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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

MALC 723, MALC 719, and MALC 319

For software version 1.11.2


June 2005
Document Part Number: 830-00989-01

Zhone Technologies
@Zhone Way
7001 Oakport Street
Oakland, CA 94621
USA
510.777.7000
www.zhone.com
info@zhone.com
COPYRIGHT 2000-2005 Zhone Technologies, Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved.
This publication is protected by copyright law. No part of this publication may be copied or
distributed, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any human
or computer language in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, manual
or otherwise, or disclosed to third parties without the express written permission from Zhone
Technologies, Inc.
BAN, GigaMux, MALC, Raptor, SLMS, Z-Edge, Zhone, ZMS, and the Zhone logo are
trademarks of Zhone Technologies, Inc.
Zhone Technologies makes no representation or warranties with respect to the contents hereof
and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability, noninfringement, or
fitness for a particular purpose. Further, Zhone Technologies reserves the right to revise this
publication and to make changes from time to time in the contents hereof without obligation of
Zhone Technologies to notify any person of such revision or changes.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

CONTENTS
Whats new in this release .....................................................................................11
Style and notation conventions............................................................................11
Typographical conventions.....................................................................................12
Related documentation...........................................................................................12
Acronyms....................................................................................................................13
Contacting Global Service and Support.............................................................14
Technical support....................................................................................................14
Service requirements...............................................................................................14

Chapter 1

MALC ..........................................................................................................................15
Overview .....................................................................................................................15
Hardware overview...................................................................................................16
Chassis ....................................................................................................................16
MALC 17- and 21-slot chassis.........................................................................17
MALC 319 chassis ...........................................................................................17
MALC Uplink cards ...............................................................................................18
MALC slot cards.....................................................................................................18
MALC buses ...........................................................................................................19
Control bus .......................................................................................................20
Supervisory bus ................................................................................................20
Metallic test access bus ....................................................................................20
Ring voltage bus...............................................................................................20
TDM bus...........................................................................................................20
Features ......................................................................................................................20
ATM........................................................................................................................21
AAL2-BLES signaling .....................................................................................21
IMA ..................................................................................................................21
ATM cell relay .................................................................................................22
Management PVC ............................................................................................22
ATM-to-TDM interworking ...................................................................................22
T1/E1 circuit emulation ..........................................................................................22
IP and data services.................................................................................................23
GR-303 and V5.2 ....................................................................................................24
GR-303 overview .............................................................................................24
ISDN overview.................................................................................................25
V5.2 overview ..................................................................................................25

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Contents

POTS voice .............................................................................................................26


VoIP ........................................................................................................................27
MGCP overview...............................................................................................27
SIP overview ....................................................................................................28
Voice gateway.........................................................................................................28
Packet voice support ...............................................................................................29
Redundancy.............................................................................................................31
Uplink card redundancy ...................................................................................31
APS...................................................................................................................31
Working card and protection card ....................................................................33
SONET/SDH APS + card redundancy.............................................................33
Management............................................................................................................33

Chapter 2

Preparing for installation ...................................................................................35


General safety precautions....................................................................................35
Safety ......................................................................................................................35
Preventing electrostatic damage .............................................................................37
Power supply safety information ............................................................................37
Tools you need..........................................................................................................37
Selecting the system location...............................................................................38
Installation precautions ..........................................................................................38
Environmental specifications ...............................................................................39
Power requirements and specifications.............................................................41
Cabling rules ...........................................................................................................41
Power specifications ...............................................................................................42
Chassis power consumption....................................................................................42
Grounding and isolation.........................................................................................42
Compliance and certifications ..............................................................................43

Chapter 3

Installing the MALC ..............................................................................................45


Unpacking the system.............................................................................................45
Installing mounting brackets on the MALC.......................................................46
Installing the chassis in a rack .............................................................................47
Wall mounting the MALC 319 chassis ................................................................49
Installing slot cards ................................................................................................50
Installation guidelines .............................................................................................50
Removing slot cards................................................................................................53
Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis........................55
Reading the LEDs.....................................................................................................63
Replacing the air filter .............................................................................................65

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Chapter 4

System cables and connectors .......................................................................67


Cabling guidelines....................................................................................................67
Connecting optical ATM trunking cables...........................................................68
Dressing DSL and POTS cables ...........................................................................68
Securing amphenol connectors ...........................................................................72
Cable descriptions ...................................................................................................73
Alarm cable and contacts guidelines..................................................................75
Uplink card pinouts..................................................................................................77
Serial (craft) port pinouts ........................................................................................78
Ethernet port pinouts...............................................................................................78
Fiber optic maintenance and handling ...............................................................79
Laser radiation ........................................................................................................79
Handling optical fibers............................................................................................80
Selecting cleaning materials ...................................................................................81

Chapter 5

Managing the MALC .............................................................................................83


Logging into the serial (craft) port.......................................................................83
Configuring a management interface..................................................................84
Uplink card 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface.........................................................84
ATM management connection................................................................................86
Managing the MALC with ZMS.............................................................................88

Chapter 6

Gigabit Ethernet card (UPLINK-2-GE) ...........................................................91


Overview .....................................................................................................................92
GigE-2 Uplink card configuration.........................................................................94
Small form factor pluggables ................................................................................99

Chapter 7

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8) ..............................................103


Overview ...................................................................................................................103
T1/E1 ATM/IP card configuration........................................................................105
Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces............................................................................107
Configuring IMA groups .......................................................................................112
Overview...............................................................................................................115
Configuring IMA groups ......................................................................................116
T1/E1 IMA cable and port pinouts ......................................................................117
T1/E1-IMA Uplink port pinouts ...........................................................................117
8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable (T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink) ..................118
Dual 8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable (T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink) .........120

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Contents

Chapter 8

DS3/E3 Uplink card (Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP) ...........................................125


Overview ...................................................................................................................126
DS3/E3 card configuration ...................................................................................128
Configuring DS3/E3 interfaces............................................................................130
DS3/E3 Uplink cable...............................................................................................133

Chapter 9

OC-3C/STM1 Uplink Card (Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP) .....................135


Overview ...................................................................................................................136
OC3C/STM1 Uplink card configuration.............................................................138
Configuring OC-3c/STM1 interfaces..................................................................139
APS.............................................................................................................................143

Chapter 10 OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards .................................................................................147


Overview ...................................................................................................................148
OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink card configuration ...............................................151
Configuring OC-12c/STM4 interfaces................................................................155
Configuring Ethernet interfaces .........................................................................158
APS.............................................................................................................................163
T1/E1 TDM cables ...................................................................................................166
Redundant T1/E1 TDM cable (OC12/STM4/GE Uplink card)............................166
Non-redundant T1/E1 TDM cable (OC12/STM4/GE Uplink card) .....................169

Chapter 11 TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP) ..............................173


Overview ...................................................................................................................174
T1/E1 TDM Uplink card configuration ...............................................................176
Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces............................................................................178
Configuring IMA groups .......................................................................................182
Overview...............................................................................................................185
Configuring IMA groups ......................................................................................186
T1/E1-ATM/TDM cables .........................................................................................187
Redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable....................................................................187
Non-redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable.............................................................190

Chapter 12 System Configuration ........................................................................................193


Adding redundant Uplink cards..........................................................................193
Dual, non-redundant Uplink cards.....................................................................200
Managing the MALC over a non-redundant Uplink.............................................204
System clocking......................................................................................................204
6

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview...............................................................................................................204

Chapter 13 ADSL cards ............................................................................................................213


Overview ...................................................................................................................213
Transmission modes..............................................................................................214
G.lite ...............................................................................................................214
Full rate ..........................................................................................................214
G.dmt..............................................................................................................214
Rate adaption ........................................................................................................215
Training.................................................................................................................215
24-port single-slot ADSL card (ADSL-24) ..........................................................216
24-port ADSL+POTS card (ADSL+POTS-24-2S) ..............................................217
32-port ADSL card (ADSL-32A) .........................................................................219
32-port ADSL+POTS card (ADSL+POTS-32A-2S) ...........................................221
32-port ADSL+Splitter card (ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-2S) ..........................223
32-port ADSL+Splitter-UK card (ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S) ............225
48-port ADSL cards (ADSL-48) ..........................................................................226
48-port ADSL card with splitter (ADSL + SPLTR-48A-2S) ...............................228
48 port ADSL+POTS (ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S and ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S) ................................................................................230
Activating ADSL cards ..........................................................................................232
Configuring ADSL interfaces ..............................................................................239
Overview...............................................................................................................239
Configuring ADSL S=1/2 .....................................................................................248
Overview ........................................................................................................249
Configuring ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+ .....................................................................252
Configuring POTS ports .......................................................................................257
ADSL cable and port pinouts ..............................................................................261
ADSL card port pinouts ........................................................................................261
ADSL 24 port card pinouts ............................................................................261
ADSL 32 port card pinouts ............................................................................262
ADSL 48 card pinouts....................................................................................264
ADSL cable pinouts..............................................................................................267
ADSL-32 to dual-50-pin cable pinouts ..........................................................267
ADSL-32 multi-connector cable pinouts .......................................................270
ADSL-48 to dual 50-pin connector cable ......................................................278

Chapter 14 SHDSL cards .........................................................................................................285


Overview ...................................................................................................................285
24-port SHDSL card (G.SHDSL-24)....................................................................286
SHDSL-24 card (SHDSL-24-LP) ..................................................................287
SHDSL 4-wire card (G.SHDSL-4W-12)..............................................................289
Activating SHDSL cards .......................................................................................289
Configuring SDSL interfaces...............................................................................292
Automatic baud rate adaption and fixed rate settings...........................................292

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Contents

Configuration restrictions .....................................................................................293


Configuring SHDSL interfaces............................................................................297
SHDSL pinouts ........................................................................................................303
SDHSL-LP connector ...........................................................................................303
SHDSL-LP IN connector......................................................................................304
G.SHDSL 4-Wire pinouts.....................................................................................306
SHDSL-24 pinouts................................................................................................307
Delivering power and data to a Raptor 100 SHDSL-LP ................................308

Chapter 15 POTS cards ............................................................................................................311


Overview ...................................................................................................................311
24-port POTS card (POTS-24 and POTS-900-24) ..............................................312
48-port POTS card (POTS-TDM-48 and POTS-TDM/PKT-48) .........................313
Configuring POTS cards.......................................................................................314
Configuring POTS ports .......................................................................................317

Chapter 16 Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S) ......................................................323


Overview ...................................................................................................................323
Adding a voice gateway card ..............................................................................325
Adding a redundant voice gateway card .........................................................326
Pinouts ......................................................................................................................327
Voice gateway non-redundant TDM cable ...........................................................328
Voice gateway redundant TDM cable............................................................333

Chapter 17 VDSL Card (VDSL-16) ........................................................................................339


Overview ...................................................................................................................339
Configuring VDSL interfaces...............................................................................342
VDSL-16 and VDSL-16+Splitter pinouts ...........................................................343

Chapter 18 T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32) .............................................................345


Overview ...................................................................................................................346
Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces............................................................................350
Configuring IMA groups .......................................................................................354
Overview...............................................................................................................357
Configuring IMA groups ......................................................................................358
T1/E1 32 port TDM cable.......................................................................................359

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Chapter 19 T1/E1 CES 12-port card .....................................................................................365


Overview ...................................................................................................................365
CES card configuration.........................................................................................366
Pinouts ......................................................................................................................368

Chapter 20 Universal Line Card (ULC-ISDN-12) .............................................................371


Overview ...................................................................................................................372
Viewing ULC card configuration profiles.........................................................375
ULC card pinouts....................................................................................................376

Chapter 21 PON Card (PON-OLT) .........................................................................................379


Overview ...................................................................................................................379
Configuring a PON interface................................................................................382

Chapter 22 Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and


MTAC-FC) 387
Overview ...................................................................................................................388
Ringing generator..................................................................................................389
External test access ...............................................................................................389
Connecting the MTAC/Ring card........................................................................393
Testing a line............................................................................................................393
Connecting external alarms.................................................................................395
Connecting an external clock .............................................................................395
Connecting an external ring source ..................................................................396
MTAC/Ring and MTAC-FC card pinouts...........................................................398
External ring generator .........................................................................................398
External alarm pinouts ..........................................................................................399
External test access ...............................................................................................401
External test control ..............................................................................................401
External clock pinouts (MTAC/Ring card)...........................................................401
External clock pinouts (MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card).........................................402

Index ....................................................................................................................................................403

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Contents

10

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ABOUT THIS GUIDE

This guide is intended for use by installation technicians, system


administrators, network administrators. It explains how to install the MALC
chassis and cards and how to provision the physical interfaces. For
information on configuring voice, data, and video services on the MALC,
refer to the MALC Configuration Guide.

Whats new in this release


The following information is new in this release:

Packet voice support on page 29 describes the cards supported in VOIP


applications.

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8) on page 103 describes the


GigaBit Ethernet card hardware and explains how to install it.

ADSL cards on page 213 describes the following new ADSL cards:

ADSL 48 port card with Splitter (ADSL + SPLTR-48A-2S)

ADSL 48 port card with TDM POTS support


(ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S)

ADSL 48 port card with TDM POTS and packet voice support
(ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S)

ADSL cards on page 213 describes the 48-port ADSL+POTS cards


explains how to install them.

POTS cards on page 311 describes the 48-port POTS cards explains how
to install them.

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S) on page 323 describes the Voice


Gateway card hardware and explains how to install it.

Style and notation conventions


The following conventions are used in this document to alert users to
information that is instructional, warns of potential damage to system

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

11

About This Guide

equipment or data, and warns of potential injury or death. Carefully read and
follow the instructions included in this document.
Caution: A caution alerts users to conditions or actions that could
damage equipment or data.
Note: A note provides important supplemental or amplified
information.
Tip: A tip provides additional information that enables users to more
readily complete their tasks.
WARNING! A warning alerts users to conditions or actions that
could lead to injury or death.
WARNING! A warning with this icon alerts users to conditions or
actions that could lead to injury caused by a laser.

Typographical conventions
The following typographical styles are used in this guide to represent specific
types of information.
Bold

Used for names of buttons, dialog boxes, icons, menus,


profiles when placed in body text, and property pages (or
sheets). Also used for commands, options, parameters in
body text, and user input in body text.

Fixed

Used in code examples for computer output, file names, path


names, and the contents of online files or directories.

Fixed Bold

Used in code examples for text typed by users.

Fixed Bold
Italic

Used in code examples for variable text typed by users.

Italic

Used for book titles, chapter titles, file path names, notes in
body text requiring special attention, section titles,
emphasized terms, and variables.

PLAIN UPPER
CASE

Used for environment variables.

Related documentation
Refer to the following publication for additional information:
MALC Configuration Guideexplains how to configure voice, data, and
video services on the MALC.

12

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Acronyms

Zhone CLI Reference Guideexplains how to use the Zhone command line
interface (CLI) and describes the system commands and parameters.
Refer to the release notes for software installation information and for
changes in features and functionality of the product (if any).

Acronyms
The following acronyms are related to Zhone products and may appear
throughout this manual:
Table 1: Acronyms and their descriptions
Acronym

Description

ADSL

Asymmetrical digital subscriber line

ARP

Address resolution protocol

ATM

Asynchronous Transfer Mode

BAN

Broadband Access Node

CID

Channel identifier

DSL

Digital subscriber line

SHDSL

Symmetric high-bit-rate digital subscriber line

IAD

Integrated access device

MALC

Multi-access line concentrator

MIB

Management information bases

MTAC

Metallic Test Access Card

MTAC-FC

Metallic Test Access Card with fan controller

PBX

Private branch exchange

POTS

Plain old telephone service

RIP

Routing Information Protocol

SDSL

Symmetric digital subscriber line

SHDSL

Symmetric high-bit-rate digital subscriber line

SLMS

Single Line Multi-Service

SNMP

Simple Network Management Protocol

TFTP

Trivial File Transfer Protocol

VCI

Virtual channel identifier

VCL

Virtual channel link

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

13

About This Guide

Table 1: Acronyms and their descriptions


Acronym

Description

VPI

Virtual path identifier

ZMS

Zhone Management System

Contacting Global Service and Support


Contact Global Service and Support (GSS) if you have any questions about
this or other Zhone products. Before contacting GSS, make sure you have the
following information:

Zhone product you are using

System configuration

Software version running on the system

Description of the issue

Technical support
If you require assistance with the installation or operation of your product, or
if you want to return a product for repair under warranty, contact GSS. The
contact information is as follows:
E-mail

support@zhone.com

Telephone (North America)

877-ZHONE20

Telephone (International)

510-777-7133

Internet

www.zhone.com/support

If you purchased the product from an authorized dealer, distributor, Value


Added Reseller (VAR), or third party, contact that supplier for technical
assistance and warranty support.

Service requirements
If the product malfunctions, all repairs must be performed by the
manufacturer or a Zhone-authorized agent. It is the responsibility of users
requiring service to report the need for service to GSS.

14

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

MALC
This chapter provides an overview of the MALC. It includes the following
sections:

Overview, page 15

Hardware overview, page 16

Features, page 20

Overview
The Multi-Access Line Concentrator (MALC) platform provides low-cost,
high-density subscriber access concentration in the Zhone Single Line
Multi-Service (SLMS) architecture.
The MALC is a next generation design that carries voice and data services
over Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Time-division multiplexing
(TDM) uplinks, or Internet Protocol (IP) uplinks. The MALC uplinks are the
primary communication channel between subscribers and upstream
networking devices. The MALC aggregates local loop traffic from a variety
of media and sends it to an upstream device, such as ATM switch, PSTN
switch, or IP router.
The MALC can be deployed in Central Office environments, outdoor
cabinets, or controlled environmental vaults for remote terminal applications.
The MALC is intended for restricted access locations only.
The single uplink from the MALC enables network providers to provision all
classes of services in a single platform and leverage the existing copper
infrastructure going to the Digital Loop Carrier (DLC) locations.
MALC cards are divided into the following general types:

Uplink cards provide ATM, TDM or IP uplinks

Access cards provide customer interfaces such as Plain Old Telephone


Service (POTS) and Digital Subscriber Line (DSL).

System services cards such as the Metallic Test Access (MTAC) cards
provide services to the MALC

The MALC supports the following types of uplinks:

DS3/E3 UNI mode

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

15

MALC

Ethernet

GR-303 or V5.2

OC-3c/STM1

OC12/STM4

T1/E1 Inverse Multiplexing over ATM (IMA)

T1/E1 User-Network Interface (UNI) mode

Figure 1 shows the different types of network configurations supported by the


MALC.
Figure 1: MALC configurations

ATM Uplink
(All Uplink cards)

AAL2/AAL5

POTS

GR-303 or V5.2 TDM Uplink


(TDM Uplink card)

ATM

PSTN

Hardware overview
This sections describes the MALC hardware, including:

Chassis on page 16

MALC Uplink cards on page 18

MALC slot cards on page 18

MALC buses on page 19

Chassis
There are three types of MALC chassis:

16

a 23-inch wide, 7U high unit containing 21 slots (MALC 723)

a 19-inch wide 7U high unit contains 17 slots (MALC 719)

a 19-inch wide 3U high unit contains 10 slots (MALC 319)

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Hardware overview

MALC 17- and 21-slot chassis


The 17-slot unit and the 21-slot unit are functionally equivalent, the only
difference is the number of slots supported.
The far left slot (slot 1) is for Uplink cards only. Any other type of card can be
installed in slots 2 through 21. Cables and connectors are accessed from the
front of the chassis. Power is supplied by dual 48V DC input power. At the
top of the unit is a removable fan tray. Airflow through the unit is from front
bottom to top rear. The chassis is Network Equipment Building System
(NEBS) level 3-compliant. (See Figure 2).
The Uplink cards, the primary control and management functions for the
system, can be installed in a redundant pair to provide card-level redundancy.
Figure 2: MALC 21-slot chassis

MALC 319 chassis


The MALC 319 supports all the same slot cards as the MALC with the
exception of the MTAC-FC card. The MTAC-FC card is only supported in the
MALC 319 and each MALC 319 must contain an MTAC-FC card.
The following guidelines must be observed when installing slot cards into the
MALC 319 chassis:

The top left slot (slot 1) is reserved for Uplink cards. Uplink cards can
only be installed in one of these slots.

The MTAC-FC card must be installed in the bottom right slot (slot 10).

Any other type of card can be installed in slots 2 through 9.

Cables and connectors (except for power cables) are accessed from the front
of the chassis. Power cables enter the device at the lower right rear of the unit.
Power is supplied by dual 48V DC input power. Airflow through the unit is
from left to right. The chassis is Network Equipment Building System
(NEBS) level 3-compliant. (See Figure 3).

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

17

MALC

Figure 3: MALC 319 chassis

MALC Uplink cards


Note: Only one type of Uplink interface can be active in the system
at a time.
The MALC supports the following Uplink cards:

Uplink-2-GE

Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP

Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP

Uplink-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP

High peformance OC12/STM-4 card with single GigE LX port

High peformance OC12/STM-4 card with single GigE SX port

Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP

Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP

MALC slot cards


The MALC supports the following slot cards:

18

ADSL-24 (single-slot, 24-port ADSL card)

ADSL+POTS-24-2S (2-slot, 24-port ADSL card with POTS)

ADSL-32A (single-slot, 32-port ADSL card)

ADSL+POTS-32A-2S (2-slot, 32-port ADSL card with POTS)

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-2S (2-slot, 32-port ADSL card with splitter)

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S (2-slot, 32-port ADSL card with


splitter that complies with UK standards)

ADSL-48A (single-slot, 48-port ADSL Annex A card)

ADSL-48B (single-slot, 48-port ADSL Annex B card)

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Hardware overview

ADSL+SPLTR-48A-2S (single-slot, 48-port ADSL Annex A card with


splitters)

ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S (2-slot, 48-port ADSL card with TDM POTS


support)

ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S (2-slot, 48-port ADSL card with TDM


POTS and packet voice support)

G.SHDSL-24 (24-port G.SHDSL card)

G.SHDSL-4W-12 (12-port G.SHDSL 4-wire card)

MTAC/RING (Metallic Test Access card with ringing generator)

MTAC/RING-2Mhz-Clk (Metallic Test Access card with ringing


generator and 2.048 clock reference port)

MTAC-FC (Metallic Test Access card with fan controller and ringing
generator). Supported on the MALC 319 only.

PON-OLT (Passive optical networking card)

POTS-24 (24-port POTS only card)

POTS-900-24 (24-port 900 ohm POTS card)

POTS-TDM-48 (48-port POTS card with TDM POTS support)

POTS-TDM/PKT-48 (48-port POTS card with TDM POTS and packet


voice support)

SHDSL-24-LP (24 port SHDSL card with line power capabilities for
Raptor 100 devices)

T1/E1-ATM-32 (32 port T1/E1 card)

T1/E1-CES-12 (12 port T1/E1 Circuit Emulation Service card)

ULC-ISDN-12 (Universal Line Card)

VDSL-16 (16 port VDSL card)

VG-T1/E1 (2-slot voice gateway card with 4, 8, 16, or 32 ports)

MALC buses
The MALC chassis contains the following buses.

Control bus

Supervisory bus

Metallic test access bus

Ring voltage bus

TDM bus

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

19

MALC

Control bus
This bus is used for program loading and high-level message transfer between
MALC cards.

Supervisory bus
This bus is used by the active Uplink cards for low-level control and
monitoring of the other cards.

Metallic test access bus


The metallic test access bus is used by the MTAC card to gain access to cards
and the buses in the system.

Ring voltage bus


The ring voltage bus provides ringing voltage to the cards, such as the POTS
card, that require it. The MTAC card generates the ringing voltage and
controls access to the ring voltage bus.

TDM bus
The TDM bus is used by the POTS cards to send pulse code modulation
(PCM)-encoded voice traffic to the Uplink card. The Uplink card performs
the TDM-to-ATM conversion to send the TDM data to the ATM network.
Each TDM channel on the bus is assigned to a fixed channel on a POTS card.

Features
This section describes some key features of the MALC, including:

20

ATM on page 21

ATM-to-TDM interworking on page 22

T1/E1 circuit emulation on page 22

IP and data services on page 23

GR-303 and V5.2 on page 24

POTS voice on page 26

VoIP on page 27

Voice gateway on page 28

Packet voice support on page 29

Redundancy on page 31

Management on page 33

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Features

ATM
The MALC provides the following ATM support:

AAL2 termination and Broadband Loop Emulation Service (BLES)


signaling for all POTS cards, provided by the Uplink card.

ATM cell relay functions between an ATM switch and ATM-based IADs.
The MALC provides the Customer Premises Interworking Function
(CP-IWF) functions of the AAL2 BLES specification.

Unspecified bit rate (UBR), real-time variable bit rate-(rt-VBR), non


real-time variable bit rate (nrt-VBR), and constant bit rate (CBR) traffic.

Connection admission control (CAC) and provisioning of


oversubscription factors on a per port and per service category basis. The
CAC functions on the Uplink card will not accept new connections if they
exceed the remaining virtual bandwidth.

Policing to enforce the service contracts specified in the ATM traffic


descriptors.

ATM User-Network Interface (UNI) 3.0 and 3.1, and portions of 4.0

IMA functions to concentrate ATM traffic from up to T1/E1 lines on the


Uplink card or T1/E1 32 card to an ATM switch. The MALC supports
multiple IMA groups, depending on the type of card installed in the
system.

Administrative Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) for management and


control.

AAL2-BLES signaling
AAL2 is specified in ITU-T (International Telecommunication Union)
recommendations I.363.2, I.366.1, and I.366.2. AAL2 is designed to support
voice applications using higher layer requirements such as voice compression,
silence detection/suppression, and idle channel removal. AAL2 uses four
bytes of the forty-eight byte ATM payload, leaving forty-four bytes for data.
Broadband Loop Emulation Service (BLES) is a DSL forum specification
(DSL Forum TR-039 Annex A) that enables ATM-based IADs to offer
Class 5 calling features and high-speed data services over a single DSL
connection.
BLES provides management signaling for POTS interfaces using inband
Channel Associated Signaling (CAS).

IMA
The T1/E1 Uplink card and the T1/E1 32 port card provides T1/E1 IMA
support for inverse-multiplexing multiple ATM cells from a number of links
into a single large, virtual connection. The MALC supports IMA version 1.1,
including support for fallback to version 1.0.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

21

MALC

ATM cell relay


In a cell relay application, the MALC switches ATM cells from the uplink
interface to the subscriber-side DSL interface, and vice-versa. On the network
side, the Uplink card connects to upstream ATM devices. On the
subscriber-side, it connects to a standards-based IAD or modem. The MALC
supports both VP and VC switching.

Management PVC
The Uplink card provides an ATM PVC interface for in-band management of
the MALC. This PVC is terminated on the Uplink card and can be used to
route management traffic over the Uplink cards Ethernet port. This enables
the MALC to provide a management interface other devices in the same
location that have an Ethernet interface.

ATM-to-TDM interworking
The MALC provides an interface between TDM-based networks and ATM
networks. It supports standard POTS interfaces on the subscriber side to
provide traditional voice services. Ring voltage for the line is provided by the
MALC ring voltage bus.
On the network side, The Uplink card performs AAL2 Segmentation and
Reassembly (SAR) and terminates the AAL2 LES traffic destined for the
POTS cards. The Uplink card then encodes the voice traffic in G.711, and puts
it on the appropriate timeslot on the TDM bus to send it to the subscriber port.
Each POTS channel is uniquely addressed by a shelf-slot-port and has an
associated AAL2 LES channel identifier (CID).
The MALC can also concentrate voice traffic and send it over an uplink
interface to a voice gateway such as a Zhone Sechtor 100ATM.

T1/E1 circuit emulation


Circuit Emulation Service (CES) allows T1/E1 circuits to be transparently
extended across an ATM network. CES is based on the ATM Forum standard
AF VTOA 0078.0000. Using constant bit rate (CBR) ATM permanent virtual
circuits (PVCs), CES allows communication between non-ATM CBR circuits
(such as T1, E1, E3, and T3) and ATM UNI interfaces.
There two types of CES: structured and unstructured. In unstructured
emulation (also known as clear channel emulation) the entire services
bandwidth is emulated and reproduced at the target port. Structured emulation
service (also called channelized emulation) emulates a point-to-point
fractional T1/E1 (less than a full T1/E1 line) connections. The frame structure
is maintained. Individual streams are visible and are byte aligned. This allows
the T1/E1 trunks using the structured emulation service to break into multiple
DS-0 channels towards different destinations.

22

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Features

IP and data services


The MALC provides an access and aggregation routing functions to connect
subscribers to the Internet or other large networks. The following MALC
interfaces support IP traffic:

One Ethernet interface on the Uplink card for management or data traffic.

High speed IP Uplink interfaces on the Uplink cards. These include T1/
E1, DS3/E3, Gigabit Ethernet, OC-3c/STM1, and OC-12c/STM4
interfaces. The ATM/IP Uplink card terminates the IP traffic and routes it
to its destination. Note that the Uplink card must be an ATM/IP card in
order for it to support IP services. Contact your Zhone sales
representative or GSS for further information.

DSL or T1/E1 subscriber interfaces. IP on subscriber interfaces runs over


ATM PVCs using RFC 1483 encapsulation.

After terminating the ATM traffic, the MALC routes the IP traffic over its
Ethernet interface to provide a connection to an IP network.
The MALC provides the following key data services:

IP forwarding and routingincoming packets from an interface are


forwarded to the appropriate output interface using the routing table rules.

Routed or bridged encapsulation.

Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) video. IGMP is used by IP


hosts to register dynamic multicast group membership. For example, all
members of one multicast group would view the same of video content.

DHCP servers to simplify user IP address configuration.

IP filtering. IP filtering is typically performed to enhance network


security by limiting access between two networks.

Numbered or unnumbered interfaces.

VLAN bridging.
The MALC hardware supports the following standards:

Multicast (IGMPv1 / v2)

RIP v1 (RFC 1058) RIPv2 (RFC 2453)

RFC 1483/2684 encapsulation (Bridged and routed)

DHCP server (RFC 2131, 2132)

Bridging 802.1D support

VLAN 802.1Q support

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

23

MALC

GR-303 and V5.2


The MALC TDM Uplink card supports GR-303 or V5.2 interfaces to a PSTN
switch. The MALC can connect ATM or POTS subscriber interfaces to the
PSTN.

GR-303 overview
GR-303 is a Bellcore-defined protocol that describes an Integrated Digital
Loop Carrier System (IDLC) that operates on DS1 (T1) circuits. The GR-303
specification describes T1 circuits exiting an Integrated Digital Terminal
(IDT) and going to remote digital terminal (RDT) equipment. Zhone products
that support GR-303 act as RDTs.
GR-303 allows concentration from 1:1 to 44:1, a timeslot management
channel (TMC) data link that uses messages for call setup and tear down, the
use of signaling bits to indicate call control, and a separate embedded
operations channel (EOC) data link.
The GR-303 specification also provides for redundancy on the circuits that
carry the data links. The primary and secondary T1 circuits each carry the
TMC and EOC for redundancy.
Figure 4 shows how T1 (DS1) circuits leaving the local switch toward the
MALC are grouped into an interface group (IG). The primary DS1 channel
carries the first TMC on DS0 24 and the first EOC on DS0 12. The secondary
DS1 is a mirror image of the first, carrying the secondary TMC and EOC
channels.

24

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Features

Figure 4: GR-303 circuits, channels, and CRVs

GR-303 IG
Primary DS1
Must be first DS1
TMC #1 on channel/DS0 24
EOC #1 on channel/DS0 12
IDT
Integrated Digital
Terminal

2048
Call Reference
Values

LDS
Local Digital
Switch

IAD

CRV
Secondary
DS1
Can be any other DS1
TMC #2 on channel/DS0 24
EOC #2 on channel/DS0 12

ISDN overview
ISDN BRI service provides a 144kbps line rate divided between two 64kbps
B (or bearer) channels, which can carry voice calls or high-speed data, and
one 16kbps D (or data) channel, which carries call-setup information and
signaling. ISDN BRI is often called 2B+D because of its three duplex
channels. ISDN networks include terminal equipment (TE) such as phones
and faxes; network terminators (NT), such as routers and IADS at the
customer premises, which connect the four-wire subscriber wiring to the
conventional two-wire local loop; terminal adapters (TA), which allow
non-ISDN devices to access the ISDN network; and line termination (LT)
equipment, which terminates the ISDN line at the local switch.
An NT1, or Network Termination-1, is required to connect ISDN terminal
equipment to an ISDN line. The NT1 connects to customers phones with a
two-wire line. This two-wire interface is referred to as the U interface or U
reference point, and is accessible via a modular RJ-11or miniature 8-position
(ISO 8877) jack. The connection point between the NT1 and terminal
equipment is the S/T interface, which defines a four-wire line with separate
transmit and receive pairs (and additional pairs for powering when required).
The S/T interface is accessible through ISO 8877 jacks on the NT1 and
terminal equipment.

V5.2 overview
The MALC supports the V5.2 European Telecommunications Standards
Institute (ETSI) standards G.965 and ETSI EN 300 347-1 V2.2.2. These

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

25

MALC

specify a set of electrical, physical, procedural, and protocol requirements for


connecting an Access Node (AN) to a Local Exchange (LE). In this context
the MALC acts as an AN.
The MALC system uses V5.2 for analog telephone (POTS) access and ISDN
basic rate (BRI) access.
V5.2 services are supported by combinations of 64 Kbps V5 bearer channels,
communication, and control protocols.
Each 2.048 Mbps E1 interface uses 32 timeslots. Timeslot 0 (zero) is used for
frame alignment. Timeslot 16 of the first E1 link is used by the V5.2 control
protocol.
C-paths (communications paths) are carried over C-channels
(communications channels). C-channels are used to carry signaling traffic. A
V5.2 interface may contain up to 44 C-channels. C-channels are restricted to
timeslots 15, 16, and 31 in accordance with the ETSI specification.
Figure 5 illustrates the relationship between links, C-channels, and C-paths.
Figure 5: V5.2 links, C-channels, and C-paths

POTS voice
The MALC supports standard POTS and ISDN interfaces to provide
traditional voice services. Ring voltage for the line is provided by the MALC
ring voltage bus. The POTS cards support dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF)
dialing only. Pulse dialing is not supported.
To support POTS functionality in the MALC chassis, an ATM voice gateway,
is required in order for the MALC to connect to a Class 5 switch.

26

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Features

VoIP
Voice over IP, also known as Internet Telephony, supports full duplex
transmission of voice traffic over IP networks. The MALC supports Media
gateway control protocol (MGCP) and Session Initiation Protocol (SIP).

MGCP overview
Media gateway control protocol (MGCP) provides the means to interconnect
a large number of IP telephony gateways. MGCP assumes that a call agent
(CA) performs the intelligence of all call-control operations and that a media
gateway (MG) carries out all media processing and conversion.
MGCP provides an internetworking control system to control telephony
gateways from external call control elements are referred to as call agents. A
telephony gateway is a network element that provides conversion between the
audio signals carried on telephone circuits and data packets carried over the
Internet or over other packet networks.
MGCP assumes a call control architecture in which the call control
intelligence is outside the gateways and handled by external call control
elements. The MGCP assumes that these call control elements, or Call
Agents, will synchronize with each other to send coherent commands to the
gateways under their control. MGCP does not define a mechanism for
synchronizing Call Agents. MGCP is, in essence, a master/slave protocol,
where the gateways are expected to execute commands sent by the Call
Agents.
MGCP assumes a connection model constructed of endpoints and
connections. Endpoints are sources or sinks of data and could be physical or
virtual.
Examples of physical endpoints are:

An interface on a gateway that terminates a trunk connected to PSTN


switch (for example, a Class 5 or Class 4 switch). A gateway that
terminates trunks is called a trunk gateway.

An interface on a gateway that terminates an analog POTS connection to


a phone, key system, PBX, etc. A gateway that terminates residential
POTS lines (to phones) is called a residential gateway.

An example of a virtual endpoint is an audio source in an audio-content


(media) server.

Creation of physical endpoints requires hardware installation, while creation


of virtual endpoints can be done in software.
Connections may be either point-to-point or multipoint. A point-to-point
connection is an association between two endpoints with the purpose of
transmitting data between these endpoints. Once this association is
established for both endpoints, data transfer between these endpoints can take
place.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

27

MALC

SIP overview
Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a signaling protocol that provides a
mechanism for:

call establishment

call teardown

call control

other supplementary services in an IP network.

There are two major architectural components within SIP: the SIP user agent
(UA) and the SIP network server. The UA is the end system component
responsible to initiate and answer calls. The SIP server is the network device
that handles the signaling associated with multiple calls.
The UA itself has a client element, the User Agent Client (UAC) and a server
element, the User Agent Server (UAS). The client element initiates the calls
and the server element answers the calls. This allows peer-to-peer calls to be
made using a client-server protocol.
The main function of the SIP server is to provide name resolution and user
location, since the caller is unlikely to know the IP address or host name of the
called party, and to pass on messages to other servers or SIP endpoints. Other
functions performed by the SIP servers are redirecting, forking, and
registration.
Together these components make up a basic SIP infrastructure. Application
servers can sit above these components delivering SIP supplementary services
to end users.

Voice gateway
The MALC voice gateway card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S) enables voice connections
from an ATM and IP voice network to a TDM local exchange switch using
GR-303 or V5.2 protocols.
The following connection types are supported.

