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UNH Precision Racing / Formula SAE

-- Final Design Report --

ECE791/792 Final Design Project Report


Project Title: Formula SAE
Project Team: Christopher Loo, Joshua Moran
ECE Faculty Advisor: Professor Francis C. Hludik
Date: May 10, 2010

Abstract:
The UNH FSAE teams main goal was produce a miniature formula racecar to compete
in the Formula SAE competition in Michigan. To successfully produce the racecar, the team
was divided into subgroups. The electrical subgroups goal for the car was to ensure that all
electrical systems on the car were working properly allowing the car to compete, as well as to
design a data acquisition system. The FSAE Michigan competition is comprised of static and
dynamic events, with each event being assigned point value. As teams competed and
accumulated points, the winning team was decided by the team who had the most points. The
UNH FSAE racecar had a very successful competition which included receiving runner up in
best 3D drawings, and 55th overall in the competition. The data acquisition system was not
realized because of a lack of time to test.

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Table Of Contents:
Section

Page

Introduction2
Backround...3
Design.4
Suspension. 5
Engine 6
Controls.. 8
Aerodynamics 9
Electrical 10
Implementation and Testing15
Evaluation...23
Conclusion..26

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List Of Figures:
Figure Number

Discussion of Figure

Page

1:Wiring Diagram that as used to Design the Wiring Harness for Car 39...12
2: Actual Wiring Harness Used in Car 39.....13
3: Photo of the Odyssey Battery Used in Car 39...14
4: Photo of the Palm Treo 750 which was Donated to the Team for Use as a Data Acquisition
system....15
5: Photo of the Wiring Harness Seen in Figure 3 Installed in Car 39...17
6: Photo of the Relay Box Used in Car 3918
7: Photo of the Brake Overshoot Kill Switch.......19
8:Photo of the Outer Battery Connected in Parallel with the battery inside of the car
(not shown)....20
9: Photo of the Dash Including Brake Bias, LEDs, Kill Switch, Tachometer, Power Switches and
Starter22
List Of Tables:
Figure Number

Discussion of Figure

Page

1: Table Showing the Breakdown of Possible Points at the Competition24

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Introduction:
The UNH Precision Racing Formula SAE team had several members returning from the
2008-2009 season along with new members that exerted a tremendous effort to improve the
vehicle in every way for this years competition. Major design goals for this years team were to
increase the reliability of the racecar, driver comfort, reduce weight, and address problems of
previous years cars. Utilization of computer aided engineering tools, including CAD 3-D
modeling, FEA, and CFD, aided with the realization of these main design goals.
Last years vehicle (Car 86) placed 41st overall at the Michigan event. The car weighed
in at 533 lbs, was built with a mild steel space frame, relied on a stock 2007 Suzuki GSXR600
engine, utilized 4-wheel independent suspension, and a Torsen limited slip differential. The
team completed all events for only the 2nd time in school history. The 2010 team has greatly
improved upon Car 86 by decreasing overall weight to approximately 490 lbs, improving driver
feel, comfort, and drivability. Some of the problems from past efforts include poor driver
comfort, drivetrain failures, undesirable handling characteristics, improper gearing, and poor
steering geometry.
To clearly describe the design of the new vehicle, this document is divided into sections
based on the six major subsystems on the car. Each subgroup discusses their designs,
implementations, and testing. The evaluation of the projects success, which is largely based on
the results of the Formula SAE competition in Michigan, is also included.

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Background:

Formula SAE is a student design competition organized by SAE International (formerly


Society of Automotive Engineers). The first competition was started back in 1979 after Mark
Marshek, then at University of Houston (Texas) contacted the SAE Educational Relations
Department in 1978 to discuss adding a variant event of the Mini Baja, and the event has
continued. Today, the competition has expanded and includes a number of spin off events. In the
United States there are two locations: California and Michigan; Michigan being the largest event
and longest running.
The concept behind Formula SAE is that a fictional manufacturing company has
contracted a design team to develop a small Formula-style race car. The prototype race car is to
be evaluated for its potential as a production item. The target marketing group for the race car
is the non-professional weekend autocross racer. Each student team designs, builds and tests a
prototype based on a series of rules whose purpose is both to ensure onsite event operations
and promote clever problem solving.

