 810-798-8091. APR-15-4
...................................................

CAREGIVERS
in
ROMEO,
RICHMOND,
ARMADA,
MEMPHIS needed for disabled
adults in a group home setting.
Afternoons/Weekends/Midnights.
Tuition reimbursement, paid training, benefits
for FT. Send
resume to:
apply@iomichigan.
org or call 586-739-9220. HW-14-4
......................................................
SENTECH
SERVICES
IS
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
for Assembly & Molding
operators for a busy client in
Imlay City. All shifts available,
competitive pay, excellent
benefits
upon
hire
in.
w w w. s e n t e c h s e r v i c e s . c o m .
(810) 984-3150. HW-17-4
...................................................
EXPERIENCED SERVERS and
cooks needed for family restaurant in Armada. Full or part time
available and immediate start.
Please apply within at Papas
Family Restaurant 23056 E Main
St Armada 48005 HW-16-4
...................................................
FA C T O RY / P R O D U C T I O N
WORKERS NEEDED. Starting
wage $9.00/hour immediate
openings available for qualified
individuals. Must have high
school diploma or GED, no felonies, reliable transportation and
must be able to pass drug test.
Please call Reliable Staffing at
810-667-5140. HW-15-4

RESERVE A TABLE FOR


$20.00 (includes a 8 foot table)
17-1

Benefits ALS of Michigan and


American Cancer Society

Email:
shop4acuremom2mom@hotmail.com

FARM/HOUSE YARD SALE:


April 28 - May 1, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
at 6841 Hough Rd., Almont.
Furniture, mens stuff, antiques,
vintage, unusual. GS-17-1
...................................................
RUMMAGE SALE at First
Congregational Church U.C.C.
275 Bancroft St., Imlay City (part
of Garage Sale Mania) May 5
and 6 Only! 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
GS-17-2
...................................................

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, April


29 and 30. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
1421 N. Van Dyke Road, Imlay
City (next to Knights of Columbus
Hall). GS-17-1
...................................................

John Deere 235 Garden tractor,


ceiling lights and fan, 2 Lazy boy
recliners, camping, hunting, and
fishing equipment, snowmobile
suits, mens golf shirts, ball caps,
sports collectibles-Tigers, Red
Wings, U of M items, holiday accessories, die cast toys, household
items and MORE! GS-17-2

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2 Bedrooms.........Starting at $610
3 Bedrooms.........Starting at $815

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Commercial For Rent

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...................................................

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Wedding Reception Rentals
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IMLAY CITY

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Garage Sale Mania Sale


May 5, 6, 7 9a.m. to 5p.m.
6150 Attica Rd. Imlay City
1/2 west of Blacks Corners Rd.

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810-346-3300
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COME HOME TO
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APARTMENTS
IMLAY CITY

FR-12-13

4 NEW TIRES - Goodyear


Wrangler P275-65R18 $400.
2013 Arising Cargo Trailer, 14 ft.,
single axle, side door, fold down
door on back $2,500. 586-2929567. FS-17-2
...................................................
3 WEED WACKERS FOR SALE
Weed eater, Mac 28 16,
ClubCadet. All are curve shaft,
all are good condition & ready to
work. $40.00 each 810-4172249. FS-16-6
...................................................
JOHN DEERE L110 automatic
riding mower 42 deck, 17.5 hp,
new blades, battery, spark plugs,
gas filter, oil, 7 years old, only
used 3 years. $850.00 810-3102478. FS-16-4
...................................................
2000 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500, 4 wheel drive, $1,800 or
best offer needs work. POND
FOUNTAIN with float $675. Call
810-310-2928. FS-16-2
...................................................

1701 W. Genesee St., Lapeer

FR-9-13

For Sale

Sunday, May 22, 2016


10 am - 4 pm
American Legion Hall

Apartment For Rent


CAPAC VILLAGE: 2 bedroom
upstairs apt. for 1 or 2 adults,
50+, spacious, lots of storage,
appliances and all utilities,
except AC included, carport, no
pets, security deposit required;
call 810-395-2226 and leave
message. APR-1-17

6TH ANNUAL

GS-13-5

DRYDEN COMMUNITY
GARAGE SALE
Sponsored by the Dryden DDA

May 19th21st, 2016 9am4pm

APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN THE VILLAGE OFFICE


A $5 FEE IS REQUIRED FOR THE ADVERTISING AND TO HAVE YOUR LOCATION LISTED ON THE MAP.

Professional
Directory

Real Estate
HOME SALES, DIVISION,
JUST LAND SALES. We are
here to Help! Almont. Brown
City. Capac. Imlay City. Yale.
586-206-0118 RE-17-8
...................................................