28

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Voice over ATM:

BLES to GR-303 or V5.2

ELCP to V5.2

Voice over IP: SIP-PLAR to GR-303 or V5.2

Features

Figure 6: Voice gateway overview

TDM
GR303
V5.2

Packet

Local Exchange
Switch
MALC with
voice gateway

The MALC voice gateway card can also serve as an aggregation point for
multiple downstream MALC or IAD systems aggregating multiple services
(PON, SHDSL, T1/E1 ATM) or multiple voice lines on residential services
(ADSL, ADSL2+, VDSL) over a single uplink connection.
Figure 7: Voice gateway aggregation point

IAD

IP Network
MALC with
voice gateway

Local Exchange
Switch

Packet voice support


For VOIP applications, the MALC supports packetizing voice traffic on
POTS cards and sending it out the MALC voice gateway card. Table 2
describes VOIP support on the MALC POTS-capable cards.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

29

MALC

Table 2: MALC POTS cards support


MALC egress

Cards

POTS TDM
only cards

POTS TDM
and packet
cards

Traffic path

TDM Uplink
Trunk

UP-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP-16

TDM > TDM

TDM > TDM

Traffic from TDM bus


out TDM interface on
uplink.

Supported

Supported

Traffic from card to


TDM bus to uplink
then converted to
AAL2 on uplink out
ATM trunk on uplink.

Not supported

Supported

Traffic from the line


card is packetized on
the line card and routed
to the uplink out an IP
port.

Not supported

Supported

Traffic from the line


card is packetized on
the line card and routed
to the uplink out an IP
port.

Not supported

Supported

Traffic from the line


card is packetized on
the line card and routed
to the uplink then is
routed back down the
blackplane to a voice
gateway card.

Not supported

Supported

Traffic from card to


TDM bus to uplink
then converted to
AAL2 on uplink then
cell switched back
down the packet bus to
the voice gateway card.

UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1
UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-SX/T-E1
UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP
UPLINK-2-GE

VoATM
(AAL2) on
ATM Uplink
Trunk

UPLINK-DS3/E3-ATM/IP
UPLINK-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP
UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP
UP-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP-16
UPLINK-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8

VoIP on
Non-Network
Processor
Based Uplinks

UPLINK-DS3/E3-ATM/IP
UPLINK-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP
UP-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP-16
UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP
UPLINK-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8

VoIP on
Network
Processor
Based Uplinks

UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1

VoIP (SIP
PLAR) to Voice
Gateway Local

UPLINK-DS3/E3-ATM/IP

UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-SX/T-E1
UPLINK-2-GE

UPLINK-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP
UP-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP-16
UPLINK-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8
UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1
UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-SX/T-E1
UPLINK-2-GE

VoATM
(AAL2) to
Voice gateway
Local

UPLINK-DS3/E3-ATM/IP
UPLINK-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP
UP-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP-16
UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP
UPLINK-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8

The following POTS cards only support TDM:

30

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL+POTS-24-2S

Features

ADSL+POTS-32A-2S

ADSL/POTS-24-2S

POTS-24

POTS-900-24

ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S

POTS-TDM-48

The following POTS cards support TDM and packet voice:

ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S

POTS-TDM/PKT-48

Redundancy
The MALC supports the following types of redundancy:

Uplink card

APS for the OC-3c/STM1 Uplink and OC-12c/S4/GE/TDM Uplink cards

Uplink card redundancy


The MALC supports Uplink and MTAC/Ring card redundancy. Cards in a
redundancy group share the same card-group-id. When you install a single
card that supports redundancy, the system assigns that card to a default
redundancy group.
To configure redundancy, assign a second card of the same type to the same
card group and optionally assign each a weight. Weights are used to specify a
preference for a particular card to become active. By default, all cards have
the same weight.
When the cards boot up, they elect an active and a standby card based on their
respective weights. If the weights are equal, the card in the lower numbered
slot becomes active.
If an active card fails, the standby takes over and becomes active. Note that
redundancy is non-revertive. That is, a previously active card does not
become active when it starts up again.
When the standby card comes up, the active card copies over the
configuration database, routing tables, and software binaries to the standby
card. As configuration changes are made to the active card, the standby card is
automatically updated.

APS
The OC-3c/STM1 and OC-12c/S4/GE/TDM cards provide Automatic
Protection Switch (APS) on their ports. APS allows the primary card to be
backed up by the second card, and hence reduces the risk of loss of data due to

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

31

MALC

cable cuts, degradation of signal, and card failure. APS also allows the far-end
equipment to request for switch-over via the use of APS command.
The OC-3c/STM1 card supports APS 1:1 protection. The OC-12c/STM4 card
supports both APS 1:1 protection and APS 1+1 protection.
In the 1:1 protection scheme, a working channel on one card carries the full
traffic, while a protect channel on another card is either idle or reserved for
low priority traffic. When a failure occurs on the working fiber, the
destination switch moves the data from the working fiber to the protect fiber.
In the 1+1 protection scheme, a working card transmits the same data in one
direction on the working channel while a protect card simultaneously
transmits the same data in the opposite direction on the protect channel. When
both transmissions reach the destination switch, the data on the protection
channel is ignored. When a failure occurs on the working channel, the
destination switch uses the transmission from the protect channel.
MALC-OC-3c/STM1 and OC-12c/STM4 card supports the following APS
features:

Failures such as LOS, LOF, AIS-L, and hardware failure.

APS 1:1 configuration, with far-end configured as 1+1 or 1:1. OC-12c/


STM4 APS 1+1 configuration.

Linear APS mode.

Uni-directional and bidirectional with non-revertive mode.


Note: Two Uplink cards are required for APS.

Overview of SONET/SDH APS


Due to the high speed nature of SONET/SDH, APS is designed as a high
speed switching protocol to minimize the risk of out of service in the event of
hardware failure or a cable cut. APS uses the SONET/SDH K1K2 byte to
signal between the local and far-end equipment. Only the protection line
exchanges the K1K2 byte between the local and far-end equipment.
To ensure interoperability with other vendors equipment, the MALC APS
implementation conforms to the Bellcore GR-253-CORE and ITU-T G.783
specifications.
SONET/SDH APS supports the following modes:

32

Linear APS: Linear mode supports both APS 1:1 and 1+1 architecture.
The architecture must be consistent between local and far-end equipment.
Otherwise, an architecture mismatch will occur.

Bi-directional mode: APS bi-directional mode allows negotiation


between local and far-end equipment. The action performs by APS is
based on event priority and acknowledgement from far-end.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Features

Uni-directional mode: APS uni-directional mode allows fast switching by


eliminating the acknowledgement from far-end.

Non-revertive modes: Only a manual switch-over or a fail-over will cause


traffic to switch from one port to another. Switching does not take place
based on restoring of the working port.

Working card and protection card


The MALC defines the Uplink card in slot 1 as the working card, and the
Uplink card in slot 2 as the protection card. The working card always has the
APS working ports. The protection card always has the APS protection ports.
The exchange of K1K2 byte takes place only on the protection card.

SONET/SDH APS + card redundancy


In APS + card redundancy, a line failure will cause the whole card to fail-over
to another card. However, switching will not take place on the standby card.
The following features are supported by APS + card redundancy:

Switching on loss of transmit/receive line (LOS, LOF, AIS-L)

Switching on hot-swap card removal

Switching on far-end APS command

Switching on hardware failure

Management
The MALC has two primary management interfaces: an ATM Virtual Channel
(VC) which carries only Simple Network Management (SNMP) traffic, and a
1483-routed IP connection. Both connections are terminated on the Uplink
card.
After establishing a connection to the MALC, administrators can manage the
device using the Command Line Interface (CLI), SNMP, or the ZMS.
The Uplink card also contains a serial (craft) session for local management.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

33

MALC

34

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

PREPARING FOR INSTALLATION


This chapter describes how to prepare your site for the installation of the
MALC. It includes the following topics:

General safety precautions, page 35

Tools you need, page 37

Selecting the system location, page 38

Installation precautions, page 38

Environmental specifications, page 39

Power requirements and specifications, page 41

Cabling rules, page 41

Power specifications, page 42

Grounding and isolation, page 42

Compliance and certifications, page 43

General safety precautions


The equipment is designed and manufactured in compliance with the
following safety standards: UL 60950, EN 60950, IEC 60950, ACA TS001.
However, the following additional precautions should be observed to ensure
personal safety during installation or service, and to prevent damage to the
equipment or equipment to which it is connected.

Safety
The precautions to take before installing or servicing the product are as
follows:
WARNING!
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace
only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the
manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to
manufacturers instructions.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

35

Preparing for installation

WARNING! Do not stare into the optical interface laser beam or


view it directly with optical instruments.
Caution: Current limiting protectors
The MALC is intended to be protected by 3-mil carbon blocks and
current limiting protectors with a continuous carry current rating of
350 milliamperes. The current limiting protectors must be applied on
the equipment side of the voltage limiting protector.

36

Read and follow all warning notices and instructions marked on the
product or included in this guide.

Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.

Never install this product in a wet location.

Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jacks are
specifically designed for this purpose only.

Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the


telephone line has first been disconnected at the network interface.

Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.

Never attempt to service this product unless you are an authorized service
technician. Doing so can expose you to dangerous high-voltage points or
other risks and may result in injury or damage to the unit and void all
warranties.

The MALC system chassis requires a dedicated ground connection to the


building ground. If more than one MALC chassis is to be installed on a
rack, each one requires its own direct connection to the building ground.

Slots and openings in the product are provided for ventilation. To ensure
reliable operation of the product and to protect it from overheating, these
slots and openings must not be blocked or covered.

DO NOT allow anything to rest on the power cord and do not locate the
product where anyone could step or walk on the power cord.

Special cables, which may be required by the regulatory inspection


authority for the installation site, are the responsibility of the buyer.

When installed in the final configuration, the product must comply with
the applicable Safety Standards and regulatory requirements of the
country in which it is installed. If necessary, consult with the appropriate
regulatory agencies and inspection authorities to ensure compliance.

A rare phenomenon can create a voltage potential between the earth


grounds of two or more buildings. If products installed in separate
buildings are interconnected, the voltage potential may cause a hazardous
condition. Consult a qualified electrical consultant to determine whether
or not this phenomenon exists and, if necessary, implement corrective
action prior to interconnecting the product.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Tools you need

Install the MALC in accordance with national and local electric codes to
meet central office requirements. Consult a qualified electrical consultant.

Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the optical ports of the
MALC when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into
open apertures.

Preventing electrostatic damage


The system slot cards are susceptible to electrostatic discharge (ESD). ESD
can cause component failure and degraded system performance. Take
adequate precautions to prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD) with these
cards. Always wear a properly-grounded wrist strap or equivalent protection
when handling system cards.
Handle each card by its front panel or stiffener. Never touch the solder side,
connector pins, or components on a printed circuit card, and do not allow
cards to come into contact with one another.
To prevent damage to system cards when not in use, store and handle the
cards in their original antistatic bags. Keep the cards in their original packing
cartons to prevent damage caused by dust or dirt. Be sure to store the cards in
areas that are free from excessive humidity and temperatures.

Power supply safety information


Install an equipment grounding conductor not smaller in size than the
ungrounded branch-circuit supply conductors as part of the circuit that
supplies the product or system. Bare, covered, or insulated grounding
conductors are acceptable. Individually covered or insulated equipment
grounding conductors should have a continuous outer finish that is either
green, or green with one or more yellow stripes. Connect the
equipment-grounding conductor to ground at the service equipment.

Tools you need


The required equipment listed in Table 3 should be available before beginning
the installation of the MALC system.
Table 3: Equipment required to install the MALC system
Qty

Equipment

Details

Use

Mounting shelf or rack,


19 or 23 inch width as
required.

Powered as indicated in attached


specifications.

MALC chassis mounting

VT-100-compatible
terminal or PC used as a
VT-100 terminal emulator

Connected to the MALC through RJ45


craft port.

Commission and configuration

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

37

Preparing for installation

Table 3: Equipment required to install the MALC system


Qty

Equipment

Details

Use

11/32-inch nutdriver

For ground stud hex nuts.

General installation

Pliers

Cable prep tools

Cables

#1 and #2 Phillips-head
and 1/8-inch flat-blade
screwdrivers

N/A

Locking and unlocking cards,


front panels and chassis
brackets

Antistatic wrist strap

N/A

Static electricity prevention

General installation
Pressfit and crimpers

Cable installation
System connections

Selecting the system location


Ensure that the environment is free of dust and excessive moisture, not
exposed to the elements or temperature extremes, and has sufficient
ventilation.
Install the system in reasonable proximity to all equipment with which it will
connect. Ensure that proper cable grades are used for all system and network
connections. For best results, use the cables and connectors recommended in
this document.

Installation precautions
Avoid creating a hazardous condition by maintaining even weight distribution
within the chassis.
WARNING! Two people are required to lift the MALC 719 or
MALC 723 systems because they weigh too much for one person
to lift. Do not attempt to lift the system chassis without assistance
or personal injury can result.
Maximum operating temperature should not exceed 550C (1310F). The
temperature of the rack environment may be greater than ambient room
temperature when the system is installed in a closed or multiunit rack
assembly. Observe the maximum recommended operating temperature as
indicated here.
Do not block system air vents; this will deprive the system of the airflow
required for proper cooling. Sufficient clearance must exist on all sides of the
rack to permit equipment access.
Zhone recommends using cabling ducts for cable routing in rack mounts.

38

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Environmental specifications

To facilitate proper cooling, cover unpopulated slots with a blank front panel.
All slots must have a card or a blank panel installed at all times for EMC,
safety and cooling requirements.
The system ships with mounting brackets. To avoid overloading the mounting
brackets, and damaging the system, do not use the MALC chassis to support
other equipment after it is mounted in the rack.
Connect the system to the power supply circuit as described in this document.
Do not overload the system or power supply circuit.
Ensure that proper system grounding is performed and maintained. Use power
supply connections for grounding instead of branch circuitry (such as power
strips).

Environmental specifications
Table 4 describes the MALC chassis environmental specifications.
Table 4: MALC chassis environmental specifications
Description

Specification

Chassis dimensions

MALC 723
23 in. (58.42 cm) wide by 12.25 in. (31.12 cm) high
(7U) by 11.625 in. (29.53 cm) deep.
MALC 719
19 in. (48.26 cm) wide by 12.25 in. (31.12 cm) high
(7U) by 11.625 in. (29.53 cm) deep.
MALC 319
19 in. (48.26 cm) wide by 5.219 in. (13.26 cm) high
(3U) by 11.30 in. (28.70 cm) deep.

Weight

80 lbs. (36.29 kg) fully loaded

Operating temperature

-400C to +700C (-400F to +1580F).

Storage temperature

400C to +850C (400F to +1850F)

Operating relative
humidity

5% to 95% noncondensing

Storage relative
humidity

Up to 95% noncondensing

Altitude

Operating altitude: Up to 4,000 m (13,123 ft.)

Airflow

MALC 319: Left to right


MALC 719 and MALC 723: Bottom front to top rear.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

39

Preparing for installation

Figure 8 on page 40 and Figure 9 on page 40 show the MALC chassis


dimensions.
Figure 8: MALC 19-inch chassis dimensions

Figure 9: MALC 23-inch chassis dimensions

40

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Power requirements and specifications

Figure 10: MALC 319 chassis dimensions

Power requirements and specifications


Separate A and B power feeds allow two individual 48V DC power sources
to be connected to the MALC system. The Return (+) terminals are
common.For the 19- and 23-inch MALC chassis, the power wiring is
field-terminated inside the lower front of the chassis. The MALC 319 chassis
is provided with factory-terminated power cables.
Note: The installation site must include overcurrent protection, such
as fuses or circuit breakers, that will limit current at the A and B
power inputs.

Cabling rules
Following are power cabling rules applicable to the MALC system.

Provide an appropriate disconnect device as part of the building


installation for systems such as the MALC that receive power from an
external, auxiliary, or emergency source. When power is routed from a
power distribution frame, the disconnect device can be used as a power
cutoff (for example, an ON/OFF switch or breaker).

Connect all disconnect devices so that they disconnect all ungrounded


conductors of a DC power circuit when placed in the OFF position.

All power cables must be rated VW-1 or higher.

Use power cabling of 10 AWG for applications of 25 feet (7.62 m) or less


from the central power distribution bus.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

41

Preparing for installation

Power specifications
Table 5 describes the MALC power specifications.
Table 5: MALC power supply specifications
Description

Specification

Rated voltage

-41.75V to -60.0V DC
Separate A/B power feeds for 48V DC protection

Rated power

MALC: 1,200 watts, maximum


MALC 319: 700 watts, maximum

Rated current

MALC: 28A maximum


MALC 319: 16A maximum

DC-input cable

AWG 10 (5.27 mm2) maximum

Listed circuit breaker or


fuse

MALC: 35 A maximum
MALC 319: 20 A maximum
A listed circuit breaker or fuse must be installed from a
central DC power source and wired in accordance with
NEC, ANSI/NFPA 70 and Canadian electrical code,
Part 1, C22.1.

Chassis power consumption


Table 6 describes the power consumption of the MALC system components.
Table 6: MALC power consumption
Component

Specification

19 inch chassis

110 W

23 inch chassis

132 W

MALC 319 chassis

With an MTAC-FC card installed, the


chassis draws 31 watts maximum with no
ringing, 45 watts maximum at full
ringing load.

Grounding and isolation


The MALC system cards and subassemblies use an integrated frame and logic
ground system as follows:

42

The MALC system chassis and logic ground are bonded.

The two-wire power supply feed is not connected to the chassis.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Compliance and certifications

Cable shielding is terminated on the MALC system chassis ground.

Compliance and certifications


Table 7: Compliance and certifications
NEBS

Specification

Safety

ACA TS001
AS/NZS 3260
CB Report
CSA 22.2 No. 950
EN 60950
IEC 60950
UL 60950

EMC emissions

FCC Part 15 Class A


GR-1089-Core Level 3
CE EN55022A

EMC immunity

GR-1089-Core Level 3
CE EN55024
CE EN 50082

Environmental

GR-63-Core Level 3
ETS 300 019-2-x
ISTA Transportation and Handling

Network

FCC Part 68
CTR-12
CTR-13
DOC CS-03
NTR-4
TSO-16

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

43

Preparing for installation

44

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

INSTALLING THE MALC


This chapter explains how to install the MALC hardware. It includes the
following sections:

Unpacking the system, page 45

Installing mounting brackets on the MALC, page 46

Installing the chassis in a rack, page 47

Wall mounting the MALC 319 chassis, page 49

Installing slot cards, page 50

Removing slot cards, page 53

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis, page 55

Reading the LEDs, page 63

Replacing the air filter, page 65


Note: Before installing the MALC, read General safety precautions
on page 35 for important safety and power information.

Unpacking the system


Use the following procedure to unpack the MALC system components from
the shipping cartons.

On system receipt, check the shipping cartons for physical damage.

Unpack the shipping cartons, and check the contents for physical damage.

If the equipment appears damaged, immediately contact the shipping


company to file a claim.

The shipping company representative will give instructions on how to submit


a claim, where to send the unit, and any special instructions that may be
required.
If you need to return the equipment, pack the equipment in its original
packing materials and send it by prepaid freight to the address given by the
claims representative. If the original packing materials are unavailable, ship
the equipment in a sturdy carton, wrapping it with shock-absorbing material.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

45

Installing the MALC

Installing mounting brackets on the MALC


Note: Units are shipped with the rack ears installed and secured to
shipping pallet. When unpacking the unit, remove the bottom two
screws that secure the shipping bracket to the rack ears and replace
them with the correct rack ear screws from the accessory kit.
This section contains the following information:

Installing the mounting brackets onto the MALC system chassis on


page 46

Installing the mounting brackets onto the MALC 319 system chassis on
page 46

Installing the mounting brackets onto the MALC system


chassis
The MALC mounting brackets are designed for use in a 19-inch or 23-inch
rack. Use the following procedure to install the mounting brackets onto the
system chassis:
1

Carefully place the system chassis right side up and facing forward on a
clean, flat, sturdy work surface.

Align the bracket so that the rack mount flange is toward the front,
centered vertically on the chassis and the 4 screw holes in the chassis
align with the 4 screw holes in the bracket.
Note: Use an 8-32 flathead UNC x 0.25 screw when attaching
the brackets to the unit. Using the wrong screw type will result in
a poorly-secured system. These screws are provided in the
installation kit.

Secure the two brackets to both sides of the system chassis with the
screws provided in the installation kit. See Figure 11 on page 48.
Caution: To prevent damage to the system, use only the screws
provided in the installation kit.

Installing the mounting brackets onto the MALC 319 system


chassis
The MALC 319 mounting brackets are designed for use in a 19-inch rack.
Use the following procedure to install the mounting brackets onto the system
chassis:
1

46

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Carefully place the system chassis right side up and facing forward on a
clean, flat, sturdy work surface.

Installing the chassis in a rack

Align the bracket so that the rack mount flange is toward the front,
centered vertically on the chassis and the 4 screw holes in the chassis
align with the 4 screw holes in the bracket.
Note: Use a 6-32 flathead UNC x 0.25 screw when attaching the
brackets to the unit. Using the wrong screw type will result in a
poorly-secured system. These screws are provided in the
installation kit.

Secure the two brackets to both sides of the system chassis with the
screws provided in the installation kit. See Figure 11 on page 48.
Caution: To prevent damage to the system, use only the screws
provided in the installation kit.

Installing the chassis in a rack


This section contains the following information:

Mounting the MALC system chassis in a rack on page 47

Mounting the MALC 319 system chassis in a rack on page 48

Mounting the MALC system chassis in a rack


The system chassis can be mounted in a 19-inch or 23-inch rack that is
connected to an earth ground.
WARNING! Two people are required to pick up the system
because it weighs too much for one person to lift. Do not attempt
to lift the system chassis without assistance or personal injury can
result.
Use the following procedure to mount the system chassis in a rack:
1

Choose a rack position for the system chassis.

Carefully lift the system chassis into the rack with the front of the system
facing outward.

Secure the system chassis to the mounting rack with the screws provided
in the installation kit.
Note: Use a 12-24 UNC x 0.5-inch screw when mounting the
system to the rack. Using the wrong screw type will result in a
poorly-secured system. These screws are provided in the
installation kit.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

47

Installing the MALC

Figure 11: Installing the MALC in a rack

Mounting the MALC 319 system chassis in a rack


The system chassis can be mounted in a 19-inch rack that is connected to an
earth ground. Use the following procedure to mount the system chassis in a
rack:
1

Choose a rack position for the system chassis.

Carefully lift the system chassis into the rack with the front of the system
facing outward.

Secure the system chassis to the mounting rack with the screws provided
in the installation kit.
Note: Use a 12-24 UNC x 0.5-inch screw when mounting the
system to the rack. Using the wrong screw type will result in a
poorly-secured system. These screws are provided in the
installation kit.

48

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Wall mounting the MALC 319 chassis

Figure 12: Installing the MALC 319 in a rack

Wall mounting the MALC 319 chassis


WARNING! Two people are required to pick up the system
because it weighs too much for one person to lift. Do not attempt
to lift the system chassis without assistance or personal injury can
result.
Use the following procedure to wall mount the system chassis.

Wall mounting the MALC 319 chassis


1

Choose a position for the system chassis.

Remove the rack ears from the front of the unit.

Align the bracket so that the rack mount flange is in the middle of the unit
and the 2 screw holes in the chassis align with the 2 screw holes in the
bracket nearest the flange.
Note: Use a 6-32 flathead UNC x 0.25 screw when attaching the
brackets to the unit. Using the wrong screw type will result in a
poorly-secured system. These screws are provided in the
installation kit.

Secure the two brackets to both sides of the system chassis with the
screws provided in the installation kit. See Figure 11 on page 48.
Caution: To prevent damage to the system, use only the screws
provided in the installation kit.

Orient the unit with the power cables facing up. See Figure 13

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

49

Installing the MALC

Figure 13: Wall mounting the MALC 319 chassis

Secure the system chassis to the wall with the screws provided in the
installation kit.

Installing slot cards


This section contains the following information:

Installation guidelines on page 50

Installing a slot card in the MALC chassis on page 51

Installing a slot card in the MALC 319 chassis on page 52

Installation guidelines
Observe the following rules when handling MALC slot cards:

50

Handle each card by its front panel or stiffener. Never touch the solder
side, connector pins, or components on a printed circuit card, and do not
allow cards to come into contact with one another.

To prevent damage to slot cards when not in use, store and handle the
cards in their original containers. Keep the cards in their original packing
cartons to prevent damage caused by dust or dirt. Be sure to store the
cards in areas that are free from excessive humidity and temperatures.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Installing slot cards

Caution: The MALC system slot cards are susceptible to


electrostatic discharge (ESD). ESD can cause component failure and
degraded system performance. Take adequate precautions to prevent
electrostatic discharge with these cards. Always wear a properly
grounded wrist strap, or equivalent protection, when handling system
cards.
Note: MALC and MALC 319 use the same slot cards with the
exception of the MTAC/Ring-FC card, which is only used in the
MALC 319.

Installing a slot card in the MALC chassis


Note: You must install the Uplink card in slot 1 or slot 2 (the 2
left-most slots).
1

Put on an antistatic wrist strap that touches the skin. Make sure it is
properly grounded to the ESD jack on the front of the unit.

Carefully remove the card from its antistatic packaging.

Visually inspect the card for damage. Check the label and part number on
the card to verify the type of card being installed is the type needed for the
particular application.

Holding the card by its faceplate, carefully insert the card into a slot. Hold
the bottom ejector open and slowly slide the card onto the backplane pins.

Close the bottom ejector to firmly seat the card.


Caution: To prevent damage to the backplane pins, do not force
cards onto the backplane pins when seating the cards. If you have
trouble seating a card, check that it is in the correct slot, pull the
card out, and try seating it again by pressing gently.

Slide the card lock down.


The card will not boot if the card lock is not in the down position.

Tighten the top and bottom screws to seat the card in the backplane.

Figure 14 illustrates installing slot cards.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

51

Installing the MALC

Figure 14: Installing slot cards in the MALC

Installing a slot card in the MALC 319 chassis


Note: You must install the MTAC/Ring card in the bottom right slot.

Put on an antistatic wrist strap that touches the skin. Make sure it is
properly grounded to the ESD jack on the front of the unit.

Carefully remove the card from its antistatic packaging.

Visually inspect the card for damage. Check the label and part number on
the card to verify the type of card being installed is the type needed for the
particular application.

Holding the card by its faceplate, carefully insert the card into a slot. Hold
the bottom ejector open and slowly slide the card onto the backplane pins.

Close the bottom ejector to firmly seat the card.


Caution: To prevent damage to the backplane pins, do not force
cards onto the backplane pins when seating the cards. If you have
trouble seating a card, check that it is in the correct slot, pull the
card out, and try seating it again by pressing gently.

Slide the card lock to the left.


The card will not boot if the card lock is not in the down position.

Tighten the top and bottom screws to seat the card in the backplane.

Figure 14 illustrates installing slot cards.

52

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Removing slot cards

Figure 15: Installing slot cards in the MALC 319

Removing slot cards


This section contains the following information:

Removing a slot card from the MALC chassis on page 53

Removing a slot card from the MALC 319 chassis on page 54

Removing a slot card from the MALC chassis


1

Put on an antistatic wrist strap that touches the skin. Make sure it is
properly grounded to the ESD jack on the front of the unit.

Loosen the top and bottom screws of the slot card.

Unscrew the top and bottom screws from the card.

Push the slide lock on the bottom of the card up.

Lift the top and bottom ejectors.

Slide the card out.

Figure 16 illustrates removing slot cards.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

53

Installing the MALC

Figure 16: Removing slot cards

Removing a slot card from the MALC 319 chassis


1

Put on an antistatic wrist strap that touches the skin. Make sure it is
properly grounded to the ESD jack on the front of the unit.

Loosen the top and bottom screws of the slot card.

Unscrew the top and bottom screws from the card.

Push the slide lock on the bottom of the card to the center of the unit.

Lift the top and bottom ejectors.

Slide the card out.

Figure 17 illustrates removing slot cards.

54

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis

Figure 17: Removing slot cards from the MALC 319 chassis

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis


This section contains the following information:

Grounding requirements on page 56

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis on page 57

Connecting power to the MALC 319 and grounding the chassis on


page 61
Note: Bare, covered, or insulated grounding conductors must comply
with Underwriters Laboratory (UL) standards. Individually covered
or insulated grounding conductors shall have a continuous outer
finish that is either green or green with one or more yellow stripes.
The equipment grounding conductor should be connected to the
ground at the service equipment. The grounding cable must be rated
at VW-1 or higher.
Zhone recommends grounding the MALC using minimum 10 gauge
copper wire and NRTL-listed two hole compression-type connectors
(such as Amphenol part number 1527272-3).

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

55

Installing the MALC

Grounding requirements
Use the guidelines in this section to provide a system ground for the
MALC.
Before concluding a MALC installation and applying DC power, measure
the impedance of the building ground reference and ensure that it is less
than 25 ohms, for safety. Use an ECOS 1023 POW-R-MATE or an EMC
Instrument Model 3710 or similar meter to do this. Zhone recommends
that the impedance be 5 ohms or less for proper equipment operation.
If the ground path connected to the MALC has an impedance of more
than 5 ohms, make improvements to the grounding system before
installing the MALC equipment.
Other grounding requirements are as follows:

56

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

The earth ground rod is normally buried in the ground at the site.
Observe local electrical codes for buried grounding techniques and
requirements. Ensure that the ground rod has been installed per local,
telco, and NEC code requirements.

Use a dedicated power source that is only shared with other isolated
bonding network (IBN)-configured equipment to provide power to
the MALC and all other related equipment. This prevents interference
from possible high surge or noise currents present in some industrial
buildings. Otherwise, you must ensure a proper grounding path of
less than 5 ohms to the building ground.

Use the ground bus of a dedicated AC service panel as the location/


site ground of the MALC equipment. This ground bus must already
be connected to the main service panel ground or main building
ground reference.

The impedance of the link between the ground terminal of the MALC
and the location/site ground to which it is connected must be less than
0.25 ohms.

The rack the MALC is installed in must be properly grounded.

Never connect a single-point-ground conductor from the MALC to


structural steel members or electrical conduits. Specifically, never tie
this conductor to a ground source or grounded electrode that is not
hard-wired to the building ground reference conductor.

It is recommended to avoid running in-building cabling near


fluorescent lights and other sources of high frequency radiation such
as transformers.

Avoid spliced conductors. Use continuous conductors, which have


lower impedance and are more reliable than spliced ones.

Terminate all conductors in a permanent manner. Ensure all


terminations are easily visible and accessible for maintenance
purposes.

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis

Tag ground connections clearly with a message such as CRITICAL


CONNECTION: DO NOT REMOVE OR DISCONNECT.

Although some electrical codes permit the use of a conduit as the sole
ground conductor between equipment, it is still recommended to use a
separate insulated ground conductor through the same conduit. The
separate insulated ground conductor maintains the safety ground
connection if the conduit is corroded or disconnected.

Avoid a ground path via serial craft interface RS-232C. The MALC
RS-232C local craft interface has pins referenced to ground. To
prevent undesirable ground path via an attached computer, it is
recommended that you only use a portable computer. If only a
desktop computer or VT-100 type monitoring equipment is available,
use it in conjunction with a UL/CSA Certified RS-232 Opto-Isolator.

Ground conductors for the MALC must meet the following requirements:

No smaller than 10 AWG at any point.

Does not carry current under normal operating conditions.

Must be tied to the +48V battery return at the main power


Distribution Center

Should be hardwired to the main ground reference.

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis


Use the following procedure to connect the wiring between the MALC
terminal block and the power supplies.
1

Remove the MALC lower bezel.

Remove the air filter.

Figure 18: Removing the front bezel and air filter

Locate the terminal block in the lower portion of the chassis.

Loosen the screws that attach the terminal block to the chassis.

Carefully remove the terminal block from the chassis.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

57

Installing the MALC

Caution: Use care when removing the terminal block from the
chassis so as not to detach the wires connecting the terminal
block to the chassis.
6

Thread the wires (minimum 10 AWG) through the hole on the right side
of the chassis.

Figure 19: Removing terminal block

Note: Some MALC terminal blocks have a quarter-turn screw.


For these units, turn the screw 1/4 turn counterclockwise to
loosen.
Note: If the MALC is installed so that the thread hole on the side
of the unit is inaccessible, thread the power supply and grounding
cables behind the front bezel as illustrated in Figure 20.

ma0220

Figure 20: Threading the power and grounding cables behind the front bezel

58

Connect the negative wire from power supply A to the terminal marked
VA.

Connect the positive wire from power supply A to the terminal marked
VA+.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis

Connect the negative wire from power supply B to the terminal marked
VB.

10 Connect the positive wire from power supply B to the terminal marked
VB+.
Note: If using a single power source, place jumpers between
terminals VA and VB.
11 Reinstall the terminal block into the chassis.
Figure 21: Connecting power cables

12 Secure the terminal block to the chassis.


13 Route a 10 AWG conductor from each chassis to a common 2 AWG
frame ground collector that connects to the single point building ground
in an IBN. Ensure that there are no sharp bends in the conductors and that
they touch bare metal. Do not connect the cables to the single point
building ground at this time.
14 Strip the 10 AWG conductor and crimp a grounding lug to the end of the
conductor.
13 mm (0.5 in.)
FW-10119

Crimp-type 2-hole lug

15 Attach the ground lug with two hex bolts to the grounding lugs, as shown
in Figure 22 on page 60.
16 Secure the hex bolts to the chassis.
17 If you suspect that there are grounding issues, it may be necessary to
verify the ground by performing the following steps.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

59

Installing the MALC

Caution: This procedure is service affecting and requires that


ground be isolated from the equipment. Perform this procedure
during a maintenance window.
a

To verify the ground, connect one lead of the insulation tester to a


known good ground point and the other lead to a grounding cable
from the frames you have just installed. The polarity of the leads is
not important for this test.

Set the test voltage to 500 V dc and measure the leakage current
between the frame ground cable and the known good ground. The
leakage current should be less than 1.5 mA (or better than 2 megohms
if you are using an instrument that provides an output reading in
ohms).

If the leakage current is greater than 1.5 mA (or the resistance is less
than 2 megohms) check the installation of the isolation shims and
repair as necessary.

Repeat the test on the grounding cable from each frame until you
have tested all frame ground cables.

18 Connect the ground cable(s) routed in Step 13 and tighten the bolt. Use a
minimum torque of 12 inch-lbs to ensure that the grounding cable is
securely fastened.
Figure 22: Securing the terminal block and grounding the chassis

-B

+B

Note: Some MALC terminal blocks have a quarter-turn screw.


For these units, turn the screw 1/4 turn clockwise to tighten.
19 Reinstall the air filter.
20 Replace the lower bezel.

60

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Connecting power to the MALC and grounding the chassis

Figure 23: Replacing the air filter and bezel

21 Turn on the power to power supply A (and to power supply B, if present).


The system is now live and ready to initialize the slot cards as they are
installed. In the absence of any slot cards, there is no activity on the system.
The Power A and Power B LEDs on the front panel of the unit should be solid
green, indicating power is normal. For information on the chassis LEDs, see
Reading the LEDs on page 63.

Connecting power to the MALC 319 and grounding the


chassis
The MALC 319 comes with 10 AWG power cables pre-installed. To connect
the MALC 319 power cables:
1

Connect the wire marked - 48 A to the power supply A negative terminal.

Connect the wire marked + RTN A to the power supply A positive


terminal.

Connect the wire marked - 48 B to the power supply B negative terminal.

Connect the wire marked + RTN B to the power supply B positive


terminal.

Route a 10 AWG conductor from each chassis to a common 2 AWG


frame ground collector that connects to the single point building ground
in an IBN. Ensure that there are no sharp bends in the conductors and that
they touch bare metal. Do not connect the cables to the single point
building ground at this time.

Remove the screw from the grounding connector and secure a


compression-type connector. See Figure 24.

If you suspect that there are grounding issues, it may be necessary to


verify the ground by performing the following steps.
Caution: This procedure is service affecting and requires that
ground be isolated from the equipment. Perform this procedure
during a maintenance window.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

61

Installing the MALC

To verify the ground, connect one lead of the insulation tester to a


known good ground point and the other lead to a grounding cable
from the frames you have just installed. The polarity of the leads is
not important for this test.

Set the test voltage to 500 V dc and measure the leakage current
between the frame ground cable and the known good ground. The
leakage current should be less than 1.5 mA (or better than 2 megohms
if you are using an instrument that provides an output reading in
ohms).

If the leakage current is greater than 1.5 mA (or the resistance is less
than 2 megohms) check the installation of the isolation shims and
repair as necessary.

Repeat the test on the grounding cable from each frame until you
have tested all frame ground cables.

Connect the ground cable(s) routed in Step 5 and tighten the bolt. Use a
minimum torque of 12 inch-lbs to ensure that the grounding cable is
securely fastened.
Note: Some MALC terminal blocks have a quarter-turn screw.
For these units, turn the screw 1/4 turn clockwise to tighten.

Tighten the nut on the chassis ground lug to secure the cable in place. Use
a minimum torque of 12 inch-lbs to ensure that the grounding cable is
securely fastened.

Figure 24: Grounding the MALC 319

10 Turn on the power to power supply A (and to power supply B, if present).


The system is now live and ready to initialize the slot cards as they are
installed.

62

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Reading the LEDs

Reading the LEDs


The MALC 719 and MALC 721 system LEDs are located on the front bezel
(see Figure 25 on page 63).
The MALC 319 LEDs are located on the MTAC-FC card (see Figure 26 on
page 63).
Figure 25: MALC 719 and MALC 721 LEDs

Figure 26: MALC 319 LEDs

These LEDs illuminate to reflect the most significant alarm in the system. For
example, if there were five major alarms and one critical alarm in the system,
only the critical LED would be lit.
Table 8 describes the MALC system LEDs.
Table 8: MALC system LED descriptions
LED

Description

Power A (green)

ON: battery A voltage is within tolerance.

Bat OK A (green) (MALC 319)

OFF: battery A is not operational.

Power B (green)

ON: battery B voltage is within tolerance.