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Design:
Frame:
The major design considerations for the frame were weight, stiffness, ergonomics,
functionality and manufacturability, while building off of and improving upon previous UNH
frames. The resulting frame design is a mild steel space frame with an expected final weight of
62 lbs, a 19 lb decrease from last year with a torsional rigidity value of 4431 ft-lbs/. The
efficiency of the frame was increased by a 23% reduction in weight and increasing the stiffness
by 10.2%. This was achieved by the removal of the rear overhang, shortening the front structure
by placing the master cylinders under the pedal mount, and triangulating the front bay to direct
loading from the suspension members. MARC/Mentat was used as the primary FEA package to
iteratively change frame member size, length, and placement which would result in the best
possible configuration for low weight and high stiffness, while maintaining functionality.
Carbon fiber shear panels were used to maintain stiffness in the cockpit and front lower frame
rails where triangulated members are not present.
Ergonomics was also considered when designing the frame. The front roll hoop was
designed with a middle hump to accommodate a larger steering wheel and to also move the
wheel out of the drivers lap, which was detrimental in last years car. The Carbon Fiber seat
was modeled similar to a Karting seat, which makes the driver feel comfortable and in control of
the car at all times.
The CAD package used in frame development was Dassault Systmes SolidWorks,
specifically the Weldments module. An accurate solid model allowed for placement of all major
components inside the tight confines of a racecar frame. This allowed for the removal of 9

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inches off the total length of the frame by more precise packaging of the brake and engine
components.
The frame was constructed using mild steel tubing ranging from .035 to .095 wall
thickness in 5/8, 7/8, and 1 round and square stock. A 1 end mill was used to fish-mouth
tubing and joints were TIG welded. Jigs and a fixture table were used to ensure that the frame
was square and met all dimensions within tolerance.

Suspension:
Ease of manufacturing while still maintaining good performance characteristics was the
goal for the suspension subgroup this year. A convergent, asymmetrical double A-arm design is
used in the front for its proven performance in past vehicles. Pull-rods were selected for
packaging advantages since the shocks can be placed under the vehicle, and the motion ratio can
be set at 1:1 with minimum compromise. Front steer is utilized also because of packaging
constraints and ease of eliminating bump steer. Penske 7800 series shocks are used both front
and rear as they have been used with success in the last four UNH Precision Racing vehicles.
The rear suspension utilizes a solid axle with a 4-link and Watts link for lateral
constraint. This design was selected over the independent design for added durability, easier
manufacturing, and a simplified design process. In the past, there have been problems with
durability of tripods and differentials so using a solid aluminum tube for the rear axle would
eliminate those problems. The Watts link was chosen over a triangulated 4-link for increased
lateral stiffness and easier roll center geometry. Bearing carriers are constructed out of welded
steel. Chain drive is still the choice for driving the rear axle with a sprocket attached to the rear

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axle with a splined aluminum hub. Pull-rod activated bellcranks are used in the rear with shocks
mounted forward of the axle.
This year we strived to maintain low weight while improving stiffness in the
wheel/upright package. Key design features include CNC machined 6061-T6 aluminum front
uprights that are symmetrical across the centerline of the car with bolt on brackets for steering
and caliper mounts. Three-piece wheels with aluminum barrels and magnesium centers maintain
stiffness while decreasing unsprung weight.
The analysis of the suspension and steering geometry was performed using WinGeo 4.0
(Bill Mitchell Suspension Software). This allowed for iterative suspension adjustments to be
performed quickly and immediately to analyze the dynamic performance of the setup. In
addition to WinGeo 4.0 the following programs were also used in the suspension design process:
MathCAD 14, Solidworks, and SolidWorks Simulation for FEA analysis.