Help Wanted
LAWN
MAINTENANCE
COMPANY, Almont area, looking for laborers/crew members.
Must have own transportation.
Call 810-614-5605. HW-17-2
...................................................

SERVICE TECH for


Local Pest Control
Company servicing St.
Clair and surrounding
counties.

IMMEDIATE OPENING
Full-time. Experience a plus but
not required. Includes paid training,
Uniform, paid Holidays &
Production Bonuses.

Call Mon-Fri:
810-392-3839 or
email: guardianpestavenger@
gmail.com
HW-17-2

The Village of Capac will


be accepting applications
for a part-time public
works employee.

Doctors of Optometry

Craig J. Watson, O.D Jeffrey D. Johnston, O.D.

518 S. Cedar Street, Imlay City


Fax: 724-6644

CAPAC

PHARMACY

BEER WINE LIQUOR LOTTO

Store Hours: Monday thru Saturday 9:00 am to 9:00 pm;


and Sunday 12:00 noon to 5:00 pm
Pharmacy Hours: Monday thru Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm;
Saturday 9:00 am - 2 pm; Closed Sunday
M O V I E R E N TA L S

136 N. MAIN ST.

810-395-2336

SEEKING REGISTERED MEDICAL ASSISTANT FOR FAMILY


PRACTICE LOCATED IN YALE.
CUSTOMER FOCUSED, TEAM
PLAYER, AND WILLING TO ASSIST IN FRONT OFFICE. FULLTIME POSITION WITH BENEFITS AND COMPETITIVE PAY.
IF YOU ARE READY FOR A
CHANGE AND WANT TO
WORK IN A TEAM ATMOSPHERE, APPLY
TODAY!
SEND RESUME TO KLAWSONDO@COMCAST.NET. HW-16-3
...................................................

EXPERIENCED HEAVY TRUCK


AND TRAILER MECHANIC.
Must have prior experience
working in this field. Must be reliable, honest and can get along
with others. Pay scale will be
determined after interview process. Please call 810-346-3579
or come to shop at 3580 Willis
Road., Marlette. HW-16-2
...................................................

Classifieds Work!
CALL 724-2615

tricitytimes-online.com

For sale or lease in Imlay City

Office/Medical. 301 E.
First (Just Off M-53)
7,200 S.F. Available.
Will Divide.

Professional Office Space/Medical

CALL JOHN JOHNSON 810-338-4780

RE-17-2

Annual 2-Day Equipment


& Vehicle Auction
Sat., April 30 @ 10AM
Tractors Equipment Construction
ATVs Tools
Sun., May 1 @ 11AM
Vehicles RVs Boats
Eastern Michigan Fairgrounds
Almont Ave., Imlay City

Directions: From I-69 & M-53, (Exit #168) in Imlay


City, go North on M-53 for approx. 1 mile, turn West
on Borland Rd, then North on Almont Ave., follow to
fairground entrance. Watch for auction signs.
Rowleys Auction Service is conducting our Annual Spring
2-Day Equipment & Vehicle Auction and selling assets from
Flint Bishop International Airport, Genesee County Parks &
Rec, Lapeer County & Twp offices, Imlay City Twp, Champion
Bus Inc. of Imlay City, businesses,
estates, and individuals to auction
See Website Daily for
their surplus vehicles, equipment
Large List and Photos!!
and tools. This is a large, multiple
ring auction!
Municipal Vehicles/Cars/Trucks (100+ Vehicles to be Auctioned!)
Tractors & Mowers, Lawn & Outdoor Equipment, Implements & Attachments, Power Sports & Marine, Heavy Trucks & Trailers
Tools, Police Confiscated Items and More.
Low entry fee and commission
Terms: Cash, checks w/ photo ID, major credit cards. 10% buyers fee with
a 3% immediate discount (on the buyers fee) if paying by cash or check. All
purchases over $1,000 will require a bank letter of guarantee. 6% MI sales
tax. $30 Document Fee on all titled units.
All purchases must be paid in full day of
Still Accepting
auction. All items are sold as is, where
Consignments!
is. All sales are final. Lunch available.

Contact: Office @ 810-724-4035 or


Greg @ 810-417-2065
Email: office@rowleyauctions.com
www.RowleyAuctions.com

Requirements
The employee must be able to operate all small
equipment necessary for the Village of Capac.
Be able to repair and maintain the development
of streets, water, sewer, parks and other related
operations of the Village of Capac. Medical card
and CDL License preferred
Application and resume deadline 4:00 p.m. May
6, 2016, to Village of Capac, Attn: Public Works,
PO Box 218, 131 N. Main St., Capac MI 48014.
For questions contact DPW Supervisor Greg
Smith at (810) 395-4355.
HW-17-2

Estate Auction

Saturday May 7, 2016 @ 10:30 A.M.