Bat OK B (green) (MALC 319)

OFF: battery B is not operational.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

63

Installing the MALC

Table 8: MALC system LED descriptions (Continued)


LED

Description

Fan fault yellow)

ON: fan tray fault has been detected.


OFF: fan is operating normally.

Minor (yellow)

ON: the highest alarm being reported by one or


more slot cards is a minor alarm.
OFF: no alarm conditions.

Major (yellow)

ON: the highest alarm being reported by one or


more slot cards is a major alarm.
OFF: no alarm conditions.

Critical (yellow)

ON: the highest alarm being reported by one or


more slot cards is a critical alarm.
OFF: no alarm conditions.

Uplink cards and MTAC/Ring card each have Active LEDs which illuminate
to indicate their redundancy status. A solid green LED indicates the card is
active, a blinking green LED indicates the card is standby.
Table 8 describes the MALC system LEDs.
Table 9: MALC card LED descriptions
LED

Description

Active (Green)

ON: the card has booted properly.


BLINKING: The card is booting.
Each Uplink card and MTAC/Ring card have
Active LEDs which illuminate to indicate their
redundancy status. A solid green LED indicates
the card is active, a blinking green LED
indicates the card is standby.
For Uplink cards, the Active LED should blink
during POST and then remain ON after it has
booted up. The LED should stop blinking after
approximately 5 minutes

Fault (Yellow)

ON: The card detected a hardware failure or the


card is not provisioned.
If the LED in ON for a provisioned card, the
card need to be repaired.

Pwr Fail

ON: The card has detected a local on-board


power failure. While the card may operate
properly, it needs repair as soon as possible.
For System power status, refer to the
appropriate chassis LEDs.

64

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Replacing the air filter

Replacing the air filter


Replacing the air filter requires you to temporarily remove the cable
management bracket (if installed). Before performing this procedure, make
sure the MALC connectors are securely fastened.

Removing the air filter with the cable management bracket


installed
1

Put on an antistatic wrist strap that touches the skin. Make sure it is
properly grounded to the ESD jack on the front of the unit.

Carefully unscrew the cable management bracket, leaving the cables


secured to the bracket.

Gently lift the bracket up and out until there is enough free space to
remove the air filter.

Figure 27: Lifting the cable management bracket

Remove the bezel from the bottom of the MALC chassis by grasping both
ends and gently pulling straight out.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

65

Installing the MALC

Figure 28: Removing the front bezel

Remove the air filter by carefully sliding it out.

Figure 29: Removing the air filter

66

Replace the air filter.

Replace the front bezel.

Secure the cable management bracket to the installation rack.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

SYSTEM CABLES AND CONNECTORS


This chapter explains how to connect the MALC cables and connectors. It
contains the following sections:

Cabling guidelines, page 67

Connecting optical ATM trunking cables, page 68

Dressing DSL and POTS cables, page 68

Securing amphenol connectors, page 72

Cable descriptions, page 73

Alarm cable and contacts guidelines, page 75

Uplink card pinouts, page 77

Fiber optic maintenance and handling, page 79

Cabling guidelines
To be in compliance with NEC article 800, ensure that the power lines are
placed at least two inches away from the communication cables. This can be
accomplished by tie-wrapping and routing the power lines behind the rack
(route the communication cables in front of the rack).
Note: To comply with FCC regulations, cables and connectors must
be shielded. If you intend to install cable covers, the maximum height
of the connector head and cable should be two inches.
If the MALC is going to be installed in an inside plant, the cables
must be shielded and grounded at both ends.
MALC system connectors are located in the front of the chassis. No
cables are included with the installation kit. You must order any
cables that are required.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

67

System cables and connectors

Connecting optical ATM trunking cables


WARNING! The single-mode fiber optic interfaces on the OC-3c/
STM1 and OC-12c/STM4 Uplink cards emit invisible laser
radiation that may cause harm. When an optical cable is
connected to the card, the radiation is confined to the cable and
does not present a hazard. However, if you are servicing the
OC-3c/STM1 Uplink or OC-12c/STM4 Uplink cards, always use
the following precautions:

Disconnect the card from the MALC before installing or


removing cables

Ensure that the protective rubber tips cover the SC connectors


when not in use

Never look directly into the optical ports


1. Disengage the OC-3c/STM1 Uplink card from the MALC backplane to
ensure that the optic interface is not emitting laser radiation.
2. Remove the protective rubber tips from the SC connectors on one end of
the fiber optic cable or cables.
3. Remove the protective rubber tips from the SC connectors on the OC-3c/
STM1 Uplink card.
4. Gently insert the SC on the cable into the Tx and Rx ports on the Uplink
card.
5. Connect the other end of the cable that is connected to the Uplink card Tx
connector to the Rx port on the ATM device.
6. Connect the other end of the cable that is connected to the Uplink card Rx
connector into the Tx port on the ATM device.

Dressing DSL and POTS cables


Use 50-pin connectors to connect the DSL and POTS cards. Dress the cables
to the side of the unit and either up or down. See Figure 30.

68

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Dressing DSL and POTS cables

Figure 30: Dressing MALC cables

The optional cable management bracket can be installed to facilitate installing


and managing cables. See Figure 31 on page 70.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

69

System cables and connectors

Figure 31: Installing the cable management bracket

The cable management bracket installation kit also includes mounting clips
intended to secure cable connectors to the card. See Figure 32.

70

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Dressing DSL and POTS cables

Figure 32: Installing bracket clip

To remove the connectors from a card, remove the top portion of the
connector, then gently rock the bottom portion of the connector until its freed
from the clip. See Figure 33.
Figure 33: Removing connectors

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

71

System cables and connectors

Securing amphenol connectors


The MALC accessory kit contains tie-wraps, tie-wrap holders, and screws
that can be optionally used to secure Amphenol connectors to MALC cards.
See Figure 34 on page 72.

Securing the Amphenol connectors


1

Remove one of the hexagonal standoffs from the slot card connector.

Install the tie-wrap holder into the space where the hexagonal standoff has
been removed.

Attach the male end of the Amphenol connector into slot card connector.

Hand-tighten the Amphenol connector hold-down screw.

Once the Amphenol connector is firmly seated, secure the connector by


looping a tie-wrap through the tie-wrap holder and around the Amphenol
connector.

Fasten the tie-wrap.

Figure 34: Securing 50-pin Amphenol connectors

72

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Cable descriptions

Cable descriptions
Table 10 lists specifications for the cables used with the MALC system. For
pinout information for these cables, refer to the chapters for each card, later in
this manual.
Table 10: Summary of cable specifications
Cable description

Interfaces the MALC to

Cable type

Connector type

ADSL subscriber

ADSL-32 cards

32-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Female 64-pin amphenol.

ADSL subscriber
multi-connector

Three ADSL-32 cards

96-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Three Female 64-pin


amphenol.

Chassis alarms

Alarm relay contact on chassis


(MALC 723 or MALC 719)

Blank wire in to screw


terminals.

Alarm relay contact on MTAC/


Ring-FC card

20 AWG minimum (0.8


mm)
24 AWG (0.5 mm)
recommended

DSL, POTS, or
ISDN subscriber

DSL, POTS, or ISDN connectors


on line cards

25 pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Male 50-pin amphenol.

E3/DS3 ATM trunk


circuits

E3/DS3 port on DS3/E3 Uplink


card.

Coax RG Series 59

Female BNC

Ethernet data

1000BaseT connector on OC12/


S4/GE/TDM Uplink card

4 pair Category 5

RJ45 plug

Management (IP)

Ethernet port on Uplink card.

4 pair Category 5

RJ45 plug

Management (serial
craft port)

RS-232D connector on Uplink


card.

4-wire minimum
26 AWG (0.4 mm)

RJ45 plug

MTAC/Ring BITS

External BITS clock

Standard T1 4-wire
cable

RJ48C

MTAC/Ring
external alarms

External alarm connector on


MTAC/Ring card

20 AWG minimum (0.8


mm)
24 AWG (0.5 mm)
recommended

26 pin D-Sub

MTAC/Ring
external ringer

External ring generator on MTAC/


Ring card

22 AWG (0.6 mm)

Screw terminals

MTAC/Ring
external test access

External test access connector on


MTAC/Ring card

2-wire or 4-wire
(depending on the test
being run). Minimum
26 AWG (0.4 mm)

RJ45 plug

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

73

System cables and connectors

Table 10: Summary of cable specifications (Continued)


Cable description

Interfaces the MALC to

Cable type

Connector type

Optical trunk
circuits

OC-3c/STM1 connector on
OC3C/STM1 Uplink card

Pair of Single mode 8/


125

Square Connector (SC)

OC-12c/STM4 connector on
OC12/S4/GE/TDM Uplink card

Pair of Single mode 9/


125

Square Connector (SC)

1000BaseT connector on OC12/


S4/GE/TDM Uplink card

Pair of Single mode 9/


125

Dual fiber LC connectors


(Tx and Rx)

T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink card


(non-redundant)

8-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Amphenol 36-pin
connector to two 50-pin
Amphenol

T1/E1 ATM circuits

Note that a split cable is


included from this
custom connector toward
2 50-pin female
amphenol RJ-21X.
T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink card
(redundant)

8-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Two Amphenol 36-pin


connectors to two 50-pin
Amphenol
Note that a split cable is
included from this
custom connector toward
2 50-pin female
amphenol RJ-21X.

T1/E1 ATM/TDM
circuits

TDM T1/E1 Uplink card

16-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Molex 96-pin connector


to 4 50-pin connectors
Note that a split cable is
included from this
custom connector toward
4 50-pin female
amphenol RJ-21X.
A patch panel, such as
the Ortronics
OR-808004339, can be
used to separate out the
16 lines from the ATM/
TDM Uplink card.

T1/E1 TDM circuits

74

TDM T1/E1 connector on OC12/


S4/GE/TDM card
(non-redundant)

8-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Amphenol 44 pin
connector.

TDM T1/E1 connector on OC12/


S4/GE/TDM card
(redundant)

8-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

Amphenol 44 pin
connector.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Alarm cable and contacts guidelines

Table 10: Summary of cable specifications (Continued)


Cable description

Interfaces the MALC to

Cable type

Connector type

T1/E1 TDM circuits

TDM T1/E1 connector on the


Voice Gateway card
(non-redundant)

32-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

128 pin telco connector.

TDM T1/E1 connector on the


Voice Gateway card
(redundant)

32-pair Category 2, 3, 4
or 5

128 pin telco connector.

Alarm cable and contacts guidelines


The MALC 719 and MALC 723 chassis alarms are located in the lower left of
the chassis, behind the bezel. See Figure 35.
MALC 319 chassis alarms are located on the MTAC-FC card.
Figure 35: MALC chassis alarms

The specifications and requirements for the MALC chassis alarm cable and
alarm relay contacts are as follows:

The alarm cable must be rated at VW-1 or higher. To comply with Part 15
of FCC regulations, all cables to DB connectors must be foiled with
braided shielding.

One cable is required to interface to the alarms connector. The minimum


gauge for this cable is 20 AWG (24 AWG recommended). To limit alarm
cable signal losses, its length should not exceed 60 feet.

Alarm relay contacts are rated at 62.5 VA (defined as being capable of


switching 1 amp at 62.5 volts). The maximum switching current of the
relay is 1 amp.

The following tables describe the MALC chassis alarms.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

75

System cables and connectors

Table 11: System alarms


Event

Type of alarm

Fan Tray up/down

Critical

Power A/B up/down

Critical (if nonredundant)


Minor (if redundant)

System control bus error

Critical

Power Threshold (power


out of acceptable range)

Minor

Thermal threshold

Minor

Table 12: Card alarms


Event

Type of alarm

Card Up/Down

Major
For Uplink and MTAC/Ring card:
Critical (if nonredundant)
Minor (if redundant)

Table 13: Interface alarms


Event

Type of alarm

Frames too long

Minor

Physical line up/down

Major

Table 14: Uplink card alarms


Event

Type of alarm

BER threshold

Critical

Card up/down

Critical (if nonredundant)


Minor (if redundant)

IMA up/down

Critical

Network clocking fault

Critical (if no fallback provided)


Minor (if fallback provided by internal clock)

Flash memory threshold

76

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Minor

Uplink card pinouts

Table 14: Uplink card alarms


Event

Type of alarm

Internal BITS clock fault

Minor (if fallback to line clocking is


provisioned, or if the clock source is currently
provisioned as secondary source)

T1/E1 threshold

Minor

Table 15: POTS card alarms


Event

Type of alarm

Continuity test fault

Minor

Ground fault

Minor

Loop resistance fault

Minor

Power cross test fault


(polarity reversal failure)

Minor

Table 16: MTAC/Ring alarms


Event

Type of alarm

Ring Generator Up/Down

Critical (if nonredundant)


Minor (if redundant)

BITS clock Up/Down


(only if provisioned
active)

Minor

External Ring Generator


Up/Down (only if
provisioned active)

Minor

Uplink card pinouts


This section lists the pinouts for the following interfaces that are common on
all the Uplink cards:

Serial (craft) port pinouts

Ethernet port pinouts

For information about other port pinouts for Uplink cards, refer to the
chapters for each type of card, later in this manual.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

77

System cables and connectors

Serial (craft) port pinouts


Table 17 lists the Uplink cards serial (craft) port pinouts. The serial (craft)
port is an RS232 D type configured as DTE.
Table 17: Uplink card serial (craft) port pinouts
Pin

Function

DCE Ready, Ring Indicator


(DSR/RI)

Received Line Signal Detector (DCD)

DTE Ready (DTR)

Signal Ground (SGND)

Received Data (RD)

Transmitted Data (TD)

Clear To Send (CTS)

Request To Send (RTS)

Table 18 lists the pinouts to connect a DB9 connector to the MALC RJ45
serial craft port.
Table 18: RJ45 to DB9 adapter pinouts
RJ-45 pin

Color

Function

DB-9 pin

N/A

DCE Ready, Ring Indicator


(DSR/RI)

not used

N/A

Received Line Signal Detector


(DCD)

not used

N/A

DTE Ready (DTR)

not used

Red

Signal Ground (SGND)

Green

Received Data (RD)

Yellow

Transmitted Data (TD)

N/A

Clear To Send (CTS)

Looped to pin 8

N/A

Request To Send (RTS)

Looped to pin 7

Ethernet port pinouts


Table 19 lists the Ethernet port pinouts on the Uplink cards.

78

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Fiber optic maintenance and handling

Table 19: Uplink card Ethernet port pinouts


Pin

Function

Tx +

Tx -

Rx +

Not used

Not used

Rx -

Not used

Not used

Fiber optic maintenance and handling


This section describes how to clean the optical connectors and receptacles
used with Zhone Technologies equipment. These processes should be applied
to optical components only in instances where degraded performance is
evidence that the connection is contaminated.
This section contains the following information:

Laser radiation on page 79

Handling optical fibers on page 80

Selecting cleaning materials on page 81

Cleaning a connector on page 81

Cleaning a receptacle on page 81

Repairing optical fibers on page 82

Laser radiation
Zhone equipment and associated optical test sets use laser sources that emit
light energy into fiber cables. This energy is within the red (visible) and
infrared (invisible) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.
Laser products are subject to federal and state or provincial regulations, and
local practices. Regulation 21 CFR 1040 of the U.S. Bureau of Radiological
Health requires manufacturers to certify each laser product as Class I, II, III,
or IV, depending upon the characteristics of the laser radiation emitted. In
terms of health and safety, Class I products present the least hazard (none at
all), while Class IV products present the greatest hazard.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

79

System cables and connectors

Read and observe the following precautions to decrease the risk of exposure
to laser radiation.
WARNING! Risk of eye damage. At all times when handling
optical fibers, follow the safety procedures recommended by your
company.
Although Zhone optical products have a Class I certification, hazardous
exposure to laser radiation can occur when fibers connecting system
components are disconnected or broken. Certain procedures carried out
during testing require the handling of optical fibers without dust caps and
therefore increase the risk of exposure. Exposure to either visible or invisible
laser light can damage your eyes under certain conditions.
During service, maintenance, repair, or removal of cables or equipment,
follow these rules:

Avoid direct exposure to fiber ends or optical connector ends. Laser


radiation may be present and can damage your eyes.

Follow the manufacturers instructions when using an optical test set.


Incorrect calibration or control settings can result in hazardous levels of
radiation.

Handling optical fibers


When you work with optical fibers, you must take these precautions:

80

Wear safety glasses when you install optical fibers.

Clean your hands after you handle optical fibers. Small pieces of glass are
not always visible and can damage your eyes. If you have a piece of a
glass in your eye, get medical assistance immediately.

Never look into an active optical fiber or a optical fiber connector opening
of an active or powered-up unit.

Prevent direct exposure to optical fiber ends or optical connector ends


where you can directly access the laser signal. Do not handle pieces of
optical fiber with your fingers. Use tweezers or adhesive tape to lift and
discard any loose optical fiber ends.

Wear rubber gloves when you clean optical connectors. The gloves
prevent direct contact with the isopropyl alcohol and prevent
contamination of the ferrules with skin oils.

Place all optical fiber clippings in a plastic container provided for that
purpose.

Handle optical fibers with caution. Place the optical fibers in a safe
location during installation.

Protect all optical fiber connectors with clean dust caps at all times.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Fiber optic maintenance and handling

Follow the manufacturer instructions when you use an optical test set.
Incorrect calibration or control settings can create hazardous levels of
radiation.

Selecting cleaning materials


Materials used for cleaning Zhone Technologies equipment should be high
quality and suitable for the purpose.

Disconnect the cable end to be cleaned.

Using inert dusting gas, blow accumulated dust and debris off the
cylindrical and end-face surfaces of the connector.

Apply optical-grade isopropyl alcohol to a cleaning tissue.

Gently wipe the tissue over the cylindrical and end face surfaces of the
connector perpendicular to the cable, then fold the cloth and repeat the
operation. Always use a clean tissue. Reusing the same portion of the
tissue may result in recontamination.

Dry the connector by blowing it with inert dusting gas for two seconds,
holding the nozzle approximately inch from the end of the connector.

Recap or reconnect the connector promptly to avoid contamination.


Check for proper system function.

Optical cleaning kits are available from optical supply sources.

Cleaning a connector
1

Disconnect the cable end to be cleaned.

Using inert dusting gas, blow accumulated dust and debris off the
cylindrical and end-face surfaces of the connector.

Apply optical-grade isopropyl alcohol to a cleaning tissue.

Gently wipe the tissue over the cylindrical and end face surfaces of the
connector perpendicular to the cable, then fold the cloth and repeat the
operation. Always use a clean tissue. Reusing the same portion of the
tissue may result in recontamination.

Dry the connector by blowing it with inert dusting gas for two seconds,
holding the nozzle approximately inch from the end of the connector.

Recap or reconnect the connector promptly to avoid contamination.


Check for proper system function.

Cleaning a receptacle
Clean the optical ports on modules only if there is evidence of contamination
or reduced performance. To minimize contamination and cleaning, keep all
optical ports securely covered with a connector or a dust cap.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

81

System cables and connectors

Using the extension tube supplied with the inert dusting gas, blow into the
optical port to remove any accumulated dust and debris. Do not allow the
tube to touch the bottom of the optical port.

Using a swab with a small head, such as TexWipe Microswab, and


optical-grade isopropyl alcohol, wipe out the optical port.

Recap or reconnect the receptacle promptly to avoid contamination.


Check for proper system function.

Repairing optical fibers


When an accidental break in the fiber feeder cable occurs, take the following
steps:

82

Notify both central-office and field-repair personnel of the problem.

Identify to central-office personnel what fibers are damaged.

Power off all laser sources related to the damaged fibers (whether located
at the central office, subscriber premises, or remote location).

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

MANAGING THE MALC


This chapter describes how to log into the MALC and add a remote
management channel. It includes the following sections:

Logging into the serial (craft) port, page 83

Configuring a management interface, page 84

Logging into the serial (craft) port


Note: Do not use the serial craft port of a standby card to modify its
configuration.
The MALC unit provides an out-of-band RS232 D serial (craft) interface for
managing the unit. To access the serial port, configure your terminal interface
software with the following settings:

9600bps

8 data bits

No parity

1 stop bit

No flow control
Tip: The serial (craft) port settings can be changed by modifying the
rs232-profile.

You must perform the initial configuration of the system using the serial
(craft) interface. After you have completed the initial configuration, you can
manage the MALC unit over the network through a telnet session over the
Ethernet interface or over the management PVC.
Note: The MALC supports 6 concurrent management sessions, 5
telnet sessions and a single local session through the serial (craft)
port.

Logging in and out of the system


Log into the system (the default user name is admin, the default password
is zhone):

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

83

Managing the MALC

login:admin
password:
zSH>

To log out of the system, enter the logout command:


zSh> logout

Tip: The system automatically logs you out after a period of


inactivity. The default logout time is 10 minutes, but can be changed
with the timeout command. Refer to the Zhone CLI Reference Guide
for information on the timeout command.

Enabling and disabling logging


By default logging is enabled on the serial craft port and disabled over
telnet sessions. To enable or disable logging for the session, using the
following command:
zSh> log session on | off

The log session command only applies to the current session. You can
also enable or disable logging for all serial craft port sessions using the
following command:
zSh> log serial on | off

This command setting persists across system reboots.

Configuring a management interface


This section describes how to configure the following interfaces to remotely
manage the MALC:

Uplink card 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface on page 84

ATM management connection on page 86

Managing the MALC with ZMS on page 88


Note: If you want to manage the MALC over an ATM PVC, first
configure the Uplink ATM interface as described later in this manual.

Uplink card 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface


The MALC has a 10/100 BaseT Ethernet interface on the Uplink card. The
ip-interface-record for the Uplink card is named ethernet1. This interface is
shared between the two Ethernet ports on redundant Uplink cards (if they
exist). The system can be reached using the address configured in the
ethernet1 ip-interface-record, no matter which card is active.

84

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring a management interface

Caution: The Uplink card Ethernet interface must be configured


before any other interfaces on the system, even if you do not intend to
manage the unit over the Ethernet.

Configuring the Ethernet IP interface


The following example configures the IP address for the system:
zSH> interface add 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd static 192.168.8.21 255.255.255.0
Created ip-interface-record ethernet1/ip

Note: If you have problems with IP interfaces not automatically


binding, refer to for more information.

Verifying the interface


Use the interface show command to verify that the Ethernet interface was
configured correctly:
zSH> interface show
Interface
Status Rd/Address
Media/Dest Address IfName
--------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip
UP
1 192.168.8.21/24
00:01:47:65:02:f2 1-1-1-0

Creating a default route


The following example creates a default route using the gateway
192.168.8.1 with a cost of 1 (one):
route add default 192.168.8.1 1

Verifying the route


Use the route show command to verify that the routes were added:
zSH> route show
Dest
Nexthop
Cost
Owner
-----------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0/0
192.168.8.1
1
STATICLOW
192.168.8.0/24
1/1/1/0/ip
1
LOCAL

Use the ping command to verify connectivity to the default gateway:


zSH> ping 192.168.8.1
PING 192.168.8.1: 64 data bytes
!!!!!
----192.168.8.1 PING Statistics---5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 0/0/0

To stop the ping, press CTRL+C.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

85

Managing the MALC

Adding a route to the remote LAN


After creating the IP interface, you might need to create a route to the
remote devices LAN interface using the route add command. The
command uses the following syntax:
route add destination mask next-hop cost

For example, in the following configuration, add a route to the


192.168.10.0 network using the MALC Uplink interface as the gateway.
Figure 36: Adding a remote route to LAN

ATM

192.168.8.1

192.168.8.21

192.168.10.0

route add 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.8.1 1

ATM management connection


The MALC can terminate an ATM PVC and route it over an Ethernet
interface for management traffic.
The following table summarizes the configuration tasks for creating an ATM
management connection.
Task

Command

Create a traffic descriptor. See


Creating the ATM traffic descriptor
on page 86.

new atm-traf-descr index

Create the VCL. See Creating the


ATM management VCL on page 87.

interface add interface/atm vc vpi/vci td td_index


static IpAddress Netmask

Multiple connections can use the same traffic descriptors and a single VCL
must use the same traffic descriptor for both transmit and receive.

This command creates the ATM VCL and the IP interface for the
management PVC.
Add a route to the Ethernet
interface. See Adding a default
route to the ATM network on
page 87.

route add destination netmask nexthop cost


This enables the MALC to route from the IP management interface to the
Ethernet interface

Creating the ATM traffic descriptor


Create a new atm-traf-descr profile and specify a unique index:
zSH> new atm-traf-descr 200

86

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring a management interface

Please provide the following: [q]uit.


td_type: ------------- {atmNoClpNoScr}: enter traffic descriptor type
td_param1: ----------- {0}: enter PCR
td_param2: ----------- {0}: enter PCR (for CLP=0 traffic) or SCR
td_param3: ----------- {0}: enter MBS
td_param4: ----------- {0}: enter CDVT
td_param5: ----------- {0}:
cac-divider: -------------> {1}:
td_service_category: - {ubr}: rtvbr | nrtvbr | ubr | cbr
td_frame_discard: --------> {false}:
usage-parameter-control: -> {true}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
New record saved.

Creating the ATM management VCL


The following example configures an ATM connection with a VPI/VCI of
0/35 that uses the atm-traf-descr profile you just configured (with an
index of 200). The VCL uses the Uplink interface:
zSH> interface add uplink1/atm vc 0/35 td 200 static 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
Created ip-interface-record uplink1-0-35/ip

This command creates the ip-interface-record and the associated VCL:


zSH> list ip-interface-record
ip-interface-record ethernet1/ip
ip-interface-record uplink1-0-35/ip
2 entries found.
zSH> list atm-vcl
atm-vcl uplink1/atm/0/35
1 entry found.

Adding a default route to the ATM network


After adding the IP interface for management, create a default route to the
ATM network:
route add default 192.168.1.254 1

Verifying the interface


Use the interface show command to verify that the interfaces are active:
zSH> interface show
Interface
Status Rd/Address
Media/Dest Address
IfName
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1/1/0/ip
UP
1 192.168.8.21/24
08:00:3e:03:02:01
1-1-1-0
1/1/2/0/ip
UP
1 192.168.1.1/24
0/35
uplink1-0-35
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 interfaces

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87

Managing the MALC

Managing the MALC with ZMS


Note: For details on using ZMS, refer to the ZMS Administrator's
Guide and the NetHorizhon User's Guide.
The system profile contains parameters that configure the system contact
information for the MALC and connection information for the ZMS. This
profile does not need to be modified in order to manage the MALC with ZMS.

CLI provisioning and ZMS


CLI configuration of a device being managed by the ZMS is disabled by
default. Attempting to configure the device results in an error:
zSH> update system 0
Provisioning via CLI is currently not available.

If you need to configure the device from the CLI, use the resetcliprov
command.
If you plan to use a script to provision the device from the CLI while it is
being managed by the ZMS:
1

Update the system profile to disable partial config syncs to ZMS:

zSH> update system 0


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
syscontact: ----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport
Road Oakland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113
support@zhone.com}:
sysname: -------------> {Zhone MALC}:
syslocation: ---------> {Oakland}:
enableauthtraps: -----> {disabled}:
setserialno: ---------> {0}:
zmsexists: -----------> {true}: false
zmsconnectionstatus: -> {inactive}:
zmsipaddress: --------> {192.168.210.28}:
configsyncexists: ----> {false}:
configsyncoverflow: --> {false}:
configsyncpriority: --> {high}:
configsyncaction: ----> {noaction}:
configsyncfilename: --> {192.168.8.21_4_1014067321329}:
configsyncstatus: ----> {synccomplete}:
configsyncuser: ------> {cfgsync}:
configsyncpasswd: ----> {}: ** private **
numshelves: ----------> {1}:
shelvesarray: --------> {}:
numcards: ------------> {3}:
ipaddress: -----------> {192.168.8.21}:
alternateipaddress: --> {0.0.0.0}:
countryregion: -------> {us}:
primaryclocksource: --> {0/0/0/0/0}:
ringsource: ----------> {internalringsourcelabel}:
revertiveclocksource: -> {true}

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring a management interface

voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}


....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

After the provisioning is complete, perform a full config sync from ZMS.

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89

Managing the MALC

90

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

GIGABIT ETHERNET CARD (UPLINK-2-GE)


This chapter describes the MALC 2 port GigaBit Ethernet Uplink card and
explains how to configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 92

GigE-2 Uplink card configuration, page 94

Small form factor pluggables, page 99


Note: Uplink cards must be installed in slot 1 or slot 2 of the MALC
chassis.

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91

Gigabit Ethernet card (UPLINK-2-GE)

Overview
The MALC 2-GE Uplink cards provide high-speed
GigaBit Ethernet interfaces for resilient packet ring (RPR)
networks. They include the following interfaces:
One 10/100 Ethernet interface for management or data.
Two Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. These interfaces can be
used for RPR or high speed data applications. The
interfaces support a number of small form factor
pluggables (SFPs) that enable the card to interface with a
variety of media types. (For more information see Small
form factor pluggables on page 99.)
Eight T1/E1 TDM ports that support either GR-303 or
V5.2.

Table 20: Uplink-2-GE specifications

92

Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

8 ports TDM T1/E1

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Table 20: Uplink-2-GE specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Physical
interfaces

TDM T1/E1: Amphenol 44 pin connector


Two Gigabit Ethernet ports with SFPs. The SFPs can be twisted
pair 1000baseT or fiber (SX, LX or ZX). See Small form factor
pluggables on page 99.
The optical interfaces are class 1 Laser International Safety
Standard IEC 825 compliant
RJ45 Ethernet 10/100 Ethernet interface for management
RS232D serial craft interface

Standards
supported

AF-PHY-0086.001
GR-303-CORE
G.965 and ETSI EN 300 347-1 V2.2.2 (V5.2)
Gigabit Ethernet (GE) IEEE 802.3

TDM line
characteristics

Supervisory signaling is Extended Superframe (ESF) CAS


signaling

TDM capacity

2 GR-303 interface groups (IGs)


8 channelized T1s per card
4096 maximum GR-303 call reference values (CRVs) per
system

Voice
processing

AAL2 SAR for converting TDM bus voice traffic to


ATMG.711 encoding only
ATMF Loop Emulation Standard

Management
interface

RS-232D serial craft port


AAL5 Management VC termination (RFC 1483 routed) for
ATM in-band management
Management Ethernet 10/100 port routable for connecting to
other Ethernet devices
SNMP

Redundancy

Card redundancy
1+1 TDM T1/E1 interface redundancy (with Y cable).
APS 1:1 bi-directional and 1+1 (with Y cable).

Power
consumption

50 W

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

93

Gigabit Ethernet card (UPLINK-2-GE)

GigE-2 Uplink card configuration


This section describes configuration procedures for the GigE-2 Uplink card. If
these procedures are required, they should be done before provisioning the
system. This section includes:

Configuring redundant Uplink cards on page 94

Adding GigE-2 cards to the primary Uplink node on page 95

Adding redundant Uplink cards to RPR nodes on page 97

Adding GigE-2 Uplink cards in linear mode on page 97

Configuring redundant Uplink cards in linear mode on page 97

Changing the RPR line type on page 98


Note: For information about creating an RPR ring, refer to the
MALC Configuration Guide.

Configuring redundant Uplink cards


Caution: When adding redundant Uplink cards, note the following:
You must configure redundant physical interfaces on both the active
and standby cards. This applies to all Uplink cards. In addition, you
must manually keep the configuration of the physical interfaces on
the active and standby cards in sync.
Each card must be running the same software version and have the
same size flash card.
Note: When configuring the redundant Uplink card, the settings in
the card-profile for the both cards must be identical.
To add a redundant Uplink card to the system:
1

Verify that active card has been configured with the same card-group-id
that is to be used for the standby card.

Install a second Uplink card in slot 2.

Create a card-profile for the second Uplink card:


By default, the GigE-2 card is configured to carry data-only traffic. You
can modify the GigE-2 card to specify that the RPR ring carry voice and
data traffic by modifying the card-line-type in the card-profile. The
following line types are supported for RPR nodes:

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

rpr: RPR data-only mode (default)

rpr-t1-gr303: RPR with data and GR-303 voice

rpr-e1-v52: RPR with data and V5.2 voice

rpr-t1cas: RPR with data and T1 CAS voice

GigE-2 Uplink card configuration

zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5041 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcrprgige.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the working Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: rpr
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Connect the redundant cables.

Once the card-profile has been saved, the standby card comes up and the
configuration and routing tables from the primary card are copied over.

Adding GigE-2 cards to the primary Uplink node


RPR requires two Uplink cards in the MALC functioning as the primary
Uplink node. Each of these Uplink cards in the primary Uplink node must use
the same card-group-id and the same card-line-type:
1

Update the card profile for the Uplink card:

zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5041 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: -----------> {malcrprgige.bin}:
admin-status: -----------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}:
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}:
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: --------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}:
card-group-id: ----------> {0}: 1
hold-active: ------------> {false}:
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: ---------> {rpr}: rpr|rpr-t1-gr303|rpr-e1-v52|rpr-t1cas
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
card redundancy group ID change to 1
This will cause the removal of all associated profiles and a slotreboot to
create new if-translate profilesbased on "uplinkx-y" names.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y

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95

Gigabit Ethernet card (UPLINK-2-GE)

Record updated.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the system will reboot.


2

Add a second uplink card to the primary Uplink node.


Set the second Uplink card to the same card-group-id and line type as the
first Uplink card.

zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5041shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: -----------> {}: malcrprgige.bin
admin-status: -----------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}:
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}:
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: --------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}:
card-group-id: ----------> {0}: 1
hold-active: ------------> {false}:
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: ---------> {unknowntype}:rpr|rpr-t1-gr303|rpr-e1-v52|
rpr-t1cas
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
card redundancy group ID change to 1
This will cause the removal of all associated profiles and a slotreboot to
create new if-translate profilesbased on "uplinkx-y" names.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Record updated.

Connect the Uplink card RDNT ports with the RPR redundant cable.

Modify the rpr-config profile to specify how the RPR ring should handle
redundancy switches. See the MALC Configuration Guide for a detailed
explanation of these protection settings.
zSH> new rpr-config 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
reversion-mode: --------> {true}:
protection-wtr: --------> {10}:
protection-fast-timer: -> {10}:
protection-slow-timer: -> {100}:
wrap-config: -----------> {false}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Repeat these steps to add GigE -2 cards to the RPR ring nodes.

GigE-2 Uplink card configuration

Adding redundant Uplink cards to RPR nodes


To add a redundant Uplink card into an RPR (non-Uplink) node:
1

Assign both cards to card-group-id 1.

Connect the cards with an intercard connector.

Do not connect the GigE port 2 to the ring.

Adding GigE-2 Uplink cards in linear mode


To add a GigE-2 Uplink card to the system:
1

Install the Uplink card in slot 1.

Create a card-profile for the Uplink card:


Note: The card line type for GigE-2 cards in a linear topology is
ds1.

zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5041 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcrprgige.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the working Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Connect the cables.

Configuring redundant Uplink cards in linear mode


Caution: When adding redundant Uplink cards, note the following
You must configure redundant physical interfaces on both the active
and standby cards. This applies to all Uplink cards. In addition, you
must manually keep the configuration of the physical interfaces on
the active and standby cards in sync.
Each card must be running the same software version and have the
same size flash card.

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97

Gigabit Ethernet card (UPLINK-2-GE)

Note: When configuring the redundant Uplink card, the settings in


the card-profile for the both cards must be identical.
To add a redundant Uplink card to the system:
1

Verify that active card has been configured with the same card-group-id
that is to be used for the standby card.

Install a second Uplink card in slot 2.

Create a card-profile for the second Uplink card:


Note: The card line type for GigE-2 cards in a linear topology is
ds1.

zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5041 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcrprgige.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the working Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Connect the redundant cables.

Once the card-profile has been saved, the standby card comes up and the
configuration and routing tables from the primary card are copied over.

Changing the RPR line type


If, after configuring the line type for a GigE-2 card, you need to change the
line type, delete the Uplink card-profile and recreate it.
Caution: Changing the line type for the Uplink card requires a
system reboot and deletes the system configuration.
Back up your configuration using the dump command before
changing the line type.
By default, the GigE-2 card is configured to carry data only. You can modify
the GigE-2 card so that the T1/E1 TDM ports can be configured to carry voice

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Small form factor pluggables

traffic. To do this, modify the card-line-type in the card-profile. The


following line types are supported for RPR nodes:

rpr: RPR data-only mode (default)

rpr-t1-gr303: RPR with data and GR-303 voice

rpr-e1-v52: RPR with data and V5.2 voice

rpr-t1cas: RPR with data and T1 CAS voice

Delete the card-profile for the Uplink card:


zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5041 shelf/slot/type

Create the Uplink card-profile and change the card-line-type:

zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5041shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: -----------> {}: malcrprgige.bin
admin-status: -----------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}:
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}:
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: --------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}:
card-group-id: ----------> {0}: 1
hold-active: ------------> {false}:
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: ---------> {rpr}: rpr|rpr-t1-gr303|rpr-e1-v52|rpr-t1cas
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the system will reboot.

Small form factor pluggables


Zhone Technologies supports a variety of small form factor pluggables (SFPs)
which you select depending on the protocol, fiber type and distance
requirements.
These SFPs (optical transceivers) are high performance integrated duplex data
links for bi-directional communication over multimode or single mode optical
fiber. All Zhone Technologies SFPs are equipped with LC receptacles, which
are compatible with the industry standard LC connector. These SFP
transceivers measure 0.532 inches in width and provide double port densities
by fitting twice the number of transceivers into the same board space as a 1x9
transceiver. They also operate at +3.3V. All supported SFPs are
hot-swappable, therefore enabling SFPs to be easily changed regardless of
whether the power is on. In addition, if an incorrect SFP is plugged in the user
will receive a mismatcherror in their management software.