Engine:
A 2008 Suzuki GSXR600 engine will provide power for Car 39. With excellent results
last year, the GSXR engine will be used again due to the ease of tuning and the availability of
parts. However, a newer model (2007 vs. 2008) was selected due to its higher compression ratio
and best in class torque. By using this engine the team was able to start from where the previous
year ended and expand the technology within this subgroup, while keeping the overall vehicle
cost in mind.
Car 39 engine design includes a dramatically improved intake manifold. The engine
operates 8000 RPM to 11000 RPM max power tuned intake, with variable 6 and 9 runner
length with a 1.39 inner diameter, variable 2400-3600cc plenium. An improved Tri-Y exhaust

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system with a smaller primary piping was utilized to increase torque. The throttle body and
restrictor assembly was improved to reduce weight, while a baffled 2.5 gallon aluminum gas tank
with fuel-cell foam and in-tank fuel pump was used for fuel storage.
Car 39s intake and exhaust designs include harmonically tuned parameters based on
calculations from Helmholtz resonance theory. A new intake manifold was designed to produce
more low and mid-range torque due to poor overall performance of previous intake designs. The
plenum was redesigned to more effectively distribute air evenly to all four cylinders (used
computational fluid dynamics analysis to confirm even distribution of air flow). The intake
manifold was designed with variable plenum volume and intake runner lengths to account for
maximum power for the constantly changing RPM ranges during throttling. As a result of the
Helmholtz analysis on the variable intake it was determined that the resulting optimum power
range was 8000-11000 RPM.
The exhaust system models the tri-y system. This design produces more low-end
torque and reduces the amount of noise from the exhaust. The fuel tank was increased from two
to two and a half gallons due to last years car running out of fuel. The tank will feature a
lightweight aluminum shell with a low profile and fuel-cell foam which will reduce slosh.
Otto Cycle analysis was performed on the engine in order to determine an effective
cooling system. It was determined that two heater cores from a 1995 Ford F-150 would be more
than sufficient when coupled with a single 7 shroud fan each. The small size and light weight
of the two heater cores is an improvement from previous years, where a single large radiator was
used.

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Controls:
Every system that the driver interacts with on the car during competition has been
designed with an emphasis on ergonomics and minimizing weight. Each component of the
steering, braking, and shifting systems has been designed to be as light as possible without risk
of failure.
The foot controls consist of a throttle and a brake pedal with the pedals mounted to a
plate of 6061-T6 aluminum, which slides fore and aft on four mounting tabs to allow four inches
of adjustability. The pedal mounting plate is elevated two inches above the bottom of the frame
which allows the master cylinders to be mounted underneath the drivers feet, saving valuable
space behind the pedals, which allowed shortening of the frame by three inches, thereby reducing
weight. The two-pedal design is preferred by our drivers since it allows left-foot braking which
will reduce coasting time since the driver doesnt have to switch from throttle to brake with the
same foot. Braking force is transmitted from two Tilton 76 Series master cylinders with bore
diameters of 3/4 and 1 1/8 front and rear, respectively. Two Brembo P32G calipers act on 8.5
diameter, steel rotors in the front, while a single Wilwood GP 320 caliper squeezes a 10
diameter rotor attached to the solid rear axle, thus acting on both rear wheels.
The two-pedal design is made possible through the use of a hand-operated clutch with the
clutch lever mounted directly to the carbon fiber bump shifter, allowing the driver to simply pull
in the clutch lever and shift gears in one fluid motion. This mechanism is mounted directly to
the right of the steering wheel to minimize the amount of time the drivers hand is off the wheel
and is connected to a push/pull cable which is connected to the sequential transmission.
The steering system utilizes a Stiletto rack and pinion with custom steering arm
extensions. The overall steering ratio is 6.5:1. The steering linkage is comprised of 1 inch

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outside diameter carbon fiber tube. The carbon fiber tubing is manufactured with a base layer of
unidirectional fibers wrapped with a thin outer layer of 45 degree weave fiber, which results in
improved torsional strength. A custom carbon fiber steering wheel with an outside diameter of
11 inches will be used. The larger wheel will provide better mechanical advantage and allow for
easier turning. In addition to the extensive use of carbon fiber, the use of only one universal
joint allows the entire system to remain lightweight and robust.