Located at:

1677 E. Newark Rd. in Lapeer, MI 48446


1 mile North, 2 miles East of Lapeer

90 Acres Prime Farmland w/Home and


Buildings in Lapeer County
Tractors, Farm Equipment, Collectibles,
Antiques, Guns, Gas Pumps, Signs, Petro
Collectibles, Large Qty Depression, Carnival
Glassware, Victoria Furniture, Old Toys.
Kingsbury-Hofman Living Trust
Visit websites for open houses, photos,
Terms/conditions, complete list of chattel.
Chuck Cryderman & Associates LLC
Gary M. Berry Auctioneers
586-784-8890 248-299-5959
crydermanauctions.com
garymberry.com

Help Wanted

Call for details.

Lapeer County Vision Center Large Public Real Estate and

724-EYES

Help Wanted

A-17-1

Legal
Announcements

continued from 6-B

NOTICE
VILLAGE OF
ALMONT

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS


HEARING

817 NORTH MAIN STREET


ALMONT, MICHIGAN 48003
(810) 798-8528
Fax (810) 798-3397

Please be notified that the Village of Almont Zoning Board of Appeals


will hold a hearing on Thursday, May 12, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. in the Almont Municipal Building located at 817 N. Main St., Almont Michigan 48003 in order
to consider a request for a non-use variance submitted by Mr. David Nash for
property detailed in the legal description below.
Section 5.01 of the Almont Village Zoning Ordinance 159 requires the
applicant to construct a masonry wall, greenbelt, or landscaped berm on the
northern portion of the lot between the property and the single family residential district. The variance, if approved would allow relief from that section.
Elizabeth Makedonsky
Applicant:

Mr. David Nash


612 S. Main St.
Almont, MI 48003

Property Owner:

Superior Contracting Group LLC


15946 Tubspring Road
Allenton, MI 48002

Property Description: 01 74 800 000 00 SEC 28 T6N R12E VILLAGE OF


ALMONT COM 1092.9 FT N & 40 FT W OF E 1/4 POST SEC 28 & TH N
144 FT W 100 FT S 144 FT TH E TO BEG.
Commonly known as 528 S. Main St. (Parcel ID #041-528-043-00)

A-17-1

NOTICE: People with disabilities needing accommodations for effective


participation in the meeting should contact the Village Clerk/Treasurer at least
seven (7) working days in advance of the meeting. An attempt will be made to
make reasonable accommodations. A copy of the application for the variance
may be inspected at the Almont Village Offices located at 817 N. Main St.,
Almont, MI 48003 during regular business hours, between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m. on regular business days. Written comments regarding this variance can
also be received at the above listed address until the day of its consideration.
Kimberly J. Keesler

Village Clerk/Treasurer
17-1

Page 8-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-APRIL 27, 2016

Sports News

Soccer

Rodriguez takes her skills to Albion

Almont knocks off


Richmond, 1-0

By Kevin Kissane

mound. The righthander finished with a 7-6 mark, includTri-City Times Sports Editor
ing a 3.39 ERA.
IMLAY CITY Imlay In 86 1/3 innings,
Citys Rebecca Rodriguez Rodriguez gave up 89 hits,
signed a national letter of struck out 76 and issued 29
intent to become a part of the walks.
Albion College softball team Rodriguez ranked second
this past week.
on the Imlay City ballclub
As a junior, Rodriguez and among Tri-City Times
attracted their attention with All-Area first team honorees
her prowess on the pitching with a .429 average.

She supplied 36 singles,


11 doubles and one triple
among 112 at bats.
Rodriguez also collected
36 RBI, provided 19 runs and
was the recipient of three
walks.
She concluded her second
campaign on Imlay Citys
varsity as an All-Blue Water
Area Conference first team
selection.

Rodriguez also earned a


spot on the All-District lineup
for her play as a third baseman.
Albion College is looking
to bounce back from a 2015
campaign which saw them go
4-28 overall, including a 0-16
showing as far as Michigan
Intercollegiate
Athletic
Conference clashes are concerned.

Nadrowski to play
basketball at Adrian
IMLAY CITY Imlay
Citys Mike Nadrowski inked
a pact to become a part of the
Adrian College mens basketball squad last week.
In addition to Adrian
College, Nadrowski received
recruiting attention from
Albion College, Defiance
College, Kalamazoo College,
Alma College, Carthage
College, Allegheny College,
Lambton College (in Ontario,
Canada), Central College,
Great
Lakes
Christian
College, Kansas Christian
College, Marietta College,
Finlandia University and
Holy Cross College.
Nadrowski, a 6 foot 6
inch forward/center, is coming off a strong senior campaign for BWAC co-champi-

on Imlay City. This winter


he averaged 8.0 rebounds
and 7.5 points per contest.
Those numbers helped
him lock up Tri-City Times
All-Area second team accolades and attain All-Blue
Water Area Conference honorable mention plaudits at
seasons end.
He wrap ups his successful stint of three-plus years
on Imlay Citys varsity as a
contributor to three Blue
Water Area Conference
championships and two
Class B district titles.
Adrian College is coming off a 2015-16 campaign
which saw them finish 13-12
overall, featuring a 6-8
showing versus Michigan
Intercollegiate
Athletic
Conference foes (good
enough for fifth place).