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99

Gigabit Ethernet card (UPLINK-2-GE)

Furthermore, this opto-electronic transceiver module is a class 1 laser product


compliant with FDA Radiation Performance Standards, 21 CFR Subchapter J.
This component is also class 1 laser compliant according to International
Safety Standard IEC-825-1.
Figure 37: Small form factor pluggable.

Zhone Technologies supports 4 types of Gigabit Ethernet SFPs:

GE-SFP-SX: This is a 850 nm, multimode SFP, used in applications that


are up to 5 km.

GE-SFP-LX: This is a 1310 nm, singlemode SFP, used in applications


that are up to 10km.

GE-SFP-ZX: This is a 1550 nm, singlemode SFP, used in applications


that are up to 80 km.

GE-SFP-TP: This is a twisted pair SFP for access to a twisted pair


GigaBit Ethernet network. It supports data rates of up to 1.25 Gbps over
distances of 100 m (per IEEE 802.3).

Table 21 describes the optical SFP specifications.


Table 21: SFP specifications
Specification

SX

LX

ZX

Data rate

1.062 to 1.25 Gbps

1.062 to 1.25 Gbps

1.062 to 1.25 Gbps

Fiber Interface

G.652

G.652

G.652

Operating wavelength range

830-860 nm

1274-1360 nm

1535-1565 nm

Maximum distance supported

500 meters

10 km

80 km

Source type

multimode

singlemode

singlemode

Power

-9.5 (minimum)

-9 dB (minimum)

2 dB (typical)

0 dB (maximum)

-3 dB (maximum)

Transmitter

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Small form factor pluggables

Table 21: SFP specifications (Continued)


Specification

SX

LX

ZX

Spectral characteristics: max. 20 dB


width

0.85 nm

4 nm

1 nm

Minimum extinction ratio

9 dB

9 dB

9 dB

Relative intensity noise (RIN) (max.)

-117 dB

-120 dB

-120 dB

Optical Rise/Fall Time

300 ps

260 ps

260 ps

Deterministic jitter (max.)

85 ps

80 ps

Total Jitter Output (pk-pk) (max.)

251 ps

227 ps

200 ps

-17 dB (minimum)

-20 dB (minimum)

-24 dB (minimum)

0 dB (maximum)

-3 dB (maximum)

0 dB to -3 dB
(maximum) with
damage threshold at 6
dB

Reflectance at the receiving point

-14 dB

-14 dB

Deterministic jitter (max.)

113 ps

170 ps

Total Jitter Output (pk-pk) (max.)

266 ps

266 ps

Receiver
Sensitivity

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

101

Gigabit Ethernet card (UPLINK-2-GE)

102

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 UPLINK CARD (UPLINK-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)


This chapter describes the MALC T1/E1 Uplink card and explains how to
configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 103

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces, page 107

Configuring IMA groups, page 112

T1/E1 IMA cable and port pinouts, page 117

Overview
IMA provides multiplexing and demultiplexing of ATM
traffic on the cell level as described in the ATM forum
AF-PHY-0086.001. On the subscriber side, the Uplink card
provides ATM Adaptation Layer 2 (AAL2) termination for
POTS cards. The Uplink card also provides system
management services such as software and configuration
database storage, management, and monitoring.
The T1/E1 Uplink card supports both IMA and UNI mode.
The Uplink card contains an Ethernet port for local
management, local LAN connectivity, or IP uplink; a T1/
E1 IMA interface for user traffic; and a serial (craft) port
for local management.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

103

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Table 22: Uplink-T1/E1 ATM/IP specifications


Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

8 ports

Physical
interface

Custom 36-pin amphenol connector

ATM support

MALC performs ATM cell relay functions between cell based


line cards (such as ADSL or SHDSL) and the Uplink card. The
Uplink card performs cell relay function for the ATM traffic on
the backplane.

Provided cable breaking out to 2 50-pin telco connectors

ATM Quality of Service types supported:

CBR, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR


Fair Weighted Queuing
Per VC and per QoS buffering

ATM Forum specifications:

UNI 3.0, UNI 3.1 compliant. Note that ILMI, SVCs,


point-to-multipoint are currently not supported.

UNI 4.0 compliant for PVC features only. Note that ABR,
SVCs, SPVCs, Multicast, and Anycast are not currently
supported.
8 IMA groups are supported, as described in the ATM forum
AF-PHY-0086.001. Note that UNI and IMA mode are not
currently supported on the same card.

Partial support for Traffic Management 4.0 including:

QOS levels described above

Connection Admission Control

Traffic descriptor specification

VPI/VCI ranges:

VPI: 0 to 3
VCI: 32 to 511

AAL2 and AAL5 termination:

Voice
processing

AAL2 SAR for MALC POTS lines


AAL5 SAR for in-band management VC termination
RFC 1483 routed termination supported

AAL2 SAR for subscriber lines on POTS cards


Supports AAL2 BLES standard, compatible with standards based
Voice Gateways
G.711 encoding of voice calls on the MALC TDM bus

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T1/E1 ATM/IP card configuration

Table 22: Uplink-T1/E1 ATM/IP specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Management
interfaces

RS-232D serial craft port


AAL5 Management VC termination (RFC 1483 routed) for ATM
in-band management
Management Ethernet 10/100 port routable for connecting to
other Ethernet devices
SNMP

Redundancy

1+1 card redundancy (with Y cable).

Uplink-T1/
E1-IMA-8

30 W

T1/E1 ATM/IP card configuration


This section describes optional configuration procedures for the T1/E1 ATM/
IP card. These procedures should be done before provisioning the system.

Configuring ATM settings for T1/E1 ATM/IP Uplink cards


To configure T1/E1 IP Uplink cards:
zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5101 shelf/slot/type (type is 5101 for T1/E1 IP Uplink cards)
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {malct1imaf.bin}:
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30} change the bandwidth allocation, if desired
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
Changing atm configuration will result in a system reboot.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Atm configuration changed system is rebooting ...Record updated.

Changing the T1/E1 IMA Uplink card line type


If, after configuring the line type for a T1/E1 Uplink card, you need to change
the line type, delete the Uplink card-profile and recreate it.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

105

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Caution: Changing the line type for the Uplink card requires a
system reboot and deletes the system configuration.
Back up your configuration using the dump command before
changing the line type.
1

Save the device configuration. For example:


a

Verify you are at the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

Back up the current configuration file to the flash card and store it in
the onreboot directory:
zSH> mkdir onreboot
zSH> cd onreboot
zSH> dump file restore

This file will be used to restore the system configuration or revert to a


previous release, if desired.
c

If desired, save the configuration file to a host on the network. For


example:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 malc.cfg

Change directories to the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

Delete the card-profile for the Uplink card:


zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5101 shelf/slot/type

Create the Uplink card-profile and change the card-line-type and


specify the ATM bandwidth allocation:

zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5101


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malct1imaf.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: e1 | e1-ima | ds1 | ds1-ima

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces

card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable} enter the bandwidth allocation


....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the system will reboot and restore the
configuration saved to the onreboot directory.

Connecting redundant T1/E1 Uplink cards


The T1/E1 ATM/IP Uplink card has a redundant Y cable to provide card
redundancy. To connect the redundant cables:
1

Attach each 36-pin connector to the uplink connector on the Uplink card.

Attach the 50-pin connectors to the appropriate network interface. (See


Figure 38.)

Figure 38: Connecting redundant T1/E1 Uplink cards

For pinout information about the redundant T1/E1 IMA cable, see T1/E1 IMA
cable and port pinouts, page 117.

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces


This section explains how to configure DS1/E1 interfaces. It applies to the
TDM Uplink card (ports 9 through 16) the T1/E1 IMA card, and the T1/E1 32
port card.
Note: For redundant systems, configure the DS1 interfaces on both
the active and standby cards.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

107

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

The following table summarizes the commands required to configure DS1


uplink interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Update the DS1 interfaces, which specify the basic


parameters of the DS1 line, including framing,
encoding, and clocking. See Configuring a DS1
interface on page 111.

update ds1-profile 1-1-port-0/ds1


where port is from 1 to 8 (for the IMA Uplink card)
9 to 16 (for the TDM Uplink card)
1 to 32 (for the T1/E1 32 card)
If your system is redundant, configure the DS1
interfaces on both the active and standby cards.

Activate the DS1 interfaces in the if-translate and


line-group profiles. See Activating a DS1 interface on
page 111.

update if-translate 1-1-port-0/ds1


where port is from
1 to 8 for the T1/E1 IMA Uplink card or
1 to 16 for the T1/E1 TDM Uplink card
1 to 32 (for the T1/E1 32 card)

The ds1-profile configures both T1 and E1 interfaces.


T1 interfaces on the MALC have the following defaults:

ESF framing

B8ZS coding

Robbed bit signaling

CSU mode

Line build out of 0 feet

E1 interfaces on the MALC have the following defaults:

108

E1-CRCMF line type

HDB3 coding

Line build out of 0 feet

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces

The following table describes the supported ds1-profile parameters.


Parameter

Options

line-type

The type of DS1 circuit.


Values:
esf Extended Super Frame.
e1Mf : G.704, table 4a, with TS16 multiframing
enabled for E1 circuits.
e1CrcMf : G.704, table 4b, with TS16 multiframing
enabled for E1 circuits.
Default: esf for T1
e1 for E1

line-code

The type of Zero Code Suppression used on the


interface.
b8zs: a specific pattern of normal bits and bipolar
violations used to replace a sequence of eight zero bits.
hdb3: High Density Bipolar of order 3. A code used
for E1.
Default: b8zs for T1
hdb3 for E1

send-code

This parameter is used for bit error rate (BER) testing.


For information, see the MALC Configuration Guide.

circuit-id

Enter a circuit identifier for the interface, up to 36


characters.

loopback-config

This parameter is used for loopback testing. For


information, see the MALC Configuration Guide.

dsx-line-length

The length of the DSX WAN interface in feet. This


parameter provides information for line build out
circuitry.
Values:
Dsx0 0 feet for the line build out (LBO) setting.
Dsx133 133 feet for the LBO.
Dsx266 266 feet for the LBO.
Dsx399 399 feet for the LBO.
Dsx533 533 feet for the LBO.
Dsx655 655 feet for the LBO.
Default: 0

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

109

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Parameter

Options

line-status-change-trap
-enable

Specifies whether a trap is generated whenever the line


state changes.
Values:
enabled
disabled
Default: enabled

ds1-mode

Type of interface.
Values:
dsx DS1 interface is DSX
csu DS1 interface is CSU
other Interface is neither CSU nor DSX
Default: csu

csu-line-length

This parameter provides information for line build out


circuitry.
Values:
csu00 0 dB line build out.
csu75 -7.5 dB line build out.
csu150 -15.0 dB line build out.
csu225 -22.5 dB line build out.
Default: csu00

transmit-clock-source

Specifies the clock source for the interface.

cell-scramble

Indicates whether ATM cell scrambling is enabled for


this interface. Both sides of the connection must agree
on whether scrambling is enabled.
Values:
true Cell scrambling enabled.
false Cell scrambling disabled.
Default: true

coset-polynomial

Indicates whether the coset polynomial is used to


calculate the ATM header error control (HEC) value.
Both sides of the connection must agree on the method
of calculating the HEC value.
Values:
true The coset polynomial is used to calculate the
HEC value.
false The coset polynomial is not used to calculate the
HEC value.
Default: true

110

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces

Configuring a DS1 interface


The default values are appropriate for most applications. If you need to
change them, update the ds1-profile for the interface:
zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
line-type: ----------------------> {esf}:
line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}:
send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}:
circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}:
loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}:
signal-mode: --------------------> {none}:
fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}:
dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}:
line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}:
channelization: -----------------> {disabled}:
ds1-mode: -----------------------> {other}:
csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}:
clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}:
transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming}:
cell-scramble: ------------------> {true}:
coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}:
protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}signal-type:
--------------------> {loopstart}
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activating a DS1 interface


Activate each DS1 interface by updating its if-translate profile:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifindex: -----> {1}: .
shelf: -------> {1}:
slot: --------> {1}:
port: --------> {1}:
subport: -----> {0}:
type: --------> {ds1}:
adminstatus: -> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

After you update the profile, a log message appears indicating the line is
active:
1/1: alarm_mgr: : l=167: 01:01:01 Major T1 Up Line
1:1:1:0

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

111

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Continue updating each DS1 interface. When all the interfaces are active,
proceed to configuring the IMA groups.

Configuring IMA groups


Note: For redundant systems, configure the IMA interfaces on both
the active and standby cards.
For more information about IMA, refer to the ATM Forum Inverse
Multiplexing for ATM (IMA) Specification Version 1.1 (AF-PHY-0086.001).
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure IMA
groups on the MALC:
Action

Command

(Optional) Update the ima-group-profile, which


specifies the basic settings of the IMA group,
including the number of transmit and receive links
and the clocking. See Configuring IMA groups on
page 116.

update ima-group-profile 1/slot/1

(Optional) Move the default IMA links to different


groups. See Moving IMA links on page 116.

112

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

where slot the slot that contains the card).


If your system is redundant, configure the IMA group on
both the active and standby cards.
imalink move SourceIMAGroup
DestinationIMAGroup ds1Interface

Configuring IMA groups

The following table describes the supported parameters in the


ima-group-profile.
Parameter

Description

groupSymmetry

The symmetry of the Inverse Multiplexing over ATM


(IMA) group. Symmetry determines whether the transmit
and receive sides of the IMA link must be configured and
how traffic is sent over the links.
Values:
symmetricOperation Both transmit and receive IMA
links must be configured and the system can transmit and
receive traffic only if both sides of the connection are
active.
asymmetricOperation Both transmit and receive IMA
links must be configured, but the system can transmit and
receive traffic even if both sides of the connection are not
active.
asymmetricConfiguration Transmit and receive links
do not have to be configured and the system can transmit
and receive traffic even if both sides of the connection are
not active.
Default: symmetricOperation

minNumTxLinks

Minimum number of transmit links required to be Active


for the IMA group to be in the Operational state. If the
number of active links falls below this value, the link
drops and the redundant link (if any) takes over.
Values:
1 to 8
Default: 1

minNumRxLinks

Minimum number of receive links required to be active


for the IMA group to be in the operational state. If the
number of active links falls below this value, the link
drops and the redundant link (if any) takes over.
Values:
1 to 8
Default: 1

txClkMode

Transmit clocking mode used by the near-end IMA


group.
Values:
itc Independent Transmit Clock. Indicates that IMA links
do not all use the same transmit clock. Each IMA link
derives clock from its associated DS1 interface.
ctc Common Transmit Clock. Indicates the transmit
clock of all IMA links are derived from the same source.
When set to ctc, the MALC derives the IMA clocking
from the system clock.
Default: ctc

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

113

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Parameter

Description

txImaId

The IMA ID currently in use by the near-end IMA


interface.
Values:
0 to 255
Default: 1

txFramLength

The frame length to be used by the IMA group in the


transmit direction. Can only be set when the IMA group
is startup.
Values:
m32 32 cells
m64 64 cells
m128 128 cells
m256 256 cells
Default: m128

diffDelayMax

The maximum number of milliseconds of differential


delay among the links that can be tolerated on this
interface.
Values:
0 to 100
Default: 25

alphaValue

The number of consecutive invalid ICP cells allowed


before the system changes from a Sync state to a Hunt
state.
Values:
1 or 2
Default: 2

betaValue

The number of consecutive errored ICP cells allowed


before the system changes from a Sync state to a Hunt
state.
Values:
1 to 5
Default: 2

gammaValue

The number of consecutive valid ICP cells allowed before


the system changes from a PreSync state to the Sync
state.
Values:
1 to 5
Default: 1

114

testLinkIfIndex

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link.

testPattern

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link.

testProcStatus

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring IMA groups

Overview
The following MALC cards support IMA groups:

T1/E1 IMA Uplink

T1/E1-ATM-32

Each card supports 16 IMA groups. The MALC T1/E1-ATM-32 card


provides 32 T1/E1 UNI or IMA ports. All ports must be configured as either
UNI or IMA. When these cards boot up, the system creates the IMA groups
and assigns the T1/E1 links to the following groups:
Links

IMA group

1-4

5-8

9 - 12

13 - 16

Empty

Empty

Empty

Empty

17 - 20

21 - 24

10

25 - 28

11

29 -32

12

Empty

13

Empty

14

Empty

15

Empty

16

Note: (T1/E1 32 card only) IMA links 1-16 can only belong to IMA
groups 1-8 and links 17-32 can only belong to IMA groups 9-16.
Note the following about multiple IMA groups:

In a redundant Uplink configuration, you must configure IMA groups on


both the active and standby cards

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

115

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Before moving IMA links to another group, the system performs a CAC
calculation to determine whether moving the links will violate ATM QoS
settings. If so, the link will not be moved.

If you do not want a link to belong to any IMA group, it is recommended


that you admin down the interface in the if-translate profile. Do not use
the imalink remove command unless requested to by Zhone GSS.

Configuring IMA groups


The following example updates an IMA group to change the minimum
number of links in the group:
zSH> update ima-group-profile 1/1/1 shelf/slot/port
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
groupSymmetry: ---> {symmetricoperation}:
minNumTxLinks: ---> {1}: 4
minNumRxLinks: ---> {1}: 4
txClkMode: -------> {ctc}:
txImaId: ---------> {1}:
txFrameLength: ---> {m128}:
diffDelayMax: ----> {75}:
alphaValue: ------> {2}:
betaValue: -------> {2}:
gammaValue: ------> {1}:
testLinkIfIndex: -> {0/0/0/0/0}:
testPattern: -----> {-1}:
testProcStatus: --> {disabled}:
txTimingRefLink: -> {0}:
rxTimingRefLink: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Moving IMA links


To move IMA links from one group to another, use the imalink move
command. For example:
zSH> imalink move 1-1-1-0/atmima 1-1-2-0/atmima 1-1-1-0/ds1
Stack unbind successful.
Link moved successfully.

This command moves the DS1 interface 1-1-1-0/ds1 from IMA group
1-1-1-0/atm to IMA group 1-1-2-0/atmima.
If this is a redundant configuration, also move the IMA link on the
standby card:
zSH> imalink move 1-2-1-0/atmima 1-2-2-0/atmima 1-2-1-0/ds1
Stack unbind successful.
Link moved successfully.

116

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 IMA cable and port pinouts

After moving the links, you can use the imalink show command to view
the links in the group:
zSH> imalink show 1-3-1-0/atmima
DS1 Links for IMA Group 1-3-1-0/atmima:
If Index
If Name
----------------------000736
1-3-1-0
000737
1-3-2-0
000738
1-3-3-0
000739
1-3-4-0

T1/E1 IMA cable and port pinouts


This section describes the T1/E1 IMA cables available from Zhone
Technologies and the T1/E1 IMA port pinouts:

T1/E1-IMA Uplink port pinouts on page 117

8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable (T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink) on


page 118

Dual 8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable (T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink)


on page 120

T1/E1-IMA Uplink port pinouts


Figure 39 shows the location of pin 1 on the T1/E1-IMA Uplink connector.
Figure 39: T1/E1 Uplink connector pin 1

Pin 1

Table 23 lists the T1/E1 uplink port pinouts.


Table 23: Uplink-T1/E1-IMA-8 uplink port pinouts
Function

Pin

Function

Pin

Tx ring 1

Rx ring 1

19

Tx tip 1

10

Rx tip 1

28

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

117

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Table 23: Uplink-T1/E1-IMA-8 uplink port pinouts (Continued)


Function

Pin

Function

Pin

Tx ring 2

Rx ring 2

20

Tx tip 2

11

Rx tip 2

29

Tx ring 3

Rx ring 3

21

Tx tip 3

12

Rx tip 3

30

Tx ring 4

Rx ring 4

22

Tx tip 4

13

Rx tip 4

31

Tx ring 5

Rx ring 5

23

Tx tip 5

14

Rx tip 5

32

Tx ring 6

Rx ring 6

24

Tx tip 6

15

Rx tip 6

33

Tx ring 7

Rx ring 7

25

Tx tip 7

16

Rx tip 7

34

Tx ring 8

Rx ring 8

26

Tx tip 8

17

Rx tip 8

35

8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable (T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink)


Figure 40 shows the 8 port T1/E1 to dual 50-pin connector cable. This cable is
used with the T1/E1 IMA Uplink card. Table 24 lists the pinouts.

118

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 IMA cable and port pinouts

Figure 40: 8-port T1 to dual 50 pin connector cable

Table 24: 8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 1 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-10

P2-26

TX 1 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-1

P2-1

RX 1 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-28

P2-2

RX 1 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-19

P2-27

TX 2 (tip)

White/Green

P1-11

P2-30

TX 2 (ring)

Green/White

P1-2

P2-5

RX 2 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-29

P2-6

RX 2 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-20

P2-31

TX 3 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-12

P2-34

TX 3 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-3

P2-9

RX 3 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-30

P2-10

RX 3 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-21

P2-35

TX 4 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-13

P2-38

TX 4 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-4

P2-13

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

119

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Table 24: 8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable pinouts (Continued)
Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

RX 4 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-31

P2-14

RX 4 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-22

P2-39

TX 5 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-14

P2-42

TX 5 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-5

P2-17

RX 5 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-32

P2-18

RX 5 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-23

P2-43

TX 6 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-15

P2-46

TX 6 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-6

P2-21

RX 6 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-33

P2-22

RX 6 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-24

P2-47

TX 7 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-16

P3-26

TX 7 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-7

P3-1

RX 7 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-34

P3-2

RX 7 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-25

P3-27

TX 8 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-17

P3-30

TX 8 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-8

P3-5

RX 8 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-35

P3-6

RX 8 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-26

P3-31

17

not used

not used

not used

not used

18

not used

not used

not used

not used

19

not used

not used

not used

not used

20

not used

not used

not used

not used

21

not used

not used

not used

not used

22

not used

not used

not used

not used

23

not used

not used

not used

not used

24

not used

not used

not used

not used

25

not used

not used

not used

not used

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Dual 8-port T1/E1 to dual 50 pin connector cable (T1/E1-IMA-8 Uplink)


There are two cables used for redundant T1/E1 Uplink cards. Figure 40 shows
the dual 8-port T1/E1 to dual 50-pin connector cable. Figure 42 shows the 50

120

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 IMA cable and port pinouts

foot dual 8-port cable. Both cables have the same pinouts. Table 25 lists the
pinouts.
Figure 41: Dual 8-port T1/E1 to dual 50-pin connector cable

Figure 42: 50 foot dual 8-port T1/E1 cable

Table 25: Cable 1: P1 to P2 pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 1 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-10

P2-10

TX 1 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-1

P2-1

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

121

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Table 25: Cable 1: P1 to P2 pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

RX 1 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-28

P2-28

RX 1 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-19

P2-19

TX 2 (tip)

White/Green

P1-11

P2-11

TX 2 (ring)

Green/White

P1-2

P2-2

RX 2 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-29

P2-29

RX 2 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-20

P2-20

TX 3 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-12

P2-12

TX 3 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-3

P2-3

RX 3 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-30

P2-30

RX 3 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-21

P2-21

TX 4 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-13

P2-13

TX 4 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-4

P2-4

RX 4 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-31

P2-31

RX 4 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-22

P2-22

TX 5 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-14

P2-14

TX 5 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-5

P2-5

RX 5 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-32

P2-32

RX 5 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-23

P2-23

TX 6 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-15

P2-15

TX 6 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-6

P2-6

RX 6 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-33

P2-33

RX 6 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-24

P2-24

10

11

12

Table 26: Cable 2: P2 to P1 pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 7 (tip)

White/Blue

P2-16

P1-16

TX 7 (ring)

Blue/White

P2-7

P1-7

RX 7 (tip)

White/Orange

P2-34

P1-34

RX 7 (ring)

Orange/White

P2-25

P1-25

122

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 IMA cable and port pinouts

Table 26: Cable 2: P2 to P1 pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 8 (tip)

White/Green

P2-17

P1-17

TX 8 (ring)

Green/White

P2-8

P1-8

RX 8 (tip)

White/Brown

P2-35

P1-35

RX 8 (ring)

Brown/White

P2-26

P1-26

Table 27: Cable 3: P1 to P3 pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 1 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-10

P3-26

TX 1 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-1

P3-1

RX 1 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-28

P3-2

RX 1 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-19

P3-27

TX 2 (tip)

White/Green

P1-11

P3-30

TX 2 (ring)

Green/White

P1-2

P3-5

RX 2 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-29

P3-6

RX 2 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-20

P3-31

TX 3 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-12

P3-34

TX 3 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-3

P3-9

RX 3 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-30

P3-10

RX 3 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-21

P3-35

TX 4 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-13

P3-38

TX 4 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-4

P3-13

RX 4 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-31

P3-14

RX 4 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-22

P3-39

TX 5 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-14

P3-42

TX 5 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-5

P3-17

RX 5 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-32

P3-18

RX 5 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-23

P3-43

TX 6 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-15

P3-46

TX 6 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-6

P3-21

10

11

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

123

T1/E1 Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8)

Table 27: Cable 3: P1 to P3 pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

12

RX 6 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-33

P3-22

RX 6 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-24

P3-47

Table 28: Cable 4: P2 to P4 pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 7 (tip)

White/Blue

P2-16

P4-26

TX 7 (ring)

Blue/White

P2-7

P4-1

RX 7 (tip)

White/Orange

P2-34

P4-2

RX 7 (ring)

Orange/White

P2-25

P4-27

TX 8 (tip)

White/Green

P2-17

P4-30

TX 8 (ring)

Green/White

P2-8

P4-5

RX 8 (tip)

White/Brown

P2-35

P4-6

RX 8 (ring)

Brown/White

P2-26

P4-31

124

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

DS3/E3 UPLINK CARD (UPLINK-DS3/E3-ATM/


IP)
This chapter describes the MALC DS3/E3 Uplink card and explains how to
configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 126

DS3/E3 card configuration, page 128

Configuring DS3/E3 interfaces, page 130

DS3/E3 Uplink cable, page 133

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

125

DS3/E3 Uplink card (Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP)

Overview
The MALC Uplink-DS3/E3 card has two active DS3/E3
interfaces (with an option to activate up to 4 interfaces). It
provides similar services and functionality as the T1/E1
Uplink card, but with a higher capacity interface.
Note that the DS3/E3 Uplink card is unchannelized that is, it
does not support separate DS1 connections.
The DS3/E3 Uplink card contains an Ethernet port for local
management, local LAN connectivity, or IP uplinks; a DS3/
E3 interface for user traffic; and a serial (craft) port for local
management.

Table 29: Uplink-DS3/E3 specifications

126

Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

4 ports

Physical
interface

Custom high density connector

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Provided cable breaking out to 4 pairs BNC Coax connectors

Overview

Table 29: Uplink-DS3/E3 specifications

(Continued)

Specification

Description

ATM support

MALC performs ATM cell relay functions between cell based


line cards (such as ADSL or G.SHDSL) and the Uplink card. The
Uplink card performs cell relay function for the ATM traffic on
the backplane.
ATM Quality of Service types supported:

CBR, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR


Fair Weighted Queuing
Per VC and per QoS buffering

ATM Forum specifications:

UNI 3.0, UNI 3.1 compliant. Note that ILMI, SVCs,


point-to-multipoint are currently not supported.

UNI 4.0 compliant for PVC features only. Note that ABR,
SVCs, SPVCs, Multicast, and Anycast are not currently
supported.

Partial support for Traffic Management 4.0 including:

QOS levels described above

Connection Admission Control

Traffic descriptor specification

Default VPI/VCI ranges:

VPI: 0 to 3
VCI: 32 to 1023

AAL2 and AAL5 termination:

Voice
processing

AAL2 SAR for MALC POTS lines


AAL5 SAR for in-band management VC termination
RFC 1483 routed termination supported

AAL2 SAR for subscriber lines on POTS cards


Supports AAL2 BLES standard, compatible with standards based
Voice Gateways
G.711 encoding of voice calls on the MALC TDM bus

Management
interfaces

RS-232D serial craft port


AAL5 Management VC termination (RFC 1483 routed) for ATM
in-band management
Management Ethernet 10/100 port routable for connecting to
other Ethernet devices
SNMP

Redundancy

1+1 card redundancy (with Y cable).

Power

30 W

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

127

DS3/E3 Uplink card (Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP)

DS3/E3 card configuration


This section describes optional configuration procedures for the DS3/E3 card.
If these procedures are required, they should be done before provisioning the
system.

Configuring ATM settings for DS3/E3 Uplink cards


To configure DS3/E3 IP Uplink cards:
zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5109 shelf/slot/type (type is 5109 for DS3/E3 IP Uplink cards)
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {malcds3f.bin}:
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {ds3}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30} change the bandwidth allocation, if desired
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
Changing atm configuration will result in a system reboot.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Atm configuration changed system is rebooting ...Record updated.

Changing the DS3 Uplink card line type


If, after configuring the line type for a DS3/E3 Uplink card, you need to
change the line type, delete the Uplink card-profile and recreate it.
Caution: Changing the line type for the Uplink card requires a
system reboot and deletes the system configuration.
Back up your configuration using the dump command before
changing the line type.
1

Save the device configuration. For example:


a

Verify you are at the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

Back up the current configuration file to the flash card and store it in
the onreboot directory:
zSH> mkdir onreboot

128

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

DS3/E3 card configuration

zSH> cd onreboot
zSH> dump file restore

This file will be used to restore the system configuration or revert to a


previous release, if desired.
c

If desired, save the configuration file to a host on the network. For


example:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 malc.cfg

Change directories to the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

Delete the card-profile for the DS3/E3 Uplink card:


zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5109

Create the Uplink card-profile and change the card-line-type to ds3 or


e3:

zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5109 shelf/slot/type (5109 for DS3 Uplink cards)
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcds3f.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds3 | e3
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable} enter the bandwidth allocation
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the system will reboot and restore
the configuration saved to the onreboot directory.

Connecting redundant DS3/E3 cards


1

Attach the 6-inch MALC DS3/E3 redundant cable to each of the DS3/E3
Uplink cards.

Connect the individual BNC connectors from each card using a


T-connector. (See Figure 43.)

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

129

DS3/E3 Uplink card (Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP)

Note: Redundant DS3/E3 connections are only supported with


the 6-inch redundant DS3/E3 cable. Do not attempt to connect
redundant cards with the 6-foot DS3/E3 cable.
Figure 43: Connecting redundant DS3/E3 Uplink cards

Configuring DS3/E3 interfaces


Note: For redundant systems, configure the DS3/E3 interfaces on
both the active and standby cards.
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure DS3
uplink interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Update the DS3/E3 interfaces, which specify the basic


parameters of the DS3 line, including line type,
encoding, and clocking. See Configuring DS3/E3
interfaces on page 130.

update ds3-profile 1-1-port-0/ds3

Activate the DS1 interfaces in the if-translate profile.


See Activating the DS3 interface on page 132.

update if-translate 1-1-port-0/ds3

where port is from 1 to 4


If your system is redundant, configure the DS3/E3
interfaces on both the active and standby cards.

where port is from 1 to 4

When the DS3 card starts up, it creates four ds3-profiles. To view the DS3s
on the system, use the list command:
zSH> list ds3-profile
ds3-profile 1-1-2-0/ds3
ds3-profile 1-1-3-0/ds3
ds3-profile 1-1-4-0/ds3
ds3-profile 1-1-5-0/ds3

130

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring DS3/E3 interfaces

4 entries found.

The ds3-profile specifies the basic operating parameters of the interface. The
following table describes the supported ds3-profile parameters.
Parameter

Description

line-type

Specifies the line type.


dsx3cbitparity (C-bit parity).
dsx3m23 (M23)
Default: dsx3cbitparity

line-coding

dsx3b3zs is the only supported value.

circuit-id

A description of the circuit.

line-length-meters

The length of the DS3 line in meters. Valid values


are 0 - 137 m. One meters is equal to 3.28 feet.
Default: 0

loopback-config

This parameter is used for loopback testing. For


information, see the MALC Configuration Guide.

medium-scramble-config

True: payload scramble is on.


False: payload scramble is off.
Default: True

transmit-clock-source

Specifies the clock source for the interface. See for


information about configuring the system clock.

medium-frame-config

The E3 framing mode.


Values:
e3FrameOther An option other than
e3FrameG832 or e3FrameG751.
e3FrameG832 E3 framing format will be G832.
e3FrameG751 E3 framing format will be G751.
Default: e3FrameG832

medium-atmframe-config

Specifies the type of ATM framing.


Values:
dsx3atmframingplcp Uses PLCP framing.
dsx3AtmFramingDirectCellMapped Uses direct
cell mapping.
Default: dsx3AtmFramingDirectCellMapped

Configuring a DS3 interface


The default values are appropriate for most applications. If you need to
change them, update the ds3-profile for the interface:
zSH> update ds3-profile 1-1-1-0/ds3
line-type: ---------------> {dsx3cbitparity}

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

131

DS3/E3 Uplink card (Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP)

line-coding: -------------> {dsx3b3zs}


send-code: ---------------> {dsx3sendnocode}
circuit-id: --------------> {}
loopback-config: ---------> {dsx3noloop}
transmit-clock-source: ---> {looptiming} throughtiming
line-length-meters: ------> {0}
line-status-trap-enable: -> {enabled}
channelization: ----------> {disabled}
ds1-for-remote-loop: -----> {0}
far-end-equip-code: ------> {}
far-end-loc-id-code: -----> {}
far-end-frame-id-code: ---> {}
far-end-unit-code: -------> {}
far-end-fac-id-code: -----> {}
medium-scramble-config: --> {true}
medium-frame-config: -----> {e3frameg832}
medium-atmframe-config: --> {dsx3atmframingdirectcellmapped}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activating the DS3 interface


Update the if-translate record for the DS3 interface to enable the line.
The if-translate record uses an index in the form shelf-slot-port-subport/
type.
The following example activates the first DS3 interface on the slot card
located in shelf 1 slot 1:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/ds3
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {154}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {1}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {ds3}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

132

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

DS3/E3 Uplink cable

DS3/E3 Uplink cable


Figure 44 shows the 6-foot DS3 Uplink cable. Table 30 lists the pinouts.
Note: Redundant DS3/E3 connections are only supported with the
6-inch redundant DS3/E3 cable. Do not attempt to connect redundant
cards with the 6-foot DS3/E3 cable.
Figure 44: DS3 Uplink cable

Table 30: DS3/E3 Uplink cable pinouts


BNC

Function

TX 1

RX 1

TX 2

RX 2

TX 3

RX 3

TX 4

RX 4

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

133

DS3/E3 Uplink card (Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP)

134

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

OC-3C/STM1 UPLINK CARD (UPLINK-OC3C/


STM1-ATM/IP)
This chapter describes the MALC OC3C/STM1 Uplink card and explains
how to configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 136

OC3C/STM1 Uplink card configuration, page 138

Configuring OC-3c/STM1 interfaces, page 139

Configuring APS, page 143

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

135

OC-3C/STM1 Uplink Card (Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP)

Overview
The MALC OC3C/STM1 card provides two single-mode
optical interfaces, as well as a serial craft port and an
Ethernet port for management or IP uplinks. The MALC
supports Automatic Protection Switching (APS) when 2
cards are installed in the system to provide card-level
redundancy for the optical interfaces.

136

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Table 31: Uplink-OC-3c/STM1-ATM/IP specifications


Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

2 ports

Physical
interface

SC connector (Class 1 Laser International Safety Standard IEC


825 compliant)

Single mode fiber


Intermediate Reach IR-1optics
1300 nM
SC connector
Tx min: -15 dBM, max: -8 dBM

RJ45 Management 10/100 Ethernet Interface


RS232D serial craft interface
ATM support

MALC performs ATM cell relay functions between cell based


line cards (such as ADSL or G.SHDSL) and the Uplink card. The
Uplink card performs cell relay function for the ATM traffic on
the backplane.
ATM Quality of Service types supported:

CBR, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR


Fair Weighted Queuing
Per VC and per QoS buffering

ATM Forum specifications:

UNI 3.0, UNI 3.1 compliant. Note that ILMI, SVCs,


point-to-multipoint are currently not supported.

UNI 4.0 compliant for PVC features only. Note that ABR,
SVCs, SPVCs, Multicast, and Anycast are not currently
supported.

Partial support for Traffic Management 4.0 including:

QOS levels described above

Connection Admission Control

Traffic descriptor specification

Default VPI/VCI ranges:

VPI: 0 to 7
VCI: 32 to 1023

AAL2 and AAL5 termination:

AAL2 SAR for MALC POTS lines

RFC 1483 routed termination supported

AAL5 SAR for in-band management VC termination

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

137

OC-3C/STM1 Uplink Card (Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP)

Table 31: Uplink-OC-3c/STM1-ATM/IP specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Voice
processing

AAL2 SAR for converting TDM bus voice traffic to ATMG.711


encoding only
ATMF Loop Emulation Standard

Management
interface

RS-232D serial craft port


AAL5 Management VC termination (RFC 1483 routed) for ATM
in-band management
Management Ethernet 10/100 port routable for connecting to
other Ethernet devices
SNMP

Redundancy

Card and link redundancy with separate fiber uplink to standby


card
APS 1:1 bi-directional, compatible with 1+1 APS switches

Power
consumption

33 W

OC3C/STM1 Uplink card configuration


This section describes optional configuration procedures for the OC3C/STM1
Uplink card. If these procedures are required, they should be done before
provisioning the system.

Configuring ATM settings for OC3C/STM1 uplink cards


To configure OC3C/STM1 IP Uplink cards:
zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5111 shelf/slot/type (type is 5111 for OC3C/STM1 IP Uplink cards)
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {malcoc3f.bin}:
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {ds1}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30} change the bandwidth allocation, if desired
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
Changing atm configuration will result in a system reboot.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Atm configuration changed system is rebooting ...Record updated.