Aerodynamics:
The main design goals for the aerodynamics subgroup are to increase the down force
experienced by the car while also providing air flow to critical cooling components like the
radiators. The effects of drag were not considered to be important due to the relatively low
speeds at which the car is traveling. The main parts of the body that were considered were the
nose, side pods, and rear under tray.
Extensive background research was performed to provide the optimum air flow and down
force for the chosen body design. To verify the design prior to fabrication, a CFD program was
used. Multiple designs were tested using Solidworks. Flow Simulation and compared to each
other qualitatively to find the best design. While several materials were considered, Car 39s
body is going to be built using blue Carbon Fiber because of strength, weight savings, and
aesthetics. Carbon fiber will provide improved airflow over the car by reducing deflection and
increasing the down force on the car. The side pods were designed to take into consideration the
size of the radiator and the air flow to each respective radiator. Also the nose was designed to
decrease the pressure experienced on the front of the car.

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Electrical:
As the electrical subgroup for the UNH Precision Racing team, our main goal is to ensure
the proper realization of the electrical systems required to operate the Formula SAE racecar. For
the racecar to operate properly the car must first be properly wired by creating a wiring harness
that connects the cars electrical systems together. The wiring harness is the primary hub of
wiring that contains all of the vital sensor data that is transmitted to the engine control unit and
the basis for its design is on the original wiring schematic of the 2008 Suzuki GSXR600 engine
which was used in this years car.

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Figure 1:
Wiring Diagram that as used to Design the Wiring Harness for Car 39

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Figure 2:
Actual Wiring Harness Used in Car 39

Using this wiring schematic, a wiring harness was made which contained all of necessary
sensors and accessories that are included on Car 39. However to conform to the goals set forth
by the UNH Precision racing team as a whole, we sought to reduce weight from all of our
components where possible, with the wiring harnesses being no exception. To reduce weight on
the wiring harness we eliminated all of the connections which were not completely necessary to
the cars operation and within the FSAE guidelines. We also furthered our goal by modifying the
wiring harness during our final wiring of the car to fit the car exactly, this allowed us to shorten
excess wiring from certain connectors by trimming off extra length and soldering the ends back
on.
Once the wiring harness was complete, the next step in ensuring that the car can operate
successfully was to provide a power source to the engine starter and to the electrical

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paraphernalia. Continuing along the trend that was established in the choosing of the 2008
Suzuki GSXR600 engine, we decided to use a compact motorcycle battery as our source of
power. The electrical team decided to use the Odyssey Power Sports PC310 battery as it is
capable of providing the cold cranking amps needed to start the engine.
Figure 3:
Photo of the Odyssey Battery Used in Car 39

This year the electrical sub group wanted to focus on taking the achievements of the
teams of the past and building upon them while taking the overall focus and goals of the team.
Last year the electrical subgroup designed and built a data acquisition system which was
mounted on the computer and monitored the performance of the car in real time. This data was
acquired and storied in the systems internal memory for analysis; it was this system that inspired
our design for this years car.
Our original goal was to create a data acquisition much as they had the previous year, but
to expand on this concept and use it to create a real time display for the driver. This system
would not only record data on the cars performance but allow the driver to view this data in real

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time, providing him with information that is crucial for making the best decisions possible on the
race track. After exploring several options to accomplish this task we decided to implement a
Pocket PC, or Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), as our data acquisition system. This type of
technology provided us with the unique blend of the computational power necessary to function
as a data acquisition system, as well as the compact size that provides a reasonable dashboard
display for the driver.
The PDA that we chose to develop our system on was the Palm Treo 750. This particular
model posses wireless internet, Bluetooth capability, as well as a compact and light weight
design. Although ideally we would have liked to use a different model, due to budget
constrictions, we were unable to afford the purchase of a new device; however, we were
fortunate enough to receive the Palm Treo 750 as a donation.