Imlay Citys (front L to R) Nick Sears and Rebecca


Rodriguez; and back Cole Inwood, Mike Nadrowski and
Dylan Hammond signed letters of intent last week.

Hammond, Sears and Inwood headed to Adrian


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City football standouts Dylan
Hammond, Nick Sears and Cole
Inwood signed their respective letters of intent to become a part of the
Adrian College football squad this
past week.
Hammond completed 55 of

137 pass plays for Imlay City during the 2015 campaign.
The 511 and 195-pound
senior finished season number two
on Imlay Citys varsity as a TriCity Times All-Area first team
selection.
Sears made his presence felt
on the offensive line for Imlay City.
It seemed no matter where coach
Steve Lestage opted to utilize his

Capac falls 3-0


CAPAC Capac dropped
a 3-0 verdict to visiting CrosLex in a Blue Water Area
Conference girls soccer game
last Wednesday.
Savannah Cox drew the
goalkeeping assignment for
Capac. Cox finished the contest
with 15 saves.

Dryden drops 5-2


outcome on road

Photo by Kevin Kissane

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT Almont
slipped past Richmond, 1-0,
last Wednesday in a Blue
Water Area Conference girls
soccer battle.
Alayna Panduren provided Almont with the gamewinning goal, connecting on
a shot during the second half
of play.
Cassie
Latcha
and
Mikayla McCarthy both
played well defensively,
according to Raider Coach
Erica DiMatteo.
Jen Weiland also saw to it
that Almont would emerge
victorious, stopping all 15 of
the shots she faced.

Friday.
Erica Bailey led Almont
with a pair of goals. Jennifer
Curtis and Cassie Latcha
added one goal each to the
Raiders cause.
Jen Weiland drew the
goalkeeping assignment for
Almont that day. She finished
with nine saves.

talents he delivered time and time


again.
The 511 and 245-pound
senior ended his third year with
Imlay Citys varsity as a Tri-City
Times All-Area first team pick and
All-Blue Water Area Conference
honorable mention choice.
Inwood also proved a key performer for Imlay City this season.
The 510 and 275-pound senior,

lined up at center and as a defensive


lineman
His presence at those spots
will be tough to replace when the
2016 campaign rolls around.
The trio join an Adrian College
program that went 7-3 a year ago.
That included a 4-2 Michigan
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
mark, good enough for share of
third place with Trine.

DRYDEN Dryden
returned from Elkton-Pigeon
BayPort with a 5-2 loss in a
girls soccer confrontation
last Wednesday.
In Wednesdays matchup,
Elkton-Pigeon BayPort took
a 2-1 edge at the halftime
break.
Elkton-Pigeon BayPort
then outscored Dryden 3-1
during the final 40 minutes of
action, putting the finishing
touches on a 5-2 win.
Natalie Poirier and
Sammy Ferrera collected
Drydens goals that day.
Maddie Decker, Jordan
Peters and Haylee Wolle all
had strong games for Dryden
as well, according to Cardinal
Coach John Burke.
Kelsey Hemptsead handled the goalkeeping chores
for Dryden that day. She was
credited with five saves.

Almont blanks
Imlay City, 4-0
TRI-CITY AREA
Almont returned from Imlay
City with a 4-0 win in a Blue
Water Area Conference girls
soccer confrontation last

JUST ANNOUNCED!

Imlay Citys Starr Howland


(L) and Capacs Andrea
Motyka (R) battle for the ball.

Imlay City bests


Capac, 4-1

TRI-CITY AREA Imlay


City beat host Capac, 4-1, in a
Blue Water Area Conference
girls soccer clash Monday afternoon.
Rachel Kulin (unassisted),
Amy Castillo (set up by Kulin),
Kulin (unassisted) and Starr
Howland (unassisted) provided
Imlay Citys goals that day.
Faby Garcia and Kayla
Louwsma shared the goalkeeping chores for Imlay City. They
collected three and two saves,
respectively.
Sara Herrera supplied the
lone Capac goal. Her tally was
of the unassisted variety.
Savannah Cox and Alex
Roehrer each took a turn in net
for Capac. Cox finished with 18
saves and Roehrer managed one.

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