138

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring OC-3c/STM1 interfaces

Configuring OC-3c/STM1 interfaces


Note: For systems configured for APS, configure the OC-3c/STM1
interfaces on both the active and standby cards.
Note: Ensure that the APS working and protection configuration is
consistent between the MALC and the far end OC-3/cSTM1
interface. This may require manual intervention on the MALC so that
both sides agree on which interface is working and which is
protection.
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure OC3C/
STM1 uplink interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Configure the OC-3c3/STM1 interfaces, which specify


the basic parameters of the interface, including line
coding, and clocking. See Configuring the OC-3c/
STM1 interface on page 142.

update sonet-profile 1-1-port-0/sonet


where port is from 1 to 2
If your system is redundant, configure the OC-3c/STM1
interfaces on both the active and standby cards.

Activate the interfaces in the if-translate profile. See


Enabling/disabling the SONET interface on page 142.

update if-translate 1-1-port-0/sonet

Configure APS (if desired). See Configuring APS on


page 143.

update aps-channel 1-1-port-0/sonet

where port is 1 or 2

update aps-group group


where group is 1 or 2

Note: For short distance connections, you may need to add


attenuation to the OC-3c/STM1 interface.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

139

OC-3C/STM1 Uplink Card (Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP)

The following table describes the supported sonet-profile parameters.


Parameter

Description

medium-type

The type of SONET signaling.


Values:
sonet Synchronous Optical Network (North
America)
sdh Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (Europe)
Default: sonet

medium-line-coding

Line coding for this interface.


Values:
sonetMediumOther
sonetMediumB3ZS Used for STS-1 and STS-3
electrical SONET/SDH signaling.
sonetMediumCMI Used for STS-1 and STS-3
electrical SONET/SDH signaling.
sonetMediumNRZ Non-Return to Zero. Used for
optical SONET/SDH signals.
sonetMediumRZ Return to Zero. Used for optical
SONET/SDH signals.
Default: sonetmediumnrz

medium-line-type

Describes the line type for this interface.


Values:
sonetMultiMode
sonetShortSingleMode
Default: sonetshortsinglemode

medium-circuit-identifier

The SONET circuit identifier, determined by the


system installer.
Values:
string of up to 260 characters

140

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring OC-3c/STM1 interfaces

Parameter

Description

medium-loopback-config

How the SONET loopback is configured.


Values:
sonetnoloop SONET circuit, with no loop.
sonetfacilityloop All incoming data on the Rx
interface is retransmitted out of the Tx interface.
Used to check the circuit between a remote device
and the MALC and to test the MALC optical
module.
sonetterminalloop All of the data transmitted on
the Tx interface is also internally looped back to
the Rx interface. Used to verify that the ATM and
PHY layers are communicating.
sonetotherloop All incoming data on the Rx
interface is retransmitted out of the Tx interface.
Used to check the circuit between the IAD and a
remote unit and to verify that the optical module
and the SONET PHY are working.

path-current-width

Indicates the type of the SONET/SDH path.


Values:
sts1
sts12cSTM4
sts3cSTM1

clock-external-recovery

Whether internal clocking can be recovered from


an external source.
Values:
enabled
disabled

clock-transmit-source

The clocking source.


Values:
external155mhz Transmit clock synthesized from
an external 155.52 MHz source.
looptiming Uses the recovered receive clock as
the transmit clock.
localtiming Either uses a local clock source or an
external clock which is attached to the device
containing the interface.
throughtiming Uses a transmit clock derived
from the recovered receive clock of another
interface.

medium-cell-scrambleconfig

Specifies whether SONET scramble mode is


enabled.

medium-line-scrambleconfig

Specifies whether the line-level SONET scramble


mode is enabled.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

141

OC-3C/STM1 Uplink Card (Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP)

Configuring the OC-3c/STM1 interface


To view the OC-3c/STM1 interfaces on the system, use the list command:
zSH> list sonet-profile
sonet-profile 1-1-1-0/sonet
sonet-profile 1-1-2-0/sonet

To display the default sonet-profile for an interface, use the get


command:
zSH> get sonet-profile 1-1-1-0/sonet
medium-type: -----------------> {sonet}:
medium-line-coding: ----------> {sonetmediumnrz}:
medium-line-type: ------------>
{sonetshortsinglemode}:
medium-circuit-identifier: ---> {}:
medium-loopback-config: ------> {sonetnoloop}:
path-current-width: ----------> {sts3cstm1}:
clock-external-recovery: -----> {enabled}:
clock-transmit-source: -------> {looptiming}:
medium-cell-scramble-config: -> {true}:
medium-line-scramble-config: -> {true}:
zSH> get sonet-profile 1-1-2-0/sonet
medium-type: -----------------> {sonet}:
medium-line-coding: ----------> {sonetmediumnrz}:
medium-line-type: ------------>
{sonetshortsinglemode}:
medium-circuit-identifier: ---> {}:
medium-loopback-config: ------> {sonetnoloop}:
path-current-width: ----------> {sts3cstm1}:
clock-external-recovery: -----> {enabled}:
clock-transmit-source: -------> {looptiming}:
medium-cell-scramble-config: -> {true}:
medium-line-scramble-config: -> {true}:

If you need to make changes to the default configuration, use the update
command.

Enabling/disabling the SONET interface


By default, the OC-3c/STM1 interface is inactive. During maintenance, or if
the port is not in use, the SONET interface should be in the down state.
The following example enables the SONET interface in shelf 1, slot 1,
port 1:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {12}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {1}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:

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APS

type: ------------->
adminstatus: ------>
physical-flag: ---->
iftype-extension: ->
ifName: ----------->
redundancy-param1: ->
....................
Save changes? [s]ave,
Record updated.

{sonet}:
{down}: up
{true}:
{0}:
{}:
{0}:
[c]hange or [q]uit: s

To disable the interface:


zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {12}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {1}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {sonet}:
adminstatus: ------> {up}: down
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

APS
Configuring APS
The system automatically creates the following APS profiles for SONET/
SDH OC3C/STM1 and OC12/STM4 uplink cards:

aps-channel: configures the APS channels. There are two APS channel
per port. OC-3c/STM1 cards have 2 ports and therefore four APS
channels. OC-12/STM4 cards have 1 port and 2 APS channels.

aps-group: configures the APS groups. There are up to two APS groups
on the system. Each APS group contains a working and protect channel.

The OC3C/STM1 card supports APS 1:1 protection. In the 1:1 protection
scheme, a working channel on one card carries the full traffic, while a protect
channel on another card is either idle or reserved for low priority traffic.
When a failure occurs on the working fiber, the destination switch moves the
data from the working fiber to the protect fiber.
The OC12/STM4 card supports both APS 1:1 protection and APS 1+1
protection. In the 1+1 protection scheme, a working card transmits the same
data in one direction on the working channel while a protect card

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OC-3C/STM1 Uplink Card (Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP)

simultaneously transmits the same data in the opposite direction on the protect
channel. When both transmissions reach the destination switch, the data on
the protection channel is ignored. When a failure occurs on the working
channel, the destintation switch uses the tranmission from the protect channel.
The following tables describe how the SONET/SDH cards and ports are
assigned to APS groups and channels. These values cannot be changed. The
OC3C/STM1 card has 2 ports per card and requires assignments for each port.
Table 32: OC3C/STM1 Card APS Assignments
Slot

Port

APS group

APS channel

The OC-12/STM4 card has 1 port and requires


Table 33: OC12/STM4 Card APS Assignments
Slot

Port

APS group

APS channel

Note: The APS protocol runs on the protect or second SONET/SDH


card.
To configure APS:
1

Verify both the working and protect SONET/SDH interfaces are


configured identically, including the same card-group-id, and both are
enabled.

Verify that the MALC working ports are connected to the working ports
on the SONET/SDH switch and the MALC protection ports are connected
to the protection ports on the SONET/SDH switch.

Activate the APS channels for the APS groups:

zSH> update aps-channel 1-1-1-0/sonet


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
apsChanConfigGroupName: ---> {group1}: **read-only **
apsChanConfigNumber: ------> {1}: ** read-only **
apsChanConfigAdminStatus: -> {notinservice}: inservice
apsChanConfigPriority: ----> {low}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.
zSH> update aps-channel 1-2-1-0/sonet
Please provide the following: [q]uit.

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APS

apsChanConfigGroupName: ---> {group1}: **read-only **


apsChanConfigNumber: ------> {0}: ** read-only **
apsChanConfigAdminStatus: -> {notinservice}: inservice
apsChanConfigPriority: ----> {low}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the APS groups:


zSH> update aps-group 1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
apsConfigName: -----------> {group1}: ** read-only **
apsConfigAdminStatus: ----> {notinservice}: inservice
apsConfigMode: -----------> {oneton}: oneplusone
apsConfigRevert: ---------> {nonrevertive}:
apsConfigDirection: ------> {unidirectional}:
apsConfigExtraTraffic: ---> {disabled}:
apsConfigSdBerThreshold: -> {6}:
apsConfigSfBerThreshold: -> {3}:
apsConfigWaitToRestore: --> {300}:
apsConfigCreationTime: ---> {0}: ** read-only **
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.
zSH> update aps-group 2
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
apsConfigName: -----------> {group2}: ** read-only **
apsConfigAdminStatus: ----> {notinservice}: inservice
apsConfigMode: -----------> {oneton}: oneplusone
apsConfigRevert: ---------> {nonrevertive}:
apsConfigDirection: ------> {unidirectional}:
apsConfigExtraTraffic: ---> {disabled}:
apsConfigSdBerThreshold: -> {6}:
apsConfigSfBerThreshold: -> {3}:
apsConfigWaitToRestore: --> {300}:
apsConfigCreationTime: ---> {0}: ** read-only **
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

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OC-3C/STM1 Uplink Card (Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP)

146

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10

OC-12C/STM4/GIGE CARDS
This chapter describes the MALC OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink cards and
explains how to configure them. It includes:

Overview, page 148

OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink card configuration, page 151

Configuring OC-12c/STM4 interfaces, page 155

Configuring Ethernet interfaces, page 158

APS, page 163

T1/E1 TDM cables, page 166


Note: Uplink cards must be installed in slot 1 or slot 2 of the MALC
chassis.

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

Overview
The MALC supports the following models OC-12c/STM4/
GigE Uplink cards:

OC12/STM-4 card with single GigE port (UP-O12/S4/


GE/TDM-ATM/IP)

High peformance OC12/STM-4 card with single GigE LX


port (UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1)

High peformance OC12/STM-4 card with single GigE SX


port (UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-SX/T-E1)
These cards include the following interfaces:
One 599 Mbps OC-12c/STM4 port
One 10/100 Ethernet interface for management or data
One Gigabit Ethernet interface.This interface is twisted
pair, multimode fiber SX, or single mode fiber LX,
depending on the model.
Eight T1/E1 TDM ports that support either GR-303 or
V5.2.

Table 34: UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP, UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1, UP-O12-S4/


HP-GE-SX/T-E1specifications
Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

8 ports TDM T1/E1


1 port OC-12c/STM4

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Overview

Table 34: UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP, UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1, UP-O12-S4/


HP-GE-SX/T-E1specifications (Continued)
Specification

Description

Physical
interfaces

TDM T1/E1: Amphenol 44 pin connector


OC-12c/STM4

Connectors: Single mode fiber with SC connector


Wavelength: 1274 nm minimum, 1356 nm maximum
Tx min: -15 dBm, max: -8 dBm
Receive sensitivity: -28 dBm maximum
Reach: 10 km with 9/125 mm single mode fiber

1000 BaseT Ethernet fiber (LX)

Connector: Dual fiber LC connectors (Tx and Rx)


Wavelength: 1274 nm minimum, 1356 nm maximum
Tx min: -9 dBm, minimum: -3 dBm maximum
Receive sensitivity: -20 dBm maximum
Reach: 10 km with 9/125 mm single mode fiber

1000 BaseT Ethernet fiber (SX)

Connector: Dual fiber LC connectors (Tx and Rx)


Wavelength: 830 nm minimum, 860 nm maximum
Tx min: -9.5dBm, minimum: 0 dBm maximum
Receive sensitivity: -117 dBm maximum
Reach: 5 km with 50/125 mm multimode fiber

The optical interfaces are class 1 Laser International Safety


Standard IEC 825 compliant
RJ45 Ethernet 10/100 Ethernet interface for management
Note: The 10/100/1000 Ethernet UTP and fiber
interfaces cannot both be active at the same time.
RS232D serial craft interface

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

Table 34: UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP, UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1, UP-O12-S4/


HP-GE-SX/T-E1specifications (Continued)
Specification

Description

ATM support

MALC performs ATM cell relay functions between cell based


line cards (such as ADSL or SHDSL) and the Uplink card. The
Uplink card performs cell relay function for the ATM traffic on
the backplane.
ATM Quality of Service types supported:

CBR, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR


Fair Weighted Queuing
Per VC and per QoS buffering

ATM Forum specifications:

UNI 3.0, UNI 3.1 compliant. Note that ILMI, SVCs,


point-to-multipoint are currently not supported.

UNI 4.0 compliant for PVC features only. Note that ABR,
SVCs, SPVCs, Multicast, and Anycast are not currently
supported.

Partial support for Traffic Management 4.0 including:

QOS levels described above

Connection Admission Control

Traffic descriptor specification

Default VPI/VCI ranges:

VPI: 0 to 7
VCI: 32 to 1023

AAL2 and AAL5 termination:

Standards
supported

AAL2 SAR for MALC POTS lines


AAL5 SAR for in-band management VC termination
RFC 1483 routed termination supported

AF-PHY-0086.001
GR-303-CORE
G.965 and ETSI EN 300 347-1 V2.2.2 (V5.2)
Gigabit Ethernet (GE) IEEE 802.3

TDM line
characteristics

Supervisory signaling is Extended Superframe (ESF) CAS


signaling

TDM capacity

2 GR-303 interface groups (IGs)


8 channelized T1s per card
4096 maximum GR-303 call reference values (CRVs) per
system

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink card configuration

Table 34: UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP, UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1, UP-O12-S4/


HP-GE-SX/T-E1specifications (Continued)
Specification

Description

Voice
processing

AAL2 SAR for converting TDM bus voice traffic to


ATMG.711 encoding only
ATMF Loop Emulation Standard

Management
interface

RS-232D serial craft port


AAL5 Management VC termination (RFC 1483 routed) for
ATM in-band management
Management Ethernet 10/100 port routable for connecting to
other Ethernet devices
SNMP

Redundancy

Card redundancy
OC-12c/STM4 link redundancy with separate fiber uplink to
standby card
1+1 TDM T1/E1 interface redundancy (with Y cable).
APS 1:1 bi-directional and 1+1 (with Y cable).

Power
consumption

50 W

OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink card configuration


This section describes optional configuration procedures for the OC-12c/
STM4/GigE Uplink cards. If these procedures are required, they should be
done before provisioning the system.

Changing the OC-12c/STM4/GigE card line type


If, after configuring the line type for a OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink card, you
need to change the line type, delete the Uplink card-profile and recreate it.
Caution: Changing the line type for the Uplink card requires a
system reboot and deletes the system configuration.
Back up your configuration using the dump command before
changing the line type.
1

Save the device configuration. For example:


a

Verify you are at the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

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Back up the current configuration file to the flash card and store it in
the onreboot directory:
zSH> mkdir onreboot
zSH> cd onreboot
zSH> dump file restore

This file will be used to restore the system configuration or revert to a


previous release, if desired.
c

If desired, save the configuration file to a host on the network. For


example:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 malc.cfg

Change directories to the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

Delete the card-profile for the Uplink card:


zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5029 UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP
card

or
zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5035 UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1
or UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-SX/T-E1 card

Create the Uplink card-profile and change the card-line-type and


specify the ATM bandwidth allocation:
For the UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP card:

zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5029 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcoc12.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1 | e1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

For the UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1 or UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-SX/T-E1


card:

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink card configuration

zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5035 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcgige.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1 | e1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the system will reboot and restore the
configuration saved to the onreboot directory.

Configuring ATM settings for OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards


To configure UP-O12/S4/GE/TDM-ATM/IP cards:
zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5029
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {malcoc12.bin}:
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {ds1}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30} change the bandwidth allocation, if desired
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
Changing atm configuration will result in a system reboot.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Atm configuration changed system is rebooting ...Record updated.

or
To configure UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-LX/T-E1 or UP-O12-S4/HP-GE-SX/
T-E1 cards:
zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5035 for the HP OC3C/STM4 card
Please provide the following: [q]uit.

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

sw-file-name: ---------> {malcgige.bin}:


admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {ds1}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30} change the bandwidth allocation, if desired
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
Changing atm configuration will result in a system reboot.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Atm configuration changed system is rebooting ...Record updated.

Connecting redundant OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink cards


The OC-12c/STM4/GigE Uplink cards have a Y cable to provide redundancy
for the TDM interfaces. To connect the redundant cables:
1

Attach each 44-pin connector to the T1/E1 TDM connector on the Uplink
card.

Attach the 50-pin connectors to the appropriate network interface. (See


Figure 45.)

Figure 45: Connecting redundant Uplink cards

For pinout information about the redundant T1/E1 TDM cable, see T1/E1
TDM cables, page 166.

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Configuring OC-12c/STM4 interfaces

Connecting the redundant APS cable


To support APS, a midplane cable must used to connect two OC12/STM4
cards. To connect the cards for APS 1+1 redundancy:
Connect the ports on the Uplink cards labeled 1+1 RDNT using the APS
1+1 cable.
Figure 46: Connecting the APS 1+1 redundant cable

Configuring OC-12c/STM4 interfaces


The following table summarizes the commands required to configure
OC-12c/STM4 uplink interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Specify whether the card has T1 or E1 interfaces and


change the default the ATM settings (optional). See
Configuring ATM settings for OC-12c/STM4/GigE
cards on page 153 .

update card-profile 1/1/5029

Modify the OC-12c/STM4 interface. See Configuring


the OC-12c/STM4 interface on page 157

update sonet-profile 1-1-1-0/sonet

Activate the interfaces in the if-translate profile. See


Enabling/disabling the SONET interface on page 158.

update if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet

(Optional) Configure APS. See Configuring APS on


page 163.

update aps-channel 1-1-1-0/sonet

If your system is redundant, configure the T1/E1


settings and the ATM settings on both the active and
standby cards.

If your system is redundant, configure the ATM settings


on both the active and standby cards.

update aps-group 1

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

The following table describes the supported sonet-profile parameters.


Parameter

Description

medium-type

The type of SONET signaling.


Values:
sonet Synchronous Optical Network
sdh Synchronous Digital Hierarchy
Default: sonet

medium-line-coding

Line coding for this interface. The only supported


value is sonetMediumCMI. This is used for
electrical SONET/SDH signals (STS-1 and
STS-3).

medium-line-type

Describes the line type for this interface. The only


supported value is sonetLongSingleMode.

medium-circuit-identifier

The SONET circuit identifier, determined by the


system installer.
Values:
string of up to 260 characters

medium-loopback-config

How the SONET loopback is configured.


Values:
sonetnoloop SONET circuit, with no loop.
sonetfacilityloop All incoming data on the Rx
interface is retransmitted out of the Tx interface.
Used to check the circuit between a remote device
and the MALC and to test the MALC optical
module.
sonetterminalloop All of the data transmitted on
the Tx interface is also internally looped back to
the Rx interface. Used to verify that the ATM and
PHY layers are communicating.
sonetotherloop All incoming data on the Rx
interface is retransmitted out of the Tx interface.
Used to check the circuit between the IAD and a
remote unit and to verify that the optical module
and the SONET PHY are working.

path-current-width

Indicates the type of the SONET/SDH Path. The


only supported value is sts12cSTM4.

clock-external-recovery

Whether internal clocking can be recovered from


an external source.
Values:
enabled
disabled

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Configuring OC-12c/STM4 interfaces

Parameter

Description

clock-transmit-source

The clocking source.


Values:
external155mhz Transmit clock synthesized from
an external 155.52 MHz source.
looptiming Uses the recovered receive clock as
the transmit clock.
localtiming Ether uses a local clock source or an
external clock is attached to the device containing
the interface.
throughtiming Uses a transmit clock derived
from the recovered receive clock of another
interface.

medium-cell-scrambleconfig

Specifies whether cell-level SONET scramble


mode is enabled.

medium-line-scrambleconfig

Specifies whether the line-level SONET scramble


mode is enabled.

Configuring the OC-12c/STM4 interface


Note: For short distance connections, you may need to add
attenuation to the OC-12c/STM4 interface.
For most configurations the default settings for the OC-12c/STM4 card
are appropriate. To view the OC-12/cSTM4 interfaces on the system, use
the list command:
zSH> list sonet-profile
sonet-profile 1-1-1-0/sonet

To display the default sonet-profile for an interface, use the get


command:
zSH> get sonet-profile 1-1-1-0/sonet
medium-type: -----------------> {sonet}
medium-line-coding: ----------> {sonetmediumcmi}
medium-line-type: ------------> {sonetshortsinglemode}
medium-circuit-identifier: ---> {}
medium-loopback-config: ------> {sonetnoloop}
path-current-width: ----------> {sts12cstm4}
clock-external-recovery: -----> {enabled}
clock-transmit-source: -------> {localtiming}
medium-cell-scramble-config: -> {true}
medium-line-scramble-config: -> {true}

If you need to make changes to the default configuration, use the update
command.

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

Enabling/disabling the SONET interface


By default, the OC-12c/STM4 interface is inactive. During maintenance, or if
the port is not in use, the SONET interface should be in the down state.
The following example enables the SONET interface in shelf 1, slot 1,
port 1:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {12}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {1}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {sonet}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

To disable the interface:


zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {12}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {1}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {sonet}:
adminstatus: ------> {up}: down
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring Ethernet interfaces


Each MALC Uplink card provides a single 10/100 Ethernet interface. The
OC12/STM4/GE/TDM Uplink cards also have a Gigabit Ethernet interface.
The Gigabit interface is either twisted pair or fiber LX.

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Configuring Ethernet interfaces

Note: The Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on the OC12/STM4 and the


OC12/STM4 high performance cards are configured in the same way,
except that the Gigabit interface on the high performance card will
autodetect the media (fiber or copper) and it does not interoperate
with 10/100 Mbps devices.
The table below describes the Ethernet parameters.
Parameter

Description

autonegstatus

Enables autonegotiation. When enabled, the interface will


negotiate the options specified in the autoNegCap
parameter.
Options:
enabled Negotiate link attributes with remote partner. Final
link rate, duplex, and flow control, are determined by the
advertised capabilities on each end. The link will settle on a
speed/duplex based on the hierarchy described in the IEEE
802.3-2000 document.
disabled Do not negotiate. Link speed and duplex will be
forced to the parameters indicated in the 'mauType' field. If
the other end does not advertise those parameters (when in
autonegotiate mode), or if the other end wants to force the
link to a different speed/duplex combination, there will no
link.
Default: enabled

mauType

Ethernet physical interface type.


Values:
mauOther Supported on UTP
mau10Baset Supported on UTP
mau10Basethd Supported on UTP
mau10Basetfd Supported on UTP
mau100Basetxhd Supported on UTP
mau100Basetxfd Supported on UTP
mau1000basethd Supported on UTP
mau1000basetfd Supported on UTP
mau1000baselxhd Supported on fiber
mau1000baselxfd Supported on fiber
mau1000basesxhd Not supported
mau1000basesxfd Not supported
Default: mau1000baselxfd (Gigabit Ethernet)

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OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

Parameter

Description

restart

Forces auto-negotiation to begin link renegotiation. If


auto-negotiation signaling is disabled, this parameter has no
effect.
Values:
restart Forces auto-negotiation to begin link renegotiation.
The Ethernet interface also renegotiates the link whenever
the ether profile is saved.
norestart This value is not supported.

ifType

The type of Ethernet. Should be set to the same value as the


mauType.
Values:
mauOther Supported on UTP
mau10Baset Supported on UTP
mau10Basethd Supported on UTP
mau10Basetfd Supported on UTP
mau100Basetxhd Supported on UTP
mau100Basetxfd Supported on UTP
mau1000basethd Supported on UTP
mau1000basetfd Supported on UTP
mau1000baselxhd Supported on fiber
mau1000baselxfd Supported on fiber
mau1000basesxhd Not supported
mau1000basesxfd Not supported

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring Ethernet interfaces

Parameter

Description

autoNegCap

The capabilities of the Ethernet interface that are advertised


by this port. Note that multiple options can be specified by
adding a plus (+) sign between entries.
This parameter also controls flow control, which is used to
regulate the flow of traffic between endpoints. Flow control
cause the transmitter to stop sending traffic if it receives a
pause message from an overwhelmed far end.
For more information on flow control refer to IEEE
802.3-2000.
Values:
bOther Other or unknown
b100baseT4 Advertise 100BASE-T4
b100baseT2 Advertise 100BASE-T2 half duplex mode
b100baseT2FD Advertise 100BASE-T2 full duplex mode
b10baseT Advertise speed 10Mbps, duplex half and full
b10baseTFD Advertise speed 10Mbps, duplex full
b100baseTX Advertise 100BASE-TX half duplex mode
b100baseX Advertise 100BaseX
b100baseT Advertise speed 100Mbps, duplex half and full
b100baseTXFD Advertise 100BASE-TX full duplex
b100baseXFD Advertise 100BaseX full duplex
b100baseTFD Advertise speed 100Mbps, duplex full
b1000baseX Advertise 1000BaseX full duplex
b1000baseT Advertise 1000Mbps, duplex full
b1000baseXFD 1000BaseX full duplex
b1000baseTFD Advertise speed 1000Mbps, duplex full
bFdxPause Advertise pause for full duplex links
bFdxBPause Advertise Full (symmetric and asymmetric)
flow control
bFdxAPause Advertise Asymmetric flow control
bFdxSPause Advertise Symmetric flow control
Default:
b10baseTFD+b100baseTXFD+bFdxBPause+b1000baseT
FD (Gigabit Ethernet)

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161

OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

Parameter

Description

remotefault

Indicates the state of the remote end of the Ethernet link.


Values:
noerror Link is operating normally.
offline Other end is not attempting to establish a link.
linkfailure Failed to establish a link. This could be caused
by different settings on either end of the link.
autonegerror Failed to establish a link because a matching
combination could not be found in the advertised
autonegotiation capabilities.

clksrc

Determines which side of the link will provide clocking for


the link.
If both sides are configured for automatic, both ends of the
link negotiate which will be the master and which will be the
slave based on the rules in IEEE 802.3-2000. If both sides
are configured the same (either as master or as slave) the link
will not be established.
Values:
automatic The clock source is selected based on the rules in
the IEEE 802.3-2000. This is the recommended setting.
master The local side will attempt to provide clock for the
link.
slave The local will attempt to recover clock from the clock
generated by the far end of the link.
Default: automatic

Configuring the 10/100 BaseT interface


The default values in the ether profile are appropriate for most applications. If
you need to modify the settings:
1

Find the ifIndex of the Ethernet port. For example, for the first Ethernet
port on the first Uplink card:
zSH> ifxlate 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd
ifIndex: ----------> {1}
shelf: ------------> {1}
slot: -------------> {1}
port: -------------> {1}
subport: ----------> {0}
type: -------------> {ethernetcsmacd}
adminstatus: ------> {up}
physical-flag: ----> {true}
iftype-extension: -> {none}
ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}

To view the defaults, use the get command:


zSH> get ether 1

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

APS

autonegstatus: ->
mauType: ------->
restart: ------->
ifType: -------->
autonegcap: ---->
remotefault: --->
clksrc: -------->

{enabled}
{mau100basetxfd}
{norestart}
{mau100basetxfd}
{b100baseTXFD}
{noerror}
{unused}

If you need to modify the profile, use the update command.

Configuring the 1000 BaseT interface


For the Gigabit Ethernet interface, settings you might need to configure
include the mauType and the autonegcap parameters:
1

Find the ifIndex of the Ethernet port. For example, for the second
Ethernet port (the Gigabit Ethernet port) on the first Uplink card:
zSH> ifxlate 1-1-2-0/ethernetcsmacd
ifIndex: ----------> {3}
shelf: ------------> {1}
slot: -------------> {1}
port: -------------> {2}
subport: ----------> {0}
type: -------------> {ethernetcsmacd}
adminstatus: ------> {up}
physical-flag: ----> {true}
iftype-extension: -> {none}
ifName: -----------> {1-1-2-0}

If required, use the update command to make changes to the Ethernet


interface configuration:

zSH> update ether 3


autonegstatus: -> {enabled}
mauType: -------> {mau100basetxfd} modify as necessary to support either UTP or fiber
interfaces
restart: -------> {norestart}
ifType: --------> {mau100basetxfd}
autonegcap: ----> {b10baseTFD+b100baseTXFD+bFdxBPause+b1000baseTFD}
remotefault: ---> {noerror}
clksrc: --------> {automatic}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

APS
Configuring APS
The system automatically creates the following APS profiles for SONET/
SDH OC3C/STM1 and OC12/STM4 uplink cards:

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

163

OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

aps-channel: configures the APS channels. There are two APS channel
per port. OC-3c/STM1 cards have 2 ports and therefore four APS
channels. OC-12/STM4 cards have 1 port and 2 APS channels.

aps-group: configures the APS groups. There are up to two APS groups
on the system. Each APS group contains a working and protect channel.

The OC3C/STM1 card supports APS 1:1 protection. In the 1:1 protection
scheme, a working channel on one card carries the full traffic, while a protect
channel on another card is either idle or reserved for low priority traffic.
When a failure occurs on the working fiber, the destination switch moves the
data from the working fiber to the protect fiber.
The OC12/STM4 card supports both APS 1:1 protection and APS 1+1
protection. In the 1+1 protection scheme, a working card transmits the same
data in one direction on the working channel while a protect card
simultaneously transmits the same data in the opposite direction on the protect
channel. When both transmissions reach the destination switch, the data on
the protection channel is ignored. When a failure occurs on the working
channel, the destintation switch uses the tranmission from the protect channel.
The following tables describe how the SONET/SDH cards and ports are
assigned to APS groups and channels. These values cannot be changed. The
OC3C/STM1 card has 2 ports per card and requires assignments for each port.
Table 35: OC3C/STM1 Card APS Assignments
Slot

Port

APS group

APS channel

The OC-12/STM4 card has 1 port and requires


Table 36: OC12/STM4 Card APS Assignments
Slot

Port

APS group

APS channel

Note: The APS protocol runs on the protect or second SONET/SDH


card.
To configure APS:
1

164

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Verify both the working and protect SONET/SDH interfaces are


configured identically, including the same card-group-id, and both are
enabled.

APS

Verify that the MALC working ports are connected to the working ports
on the SONET/SDH switch and the MALC protection ports are connected
to the protection ports on the SONET/SDH switch.

Activate the APS channels for the APS groups:

zSH> update aps-channel 1-1-1-0/sonet


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
apsChanConfigGroupName: ---> {group1}: **read-only **
apsChanConfigNumber: ------> {1}: ** read-only **
apsChanConfigAdminStatus: -> {notinservice}: inservice
apsChanConfigPriority: ----> {low}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.
zSH> update aps-channel 1-2-1-0/sonet
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
apsChanConfigGroupName: ---> {group1}: **read-only **
apsChanConfigNumber: ------> {0}: ** read-only **
apsChanConfigAdminStatus: -> {notinservice}: inservice
apsChanConfigPriority: ----> {low}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the APS groups:


zSH> update aps-group 1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
apsConfigName: -----------> {group1}: ** read-only **
apsConfigAdminStatus: ----> {notinservice}: inservice
apsConfigMode: -----------> {oneton}: oneplusone
apsConfigRevert: ---------> {nonrevertive}:
apsConfigDirection: ------> {unidirectional}:
apsConfigExtraTraffic: ---> {disabled}:
apsConfigSdBerThreshold: -> {6}:
apsConfigSfBerThreshold: -> {3}:
apsConfigWaitToRestore: --> {300}:
apsConfigCreationTime: ---> {0}: ** read-only **
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.
zSH> update aps-group 2
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
apsConfigName: -----------> {group2}: ** read-only **
apsConfigAdminStatus: ----> {notinservice}: inservice
apsConfigMode: -----------> {oneton}: oneplusone
apsConfigRevert: ---------> {nonrevertive}:
apsConfigDirection: ------> {unidirectional}:
apsConfigExtraTraffic: ---> {disabled}:
apsConfigSdBerThreshold: -> {6}:
apsConfigSfBerThreshold: -> {3}:

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165

OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

apsConfigWaitToRestore: --> {300}:


apsConfigCreationTime: ---> {0}: ** read-only **
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

T1/E1 TDM cables


This section describes the following T1/E1 TDM cables available from Zhone
Technologies:

Redundant T1/E1 TDM cable (OC12/STM4/GE Uplink card) on page 166

Non-redundant T1/E1 TDM cable (OC12/STM4/GE Uplink card) on


page 169

Redundant T1/E1 TDM cable (OC12/STM4/GE Uplink card)


Figure 47: Redundant T1/E1 TDM cable

Table 37: P1 to P2 pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 9 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-10

P2-16

TX 9 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-1

P2-1

RX 9 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-17

P2-2

RX 9 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-2

P2-27

TX 10 (tip)

White/Green

P1-18

P2-30

TX 10(ring)

Green/White

P1-3

P2-5

166

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 TDM cables

Table 37: P1 to P2 pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

RX 10(tip)

White/Brown

P1-19

P2-6

RX 10(ring)

Brown/White

P1-4

P2-31

TX 11 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-20

P2-34

TX 11(ring)

Slate/White

P1-5

P2-9

RX 11(tip)

Red/Blue

P1-21

P2-10

RX 11(ring)

Blue/Red

P1-6

P2-35

TX 12 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-22

P2-38

TX 12 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-7

P2-13

RX 12 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-23

P2-14

RX 12 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-8

P2-39

TX 13 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-24

P2-42

TX 13(ring)

Brown/Red

P1-9

P2-17

RX 13(tip)

Red/Slate

P1-25

P2-18

RX 13(ring)

Slate/Red

P1-10

P2-43

TX 14 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-26

P2-46

TX 14 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-11

P2-21

RX 14 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-27

P2-22

RX 14 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-12

P2-47

10

11

12

Table 38: P1 to P3 pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

13

TX 15 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-28

P3-26

TX 15 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-13

P3-1

RX 15 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-29

P3-2

RX 15 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-14

P3-27

TX 16 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-30

P3-30

TX 16 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-15

P3-5

RX 16 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-44

P3-6

RX 16 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-43

P3-31

14

15

16

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

167

OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

Table 39: P1 to P4 pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 9 (tip)

White/Blue

P2-16

P4-16

TX 9 (ring)

Blue/White

P2-1

P4-1

RX 9 (tip)

White/Orange

P2-17

P4-17

RX 9 (ring)

Orange/White

P2-2

P4-2

TX 10 (tip)

White/Green

P2-18

P4-18

TX 10 (ring)

Green/White

P2-3

P4-3

RX 10 (tip)

White/Brown

P2-19

P4-19

RX 10 (ring)

Brown/White

P2-4

P4-4

TX 11 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-20

P4-20

TX 11 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-5

P4-5

RX 11 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-21

P4-21

RX 11 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-6

P4-6

TX 12 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-22

P4-22

TX 12 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-7

P4-7

RX 12 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-23

P4-23

RX 12 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-8

P4-8

TX 13 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-9

P4-9

TX 13 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-25

P4-25

RX 13 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-10

P4-10

RX 13 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-26

P4-26

TX 14 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-26

P4-26

TX 14 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-11

P4-11

RX 14 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-27

P4-22

RX 14 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-12

P4-12

TX 15 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-28

P3-26

TX 15 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-13

P3-1

RX 15 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-29

P3-2

RX 15 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-14

P3-27

TX 16 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-30

P3-30

TX 16 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-15

P3-5

10

11

12

13

14

15

168

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 TDM cables

Table 39: P1 to P4 pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

16

RX 16 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-44

P3-6

RX 16 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-43

P3-31

Ground

Yellow/Orange

P1-31

P4-32

Cable detect

Orange/Yellow

P1-32

P4-31

17

Non-redundant T1/E1 TDM cable (OC12/STM4/GE Uplink card)


There are two cables for the T1/E1 TDM interfaces on the OC12/STM4
Uplink card a redundant and a non-redundant version.
Figure 48: Non-redundant T1/E1 TDM cable

Table 40: Non-redundant 8-port T1/E1 to 50 pin connector cable pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 9 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-16

P2-26

TX 9 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-1

P2-1

RX 9 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-17

P2-2

RX 9 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-2

P2-27

TX 10 (tip)

White/Green

P1-18

P2-30

TX 10 (ring)

Green/White

P1-3

P2-5

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

169

OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

Table 40: Non-redundant 8-port T1/E1 to 50 pin connector cable pinouts (ConPair

Signal

Color

From

To

RX 10 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-19

P2-6

RX 10 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-4

P2-31

TX 11 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-20

P2-34

TX 11 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-5

P2-9

RX 11 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-21

P2-10

RX 11 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-6

P2-35

TX 12 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-22

P2-38

TX 12 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-7

P2-13

RX 12 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-23

P2-14

RX 12 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-8

P2-39

TX 13 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-24

P2-42

TX 13 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-9

P2-17

RX 13 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-25

P2-18

RX 13 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-10

P2-43

TX 14 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-26

P2-46

TX 14 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-11

P2-21

RX 14 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-27

P2-22

RX 14 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-12

P2-47

TX 15 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-28

P3-26

TX 15 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-13

P3-1

RX 15 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-29

P3-2

RX 15 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-14

P3-27

TX 16 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-30

P3-30

TX 16 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-15

P3-5

RX 16 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-44

P3-6

RX 16 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-43

P3-31

17

not used

not used

not used

not used

18

not used

not used

not used

not used

19

not used

not used

not used

not used

20

not used

not used

not used

not used

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

170

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 TDM cables

Table 40: Non-redundant 8-port T1/E1 to 50 pin connector cable pinouts (ConPair

Signal

Color

From

To

21

not used

not used

not used

not used

22

not used

not used

not used

not used

23

not used

not used

not used

not used

24

not used

not used

not used

not used

25

not used

not used

not used

not used

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

171

OC-12c/STM4/GigE cards

172

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

11

TDM/ATM UPLINK CARD (UPLINK-T1/E1-ATM/


TDM/IP)
This chapter describes the MALC TDM/ATM Uplink card and explains how
to configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 174

T1/E1 TDM Uplink card configuration, page 176

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces, page 178

Configuring IMA groups, page 182

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

173

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Overview
The TDM/ATM Uplink card provides GR-303 and V5.2
support for the MALC. The card occupies a single slot in
the MALC chassis and has 16 T1/E1 ports. The first eight
ports are ATM T1/E1 ports; the second eight are TDM T1/
E1 ports. The ATM ports provide multiplexing and
demultiplexing of ATM traffic on the cell level as described
in the ATM Forum AF-PHY-0086.001.
The Uplink card also contains an Ethernet port for local
management, local LAN connectivity, or IP uplink; and a
serial (craft) port for local management.
The TDM ports receive GR-303 or V5.2 signaling and
convert it to PSTN analog signaling.
Note: Pulse dialing is not supported on the TDM/ATM
Uplink card.