Figure 4:
Photo of the Palm Treo 750 which was Donated to the Team for Use as a Data Acquisition system

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Implementation and Testing:


The Versatile Engine Management System V3.3 (VEMS) is designed to be a fully
programmable ECU. It allows the user to program new engine maps by connecting serially to a
computer. The implementation began by running all of the sensors we needed from the engine to
the VEMS. The sensors that we used were, engine temperature, oil pressure, fuel pressure,
exhaust temperature, RPM, gear sensor, and throttle position. We ran 12 volts to all of the
sensors and the VEMs would act as a ground controlling when everything was on or off. We then
took the VEMs and used Megatunes to monitor that the device under test was actually receiving
the signals we thought it was receiving. We then double checked all of the pinouts versus our
harness to verify that the harness was connected properly. After we verified the wiring was
correct we used a digital multi meters continuity feature to ensure solid connections all around.
Once it was confirmed that the VEMs was working properly we then used Megatunes in
conjunction with the power train team to tune the car to its optimal performance. The car initially
would not start because RPM sensor was sending the VEMs bad information. This caused the
VEMs to raise the amount of gas delivered to the engine and the excess gas was being shot out of
the exhaust. Upon testing we found that the ground wire to that sensor was not connected
securely and by fixing that connection the car was able to start and run smoothly.

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Figure 5:
Photo of the Wiring Harness Seen in Figure 3 Installed in Car 39

The relay box design was implemented by first looking at the rules from competition
and designing around those. It was required that a relay be placed on the starter so we had to
connect power through the relay and use a dash mounted switch to control the starter which
would then power the engine. The relay allows large amount of current to be controlled by a
small switch normally controlled by the driver. The VEMs was also controlled by a relay which
allowed the driver to turn off the VEMs in an emergency. For our relay box we choose to use
the directed 451m door relay made by Direct Electronics Incorporated.

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Figure 6:
Photo of the Relay Box Used in Car 39

Another rule was to have at least two emergency shut off systems in the car. Our car had
3 shut off switches. There were two shutoffs located on the dash and the last switch was behind
the brake. The reason for the brake overshoot switch is if the brake goes out the switch will be
tripped and the car will automatically shut off. The brake switch was put into effect the first test
run. The driver tried to stop the car and the brake line broke causing the driver to hit the kill
switch. When the car finally stopped it was noted that the brake switched performed its duty and
the car was completely off. This is especially important because it will ensure that no fires will
start upon impact because the engine and power will already be off before impact.

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Figure 7:
Photo of the Brake Overshoot Kill Switch

During competition the electrical team noticed that the battery that we were using needed
to be charged after every start. This was not an issue initially because all of the competitions
needed to start only once and then the stator built into the engine would take care of running the
car. However, the endurance competition needed the car to start twice, once at the beginning of
the event, and then again after the driver change. This posed a problem for us since we are
unable to modify the car in any way during the event, which includes jump starting the car. We
decided that the best method to insure that enough cranking amps would reach the engine and not
drain the batteries was to connect another identical battery in parallel with the first battery.

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Once the batteries were connected the car had no issue starting multiple times and the batteries
were lasting much longer due to the sharing of the starter load.
Figure 8:
Photo of the Outer Battery Connected in Parallel with the battery inside of the car (not shown)

Out dashboard design was based on the concepts of ease of vision and use for the driver.
With this in mind we included a brake bias line, three LEDs, a kill switch, tachometer, two
power switches, and ignition button. The brake bias line allows the driver to bias the pressure of
the brake system to the front or rear depending on the drivers particular style, weather
conditions, or the particular track on which he is racing. The three LEDs were 10 mm Light
Jumbo Super Bright Light Emitting Diodes made by HY LED. They provide quick information