Table 41: Uplink-T1/E1-TDM/ATM specifications


Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

16 ports:
8 ATM T1/E1 ports (ports 1 through 8)
8 TDM T1/E1 ports (ports 9 through 16)

Connectors

One (1) 96-pin telco connector


One Ethernet 10/100 port
One RS-232D serial craft port

174

Standards
supported

AF-PHY-0086.001

Supported line
rates

T1: 1.544 Mbps

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

GR-303-CORE

E1: 2.048 Mbps

Overview

Table 41: Uplink-T1/E1-TDM/ATM specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

ATM support

MALC performs ATM cell relay functions between cell based


line cards (such as ADSL or G.SHDSL) and the Uplink card. The
Uplink card performs cell relay function for the ATM traffic on
the backplane.
ATM Quality of Service types supported:

CBR, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR


Fair Weighted Queuing
Per VC and per QoS buffering

ATM Forum specifications:

UNI 3.0, UNI 3.1 compliant. Note that ILMI, SVCs,


point-to-multipoint are currently not supported.

UNI 4.0 compliant for PVC features only. Note that ABR,
SVCs, SPVCs, Multicast, and Anycast are not currently
supported.
16 IMA groups are supported, as described in the ATM
forum AF-PHY-0086.001. Note that UNI and IMA mode are
not currently supported on the same card.

Partial support for Traffic Management 4.0 including:

QOS levels described above

Connection Admission Control

Traffic descriptor specification

VPI/VCI ranges:

VPI: 0 to 3
VCI: 32 to 511

AAL2 and AAL5 termination:

AAL2 SAR for MALC POTS lines

RFC 1483 routed termination supported

AAL5 SAR for in-band management VC termination

Redundancy

1+1 card redundancy (with Y cable).

TDM line
characteristics

Supervisory signaling is Extended Superframe (ESF) CAS


signaling

TDM capacity

2 GR-303 interface groups (IGs)


8 channelized T1s per card
4096 maximum GR-303 call reference values (CRVs) per system

Power
consumption

36 W

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

175

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

T1/E1 TDM Uplink card configuration


This section describes optional configuration procedures for the T1/E1 TDM
Uplink card. If these procedures are required, they should be done before
provisioning the system.

Configuring ATM settings for T1/E1 ATM/TDM Uplink cards


To change the ATM bandwidth settings for the first 8 ports of the T1/E1
TDM IP Uplink cards:
zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5114 shelf/slot/type (type is 5114 for T1/E1 TDM IP Uplink cards)
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {malcT1E1Tdmf.bin}:
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30} change the bandwidth allocation, if desired
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
Changing atm configuration will result in a system reboot.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Atm configuration changed system is rebooting ...Record updated.

Changing the T1/E1 ATM/TDM Uplink card line type


If, after configuring the line type for a T1/E1 TDM Uplink card, you need to
change the line type, delete the Uplink card-profile and recreate it.
Caution: Changing the line type for the Uplink card requires a
system reboot and deletes the system configuration.
Back up your configuration using the dump command before
changing the line type.
1

Save the device configuration. For example:


a

Verify you are at the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Back up the current configuration file to the flash card and store it in
the onreboot directory:

T1/E1 TDM Uplink card configuration

zSH> mkdir onreboot


zSH> cd onreboot
zSH> dump file restore

This file will be used to restore the system configuration or revert to a


previous release, if desired.
c

If desired, save the configuration file to a host on the network. For


example:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 malc.cfg

Change directories to the root of the flash card:


zSH> cd /card1
zSH> pwd
/card1/

Delete the card-profile for the Uplink card:


zSH> delete card-profile 1/1/5114 shelf/slot/type

Create the Uplink card-profile and change the card-line-type and


specify the ATM bandwidth allocation:

zSH> new card-profile 1/1/5114


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcT1E1Tdmf.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: e1 | ds1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable} enter the bandwidth allocation
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

After saving the Uplink card-profile, the system will reboot and restore the
configuration saved to the onreboot directory.

Connecting redundant T1/E1 ATM/TDM Uplink cards


The T1/E1 TDM Uplink card has a redundant Y cable to provide card
redundancy. To connect the redundant cables:
1

Attach the 96-pin connector to the uplink connector on the Uplink card.

Attach the 50-pin connectors to the appropriate network interface. (See


Figure 49.)

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

177

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Figure 49: Connecting redundant T1/E1 TDM Uplink cards

For pinout information about the redundant T1/E1 TDM cable, see T1/
E1-ATM/TDM cables, page 187.

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces


This section explains how to configure DS1/E1 interfaces. It applies to the
TDM Uplink card (ports 9 through 16) the T1/E1 IMA card, and the T1/E1 32
port card.
Note: For redundant systems, configure the DS1 interfaces on both
the active and standby cards.
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure DS1
uplink interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Update the DS1 interfaces, which specify the basic


parameters of the DS1 line, including framing,
encoding, and clocking. See Configuring DS1/E1
interfaces on page 178.

update ds1-profile 1-1-port-0/ds1


where port is from 1 to 8 (for the IMA Uplink card)
9 to 16 (for the TDM Uplink card)
1 to 32 (for the T1/E1 32 card)
If your system is redundant, configure the DS1
interfaces on both the active and standby cards.

Activate the DS1 interfaces in the if-translate and


line-group profiles. See Activating a DS1 interface on
page 182.

update if-translate 1-1-port-0/ds1


where port is from
1 to 8 for the T1/E1 IMA Uplink card or
1 to 16 for the T1/E1 TDM Uplink card
1 to 32 (for the T1/E1 32 card)

178

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces

The ds1-profile configures both T1 and E1 interfaces.


T1 interfaces on the MALC have the following defaults:

ESF framing

B8ZS coding

Robbed bit signaling

CSU mode

Line build out of 0 feet

E1 interfaces on the MALC have the following defaults:

E1-CRCMF line type

HDB3 coding

Line build out of 0 feet

The following table describes the supported ds1-profile parameters.


Parameter

Options

line-type

The type of DS1 circuit.


Values:
esf Extended Super Frame.
e1Mf : G.704, table 4a, with TS16 multiframing
enabled for E1 circuits.
e1CrcMf : G.704, table 4b, with TS16 multiframing
enabled for E1 circuits.
Default: esf for T1
e1 for E1

line-code

The type of Zero Code Suppression used on the


interface.
b8zs: a specific pattern of normal bits and bipolar
violations used to replace a sequence of eight zero bits.
hdb3: High Density Bipolar of order 3. A code used
for E1.
Default: b8zs for T1
hdb3 for E1

send-code

This parameter is used for bit error rate (BER) testing.


For information, see the MALC Configuration Guide.

circuit-id

Enter a circuit identifier for the interface, up to 36


characters.

loopback-config

This parameter is used for loopback testing. For


information, see MALC Configuration Guide.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

179

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Parameter

Options

dsx-line-length

The length of the DSX WAN interface in feet. This


parameter provides information for line build out
circuitry.
Values:
Dsx0 0 feet for the line build out (LBO) setting.
Dsx133 133 feet for the LBO.
Dsx266 266 feet for the LBO.
Dsx399 399 feet for the LBO.
Dsx533 533 feet for the LBO.
Dsx655 655 feet for the LBO.
Default: 0

line-status-change-trap
-enable

Specifies whether a trap is generated whenever the line


state changes.
Values:
enabled
disabled
Default: enabled

ds1-mode

Type of interface.
Values:
dsx DS1 interface is DSX
csu DS1 interface is CSU
other Interface is neither CSU nor DSX
Default: csu

csu-line-length

This parameter provides information for line build out


circuitry.
Values:
csu00 0 dB line build out.
csu75 -7.5 dB line build out.
csu150 -15.0 dB line build out.
csu225 -22.5 dB line build out.
Default: csu00

transmit-clock-source

180

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Specifies the clock source for the interface. See for


information about configuring the system clock.

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces

Parameter

Options

cell-scramble

Indicates whether ATM cell scrambling is enabled for


this interface. Both sides of the connection must agree
on whether scrambling is enabled.
Values:
true Cell scrambling enabled.
false Cell scrambling disabled.
Default: true

coset-polynomial

Indicates whether the coset polynomial is used to


calculate the ATM header error control (HEC) value.
Both sides of the connection must agree on the method
of calculating the HEC value.
Values:
true The coset polynomial is used to calculate the
HEC value.
false The coset polynomial is not used to calculate the
HEC value.
Default: true

Configuring a DS1 interface


The default values are appropriate for most applications. If you need to
change them, update the ds1-profile for the interface:
zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
line-type: ----------------------> {esf}:
line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}:
send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}:
circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}:
loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}:
signal-mode: --------------------> {none}:
fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}:
dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}:
line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}:
channelization: -----------------> {disabled}:
ds1-mode: -----------------------> {other}:
csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}:
clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}:
transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming}:
cell-scramble: ------------------> {true}:
coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}:
protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}
signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart}
ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0}
line-power: ---------------------> {disabled}
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

181

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Activating a DS1 interface


Activate each DS1 interface by updating its if-translate profile:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifindex: -----> {1}: .
shelf: -------> {1}:
slot: --------> {1}:
port: --------> {1}:
subport: -----> {0}:
type: --------> {ds1}:
adminstatus: -> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

After you update the profile, a log message appears indicating the line is
active:
1/1: alarm_mgr: : l=167: 01:01:01 Major T1 Up Line
1:1:1:0

Continue updating each DS1 interface. When all the interfaces are active,
proceed to configuring the IMA groups.

Configuring IMA groups


Note: For redundant systems, configure the IMA interfaces on both
the active and standby cards.
For more information about IMA, refer to the ATM Forum Inverse
Multiplexing for ATM (IMA) Specification Version 1.1 (AF-PHY-0086.001).
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure IMA
groups on the MALC:

182

Action

Command

(Optional) Update the ima-group-profile, which


specifies the basic settings of the IMA group,
including the number of transmit and receive links
and the clocking. See Configuring IMA groups on
page 186.

update ima-group-profile 1/slot/1


If your system is redundant, configure the IMA group on
both the active and standby cards.

(Optional) Move the default IMA links to different


groups. See Moving IMA links on page 186.

imalink move SourceIMAGroup


DestinationIMAGroup ds1Interface

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

where slot the slot that contains the card).

Configuring IMA groups

The following table describes the supported parameters in the


ima-group-profile.
Parameter

Description

groupSymmetry

The symmetry of the Inverse Multiplexing over ATM


(IMA) group. Symmetry determines whether the transmit
and receive sides of the IMA link must be configured and
how traffic is sent over the links.
Values:
symmetricOperation Both transmit and receive IMA
links must be configured and the system can transmit and
receive traffic only if both sides of the connection are
active.
asymmetricOperation Both transmit and receive IMA
links must be configured, but the system can transmit and
receive traffic even if both sides of the connection are not
active.
asymmetricConfiguration Transmit and receive links
do not have to be configured and the system can transmit
and receive traffic even if both sides of the connection are
not active.
Default: symmetricOperation

minNumTxLinks

Minimum number of transmit links required to be Active


for the IMA group to be in the Operational state. If the
number of active links falls below this value, the link
drops and the redundant link (if any) takes over.
Values:
1 to 8
Default: 1

minNumRxLinks

Minimum number of receive links required to be active


for the IMA group to be in the operational state. If the
number of active links falls below this value, the link
drops and the redundant link (if any) takes over.
Values:
1 to 8
Default: 1

txClkMode

Transmit clocking mode used by the near-end IMA


group.
Values:
itc Independent Transmit Clock. Indicates that IMA links
do not all use the same transmit clock. Each IMA link
derives clock from its associated DS1 interface.
ctc Common Transmit Clock. Indicates the transmit
clock of all IMA links are derived from the same source.
When set to ctc, the MALC derives the IMA clocking
from the system clock.
Default: ctc

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

183

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Parameter

Description

txImaId

The IMA ID currently in use by the near-end IMA


interface.
Values:
0 to 255
Default: 1

txFramLength

The frame length to be used by the IMA group in the


transmit direction. Can only be set when the IMA group
is startup.
Values:
m32 32 cells
m64 64 cells
m128 128 cells
m256 256 cells
Default: m128

diffDelayMax

The maximum number of milliseconds of differential


delay among the links that can be tolerated on this
interface.
Values:
0 to 100
Default: 25

alphaValue

The number of consecutive invalid ICP cells allowed


before the system changes from a Sync state to a Hunt
state.
Values:
1 or 2
Default: 2

betaValue

The number of consecutive errored ICP cells allowed


before the system changes from a Sync state to a Hunt
state.
Values:
1 to 5
Default: 2

gammaValue

The number of consecutive valid ICP cells allowed before


the system changes from a PreSync state to the Sync
state.
Values:
1 to 5
Default: 1

testLinkIfIndex

184

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link. See


MALC Configuration Guide for information.

Configuring IMA groups

Parameter

Description

testPattern

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link. See


MALC Configuration Guide for information.

testProcStatus

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link. See


MALC Configuration Guide for information.

Overview
The following MALC cards support IMA groups:

T1/E1 IMA Uplink

T1/E1-ATM-32

Each card supports 16 IMA groups. The MALC T1/E1-ATM-32 card


provides 32 T1/E1 UNI or IMA ports. All ports must be configured as either
UNI or IMA. When these cards boot up, the system creates the IMA groups
and assigns the T1/E1 links to the following groups:
Links

IMA group

1-4

5-8

9 - 12

13 - 16

17 - 20

21 - 24

10

25 - 28

11

29 -32

12

Note: (T1/E1 32 card only) IMA links 1-16 can only belong to IMA
groups 1-8 and links 17-32 can only belong to IMA groups 9-16.
Note the following about multiple IMA groups:

In a redundant Uplink configuration, you must configure IMA groups on


both the active and standby cards

Before moving IMA links to another group, the system performs a CAC
calculation to determine whether moving the links will violate ATM QoS
settings. If so, the link will not be moved.

If you do not want a link to belong to any IMA group, it is recommended


that you admin down the interface in the if-translate profile. Do not use
the imalink remove command unless requested to by Zhone GSS.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

185

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Configuring IMA groups


The following example updates an IMA group to change the minimum
number of links in the group:
zSH> update ima-group-profile 1/1/1 shelf/slot/port
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
groupSymmetry: ---> {symmetricoperation}:
minNumTxLinks: ---> {1}: 4
minNumRxLinks: ---> {1}: 4
txClkMode: -------> {ctc}:
txImaId: ---------> {1}:
txFrameLength: ---> {m128}:
diffDelayMax: ----> {75}:
alphaValue: ------> {2}:
betaValue: -------> {2}:
gammaValue: ------> {1}:
testLinkIfIndex: -> {0/0/0/0/0}:
testPattern: -----> {-1}:
testProcStatus: --> {disabled}:
txTimingRefLink: -> {0}:
rxTimingRefLink: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Moving IMA links


To move IMA links from one group to another, use the imalink move
command. For example:
zSH> imalink move 1-1-1-0/atmima 1-1-2-0/atmima 1-1-1-0/ds1
Stack unbind successful.
Link moved successfully.

This command moves the DS1 interface 1-1-1-0/ds1 from IMA group
1-1-1-0/atm to IMA group 1-1-2-0/atmima.
If this is a redundant configuration, also move the IMA link on the
standby card:
zSH> imalink move 1-2-1-0/atmima 1-2-2-0/atmima 1-2-1-0/ds1
Stack unbind successful.
Link moved successfully.

After moving the links, you can use the imalink show command to view
the links in the group:
zSH> imalink show 1-3-1-0/atmima
DS1 Links for IMA Group 1-3-1-0/atmima:
If Index
If Name
----------------------000736
1-3-1-0
000737
1-3-2-0

186

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1-ATM/TDM cables

000738
000739

1-3-3-0
1-3-4-0

T1/E1-ATM/TDM cables
This section describes the following T1/E1-ATM/TDM cables available from
Zhone Technologies:

Redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable on page 187

Non-redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable on page 190

Redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable


The TDM/ATM Uplink card can be redundantly configured by using active
and standby cards connected with a Y cable. Figure 50 shows the
96-pin-to-three-50-pin, redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable. Table 42 lists the
pinouts.
Figure 50: Redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable

Table 42: Redundant TDM/ATM uplink cable pinouts


Port

Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 1 Ring

Blue/White

P1-1 and P2-1

P3-1

TX 1 Tip

White/Blue

P1-2 and P2-2

P3-26

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

187

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Table 42: Redundant TDM/ATM uplink cable pinouts (Continued)


Port

Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

RX 1 Ring

Orange/White

P1-3 and P2-3

P3-27

RX 1 Tip

White/Orange

P1-4 and P2-4

P3-2

TX 2 Ring

Green/White

P1-5 and P2-5

P3-5

TX 2 Tip

White/Green

P1-6 and P2-6

P3-30

RX 2 Ring

Brown/White

P1-7 and P2-7

P3-31

RX 2 Tip

White/Brown

P1-8 and P2-8

P3-6

TX 3 Ring

Slate/White

P1-9 and P2-9

P3-39

TX 3 Tip

White/Slate

P1-10 and P2-10

P3-34

RX 3 Ring

Blue/Red

P1-11 and P2-11

P3-35

RX 3 Tip

Red/Blue

P1-12 and P2-12

P3-10

TX 4 Ring

Orange/Red

P1-13 and P2-13

P3-13

TX 4 Tip

Red/Orange

P1-14 and P2-14

P3-38

RX 4 Ring

Green/Red

P1-15 and P2-15

P3-39

RX 4 Tip

Red/Green

P1-16 and P2-16

P3-14

TX 5 Ring

Brown/Red

P1-17 and P2-17

P3-17

TX 5 Tip

Red/Brown

P1-18 and P2-18

P3-42

RX 5 Ring

Slate/Red

P1-19 and P2-19

P3-43

RX 5 Tip

Red/Slate

P1-20 and P2-20

P3-18

TX 6 Ring

Blue/Black

P1-21 and P2-21

P3-21

TX 6 Tip

Black/Blue

P1-22 and P2-22

P3-46

RX 6 Ring

Orange/Black

P1-23 and P2-23

P3-47

RX 6 Tip

Black/Orange

P1-24 and P2-24

P3-22

TX 7 Ring

Blue/White

P1-25 and P2-25

P4-1

TX 7 Tip

White/Blue

P1-26 and P2-26

P4-26

RX 7 Ring

Orange/White

P1-27 and P2-27

P4-27

RX 7 Tip

White/Orange

P1-28 and P2-28

P4-2

TX 8 Ring

Green/White

P1-29 and P2-29

P4-5

TX 8 Tip

White/Green

P1-30 and P2-30

P4-30

RX 8 Ring

Brown/White

P1-31 and P2-31

P4-31

RX 8 Tip

White/Brown

P1-32 and P2-32

P4-6

3
2
4

5
3
6

7
4
8

9
5
10

11
6
12

13
7
14

15
8
16

188

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1-ATM/TDM cables

Table 42: Redundant TDM/ATM uplink cable pinouts (Continued)


Port

Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

17

TX 9 Ring

Slate/White

P1-33 and P2-33

P4-9

TX 9 Tip

White/Slate

P1-34 and P2-34

P4-34

RX 9 Ring

Blue/Red

P1-35 and P2-35

P4-35

RX 9 Tip

Red/Blue

P1-36 and P2-36

P4-10

TX 10 Ring

Orange/Red

P1-37 and P2-37

P4-13

TX 10 Tip

Red/Orange

P1-38 and P2-38

P4-38

RX 10 Ring

Green/Red

P1-39 and P2-39

P4-39

RX 10 Tip

Red/Green

P1-40 and P2-40

P4-14

TX 11 Ring

Brown/Red

P1-41 and P2-41

P4-17

TX 11 Tip

Red/Brown

P1-42 and P2-42

P4-42

RX 11 Ring

Slate/Red

P1-43 and P2-43

P4-43

RX 11 Tip

Red/Slate

P1-44 and P2-44

P4-18

TX 12 Ring

Blue/Black

P1-45 and P2-45

P4-21

TX 12 Tip

Black/Blue

P1-46 and P2-46

P4-46

RX 12 Ring

Orange/Black

P1-47 and P2-47

P4-47

RX 12 Tip

Black/Orange

P1-48 and P2-48

P4-22

TX 13 Ring

Blue/White

P1-49 and P2-49

P5-1

TX 13 Tip

White/Blue

P1-50 and P2-50

P5-26

RX 13 Ring

Orange/White

P1-51 and P2-51

P5-27

RX 13 Tip

White/Orange

P1-52 and P2-52

P5-2

TX 14 Ring

Green/White

P1-53 and P2-53

P5-5

TX 14 Tip

White/Green

P1-54 and P2-54

P5-30

RX 14 Ring

Brown/White

P1-55 and P2-55

P5-31

RX 14 Tip

White/Brown

P1-56 and P2-56

P5-6

TX 15 Ring

Slate/White

P1-57 and P2-57

P5-9

TX 15 Tip

White/Slate

P1-58 and P2-58

P5-34

RX 15 Ring

Blue/Red

P1-59 and P2-59

P5-35

RX 15 Tip

Red/Blue

P1-60 and P2-60

P5-10

TX 16 Ring

Orange/Red

P1-61 and P2-61

P5-13

TX 16 Tip

Red/Orange

P1-62 and P2-62

P5-38

9
18

19
10
20

21
11
22

23
12
24

25
13
26

27
14
28

29
15
30

31
16

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

189

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Table 42: Redundant TDM/ATM uplink cable pinouts (Continued)


Port

Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

32

RX 16 Ring

Green/Red

P1-63 and P2-63

P5-34

RX 16 Tip

Red/Green

P1-64 and P2-64

P5-14

Non-redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable


Figure 51 shows the 96-pin-to-four-50-pin, non-redundant TDM/ATM Uplink
cable. Table 43 lists the pinouts.
Figure 51: Non-Redundant TDM/ATM Uplink cable

Table 43: Non-redundant TDM/ATM uplink cable pinouts


Port

Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 1 Ring

Blue/White

P1-1

P2-1

TX 1 Tip

White/Blue

P1-2

P2-26

RX 1 Ring

Orange/White

P1-3

P2-27

RX 1 Tip

White/Orange

P1-4

P2-2

TX 2 Ring

Green/White

P1-5

P2-5

TX 2 Tip

White/Green

P1-6

P2-30

RX 2 Ring

Brown/White

P1-7

P2-31

RX 2 Tip

White/Brown

P1-8

P2-6

1
2

3
2
4

190

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1-ATM/TDM cables

Table 43: Non-redundant TDM/ATM uplink cable pinouts (Continued)


Port

Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

TX 3 Ring

Slate/White

P1-9

P2-39

TX 3 Tip

White/Slate

P1-10

P2-34

RX 3 Ring

Blue/Red

P1-11

P2-35

RX 3 Tip

Red/Blue

P1-12

P2-10

TX 4 Ring

Orange/Red

P1-13

P2-13

TX 4 Tip

Red/Orange

P1-14

P2-38

RX 4 Ring

Green/Red

P1-15

P2-39

RX 4 Tip

Red/Green

P1-16

P2-14

TX 5 Ring

Brown/Red

P1-17

P2-17

TX 5 Tip

Red/Brown

P1-18

P2-42

RX 5 Ring

Slate/Red

P1-19

P2-43

RX 5 Tip

Red/Slate

P1-20

P2-18

TX 6 Ring

Blue/Black

P1-21

P2-21

TX 6 Tip

Black/Blue

P1-22

P2-46

RX 6 Ring

Orange/Black

P1-23

P2-47

RX 6 Tip

Black/Orange

P1-24

P2-22

TX 7 Ring

Blue/White

P1-25

P3-1

TX 7 Tip

White/Blue

P1-26

P3-26

RX 7 Ring

Orange/White

P1-27

P3-27

RX 7 Tip

White/Orange

P1-28

P3-2

TX 8 Ring

Green/White

P1-29

P3-5

TX 8 Tip

White/Green

P1-30

P3-30

RX 8 Ring

Brown/White

P1-31

P3-31

RX 8 Tip

White/Brown

P1-32

P3-6

TX 9 Ring

Slate/White

P1-33

P3-9

TX 9 Tip

White/Slate

P1-34

P3-34

RX 9 Ring

Blue/Red

P1-35

P3-35

RX 9 Tip

Red/Blue

P1-36

P3-10

TX 10 Ring

Orange/Red

P1-37

P3-13

TX 10 Tip

Red/Orange

P1-38

P3-38

3
6

7
4
8

9
5
10

11
6
12

13
7
14

15
8
16

17
9
18

19
10

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191

TDM/ATM Uplink card (Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP)

Table 43: Non-redundant TDM/ATM uplink cable pinouts (Continued)


Port

Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

20

RX 10 Ring

Green/Red

P1-39

P3-39

RX 10 Tip

Red/Green

P1-40

P3-14

TX 11 Ring

Brown/Red

P1-41

P3-17

TX 11 Tip

Red/Brown

P1-42

P3-42

RX 11 Ring

Slate/Red

P1-43

P3-43

RX 11 Tip

Red/Slate

P1-44

P3-18

TX 12 Ring

Blue/Black

P1-45

P3-21

TX 12 Tip

Black/Blue

P1-46

P3-46

RX 12 Ring

Orange/Black

P1-47

P3-47

RX 12 Tip

Black/Orange

P1-48

P3-22

TX 13 Ring

Blue/White

P1-49

P4-1

TX 13 Tip

White/Blue

P1-50

P4-26

RX 13 Ring

Orange/White

P1-51

P4-27

RX 13 Tip

White/Orange

P1-52

P4-2

TX 14 Ring

Green/White

P1-53

P4-5

TX 14 Tip

White/Green

P1-54

P4-30

RX 14 Ring

Brown/White

P1-55

P4-31

RX 14 Tip

White/Brown

P1-56

P4-6

TX 15 Ring

Slate/White

P1-57

P4-9

TX 15 Tip

White/Slate

P1-58

P4-34

RX 15 Ring

Blue/Red

P1-59

P4-35

RX 15 Tip

Red/Blue

P1-60

P4-10

TX 16 Ring

Orange/Red

P1-61

P4-13

TX 16 Tip

Red/Orange

P1-62

P4-38

RX 16 Ring

Green/Red

P1-63

P4-34

RX 16 Tip

Red/Green

P1-64

P4-14

21
11
22

23
12
24

25
13
26

27
14
28

29
15
30

31
16
32

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12

SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
This chapter explains how to configure the system level settings on the
MALC. It contains the following:

Adding redundant Uplink cards, page 193

Dual, non-redundant Uplink cards, page 200

System clocking, page 204

Adding redundant Uplink cards


The MALC supports Uplink card redundancy, in which two Uplink cards are
installed in the system, one primary and one standby. The card installed in the
lower slot becomes the primary card, and shares configuration information
with the standby card. If the primary card goes down, the standby card takes
over.
After install an Uplink card in the MALC chassis, you can add a redundant
Uplink by installing a card of the same type and creating a new card-profile
for it.
Caution: Both Uplink cards in a redundant pair must have flash
cards of the same size and must be running the same software version.
Ensure all redundant and spare Uplink cards are upgraded to the
current software version.

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System Configuration

The following table describes the parameters in the card-profile used to


configure Uplink cards:
Parameter

Description

card-group-id

The unique redundancy group to which the card is assigned. A card group can contain at
most two cards and redundant card pairs must be in the same card group.
Note that you cannot change a non-zero card-group-id. The card-profile must be
deleted and reprovisioned.
Values:
0 to 65535
Default: 1 (for Uplink cards)
2 (for MTAC/Ring cards)
0 (for non-redundant cards)

weight

A weight given to this card that determines whether this card should become the active
card after both cards are reset. Cards in a card group negotiate which cards are active and
standby by comparing weights. Cards with higher preferences become active. If multiple
cards have the same weight, the card in the lower numbered slot becomes active.
Values:
noPreference No preference.
neveractive The card never becomes active.
slightpreference
mediumpreference
highpreference
Default: noPreference

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Adding redundant Uplink cards

Parameter

Description

card-line-type

Specifies the line type of the card and the signaling that runs over it. Does not apply to
OC3C/STM1 Uplink cards or OC12/S4/GE/TDM Uplink cards (for these cards, enter any
value):
Values:
e1 E1 UNI mode (T1/E1 IMA Uplink card)
ds1 DS1 UNI mode (T1/E1 IMA Uplink card)
e1-ima E1 ATM IMA mode (T1/E1 IMA Uplink card)
ds1-ima DS1 ATM IMA mode (T1/E1 IMA Uplink card)
e3 E3 UNI mode (DS3/E3 Uplink card)
ds3 DS3 UNI mode (DS3/E3 IMA Uplink card)
t1-uni-gr303 T1 UNI mode of ATM and GR-303 TDM signaling (T1/E1 TDM Uplink
card)
t1-ima-v52 T1 IMA mode of ATM and GR-303 TDM signaling (T1/E1 TDM Uplink
card)
t1-uni-gr303 T1 UNI mode of ATM and GR-303 TDM signaling (T1/E1 TDM Uplink
card)
t1-ima-v52 T1 IMA mode of ATM and V5.2 TDM signaling (T1/E1 TDM Uplink card)

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System Configuration

Parameter

Description

card-atmconfiguration

Specifies the percentage of the uplink interfaces assigned to particular ATM service
categories.
Values:
vbnrt95rt5 Specifies the following allocation:

UBR: 1%
nrt-VBR: 94%
CBR/rt-VBR: 5%
vbnrt80rt15 Specifies the following allocation:

UBR: 5%
nrt-VBR: 80%
CBR/rt-VBR: 15%
vbnrt65rt30 Specifies the following allocation:

UBR: 5%
nrt-VBR: 65%
CBR/rt-VBR: 30%
vbnrt50rt45 Specifies the following allocation:

UBR: 5%
nrt-VBR: 50%
CBR/rt-VBR: 45%
vbnrt35rt60 Specifies the following allocation:

UBR: 5%
nrt-VBR: 35%
CBR/rt-VBR: 60%
vbnrt20rt75 Specifies the following allocation:

UBR: 5%
nrt-VBR: 20%
CBR/rt-VBR: 75%
vbnrt5rt95 Specifies the following allocation:

UBR: 1%
nrt-VBR: 5%
CBR/rt-VBR: 94%

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Adding redundant Uplink cards

Uplink cards on the MALC have the following types and software images:
Table 44: MALC Uplink card types
Card

Type

Name of software image

Uplink-DS3/E3

5009

malcds3.bin
malcds3raw.bin (Boot partition
image file)

Uplink-DS3/E3-ATM/IP

5109

malcds3f.bin
malcds3fraw.bin (Boot partition
image file)

Uplink-OC3C/STM1

5011

malcoc3.bin
malcoc3raw.bin (Boot partition
image file)

Uplink-OC3C/STM1-ATM/IP

5111

malcoc3f.bin
malcoc3fraw.bin (Boot partition
image file)

Uplink-T1/E1-IMA-8

5001

malct1ima.bin
malct1imaraw.bin (Boot partition
image file)

Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/IP-8

5101

malct1imaf.bin
malct1imafraw.bin (Boot partition
image file)

Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM-16

5014

malcT1E1Tdm.bin
malct1e1tdmraw.bin (Boot
partition image file)

Uplink-T1/E1-ATM/TDM/IP-16

5114

malct1e1tdmf.bin
malct1e1tdmfraw.bin (Boot
partition image file)

Uplink-OC12/S4/GE/
TDM-ATM/IP

5029

malcoc12.bin
malcoc12raw.bin (Boot partition
image file)

Configuring redundant Uplink cards


Caution: You must configure redundant physical interfaces on both
the active and standby cards. This applies to all Uplink cards. In
addition, you must manually keep the configuration of the physical
interfaces on the active and standby cards in sync.
Note: When configuring the redundant Uplink card, the settings in
the card-profile for the both cards must be identical.

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System Configuration

To add a redundant Uplink card to the system:


1

Verify that active card has been configured with the same card-group-id
that is to be used for the standby card.

Install a second Uplink card in slot 2.

Create a card-profile for the second Uplink card:


To configure the card-profile for a standby DS3/E3 Uplink card:

zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5009 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcds3.bin or malcds3f.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the primary Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds3 | e3
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

To configure the card-profile for a protection OC3C/STM1 Uplink card:


zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5011 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcoc3.bin or malcoc3f.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the working Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1 | e1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

To configure the card-profile for a protection OC12/STM4 Uplink card:


zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5029 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcoc12.bin

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admin-status: ---------> {operational}:


upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the working Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

To configure the card-profile for a standby T1/E1 IMA Uplink card:


zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5001 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malct1ima.bin or malct1imaf.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the primary Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: e1 | ds1 | e1-ima | ds1-ima
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

To configure the card-profile for a standby T1/E1 TDM Uplink card:


zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5014 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcT1E1Tdm.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the primary Uplink card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}

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System Configuration

....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
New record saved.

Once the card-profile has been saved, the standby card comes up and the
configuration and routing tables from the primary card are copied over.

Verifying redundancy status


The showactivecards and showredundancy commands display
information about MALC redundancy.
The showredundancy command displays the status of the Uplink card
redundancy:
zSH> showredundancy
Redundancy status for card 01:01 - Safe, all services have redundant peers
01:01 is active storage
01:02 is standby storage

The showactivecards command displays the active cards for all


redundancy groups on the system:
zSH> showactivecards
Shelf/Slot Group Id
Card Type
__________________________________
2:
1/1
1
MALC DS3

Dual, non-redundant Uplink cards


The MALC chassis can include two non-redundant DS3/E3 or OC3C/
STM1 Uplink cards. In this configuration, only cell relay is supported and
there is no Uplink card redundancy.

Configuring non-redundant Uplink cards


Caution: Changing to non-redundant Uplinks requires you to erase
the system configuration and should only be done during a
maintenance window.
This procedure requires serial port access to the MALC.
By default, two Uplink cards of the same type in the same chassis are part of a
redundancy group. Converting these cards to non-redundant requires that you
reassign these cards to the redundancy group 0 (which means they are not
redundant).
To add non-redundant Uplinks:
1

Back up the configuration. To back up the configuration to the network:


a

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Create the file in the destination location of the TFTP server and
make it writable.

Dual, non-redundant Uplink cards

Save the configuration using the dump command. The following


example saves the configuration to a file named malc.cfg on the host
192.168.8.21:
zSH> dump network 192.168.8.21 malc.cfg

Erase the configuration:


zSH> set2default

Wait for the uplink card in slot 1 to reach the running state.

List the if-translate profiles. Note that the if-translate profile addresses
are in the form uplink1/type for port 1 and uplink2/type for port 2, and so
on. For example:
zSH> list if-translate
if-translate 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd
if-translate ethernet1/other
if-translate 1-1-1-0/rs232
if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet
if-translate 1-1-2-0/sonet
if-translate uplink1/other
if-translate uplink2/other
if-translate 1-1-1-0/propvirtual
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/other
if-translate uplink1/atm
if-translate uplink1/aal5
if-translate uplink1/rfc1483
if-translate uplink2/atm
if-translate uplink2/aal5
if-translate uplink2/rfc1483
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/aal5
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/rfc1483
18 entries found.

Update the card profile for slot 1 and set the card-group-id to 0. The
following example uses an OC3C/STM1 ATM/IP card:
zSH> update card-profile 1/1/5111
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: -----------> {malcoc3f.bin}:
admin-status: -----------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}:
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}:
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: --------------> {true}:
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}:
card-group-id: ----------> {1}: 0
hold-active: ------------> {false}:
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: ---------> {ds1}: ** read-only **
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30}:
....................

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System Configuration

Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s


card redundancy group ID change to 0
This will cause the removal of all associated
profilesand a slotreboot to create new if-translate
profilesbased on "uplinkx-y" names.
Continue? [y]es or [n]o: y
Record updated.

The system removes the profiles for the card and then reboots the card.
6

Wait for the Uplink card in slot 1 to reach the RUNNING state.

List the if-translate profiles. Note that for a single Uplink card, the
if-translate profiles addresses are in the form uplink1-1/type for port 1
and uplink1-2/type for port 2, and so on. For example:
zSH> list if-translate
if-translate 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd
if-translate ethernet1-1/other
if-translate 1-1-1-0/rs232
if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet
if-translate 1-1-2-0/sonet
if-translate uplink1-1/other
if-translate uplink1-2/other
if-translate 1-1-1-0/propvirtual
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/other
if-translate uplink1-1/atm
if-translate uplink1-1/aal5
if-translate uplink1-1/rfc1483
if-translate uplink1-2/atm
if-translate uplink1-2/aal5
if-translate uplink1-2/rfc1483
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/aal5
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/rfc1483
18 entries found.

Create a card-profile for slot 2, using 0 for the card-group-id.

zSH> new card-profile 1/2/5111


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcoc3f.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: 0
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1 | e1 enter line type of DS1 interface
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}

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Dual, non-redundant Uplink cards

....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
New record saved.

Wait for the Uplink card in slot 2 to reach the RUNNING state.

10 List the if-translate profiles. Note that the if-translate profiles addresses
are now in the form uplink1-x/type for the Uplink card in slot 1 and
uplink2-x/type for the Uplink card in slot 2, and so on. For example:
zSH> list if-translate
if-translate 1-1-1-0/ethernetcsmacd
if-translate ethernet1-1/other
if-translate 1-1-1-0/rs232
if-translate 1-1-1-0/sonet
if-translate 1-1-2-0/sonet
if-translate uplink1-1/other
if-translate uplink1-2/other
if-translate 1-1-1-0/propvirtual
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/other
if-translate uplink1-1/atm
if-translate uplink1-1/aal5
if-translate uplink1-1/rfc1483
if-translate uplink1-2/atm
if-translate uplink1-2/aal5
if-translate uplink1-2/rfc1483
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/atm
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/aal5
if-translate 1-1-1-0-propvirtual/rfc1483
if-translate 1-2-1-0/ethernetcsmacd
if-translate ethernet2-1/other
if-translate 1-2-1-0/rs232
if-translate 1-2-1-0/sonet
if-translate 1-2-2-0/sonet
if-translate uplink2-1/other
if-translate uplink2-2/other
if-translate 1-2-1-0/propvirtual
if-translate 1-2-1-0-propvirtual/other
if-translate uplink2-1/atm
if-translate uplink2-1/aal5
if-translate uplink2-1/rfc1483
if-translate uplink2-2/atm
if-translate uplink2-2/aal5
if-translate uplink2-2/rfc1483
if-translate 1-2-1-0-propvirtual/atm
if-translate 1-2-1-0-propvirtual/aal5
if-translate 1-2-1-0-propvirtual/rfc1483
36 entries found.

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203

System Configuration

Managing the MALC over a non-redundant Uplink


In a dual, non-redundant configuration, the system is managed over only one
of the Uplink cards a time. The first card active in the system (by default, the
card in the first slot) contains the management channel.
To maintain a management connection to the device, you should provision a
management channel on both Uplink cards. In this case, if the Uplink card
that is managing the MALC reboots, the other Uplink card takes over
management of the system. The management channel can either be over the
Ethernet or an ATM PVC. In either case, the IP addresses for each of the
Uplink cards must be on different subnets.

System clocking
The following table summarizes the tasks for configuring system clocking on
the MALC.
Task

Command

Update the ds1-profile,


sonet-profile, or ds3-profile to
verify the type of clocking for the
interface. See Configuring a DS1 or
MTAC/Ring clock source on
page 206

update ds1-profile shelf-slot-port-subport/ds1

Configuring a DS3 clock source on


page 207,

or

Configuring an OC-3c/STM1 or
OC-12c/STM4 clock source on
page 208.
Update the system-clock-profile to
specify whether the clock is eligible
and to assign a weight. See
Configuring a DS1 or MTAC/Ring
clock source on page 206
Configuring a DS3 clock source on
page 207.
If required, specify a system clock
in the system-profile. See
Configuring a clock source in the
system profile on page 209.

The MTAC/Ring card has a single ds1-profile for the BITS clock
interface.
or
update ds3-profile shelf-slot-port-subport/ds3
update sonet-profile shelf-slot-port-subport/
sonet

update system-clock-profile shelf-slot-port-0/


type
Where type is ds1, ds3, or sonet.
The MALC creates system-clock-profiles for each interface in the system
that can provide clock. By default, interfaces are not eligible to provide
clock and all interfaces have an equal weight of 5.
update system 0
Clock sources specified in the system-profile always override settings in
system-clock-profiles.
Note: clock-source-profiles are recommended for configuring
clock sources.

Overview
The MALC can receive system clocking from one of the following sources:
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System clocking

The DS1 interfaces on the T1/E1 Uplink card

The DS3 interfaces on the DS3 Uplink card

OC-3c/STM1 interfaces on the OC3C/STM1 Uplink card

OC-12c/STM4 interfaces on the OC12/STM4 Uplink card

The BITS clock source on the MTAC/Ring card (which has a type of
DS1)
Note: Interfaces that are designated as eligible clock sources cannot
be set to through timing

The MALC creates system-clock-profiles for each interface that can provide
clock for the system. These profiles define the clock sources that are eligible
to provide system clock and defines the weights for the clock on the interface.
If there are multiple active interfaces configured as eligible clock sources, the
system selects a clock source based on the weight configured in the
system-clock-profile. If a primary clock source has been configured in the
system profile, this clock source overrides all other clocks.
Note the following information about redundant clock sources on the MALC:

By default, interfaces are not eligible to provide clock.

The clock source with the highest weight becomes the primary clock
source. Weights are from 1 (lowest priority) to 10 (highest priority).

If a clock source is defined in the primaryclocksource parameter in the


system profile, that clock source takes precedence over the settings in the
system-clock-source profiles, if any. Clock sources defined in the system
profile are given a weight of 11.

If you assign weight to a clock source that is higher than the currently
active clock source, or if you assign a clock source in the system profile,
the system will switch over to the new clock source.

The following table describes the parameters used to provide clocking for the
the system.

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System Configuration

Parameter

Description

transmit-clock-source

There are three clocking options for DS1/DS3


interfaces:

(ds1-profile,
ds3-profile, or
sonet-profile)

Values:
looptiming The recovered receive clock from the
DS1/DS3 is used as the transmit clock.
localtiming A local (to the DS1/DS3 interface) clock
source is used on the DS1/DS3 transmit signal.
throughtiming The transmit DS1/DS3 clock is
derived from the recovered receive clock of another
DS1/DS3 interface. Interfaces that are designated as
eligible clock sources cannot be set to through timing.
Default: looptiming (DS3) throughtiming (DS1)

primaryclocksource
(system profile)

The shelf-slot-port-subport/type of an interface to


provide clocking for the system. For the BITS clock
on the MTAC/Ring card, specify the address in the
form shelf-slot-1-0/ds1.
Note: If configured, the setting in the
primaryclocksource parameter overrides
settings in the system-clock-profile for all
interfaces that provide clocking.

system-clock-eligibility
(system-clock-profile)

Specifies whether the interface is eligible to provide


clocking for the system.
Values:
true
false
Default: false

system-clock-weight
(system-clock-profile)

Assigns a weight to the clock source. If you assign


weight to a clock source that is higher than the
currently active clock source, the system will switch
over to that clock source.
Values:
1 to 10 1 is the lowest priority, 10 is the highest
Default: 5

Configuring a DS1 or MTAC/Ring clock source


1

Verify that the interface that is to provide clock is up and active.

Verify the transmit-clock-source parameter in the ds1-profile is set to


looptiming:

zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1 for the MTAC/Ring card, enter the shelf-slot-port-subbport
line-type: ----------------------> {esf}
line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}

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System clocking

send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}


circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}
loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}
signal-mode: --------------------> {robbedbit}
fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}
dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}
line-status-change-trap-enable: -> {disabled}
channelization: -----------------> {enabledds0}
ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}
csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}
clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}
transmit-clock-source: ----------> {looptiming}
cell-scramble: ------------------> {false}
coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}:
protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}
signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart}
ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0}
line-power: ---------------------> {disabled}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

In the system-clock-profile, enable the clock source and change the


default weight (if necessary):
zSH> update system-clock-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
system-clock-eligibility: -> {false}: true
system-clock-weight: ------> {5}:modify the weight if necessary
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring a DS3 clock source


To configure a DS3 clock source:
1

Verify that the interface that is to provide clock is up and active.

Verify transmit-clock-source parameter in the ds3-profile is set to


looptiming:

zSH> update ds3-profile 1-1-2-0/ds3


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
line-type: ---------------> {dsx3cbitparity}:
line-coding: -------------> {dsx3b3zs}:s
end-code: ---------------> {dsx3sendnocode}:
circuit-id: --------------> {}:
loopback-config: ---------> {dsx3noloop}:
transmit-clock-source: ---> {looptiming}:
line-length-meters: ------> {0}:
line-status-trap-enable: -> {enabled}:
channelization: ----------> {disabled}:
ds1-for-remote-loop: -----> {0}:
far-end-equip-code: ------> {}:

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System Configuration

far-end-loc-id-code: -----> {}:


far-end-frame-id-code: ---> {}:
far-end-unit-code: -------> {}:
far-end-fac-id-code: -----> {}:
medium-scramble-config: --> {true}:
medium-frame-config: -----> {e3frameg832}:
medium-atmframe-config: --> {dsx3atmframingdirectcellmapped}:
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

In the system-clock-profile, enable the clock source and change the


default weight (if necessary):
zSH> update system-clock-profile 1-1-2-0/ds3
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
system-clock-eligibility: -> {false}: true
system-clock-weight: ------> {5}:modify the wieght if necessary
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring an OC-3c/STM1 or OC-12c/STM4 clock source


To configure a OC-3c/STM1 clock source:
1

Verify that the interface that is to provide clock is up and active.

Verify clock-transmit-source parameter in the sonet-profile is set


looptiming:

zSH> get sonet-profile 1-1-1-0/sonet


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
medium-type: -----------------> {sonet}:
medium-line-coding: ----------> {sonetmediumnrz}:
medium-line-type: ------------> {sonetlongsinglemode}:
medium-circuit-identifier: ---> {}:
medium-loopback-config: ------> {sonetnoloop}:
path-current-width: ----------> {sts12cstm4}:
clock-external-recovery: -----> {enabled}:
clock-transmit-source: -------> {looptiming}:
medium-cell-scramble-config: -> {true}:
medium-line-scramble-config: -> {true}:

In the system-clock-profile, enable the clock source and change the


default weight (if necessary):
zSH> update system-clock-profile 1-1-2-0/ds3
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
system-clock-eligibility: -> {false}: true
system-clock-weight: ------> {5}:modify the wieght if necessary
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

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System clocking

Revertive clock source


Redundant clock sources are revertive by default. If a standby clock source
becomes active after the failure of a primary clock source, the system will
revert to the primary clock source after that clock source becomes active
again. Note that the clock source must be active for 30 seconds before the
system will revert back to the primary clock source.
To disable revertive clock sources set the revertiveclocksource
parameter in the system profile to false:
zSH> update system 0
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
syscontact: -----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport
Street Oakland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113
support@zhone.com}:
sysname: --------------> {b142}:
syslocation: ----------> {Oakland}:
enableauthtraps: ------> {disabled}:
setserialno: ----------> {0}:
zmsexists: ------------> {true}:
zmsconnectionstatus: --> {inactive}:
zmsipaddress: ---------> {192.25.84.91}:
configsyncexists: -----> {false}:
configsyncoverflow: ---> {false}:
configsyncpriority: ---> {high}:
configsyncaction: -----> {noaction}:
configsyncfilename: ---> {192.25.202.142_4_1028333450007}:
configsyncstatus: -----> {synccomplete}:
configsyncuser: -------> {cfgsync}:
configsyncpasswd: -----> {** private **}: ** read-only **
numshelves: -----------> {1}:
shelvesarray: ---------> {}:
numcards: -------------> {3}:
ipaddress: ------------> {192.25.200.142}:
alternateipaddress: ---> {0.0.0.0}:
countryregion: --------> {us}:
primaryclocksource: ---> {0/0/0/0/0}:
ringsource: -----------> {internalringsourcelabel}:
revertiveclocksource: -> {true}: false
voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record saved.

Configuring a clock source in the system profile


Note: clock-source-profiles are recommended for configuring clock
sources.
Clock sources configured in the system profile override settings in
clock-source-profiles. Typically, specifying a clock source in the system

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209

System Configuration

profile is not necessary, but can be use to manually change clock sources, or
for testing purposes.
Update the system profile to specify the clock source. The following
example specifies that the first T1 interface on the Uplink card provides
system clocking:
zSH> update system 0
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
syscontact: ----------> {Zhone Global Services and
Support 7001 Oakport Road Oakland Ca. (877) Zhone20
(946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113 support@zhone.com}:
sysname: -------------> {Zhone Malc}:
syslocation: ---------> {Oakland}:
enableauthtraps: -----> {disabled}:
setserialno: ---------> {0}:
zmsexists: -----------> {false}:
zmsconnectionstatus: -> {inactive}:
zmsipaddress: --------> {0.0.0.0}:
configsyncexists: ----> {false}:
configsyncoverflow: --> {false}:
configsyncpriority: --> {high}:
configsyncaction: ----> {noaction}:
configsyncfilename: --> {}:
configsyncstatus: ----> {syncinitializing}:
configsyncuser: ------> {}:
configsyncpasswd: ----> {**private**}: **read-only**
numshelves: ----------> {1}:
shelvesarray: --------> {}:
numcards: ------------> {3}:
ipaddress: -----------> {192.168.8.21}:
alternateipaddress: --> {0.0.0.0}:
countryregion: -------> {us}:
primaryclocksource: --> {0/0/0/0/0}: 1-1-1-0/dsl
ringsource: ----------> {internalringsourcelabel}
revertiveclocksource: -> {true}
voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

As soon as the profile is saved, the clock source specified becomes active.

Viewing clock source information


To view the clock information on the system, use the clkmgrshow
command. This command has the following syntax:
clkmgrshow [current | eligible | list ]

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

current: displays the current primary and secondary clock sources.

eligible: displays only the eligible clock sources. Eligible clock


sources are interfaces that are configured as eligible and are active.

System clocking

list: lists the eligible and non-eligible clock sources. Non-eligible


clock sources are interfaces that either not configured as eligible, or
are not active.

For example, to display the eligible and non-eligible clock sources:


zSH> clkmgrshow list
eligible list has 0 entries
ineligible list has 5 entries
1 not eligible (4) 1/1/2 (5) : DS3 : LOOP
2 not eligible (6) 1/1/3 (5) : DS3 : LOOP
3 not eligible (8) 1/1/4 (5) : DS3 : LOOP
4 not eligible (10) 1/1/5 (5) : DS3 : LOOP
5 not eligible (26) 1/21/1 (5) : T1 : LOCAL

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211

System Configuration

212

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

13

ADSL CARDS
This chapter describes the MALC ADSL cards and explains how to configure
them. It includes:

Overview, page 213

Activating ADSL cards, page 232

Configuring POTS ports, page 257

ADSL cable and port pinouts, page 261

Overview
MALC ADSL interfaces provide a standards-based, high-speed DSL interface
between the MALC and CPE devices.
The following cards provide ADSL interfaces:

ADSL-24: 24 ADSL interfaces in a single-slot card. See 24-port


single-slot ADSL card (ADSL-24) on page 216.

ADSL+POTS-24-2S: 24 ADSL interfaces and 24 POTS interfaces in a


two-slot card. See 24-port ADSL+POTS card (ADSL+POTS-24-2S) on
page 217.

ADSL-32A: 32 ADSL interfaces in a single-slot card. See 32-port ADSL


card (ADSL-32A) on page 219.

ADSL+POTS-32A-2S: 32 ADSL interfaces and 32 POTS interfaces in a


two-slot card. See 32-port ADSL+POTS card (ADSL+POTS-32A-2S) on
page 221.

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32AB-2S: 32 ADSL interfaces with splitter in a


two-slot card. See 32-port ADSL+Splitter card
(ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-2S) on page 223.

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S: 32 ADSL interfaces with splitter


that complies with UK standards in a two-slot card. See 32-port
ADSL+Splitter-UK card (ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S) on page 225

ADSL-48A: 48 ADSL Annex A interfaces that support ADSL2 and


ADSL2+ standards. See 48-port ADSL cards (ADSL-48) on page 226

ADSL-48B: 48 ADSL Annex B interfaces that support ADSL2 and


ADSL2+ standards. See 48-port ADSL cards (ADSL-48) on page 226

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

213

ADSL cards

ADSL + SPLTR-48A-2S: 48 ADSL interfaces with splitter in a two-slot


card. See 48-port ADSL card with splitter (ADSL + SPLTR-48A-2S) on
page 228.

ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S and ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S: 48


ADSL interfaces and 48 POTS interfaces in a two-slot card. See 48 port
ADSL+POTS (ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S and
ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S) on page 230.

MALC ADSL interfaces comply with the ANSI T1.413 Issue 2, G.992.1
(G.dmt) and G.992.2 (G.lite) specifications. They support:

Annex A mode (ADSL over POTS)

Fast or interleaved channel modes


Note: For information on configuring the POTS interfaces of the
ADSL card, see POTS cards on page 311.

Transmission modes
This section briefly describes the supported ADSL transmission modes.

G.lite
G.lite, defined in the International Telecommunications Union (ITU)
specification G.992.2, allows downstream speeds of up to 1536 Kbps.
Advantages of G.lite modems include:

No voice splitters required at the customer premises to separate voice and


data traffic.

Fast retrain capabilities enable the modems to respond quickly to


changing line conditions.

Efficient power management capabilities allows the modem to reduce


power consumption during periods of low data transfer.

Full rate
Full rate T1 ADSL modem. This is used for connecting to full rate T1.413
issue 2 modems.

G.dmt
G.dmt is a higher-bandwidth variant of G.lite that provides for downstream
speeds of up to 8160 Kbps. G.dmt is defined in ITU specification G.992.1.

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Rate adaption
The ADSL card supports rate adaption, which enables it to respond to
changing line conditions by adjusting the line rate. At startup, the ADSL
modems negotiate a data rate. If the line conditions change, the line drops and
the modems attempt to retrain (possibly at a different line rate).

Training
The ADSL modem uses signal-to-noise ratio measurements to adjust its
performance to maintain a bit error rate (BER) of 10-7 or better. The minimum
margin is the floor at which the modem will maintain a connection. The
maximum margin is the ceiling for power cutback. The target margin is the
lowest margin that the modem tries to achieve when training and adapting.
Figure 52: Signal-to-noise margins

connection drops
and retrains

signal-to-noise margin

maximum
modem reduces power
to maintain connection

target

level the modem trains to


modem attempts to
increase margin

minimum

connection drops
and retrains

The system will try to attain the target signal-to-noise margin when training.
If the line reaches the maximum bit rate and the actual margin is below the
maximum margin, the line operates normally. If the margin rises above the
target margin, the modem drops the connection and retrains once, then drops
the power to enforce the maximum margin.
If, after a connection is made, the margin drops below the target margin, the
modem attempts to increase the margin. If the minimum margin cannot be
kept, the modem drops the connection and retrains.

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215

ADSL cards

24-port single-slot ADSL card (ADSL-24)

The 24-port ADSL card occupies a single slot in the MALC


chassis. It supports the ANSI T1.413 Issue 2, G.992.1
(G.dmt) and G.992.2 (G.lite) ADSL standards.
The discrete multitone (DMT) modulation technique used in
G.dmt and G.lite modems modulates user data into as many
as 255 separate frequency-division multiplexed modem
channels. Each modem channel (or tone) occupies
approximately 4KHz of analog bandwidth. The ADSL
DMT modem does not use the first 20KHz of the signal,
which are the frequencies POTS lines use. The ADSL card
does not have an integrated splitter, it requires an external
splitter.

Table 45: ADSL-24 specifications


Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

24 ports ADSL

Connectors

One (1) RJ-21X 50-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)

Line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

Supported line
rates

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

32 Kbps to 8160 Kbps (1536 Kbps for G.lite) downstream


32 Kbps to 896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Overview

Table 45: ADSL-24 specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card


Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Metallic test
function

Look-out test

Redundancy

None

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 8 ports each

Power
consumption

30 W nominal (all ports initialized, no ports trained)


plus
1.1 W additional per active ADSL interface
56.4 W maximum

24-port ADSL+POTS card (ADSL+POTS-24-2S)

The 24-port ADSL+POTS card occupies two slots


in the MALC chassis and provides 24 ports of
integrated ADSL and POTS service. It supports
the ANSI T1.413 Issue 2, G.992.1 (G.dmt) and
G.992.2 (G.lite) ADSL standards.
Each port on the card has an internal passive
splitter to separate the ADSL data traffic from the
POTS voice traffic. At the customer premise, the
IAD requires a splitter to separate the data and
voice traffic coming over a single line.
Each ADSL and POTS interface on the card is
configured in the same way as other similar
interfaces on the system.

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217

ADSL cards

Table 46: ADSL+POTS-24-2S specifications


Specification

Description

Size

2 slots

Density

24 ports ADSL, 24 ports POTS

Connectors

One (1) RJ-21X 50-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)

ADSL line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

POTS line
characteristics

2 wire POTS, Loop Start


900 Ohm line impedance (POTS-24)
23mA loop current @ 18,000 feet loop length (long reach)
0-4KHz spectrum support only
Internal passive splitter.

Supported line
rates

32 Kbps to 8160 Kbps (1536 Kbps for G.lite) downstream

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card

32 Kbps to 896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per ADSL port):

218

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Metallic test
function

Look-out test (ADSL and POTS)

Redundancy

None

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 8 ports each

Power
consumption

37.4 W nominal (all ports initialized, no ports trained)


plus
1.10 W additional per active POTS interface
1.37 W additional per active ADSL interface
96.68 W maximum

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

32-port ADSL card (ADSL-32A)

The 32-port ADSL card occupies a single slot in the MALC


chassis. It supports the ANSI T1.413 Issue 2, G.992.1 (G.dmt)
and G.992.2 (G.lite) ADSL standards.
The discrete multitone (DMT) modulation technique used in
G.dmt and G.lite modems modulates user data into as many as
255 separate frequency-division multiplexed modem
channels. Each modem channel (or tone) occupies
approximately 4KHz of analog bandwidth. The ADSL DMT
modem does not use the first 20KHz of the signal, which are
the frequencies POTS lines use.
The 32-port ADSL card does not have an integrated splitter, it
requires an external splitter.

Table 47: ADSL-32A specifications


Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

32 ports ADSL

Connectors

One (1) Champ 64-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)

Line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

219

ADSL cards

Table 47: ADSL-32A specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Supported line
rates

32 Kbps to 8160 Kbps (1536 Kbps for G.lite) downstream

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card

32 Kbps to 896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

220

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Metallic test
function

Look-out test

Redundancy

None

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 8 ports each

Power
consumption

20 W nominal (all ports initialized, no ports trained)


plus
1 W additional per active ADSL interface
50 W maximum

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

32-port ADSL+POTS card (ADSL+POTS-32A-2S)

The 32-port ADSL+POTS occupies two slots in


the MALC chassis and provides 32 ports of
integrated ADSL and POTS service. It supports
the ANSI T1.413 Issue 2, G.992.1 (G.dmt) and
G.992.2 (G.lite) ADSL standards.
Each port on the card has an internal passive
splitter to separate the ADSL data traffic from the
POTS voice traffic. At the customer premise, the
IAD requires a splitter to separate the data and
voice traffic coming over a single line.

Table 48: ADSL+POTS-32A-2S specifications


Specification

Description

Size

2 slots

Density

32 ports ADSL, 32 ports POTS

Connectors

One (1) Amphenol champ 64-pin connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)

ADSL line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

221

ADSL cards

Table 48: ADSL+POTS-32A-2S specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

POTS line
characteristics

2 wire POTS, Loop Start


900 Ohm line impedance
23mA loop current @ 18,000 feet loop length (long reach)
0-4KHz spectrum support only
Internal passive splitter.

Supported line
rates

32 Kbps to 8160 Kbps (1536 Kbps for G.lite) downstream

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card

32 Kbps to 896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per ADSL port):

222

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Metallic test
function

Look-out test (ADSL and POTS)

Redundancy

None

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 8 ports each

Power
consumption

28 W nominal (all ports initialized, no ports trained)


plus
1.10 W additional per active POTS interface
1 W additional per active ADSL interface
95 W maximum

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

32-port ADSL+Splitter card (ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-2S)

The 32-port ADSL+Splitter card occupies two slots


in the MALC chassis. It supports the ANSI T1.413
Issue 2, G.992.1 (G.dmt) and G.992.2 (G.lite) ADSL
standards.

Table 49: ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32AB-2S specifications


Specification

Description

Size

2 slot

Density

32 ports ADSL

Connectors

Two (2) Amphenol Champ 64-pin telco connectors

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)

Line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

223

ADSL cards

Table 49: ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32AB-2S specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Supported line
rates

32 Kbps to 8160 Kbps (1536 Kbps for G.lite) downstream

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card

32 Kbps to 896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

224

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Metallic test
function

Look-out test

Redundancy

None

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 8 ports each

Power
consumption

20 W nominal (all ports initialized, no ports trained)


plus
1 W additional per active ADSL interface
50 W maximum

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

32-port ADSL+Splitter-UK card (ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S)

The 32-port ADSL+Splitter-UK card occupies two


slots in the MALC chassis. It supports the ANSI
T1.413 Issue 2, G.992.1 (G.dmt) and G.992.2 (G.lite)
ADSL standards. The splitter complies with UK
standards.

Table 50: ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S specifications


Specification

Description

Size

2 slot

Density

32 ports ADSL

Connectors

One (1) RJ-21X 50-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)

Line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

225

ADSL cards

Table 50: ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Supported line
rates

32 Kbps to 8160 Kbps (1536 Kbps for G.lite) downstream

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card

32 Kbps to 896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Metallic test
function

Look-out test

Redundancy

None

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 8 ports each

Power
consumption

30 W nominal (all ports initialized, no ports trained)


plus
1.1 W additional per active ADSL interface
56.4 W maximum

48-port ADSL cards (ADSL-48)

There are two models of ADSL 48 port cards:

Annex A
Annex B
The ADSL Annex A 48-port card (ADSL-48) occupies a
single slot in the MALC chassis for ADSL-only or a double
slot for use with the internal splitter card. This card supports
ADSL Annex A, ADSL2, and ADSL2+.
The discrete multitone (DMT) modulation technique used in
ADSL2+ modems modulates user data into as many as 511
separate frequency-division multiplexed modem channels.
Each modem channel (or tone) occupies approximately
4KHz of analog bandwidth. The ADSL DMT modem does
not use the first 20KHz of the signal, which are the
frequencies POTS lines use. The ADSL card has an optional
integrated splitter.
The ADSL Annex B 48-port card (ADSL-48) occupies a
single slot in the MALC chassis. This card supports ADSL
Annex B.
The discrete multitone (DMT) modulation technique used in
G.dmt and G.lite modems modulates user data into as many

226

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

as 255 separate frequency-division multiplexed modem channels. Each


modem channel (or tone) occupies approximately 4KHz of analog bandwidth.
The ADSL DMT modem does not use the first 128 KHz of the signal, which
are the frequencies ISDN lines use. This ADSL card does not have an
integrated splitter. It requires an external splitter.
Table 51: ADSL-48 specifications
Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

48 ports ADSL

Connectors

One (1) Champ 96-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)
G.992.3 and G.992.4 (ADSL2)
G.992.5 (ADSL2+)
Reach Extended ADSL2 (READSL2)

Line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Annex B supported (ADSL over ISDN)
Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

Supported line
rates

T1.413:

32 Kbps to 12 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps upstream

G.lite:

64 Kbps to 4 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps upstream

ADSL2+:

ATM support

32 Kbps to 24 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card


Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

VPI: 0 to 11
VCI: 32 to 63

Metallic test
function

Look-out test

Redundancy

None

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

227

ADSL cards

Table 51: ADSL-48 specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 8 ports each

Power

23 Watts nominal
plus
.72 W additional per active ADSL2+ port
.67 Watts additional per active ADSL port
57.5 W maximum total. This is at maximum distance with all
ports trained at ADSL2+ rates

48-port ADSL card with splitter (ADSL + SPLTR-48A-2S)

The ADSL Annex A 48-port card with splitter


(ADSL + SPLTR-48A-2S) occupies two slots in
the MALC chassis. This card supports ADSL
Annex A, ADSL2, and ADSL2+.
The discrete multitone (DMT) modulation
technique used in ADSL2+ modems modulates
user data into as many as 511 separate
frequency-division multiplexed modem
channels. Each modem channel (or tone)
occupies approximately 4KHz of analog
bandwidth. The ADSL DMT modem does not
use the first 20KHz of the signal, which are the
frequencies POTS lines use. The ADSL card has
an optional integrated splitter.

228

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Table 52: ADSL-48 + splitter specifications


Specification

Description

Size

2 slot

Density

48 ports ADSL

Connectors

Two 96-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)
G.992.3 and G.992.4 (ADSL2)
G.992.5 (ADSL2+)
Reach Extended ADSL2 (READSL2)

Line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

Supported line
rates

T1.413:

32 Kbps to 12 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps upstream

G.lite:

64 Kbps to 4 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps upstream

ADSL2+:

ATM support

32 Kbps to 24 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card


Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

VPI: 0 to 11 (can be configured up to 63)


VCI: 32 to 63

448 VC-switched connections and 48 VP-switched


connections
Metallic test
function

Look-out test

Redundancy

None

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

229

ADSL cards

Table 52: ADSL-48 + splitter specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 24 ports each

Power

23 Watts nominal
plus
.72 W additional per active ADSL2+ port
.67 Watts additional per active ADSL port
57.5 W maximum total. This is at maximum distance with all
ports trained at ADSL2+ rates

48 port ADSL+POTS (ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S and


ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S)

Each 48-port ADSL+POTS cards occupies two slots


in the MALC chassis and provides 48 ports of
integrated ADSL and POTS service. It supports the
ANSI T1.413 Issue 2, G.992.1 (G.dmt) and G.992.2
(G.lite), G.992.3 and G.992.4 (ADSL2), G.992.5
(ADSL2+), and Reach Extended ADSL2
(READSL2) ADSL standards.
Each port on the card has an internal passive splitter
to separate the ADSL data traffic from the POTS
voice traffic. At the customer premise, the IAD
requires a splitter to separate the data and voice
traffic coming over a single line.
The ADSL+POTS-TDM/PKT-48-2S card supports
traditional TDM POTS services as well packet voice
for use in a VOIP network.
The ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S card supports
traditional TDM POTS services.
For information on the POT

230

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Table 53: ADSL-48 + POTS specifications


Specification

Description

Size

2 slot

Density

48 ports ADSL and 48 ports ADSL

Connectors

One 96-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ANSI T1.413.2 (auto-detected)


G.992.1 (G.DMT) (auto-detected)
G.992.2 (G.Lite)
G.994.1 (G.hs)
G.992.3 and G.992.4 (ADSL2)
G.992.5 (ADSL2+)
Reach Extended ADSL2 (READSL2)

Line
characteristics

Annex A supported (ADSL over POTS)


Fast Path or Interleaved mode supported on a per port basis
Fast Retrain supported

Supported line
rates

T1.413:

32 Kbps to 12 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps upstream

G.lite:

64 Kbps to 4 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps upstream

ADSL2+:

ATM support

32 Kbps to 24 Mbps downstream


32 Kbps to 1024 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite) upstream

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card


Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

VPI: 0 to 11 (can be configured up to 63)


VCI: 32 to 63

448 VC-switched connections and 48 VP-switched


connections
Metallic test
function

Look-out test

Redundancy

None

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

231

ADSL cards

Table 53: ADSL-48 + POTS specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Main
components

ADSL chipset, 24 ports each

Power

23 Watts nominal
plus
.72 W additional per active ADSL2+ port
.67 Watts additional per active ADSL port
57.5 W maximum total. This is at maximum distance with all
ports trained at ADSL2+ rates

Activating ADSL cards


Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.
Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.
ADSL slot cards on the MALC have the following types and software images:
Table 54: ADSL card types
Card

Type

Name of software
image

ADSL-24 (single-slot AC5 ADSL)

5010

malcadslac5.bin

ADSL+POTS-24-2S

5005

malcadslpots.bin

ADSL-32A (single-slot AC6 ADSL)

5015

malcadslac6.bin

ADSL+POTS-32A-2S

5016

malcadslpotsac6.bin

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32AB-2S

5017

malcadslspltac6.bin

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S

5023

malcadslspltukt6.bin

ADSL-48A
(single slot ADSL Annex A)

5036

malcxdsl48.bin

ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S (two slot


ADSL Annex A with TDM POTS)
ADSL+POTS-48 TDM/PKT-48-2S
(two slot ADSL Annex A with TDM
POTS and packet voice support)

232

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Activating ADSL cards

Table 54: ADSL card types (Continued)


Card

Type

Name of software
image

ADSL+SPLTR-48A-2S
(two slot ADSL Annex A with splitter)

5038

malcxdslspltanxa.bin

ADSL-48B
(single slot ADSL Annex B)

5039

malcxdsl48anxb.bin

Creating card-profiles for ADSL-24 cards


The following example create a card-profile for an ADSL card in shelf 1,
slot 13:
zSH> new card-profile 1/13/5002 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcadslac5.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
New record saved.

Creating card-profiles for 32-port ADSL cards


The following example creates a card-profile for an ADSL-32 card in
shelf 1, slot 16:
zSH> new card-profile 1/16/5015 shelf/slot/type
sw-file-name: -----------> {} malcadslac6.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

233

ADSL cards

Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:


New record saved.

Creating card-profiles for 32-port ADSL+POTS cards


The following example creates a card-profile for an
ADSL+POTS-32A-2S card in shelf 1, slot 18:
zSH> new card-profile 1/18/5016 shelf/slot/type
(enter the lower-numbered slot for cards which occupy two slots)
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcadslpotsac6.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Creating card-profiles for 32-port ADSL+Splitter cards


The following example creates a card-profile for a 32-port
ADSL+Splitter card in shelf 1, slot 8:
zSH> new card-profile 1/8/5017 shelf/slot/type
(enter the lower-numbered slot for cards which occupy two slots)
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcadslspltac6.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

234

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Activating ADSL cards

Creating card-profiles for 32-port ADSL+Splitter-UK cards


The following example creates a card-profile for a 32-port
ADSL+Splitter card in shelf 1, slot 5:
zSH> new card-profile 1/5/5023 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcadslspltukt6.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Creating card-profiles for 48-port ADSL cards


All 48 port ADSL cards use the same card type and software image: After
specifying the image name, assign a card-line-type to indicate the type of
card:

unknowntype (the default): ADSL only

adsl-pots: ADSL and TDM-based POTS

adsl-pots-pv: ADSL and packet-based POTS

adsl-splitter: ADSL+splitter
The following example creates a card-profile for an ADSL-48 Annex A
card in shelf 1, slot 12:
zSH> new card-profile 1/12/5036 shelf/slot/type
sw-file-name: -----------> {} malcxdsl48.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

235

ADSL cards

Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:


New record saved.

Configuring an ADSL+POTS 48 card for TDM voice


1

View the type of card installed in the system:


zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 F (RUNNING)
2: MALC DS3 F (LOADING)
4: MALC XDSL 48 POTS (LOADING)
10: MALC MTAC FC (RUNNING)

The POTS card in slot 4 is an ADSL+POTS-TDM-48-2S card, which


supports TDM voice only.
2

Create a card-profile for the ADSL+POTS card:

zSH> new card-profile 1/4/5036 slot 4


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcxdsl48.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: adsl-pots indicates TDM voice only
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Configuring an ADSL+POTS 48 card for packet voice


1

View the type of card installed in the system:


zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 F (RUNNING)
2: MALC DS3 F (LOADING)
6: MALC XDSL 48/with Packet Voice POTS
10: MALC MTAC FC (RUNNING)

The POTS card in slot 6 is an ADSL+POTS-48 TDM/PKT card, which


supports packet voice only.
2

Create a card-profile for the ADSL+POTS card:

zSH> new card-profile 1/6/5036 slot 6


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcxdsl48.bin

236

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Activating ADSL cards

admin-status: ---------> {operational}:


upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: adsl-pots-pv indicates packet voice
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Configuring a 48-port ADSL Annex B card


Create a card-profile for the ADSL Annex B card:
zSH> new card-profile 1/4/5039 slot 4
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcxdsl48anxb.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Configuring a 48-port ADSL+Splitter card


Create a card-profile for the ADSL+splitter:
zSH> new card-profile 1/4/5038 slot 4
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcxdslspltanxa.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

237

ADSL cards

hold-active: ----------> {false}:


weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: adsl-splitter
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and the
begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This could take
a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the following is
displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

You can also use the slots command and specify the slot number of the
card to view the state of the card. For example:

238

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat
Fault reset
Uptime

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL ANNEX B AC5


1
2
110011
No CLEI
1/15/5013
1
15
LOADING indicates the card is booting up
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
51
enabled
0 hours, 0 minutes

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat
Fault reset
Uptime

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL ANNEX B AC5


1
2
110011
No CLEI
1/15/5013
1
15
RUNNING indicates the card is active
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
51
enabled
0 hours, 5 minutes

Configuring ADSL interfaces

To view the status of all the cards, use the slots command without any
arguments:
zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 (RUNNING)
13: MALC ADSL (RUNNING)
15: MALC MTAC (RUNNING)

Configuring ADSL interfaces


This section explains how to configure ADSL connections on the MALC. It
contains the following sections:

Overview on page 239

Configuring ADSL S=1/2 on page 248

Configuring ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+ on page 252


Note: ADSL connections on the ADSL card and the ADSL + POTS
cards are configured in the same way.