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to the driver regarding engine temperature, oil pressure, and if the engine was in neutral. The
lights were designed by limiting their current utilizing a 510 resistor in series with the LEDs,
we were able to limit the current to 2.4 mA thus staying within the operation range of the LED.
The output signal that controlled the activation of the LEDs came from the engine control unit
which was programmed to specify the acceptable ranges of operation, and would send a signal to
turn on the warning lights if the sensors detected data outside of the acceptable range. The kill
switch was run through another relay and when used disables all of the electrical systems of the
car, allowing the driver total control.
The tachometer used was the GR2-TACH-07 made by Revolution, we chose this
tachometer because it was fully programmable, allowing us to program the desired shift RPMs.
The tachometer stored these desired RPMs and would activate a shift light upon reaching them,
allowing the driver to pay minimal attention to the tachometer by simply paying attention to the
LED. This feature was a significant factor in the cars ease of use, allowing even inexperienced
drivers to shift properly while still devoting their attention to the course. The tachometer also
includes a back light giving the driver the option of driving in low light conditions.
The two power switches mounted on the dashboard control power to the VEMs engine
control unit. This is essence acts as the third kill switch on the car as cutting power to the engine
control unit immediately stops the engine. The ignition button is a simple push button switch
which is connected to the starter relay. This button was placed on the right side of the
dashboard, based on the fact that the majority of the members of the UNH Precision Racing
Team were right handed, as well as both of the main drivers.

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Figure 9:
Photo of the Dash Including Brake Bias, LEDs, Kill Switch, Tachometer, Power Switches and Starter

To accomplish the challenge of developing a data acquisition system we had to find a


way to allow the PDA to communicate with the engine control unit on the car. By integrating the
data acquisition system with the engine control unit, the system will have access to all of the
sensor readings and calculations which are preformed to monitor the cars performance.
Unfortunately, it was in this stage of the system creation which we ran into problems.
When attempting to interface the PDA with the engine control unit, we ran into
difficulties getting the PDA to recognize that a connection had taken place. This problem is a
result of the fact that Palm Treo uses a Windows Mobile operating system which utilizes

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different drivers than the standard Windows desktop operating systems, such as Windows XP.
Unfortunately, the availability of drivers is significantly worse for the Windows Mobile
platform, and without the proper installation of drivers, the Palm Treo was unable to successfully
communicate with the engine control unit as it was not able to properly recognize the cable
connecting the two systems together.
Although we believe this problem to be solvable, we were unable to successfully
implement a solution in the limited time available between the time in which the car was running
and the competition. Unfortunately, due to the limited time frame in which the car is constructed
the UNH Precision Racing Team fell behind schedule for the construction of the car. This
resulted in a window of only 5 days before we left for competition in which the car was running.
Most of this limited time frame was spent helping the mechanical engineers to finish the
components necessary to finalize the car as well as ensure that the electrical components on the
car were capable of withstanding the rigors of the trip and competition. However, if more time
was available to seek out a solution, we would most likely look to achieve this by designing and
writing a driver which would allow the Palm Treo to communicate successfully with the engine
control unit.

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Evaluation:
As a team, the UNH Precision Racing Team sought to design a Formula SAE racecar that
would be the best car UNH has ever produced. To achieve this goal we wanted to finish the
overall Formula SAE Michigan competition better than we ever had, with our goal being within
the top twenty. To accomplish this task we had to focus on all of the events of the competition,
as well ensuring that our car met all of the safety and technical standards put forth by the Society
of Automotive Engineers. The competition is broken down into two separate types of events,
static which involve all of the events in which the car is not moving, and dynamic which involve
the cars performance. Each team who completes an event is awarded an amount of percentage of
the total points available for the event based on their performance.
Table 1:
Table Showing the Breakdown of Possible Points at the Competition

The first static event is that of the design report and the design judging. For this event the
students must demonstrate the creative thought processes that they underwent along the design
and construction of their racecar to a panel of professional engineers in the automotive industry.
The judges examine each of the racecars entered into the competition and discuss the design with

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the students that produced it with the intent of examining the engineering effort and how the
design meets the needs of the theoretic market set forth by the competition. The team that
designs their racecar to best embrace the needs of this market as well demonstrates the
knowledge necessary for the competition will win. For this years competition the UNH team
finished 41st in the design portion.
The second static event is that of the cost report, which is based off of the assumption that
one thousand replications will be built per year following the construction of the prototype. This
event requires the students to understand and embrace the manufacturing techniques and
processes of the components that are purchased for the construction of the car. Each team must
document the components that are used during construction, and their associated costs. The
judges then evaluate each car comparing the submitted cost report to the actual components of
the car ensuring that the overall cost of production is accurate. This year the UNH team finished
15th in the cost report portion of the competition.
The final static event is that of the marketing presentation, which is based on the idea of
selling the design of the car to a theoretical automotive manufacturer. A business plan must be
drawn up and demonstrated to the panel of judges who evaluate if the teams design meets the
demands of an amateur formula racing market. The UNH team finished the marketing
presentation in 75th place, a disappointing finish considering the low cost of the car that allowed
us to perform so well in the cost report.
The first dynamic event is that of the acceleration test, which evaluates the cars ability to
travel a distance of 75 meters from a standing start. The UNH team finished 44th in the
competition, which was a disappointing finish considering the potential of our car.

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Unfortunately, we were only able to perform one of our possible four runs as we were late to the
event due to last minute finishing by some of the mechanical engineers.
The second dynamic event is that of the Autocross, which is designed to evaluate the
maneuverability and handling of each teams racecar on a closed road course without the
hindrance of competing cars. The event is intended to test the acceleration, braking, and
cornering of the car and the skills of the driver. The UNH team finished 34th in this event which
was a solid performance considering it was the first chance for both of the teams drivers to drive
the racecar in a competitive environment.
The third dynamic event is that of the skidpad, which examines the cars ability to absorb
lateral forces of up to 1.4 g and make turns at high speeds. This is done by having the cars drive
around a track consisting of two concentric circles in the shape of a figure eight while
maintaining a constant radius turn. The UNH team finished this event in 65th place which was a
result of a timing error in the cars throttle which caused the car to have a spike in the amount of
air taken into the engine prior to entering a turn which caused an unwanted acceleration.
The final dynamic event is that of the endurance and fuel efficiency. Over the course of a
22 km race, two drivers for each team must demonstrate their cars acceleration, top speed,
handling, dynamics, fuel economy, and reliability. Each driver must drive for exactly half of the
race totaling in 11 km each. After the first driver finishes his portion of the race the car is driven
into the pit where it is shut off and inspected to ensure there are no issues. If the car passes
inspection the second driver then takes his turn and finishes the final 11 km of the race.
Unfortunately, this years UNH Precision Racing team was unable to finish the event, as an
overflow oil hose came loose during the first half of the race and was caught during the driver
change. As a result of this we were disqualified from the event and were not awarded any points

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for this portion of the competition even though it was a simple fix. However, during the first half
of the race our driver was recording lap times that were comparable to the leaders at the time and
even passed five cars during his 11 km.
Conclusion:
As a whole the results of the competition were a success, with our placing being well on
our way towards achieving our goals until we were disqualified from the endurance event. Even
with our disqualification our team still finished better than half of the teams who entered the
competition with a 55th place finish. However, like any good team we seek out ways to improve
for next year and for our next competition, and we can do this by looking back at what we have
done incorrectly this year. Much of the problems that arose during competition were due to the
late completion of the car, which prevented proper testing. In any engineering endeavor, ideally
one third of the time should be devoted to design, the second third to construction, and the final
to testing. However, with the car being finished only days before the competition the drivers had
little to no experience racing the car, as well no time to properly tune the car.
For those seeking to expand upon the data acquisition system for the UNH FSAE
racecar we recommend pushing for the team to begin design of the car in May rather than
September, this should allow for construction to begin halfway through the first semester,
resulting in at least half a semester of testing. This will provide the time necessary to work on
the unforeseen issues that arise in any engineering project.
Although this years UNH Precision Racing team did not meet their overall goal
of finishing in the top twenty of the Formula SAE Michigan competition, we did produce what
we believe to the best car that has ever been built by the team. It is a step in the right direction
for the future of the team as we refined our engineering skills and built a platform on which next

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years team can grow. Using the lessons that we have learned over the course of this year next
years team will be able to develop an even better car then that which was produced this year.

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