Overview
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure ADSL
interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Configure the type of ADSL interface. See


Configuring the ADSL transmission and channel mode
on page 240.

update adsl-profile shelf/slot/port


where port is from:
1 to 24 (for 24 port ADSL cards)
1 to 32 (for 32 port ADSL cards)
1 to 48 (for 48 port ADSL cards)

Configure the downstream interface. See Configuring


an ADSL downstream interface on page 243.

update adsl-co-profile shelf/slot/


port

Configure the upstream interface. See Configuring an


ADSL upstream interface on page 245

update adsl-cpe-profile shelf/slot/


port

Activate the interface. See Activating the interface on


page 246

update if-translate shelf/slot/port

Configuring ADSL S=1/2. See Configuring ADSL


S=1/2 on page 248.

update adsl-profile shelf/slot/port

Configuring ADSL2 or ADSL2+. See Configuring


ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+ on page 252.

update adsl-profile shelf/slot/port

update adsl-co-profile shelf/slot/


port
update adsl-co-profile shelf/slot/
port

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

239

ADSL cards

Configuring the ADSL transmission and channel mode


Configure the ADSL transmission and channel mode in the adsl-profile. The
following parameters are supported in this profile:
Parameter

Description

adslTrellisModeEnabled

Enables or disables trellis mode.

adslTransmissionMode

ADSL transmission mode. Supported values:


Values:
autonegotiatemode : automatically
negotiates all supported transmission modes.
The modem uses the G.hs protocol to
negotiate a transmission mode in this order:
T1.413, then G.dmt, then G.lite.
fullratemode : automatically negotiates full
rate modes (G.dmt and T1 mode). G.dmt has
priority over T1 mode.
glitemode : G.lite. Supports only interleave
mode.
t1mode : Full rate T1
gdmtmode : G.dmt
ghsmode : the modem negotiates only G.dmt
and G.lite modes. G.dmt has priority over
G.lite.

adslChannelMode

Specifies the channelization of the ADSL


line. Supported values:
Values:
fastonly
interleavedonly

adslMaxDownstreamToneIndex

Specifies the maximum downstream active


tone.
Values:
32 (128KHz) to 511 (2044KHz) Each value
represents 4KHz.
Default: 255

240

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Changing this value causes the DSL


modems to retrain.

The parameter is only supported on


MALC single-slot ADSL (24-port AC5
and 32-port AC6) cards

Configuring ADSL interfaces

Parameter

Description

adslMinDownstreamToneIndex

Specifies the minimum downstream active


tone.
Values:
32 (128KHz) to 255 (1020KHz) Each value
represents 4KHz.
Default: 32

adslMaxUpstreamToneIndex

Changing this value causes the DSL


modems to retrain.

The parameter is only supported on


MALC single-slot ADSL (24-port AC5
and 32-port AC6) cards

Specifies the maximum upstream active tone.


Values:
6 (24KHz) to 30 (120KHz) Each value
represents 4KHz.
Default: 30

adslMinUpstreamToneIndex

Changing this value causes the DSL


modems to retrain.

The parameter is only supported on


MALC single-slot ADSL (24-port AC5
and 32-port AC6) cards

Specifies the minimum upstream active tone.


Values:
6 (24KHz) to 30 (120KHz) Each value
represents 4KHz.
Default: 6

adslPotsBypassRelayMaxDurat
ion

Changing this value causes the DSL


modems to retrain.

The parameter is only supported on


MALC single-slot ADSL (24-port AC5
and 32-port AC6) cards

The maximum duration in seconds that an


ADSL POTS low-pass filter bypass relay will
remain active (closed). The relay will
automatically return a line back to normal
(open) mode when this timer has expired.
Values:
1 to 300
Default: 60
Only valid for ADSL-SPLTR-32 cards.

The following example accepts the defaults, which are appropriate for
most applications:

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ADSL cards

zSH> update adsl-profile 1/12/1


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
adslLineConfProfile: ----> {}:
adslAlarmConfProfile: ---> {}:
adslTrellisModeEnabled: -> {true}:
adslNTRModeEnabled: -----> {true}:
adslTransmissionMode: ---> {autonegotiatemode}:
adslChannelMode: --------> {fastonly}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring ADSL tone ranges


The MALC supports setting the active upstream and downstream tone ranges
for ADSL modems on the single-slot ADSL (24-port and 32-port) cards.
Although this is not typically required, changing the range of tones can affect
the maximum throughput of the channel as well as providing isolation from
certain interference.
The following parameters in the adsl-profile specify the range of active
tones for the DSL modem:

AdslMaxDownstreamToneIndex

AdslMinDownstreamToneIndex

AdslMaxUpstreamToneIndex

AdslMinUpstreamToneIndex

For POTS lines, the valid frequency range in the downstream direction is
128 KHz to 1020 KHz. In the upstream direction valid frequency range is
24 KHz to 120 KHz.
ADSL occupies from about 24KHz to 1100KHz. (The theoretical limit is
15 bits/Hz.)
Note: Changing of any of these parameters will cause the
modem to retrain.

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Configuring an ADSL downstream interface


Configure the ADSL downstream interface in the adsl-co-profile. The
following parameters are supported in this profile:
Parameter

Description

rateMode

The transmit rate adaptation configured on this


modem. Supported values:
fixed: The rate is negotiated at startup and remains
fixed. Modem speed is determined by the
fastMaxTxRate or interleaveMaxTxRate
parameters.
adaptatstartup: The rate is negotiated at startup
and remains fixed. Modem speed is determined by
the fastMaxTxRate or interleaveMaxTxRate
parameters. If the line is able to support a higher
rate, the rate above the minimum is assigned to the
available channel (either fast or interleave).
adaptatruntime: The rate is negotiated
dynamically and can vary between the maximum
and minimum configured rates. If the line
conditions change during runtime, the line speed is
adjusted.

targetSnrMgn

Target signal to noise margin (in tenths of dBs).


This is the noise margin the modem must achieve
with a BER of 10-7 or better to successfully
complete initialization.

maxSnrMgn

Maximum acceptable signal/noise margin (in


tenths of dBs). If the noise margin rises above this
the modem attempts to reduce its power output to
optimize its operation.

minSnrMgn

Minimum acceptable signal to noise margin (in


tenths of dBs). If the noise margin falls below this
level, the modem attempts to increase its power
output. If that is not possible the modem will
attempt to re-initialize or shut down.

fastMinTxRate

Minimum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for fast transmission mode.
For a CO interface, the range is 32Kbps to
8160Kbps (1536Kbps for G.Lite).

interleaveMinTxRate

Minimum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for interleaved transmission mode.
For a CO interface, the range is 32Kbps to
8160Kbps (1536Kbps for G.Lite).

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ADSL cards

Parameter

Description

fastMaxTxRate

Maximum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for fast transmission mode.
For a CO interface, the range is 32Kbps to
8160Kbps (1536Kbps for G.Lite).

maxInterleaveDelay

Maximum interleave delay for this channel.


Interleave delay applies only to the interleave
channel and defines the mapping (relative spacing)
between subsequent input bytes at the interleaver
input and their placement in the bit stream at the
interleaver output. Larger numbers provide
greater separation between consecutive input bytes
in the output bit stream allowing for improved
impulse noise immunity, but at the expense of
payload latency.
Values:
0 0.5 ms
1 1 ms
2 2 ms
4 4 ms
8 8 ms
16 16 ms
32 32 ms
63 63 ms

interleaveMaxTxRate

Maximum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for interleaved transmission mode.
For a CO interface, the range is 32Kbps to
8160Kbps (1536Kbps for G.Lite).

initFailureTrapEnable

Enables and disables the InitFailureTrap.This trap


controls whether line up or line down traps are
sent while the system is booting up.
Default: disable

Note: If the interface is configured for G.lite, change the


interleaveMaxTxRate parameter to a valid value for G.lite
(1536 Kbps or less).
The following example configures an ADSL downstream interface. Note
that you can accept most of the default values.
zSH> update adsl-co-profile 1/12/1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
rateMode: -----------------> {adaptatstartup}:
rateChanRatio: ------------> {50}:
targetSnrMgn: -------------> {60}:
maxSnrMgn: ----------------> {310}:

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Configuring ADSL interfaces

minSnrMgn: ----------------> {0}:


downshiftSnrMgn: ----------> {0}:
upshiftSnrMgn: ------------> {0}:
minUpshiftTime: -----------> {0}:
minDownshiftTime: ---------> {0}:
fastMinTxRate: ------------> {32000}:
interleaveMinTxRate: ------> {32000}:
fastMaxTxRate: ------------> {8160000}:
maxInterleaveDelay: -------> {24}:
interleaveMaxTxRate: ------> {8160000}: for G..lite, change
to a value less than 1536000
thresh15MinLofs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLoss: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLols: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLprs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinESs: -----------> {0}:
threshFastRateUp: ---------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateUp: ---> {0}:
threshFastRateDown: -------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateDown: -> {0}:
initFailureTrapEnable: ----> {disable}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring an ADSL upstream interface


Note: If the interface is configured for G.lite, change the
interleaveMaxTxRate parameter to a valid value for G.lite (512
Kbps or less).
Configure the ADSL upstream interface in the adsl-cpe-profile. The
supported parameters in the upstream profile are identical to the CO profile,
with the following exceptions:
Parameter

Description

fastMinTxRate

Minimum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for fast transmission mode.
For a CPE interface, the range is 32 Kbps to
896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite).

interleaveMinTxRate

Minimum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for interleaved transmission mode.
For a CPE interface, the range is 32 Kbps to
896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite).

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ADSL cards

Parameter

Description

fastMaxTxRate

Maximum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for fast transmission mode.
For a CPE interface, the range is 32 Kbps to
896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite).

interleaveMaxTxRate

Maximum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for interleaved transmission mode.
For a CPE interface, the range is 32 Kbps to
896 Kbps (512 Kbps for G.lite).

The following example configures an ADSL upstream interface. Note that


you can accept most of the default values.
zSH> update adsl-cpe-profile 1/12/1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
rateMode: -----------------> {adaptatstartup}:
rateChanRatio: ------------> {50}:
targetSnrMgn: -------------> {60}:
maxSnrMgn: ----------------> {310}:
minSnrMgn: ----------------> {0}:
downshiftSnrMgn: ----------> {0}:
upshiftSnrMgn: ------------> {0}:
minUpshiftSnrMgn: ---------> {0}:
minDownshiftSnrMgn: -------> {0}:
fastMinTxRate: ------------> {32000}:
interleaveMinTxRate: ------> {32000}:
fastMaxTxRate: ------------> {2048000}:
interleaveMaxTxRate: ------> {2048000}: for G.lite, change to a value less than 512000
maxInterleaveDelay: -------> {24}:
thresh15MinLofs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLoss: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLprs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinESs: -----------> {0}:
threshFastRateUp: ---------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateUp: ---> {0}:
threshFastRateDown: -------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateDown: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activating the interface


Activate the interface using the if-translate profile. The following
example activates the ADSL card in shelf 1, slot 12, port 1:
zSH> update if-translate 1-12-1-0/adsl
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {156}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {12}:

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Configuring ADSL interfaces

port: ------------->
subport: ---------->
type: ------------->
adminstatus: ------>
physical-flag: ---->
iftype-extension: ->
ifName: ----------->
redundancy-param1: ->
....................
Save changes? [s]ave,
Record updated.

{1}:
{0}:
{adsl}:
{down}: up
{true}:
{0}:
{1-12-1-0}:
{0}:
[c]hange or [q]uit: s

Activate the rest of the interfaces similarly.

Verifying the interface


Use the dslstat command to displays the status of the interface:
zSH> dslstat 1-12-1-0/adsl
General Stats:
------------AdminStatus..................................UP
Line uptime(DD:HH:MM:SS)....................0:02:27:52
DslUpLineRate (bitsPerSec)...................512000
DslDownLineRate (bitsPerSec).................8064000
DslMaxAttainableUpLineRate (bitsPerSec)......565333
DslMaxAttainableDownLineRate (bitsPerSec)....856000
Out Octets...................................286571
Out Discards.................................0
Out Errors...................................0
In Octets....................................286571
In Discards..................................0
In Errors....................................0
ATM OCD Count................................0
ATM NCD Count................................0
ATM HEC Count................................0
ATM far-end OCD Count........................0
ATM far-end NCD Count........................0
ATM far-end HEC Count........................0
ADSL Physical Stats:
-----------------Actual Transmission connection standard......G.dmt
AdslAtucCurrLineSnrMgn (tenths dB)...........310
AdslAtucCurrLineAtn (tenths dB)..............135
AdslAtucCurrOutputPwr (tenths dB)............70
AdslAturCurrLineSnrMgn (tenths dB)...........90
AdslAturCurrLineAtn (tenths dB)..............135
AdslAturCurrOutputPwr (tenths dB)............103
LOFS.........................................0
LOLS.........................................0
LOSS.........................................0
ESS..........................................0
Inits........................................1

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Adsl connects................................1
Adsl disconnects.............................5407
near-end statistics:
------------------blocks received..............................147087
errored blocks received......................0
CRC errors on interleaved buffer.............0
CRC errors on fast buffer....................0
FEC corrected errors on interleaved buffer...0
FEC corrected errors on fast buffer..........0
background errored blocks received...........0
non-SES blocks received......................0
Severely Errored Seconds.....................0
Unavailable Seconds..........................59
Loss of Signal Seconds.......................0
Seconds with one/more FECs...................0
Seconds declared as high BER.................0
far-end statistics:
------------------blocks received..............................147205
errored blocks received......................1
CRC errors on interleaved buffer.............0
CRC errors on fast buffer....................1
FEC corrected errors on interleaved buffer...0
FEC corrected errors on fast buffer..........0
background errored blocks received...........0
non-SES blocks received......................0
Severely Errored Seconds.....................0
Unavailable Seconds..........................0
Loss of Signal Seconds.......................0
Seconds with one/more FECs...................0
Loss of Power (dying gasps)..................0
Seconds declared as high BER.................0
Fast retrains................................0
Fast retrain failures........................0

Configuring ADSL S=1/2


This section describes S=1/2 mode transmission on the MALC ADSL 32-port
and 32-port+Splitter cards.
The ADSL S=1/2 specification, as defined in the ITU standard G.992.2, is a
transmission mode that supports downstream data rates up to 12 Mbps at
distances of 6,000 feet or less.
The following ADSL 32-port and cards support S=1/2 mode transmission:

248

ADSL-32A

ADSL+POTS-32A-2S

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring ADSL interfaces

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-2S

ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S

ADSL 48

Overview
There are two ADSL S=1/2 configurations:

Configuring the ADSL transmission and channel mode on page 240

Configuring S=1/2 transmission mode for interleaved mode on page 250

Modify the following parameters to enable S=1/2 transmission.


Configure interleaved channels in the adsl-profile:
Parameter

Description

adslChannelMode

Specifies the channelization of the ADSL


line. Supported values:
Values:
fastonly
interleavedonly
Default: fastonly

Set the maximum transmit rate in the adsl-co-profile:


Parameter

Description

fastMaxTxRate

Maximum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for fast transmission mode.

interleaveMaxTxRate

Maximum transmit rate (in bps) for channels


configured for interleaved transmission mode.

Configuring S=1/2 transmission mode for fast mode


1

Verify that the adminstatus of the if-translate profile for the ADSL port
is up:
zSH> update if-translate 1-12-1-0/adsl
ifIndex: ----------> {505}
shelf: ------------> {1}
slot: -------------> {12}
port: -------------> {1}
subport: ----------> {0}
type: -------------> {adsl}
adminstatus: ------> {down} up
physical-flag: ----> {true}
iftype-extension: -> {none}
ifName: -----------> {1-12-1-0}
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................

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ADSL cards

Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s


Record updated.

Verify that the ADSL channelization is set to fast:

zSH> update adsl-profile 1/12/1


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
adslLineConfProfile: ----> {}:
adslAlarmConfProfile: ---> {}:
adslTrellisModeEnabled: -> {true}:
adslNTRModeEnabled: -----> {true}:
adslTransmissionMode: ---> {autonegotiatemode}:
adslChannelMode: --------> {fastonly}: leave the default
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Set the maximum transmit rate to 12 Mbps for fast ADSL channel modes.
This forces the ADSL port into S=1/2 transmission mode.

zSH> update adsl-co-profile 1/12/1


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
rateMode: -----------------> {adaptatstartup}:
rateChanRatio: ------------> {50}:
targetSnrMgn: -------------> {60}:
maxSnrMgn: ----------------> {310}:
minSnrMgn: ----------------> {0}:
downshiftSnrMgn: ----------> {0}:
upshiftSnrMgn: ------------> {0}:
minUpshiftTime: -----------> {0}:
minDownshiftTime: ---------> {0}:
fastMinTxRate: ------------> {32000}:
interleaveMinTxRate: ------> {32000}:
fastMaxTxRate: ------------> {8160000}: 12000000 12Mbps
maxInterleaveDelay: -------> {24}:
interleaveMaxTxRate: ------> {8160000}:
thresh15MinLofs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLoss: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLols: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLprs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinESs: -----------> {0}:
threshFastRateUp: ---------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateUp: ---> {0}:
threshFastRateDown: -------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateDown: -> {0}:
initFailureTrapEnable: ----> {disable}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring S=1/2 transmission mode for interleaved mode


1

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Ensure the adminstatus of the if-translate profile for the ADSL port is
up:

Configuring ADSL interfaces

zSH> update if-translate 1-12-1-0/adsl


ifIndex: ----------> {505}
shelf: ------------> {1}
slot: -------------> {12}
port: -------------> {1}
subport: ----------> {0}
type: -------------> {adsl}
adminstatus: ------> {down} up
physical-flag: ----> {true}
iftype-extension: -> {none}
ifName: -----------> {1-12-1-0}
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Set the ADSL channelization to interleaved:

zSH> update adsl-profile 1/12/1


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
adslLineConfProfile: ----> {}:
adslAlarmConfProfile: ---> {}:
adslTrellisModeEnabled: -> {true}:
adslNTRModeEnabled: -----> {true}:
adslTransmissionMode: ---> {autonegotiatemode}:
adslChannelMode: --------> {fastonly}: interleavedonly
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Set the maximum transmit rate to 12 Mbps for interleaved ADSL channel
mode. This forces the ADSL port into S=1/2 transmission mode.

zSH> update adsl-co-profile 1/12/1


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
rateMode: -----------------> {adaptatstartup}:
rateChanRatio: ------------> {50}:
targetSnrMgn: -------------> {60}:
maxSnrMgn: ----------------> {310}:
minSnrMgn: ----------------> {0}:
downshiftSnrMgn: ----------> {0}:
upshiftSnrMgn: ------------> {0}:
minUpshiftTime: -----------> {0}:
minDownshiftTime: ---------> {0}:
fastMinTxRate: ------------> {32000}:
interleaveMinTxRate: ------> {32000}:
fastMaxTxRate: ------------> {8160000}:
maxInterleaveDelay: -------> {24}:
interleaveMaxTxRate: ------> {8160000}: 12000000 12Mbps
thresh15MinLofs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLoss: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLols: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLprs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinESs: -----------> {0}:

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threshFastRateUp: ---------> {0}:


threshInterleaveRateUp: ---> {0}:
threshFastRateDown: -------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateDown: -> {0}:
initFailureTrapEnable: ----> {disable}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+


ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+ is supported on MALC ADSL 48 port cards only.

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Configuring ADSL interfaces

Configuring the ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+ interfaces


The following parameters are used to configure ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+
interfaces:
Parameter

Description

adslTransmissionMode

ADSL transmission mode. Supported values:

(adsl-profile)

Values:
autonegotiatemode : automatically
negotiates all supported transmission modes.
The modem uses the G.hs protocol to
negotiate a transmission mode in this order:
ADSL2+, ADSL2, then G.dmt.
fullratemode : automatically negotiates full
rate modes (G.dmt and T1 mode). G.dmt has
priority over T1 mode.
glitemode : G.lite. Supports only interleaved
mode.
t1mode : Full rate T1
gdmtmode : G.dmt
ghsmode :The modem uses the G.hs
protocol to negotiate a transmission mode in
this order: T1.413, G.dmt, then G.lite.
adsl2Mode the modem negotiates ADSL2
only
adsl2PlusMode the modem negotiates
ADSL2+ only

adslLineDMTConfMode
(adsl-profile)

Selects whether there is overlap of ADSL


Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) frequency bins.
Values:
echoCancel overlap of DMT frequency
bins. Only supported by g.dmt Annex A.
freqDivMux no overlap of DMT frequency
bins.
Default: freqDivMux

reachExtendedAdsl2
(adsl-co-profile)

Defines whether downstream reach extended


ADSL2 (READSL2) operation should be
enforced by the ATU-C. Only enable for
ADSL2 and ADSL2+
Values:
enable
disable
Default: enable

There is typically no need to change the settings in ADSL profiles to


configure ADSL 2 or ADSL 2+. But if your setup requires it, use the
update command:
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253

ADSL cards

zSH> update adsl-profile 1/3/1


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
adslLineConfProfile: ------------> {0000000334}:
adslAlarmConfProfile: -----------> {0000000334}:
adslTrellisModeEnabled: ---------> {true}:
adslNTRModeEnabled: -------------> {false}:
adslTransmissionMode: -----------> {autonegotiatemode}:
adslChannelMode: ----------------> {fastonly}:
adslMaxDownstreamToneIndex: -----> {511}:
adslMinDownstreamToneIndex: -----> {32}:
adslMaxUpstreamToneIndex: -------> {31}:
adslMinUpstreamToneIndex: -------> {6}:
adslPotsBypassRelayMaxDuration: -> {60}:
adslLineDMTConfMode: ------------> {freqdivmux}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Update the downstream interface to specify a line speed:


zSH> update adsl-co-profile 1/3/1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
rateMode: -----------------> {adaptatruntime}:
rateChanRatio: ------------> {50}:
targetSnrMgn: -------------> {60}:
maxSnrMgn: ----------------> {310}:
minSnrMgn: ----------------> {0}:
downshiftSnrMgn: ----------> {0}:upshiftSnrMgn:
------------> {0}:
minUpshiftTime: -----------> {0}:
minDownshiftTime: ---------> {0}:
fastMinTxRate: ------------> {32000}:
interleaveMinTxRate: ------> {32000}:
fastMaxTxRate: ------------> {32736000}:
maxInterleaveDelay: -------> {63}:
interleaveMaxTxRate: ------> {32736000}:
thresh15MinLofs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLoss: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLols: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLprs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinESs: -----------> {0}:
threshFastRateUp: ---------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateUp: ---> {0}:
threshFastRateDown: -------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateDown: -> {0}:
initFailureTrapEnable: ----> {disable}:
reachExtendedAdsl2: -------> {enable}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

There is typically no need to change the settings for the upstream


interface, unless you want to configure trap thresholds. If your setup
requires it, use the update command:

Configuring ADSL interfaces

zSH> update adsl-cpe-profile 1/3/1


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
rateMode: -----------------> {adaptatruntime}:
rateChanRatio: ------------> {50}:
targetSnrMgn: -------------> {60}:
maxSnrMgn: ----------------> {310}:
minSnrMgn: ----------------> {0}:
downshiftSnrMgn: ----------> {30}:
upshiftSnrMgn: ------------> {90}:
minUpshiftSnrMgn: ---------> {60}:
minDownshiftSnrMgn: -------> {60}:
fastMinTxRate: ------------> {32000}:
interleaveMinTxRate: ------> {32000}:
fastMaxTxRate: ------------> {1024000}:
interleaveMaxTxRate: ------> {1536000}:
maxInterleaveDelay: -------> {16}:
thresh15MinLofs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLoss: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinLprs: ----------> {0}:
thresh15MinESs: -----------> {0}:
threshFastRateUp: ---------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateUp: ---> {0}:
threshFastRateDown: -------> {0}:
threshInterleaveRateDown: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the interface using the if-translate profile:


zSH> update if-translate 1-3-1-0/adsl
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {334}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {3}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {adsl}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-3-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Use the dslstat command to displays the status of the interface:


zSH> dslstat 1-3-1-0/adsl
General Stats:
------------AdminStatus..................................UP

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ADSL cards

Line uptime
(DD:HH:MM:SS)....................0:04:27:52
DslUpLineRate (bitsPerSec)...................512000
DslDownLineRate (bitsPerSec).................8064000
DslMaxAttainableUpLineRate (bitsPerSec)......565333
DslMaxAttainableDownLineRate (bitsPerSec)....856000
Out Octets...................................286571
Out Discards.................................0
Out Errors...................................0
In Octets....................................286571
In Discards..................................0
In Errors....................................0
ATM OCD Count................................0
ATM NCD Count................................0
ATM HEC Count................................0
ATM far-end OCD Count........................0
ATM far-end NCD Count........................0
ATM far-end HEC Count........................0
ADSL Physical Stats:
-----------------Actual Transmission connection standard......G.dmt
AdslAtucCurrLineSnrMgn (tenths dB)...........310
AdslAtucCurrLineAtn (tenths dB)..............135
AdslAtucCurrOutputPwr (tenths dB)............70
AdslAturCurrLineSnrMgn (tenths dB)...........90
AdslAturCurrLineAtn (tenths dB)..............135
AdslAturCurrOutputPwr (tenths dB)............103
LOFS.........................................0
LOLS.........................................0
LOSS.........................................0
ESS..........................................0
Inits........................................1
Adsl connects................................1
Adsl disconnects.............................5407
near-end statistics:
------------------blocks received..............................147087
errored blocks received......................0
CRC errors on interleaved buffer.............0
CRC errors on fast buffer....................0
FEC corrected errors on interleaved buffer...0
FEC corrected errors on fast buffer..........0
background errored blocks received...........0
non-SES blocks received......................0
Severely Errored Seconds.....................0
Unavailable Seconds..........................59
Loss of Signal Seconds.......................0
Seconds with one/more FECs...................0
Seconds declared as high BER.................0
far-end statistics:
-------------------

256

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring POTS ports

blocks received..............................147205
errored blocks received......................1
CRC errors on interleaved buffer.............0
CRC errors on fast buffer....................1
FEC corrected errors on interleaved buffer...0
FEC corrected errors on fast buffer..........0
background errored blocks received...........0
non-SES blocks received......................0
Severely Errored Seconds.....................0
Unavailable Seconds..........................0
Loss of Signal Seconds.......................0
Seconds with one/more FECs...................0
Loss of Power (dying gasps)..................0
Seconds declared as high BER.................0
Fast retrains................................0
Fast retrain failures........................0

Configuring POTS ports


Note: The MALC POTS-24 and ADSL+POTS-32A-2S cards do not
support pulse dialing or ground start signaling.
The following table summarizes how to configure a POTS interfaces on the
MALC:
Action

Command

Configure the POTS gain settings. See


Configuring POTS settings on page 257.

update analog-if-cfg-profile index/voicefxs


Where index is of the form shelf-slot-port-subport or a user-defined
string.
For typical applications, the settings in this profile do not need to be
modified.

Configure the POTS signaling. See


Configuring signal type and ring
frequency on page 260.

update analog-fxs-cfg-profile index/voicefxs

Activate the POTS interfaces in the


if-translate profiles. See Activating
POTS interfaces on page 261.

update if-translate index/voicefxs

For typical applications, the settings in this profile do not need to be


modified.

Configuring POTS settings


Modify the following parameters in the analog-if-cfg-profile if you need to
change the gain settings for each voice line:

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

257

ADSL cards

Parameter

Description

if-cfg-impedence

Specifies the terminating impedance of analog voice interfaces.


Values:
ohms600complex 600 Ohms + 2.16uF
ohms900complex 00 Ohms + 2.16uF
Default: ohms600complex

if-cfg-receive-tlp

The receive TLP is the signal level to the customer premises equipment (CPE). The
receive signal range is +3 dB to -9 dB. A positive number adds gain, a negative
number adds loss to the analog signal after decoding from PCM. For example, a
receive TLP setting of -6 dB will generate a voice signal at -6 dB level.
Values:
fxsrtlpn9db
fxsrtlpn8db
fxsrtlpn7db
fxsrtlpn6db
fxsrtlpn5db
fxsrtlpn4db
fxsrtlpn3db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsrtlpn2db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsrtlpn1db
fxsrtlp0db
fxsrtlp1db
fxsrtlp2db
fxsrtlp3db
rtlpnummeric
Default: fxsrtlpn6db

258

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring POTS ports

Parameter

Description

if-cfg-transmit-tlp

The transmit TLP is the signal level from the customer premises equipment (CPE).
The transmit signal range is +9 dB to -3 dB. A positive number adds loss, a negative
number adds gain to the analog signal before encoding to PCM. For example, a
transmit TLP setting of +3 dB will set a loss of 3 dB to generate a 0 dB PCM signal.
Values:
fxsTtlp9db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsTtlp8db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsTtlp7db
fxsTtlp6db
fxsTtlp5db
fxsTtlp4db
fxsTtlp3db
fxsTtlp2db
fxsTtlp1db
fxsTtlp0db
fxsTtlpN1db
fxsTtlpN2db
fxsTtlpN3db
Default: fxsTtlp0db

if-cfg-pcm-encoding

Line encoding.
Values:
alaw for E1.
mulaw for T1.

if-cfg-receive-tlpNum

Receive Transmission Level Point (RTLP) settings control the amount gain or loss
added to the incoming signal after it is decoded to analog. To incrase the signal level
set the RTLP setting to higher values. The default is 0 dB.
Values:
-160 to 85 (in tenths of dB)
Default: 0 dB

if-cfg-transmit-tlpNum

Transmit Transmission Level Point (TTLP) controls the amount of gain or loss added
to a voice signal before it is encoded to digital PCM. To increase the signal level,
reduce the TTLP setting to lower value.
Values:
-175 to 70 (in tenths of dB)
Default: 0 dB

If you need to modify the gain settings, update the analog-if-cfg-profile


for each interface. For example;:
zSH> update analog-if-cfg-profile 1-3-1-0/voicefxs
Please provide the following: (q=quit)
if-cfg-impedence: ------------>{ohms600complex}: modify if required
if-cfg-receive-tlp: ---------->{fxsrtlp0db}: modify if required

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

259

ADSL cards

if-cfg-transmit-tlp: --------->{fxsttlp0db}: modify if required


if-cfg-trunk-conditioning: --->{idle}:
if-maintenance-mode: --->{off}:
if-cfg-pcm-encoding: --->{mulaw}: alaw | mulaw
if-cfg-receive-tlpNum: -----> {0}:
if-cfg-transmit-tlpNum: ----> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring signal type and ring frequency


Modify the following parameters in the analog-fxs-cfg-profile if you need to
change signalling type and ring frequency for each voice line:
Parameter

Description

signal-type

The method by which an off-hook condition is indicated.


Values:
fxsloopstart
Default: fxsloopstart

ring-frequency

Rate in cycles per second (Hertz) at which polarity reversal


occurs on ringing.
Values:
ringfrequency20
ringfrequency25
ringfrequency30
ringfrequency50
Default: ringfrequency20

ring-back

The ring back is requested if this variable is set to on.


Values:
on
off
Default: off

If you need to modify the signaling and ring frequency, update the
analog-fxs-cfg-profile for each interface. For example;:
zSH> update analog-fxs-cfg-profile 1-3-1-0/voicefxs
signal-type: ----> {fxsloopstart}
ring-frequency: -> {ringfrequency20} modify if required
ring-back: ------> {off} modify if required
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

260

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Activating POTS interfaces


Update the if-translate records for the POTS interface to enable the line.
The following example activates the first POTS interface on the slot card
located in shelf 1 slot 3:
zSH> update if-translate 1-3-1-0/voicefxs
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {132}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {3}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {voicefxs}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-3-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the rest of the interfaces similarly.

ADSL cable and port pinouts


This section describes the ADSL cables available from Zhone Technologies
and the ADSL port pinouts.

ADSL 48 card pinouts on page 264

ADSL cable pinouts on page 267

ADSL card port pinouts


This section describes the following ADSL port pinouts:

ADSL 24 port card pinouts on page 261

ADSL 32 port card pinouts on page 262

ADSL 48 card pinouts on page 264

ADSL 24 port card pinouts


The ADSL-24, ADSL-24-2S, POTS-24-2S, and POTS-24 cards use standard
RJ-21X pinouts. Table 55 lists the port pinouts.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

261

ADSL cards

Table 55: ADSL-24-2S, ADSL-24-2S, POTS-24-2S, and POTS-24 pinouts


Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Channel 1 ring

26

Channel 1 tip

Channel 2 ring

27

Channel 2 tip

Channel 3 ring

28

Channel 3 tip

Channel 4 ring

29

Channel 4 tip

Channel 5 ring

30

Channel 5 tip

Channel 6 ring

31

Channel 6 tip

Channel 7 ring

32

Channel 7 tip

Channel 8 ring

33

Channel 8 tip

Channel 9 ring

34

Channel 9 tip

10

Channel 10 ring

35

Channel 10 tip

11

Channel 11 ring

36

Channel 11 tip

12

Channel 12 ring

37

Channel 12 tip

13

Channel 13 ring

38

Channel 13 tip

14

Channel 14 ring

39

Channel 14 tip

15

Channel 15 ring

40

Channel 15 tip

16

Channel 16 ring

41

Channel 16 tip

17

Channel 17 ring

42

Channel 17 tip

18

Channel 18 ring

43

Channel 18 tip

19

Channel 19 ring

44

Channel 19 tip

20

Channel 20 ring

45

Channel 20 tip

21

Channel 21 ring

46

Channel 21 tip

22

Channel 22 ring

47

Channel 22 tip

23

Channel 23 ring

48

Channel 23 tip

24

Channel 24 ring

49

Channel 24 tip

25

Not used

50

Not used

ADSL 32 port card pinouts


The ADSL-32A, ADSL+POTS-32A-2S, ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32AB-2S,
and ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S cards use standard Champ 64
pinouts. Table 56 lists the port pinouts.

262

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 56: ADSL-32A, ADSL+POTS-32A-2S, ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32AB-2S,


and ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S pinouts
Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Channel 1 ring

33

Channel 1 tip

Channel 2 ring

34

Channel 2 tip

Channel 3 ring

35

Channel 3 tip

Channel 4 ring

36

Channel 4 tip

Channel 5 ring

37

Channel 5 tip

Channel 6 ring

38

Channel 6 tip

Channel 7 ring

39

Channel 7 tip

Channel 8 ring

40

Channel 8 tip

Channel 9 ring

41

Channel 9 tip

10

Channel 10 ring

42

Channel 10 tip

11

Channel 11 ring

43

Channel 11 tip

12

Channel 12 ring

44

Channel 12 tip

13

Channel 13 ring

45

Channel 13 tip

14

Channel 14 ring

46

Channel 14 tip

15

Channel 15 ring

47

Channel 15 tip

16

Channel 16 ring

48

Channel 16 tip

17

Channel 17 ring

49

Channel 17 tip

18

Channel 18 ring

50

Channel 18 tip

19

Channel 19 ring

51

Channel 19 tip

20

Channel 20 ring

52

Channel 20 tip

21

Channel 21 ring

53

Channel 21 tip

22

Channel 22 ring

54

Channel 22 tip

23

Channel 23 ring

55

Channel 23 tip

24

Channel 24 ring

56

Channel 24 tip

25

Channel 25 ring

57

Channel 25 tip

26

Channel 26 ring

58

Channel 26 tip

27

Channel 27 ring

59

Channel 27 tip

28

Channel 28 ring

60

Channel 28 tip

29

Channel 29 ring

61

Channel 29 tip

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

263

ADSL cards

Table 56: ADSL-32A, ADSL+POTS-32A-2S, ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32AB-2S,


and ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S pinouts (Continued)
Pin

Function

Pin

Function

30

Channel 30 ring

62

Channel 30 tip

31

Channel 31 ring

63

Channel 31 tip

32

Channel 32 ring

64

Channel 32 tip

ADSL 48 card pinouts


Table 57 lists the ADSL-48 card pinouts.
Table 57: 48-port ADSL card pinouts
Port

Signal

Pin

Tip

J7-2

Ring

J7-1

Tip

J7-4

Ring

J7-3

Tip

J7-6

Ring

J7-5

Tip

J7-8

Ring

J7-7

Tip

J7-10

Ring

J7-9

Tip

J7-12

Ring

J7-11

Tip

J7-14

Ring

J7-13

Tip

J7-16

Ring

J7-15

Tip

J7-18

Ring

J7-17

Tip

J7-20

Ring

J7-19

Tip

J7-22

Ring

J7-21

10

11

264

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 57: 48-port ADSL card pinouts (Continued)


Port

Signal

Pin

12

Tip

J7-24

Ring

J7-23

Tip

J7-26

Ring

J7-25

Tip

J7-28

Ring

J7-27

Tip

J7-30

Ring

J7-29

Tip

J7-32

Ring

J7-31

Tip

J7-34

Ring

J7-33

Tip

J7-36

Ring

J7-35

Tip

J7-38

Ring

J7-37

Tip

J7-40

Ring

J7-39

Tip

J7-42

Ring

J7-41

Tip

J7-44

Ring

J7-43

Tip

J7-46

Ring

J7-45

Tip

J7-48

Ring

J7-47

Tip

J7-50

Ring

J7-49

Tip

J7-52

Ring

J7-51

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

265

ADSL cards

Table 57: 48-port ADSL card pinouts (Continued)


Port

Signal

Pin

27

Tip

J7-54

Ring

J7-53

Tip

J7-56

Ring

J7-55

Tip

J7-58

Ring

J7-57

Tip

J7-60

Ring

J7-59

Tip

J7-62

Ring

J7-61

Tip

J7-64

Ring

J7-63

Tip

J7-66

Ring

J7-65

Tip

J7-68

Ring

J7-67

Tip

J7-70

Ring

J7-69

Tip

J7-72

Ring

J7-71

Tip

J7-74

Ring

J7-73

Tip

J7-76

Ring

J7-75

Tip

J7-78

Ring

J7-77

Tip

J7-80

Ring

J7-79

Tip

J7-82

Ring

J7-81

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

266

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 57: 48-port ADSL card pinouts (Continued)


Port

Signal

Pin

42

Tip

J7-84

Ring

J7-83

Tip

J7-86

Ring

J7-85

Tip

J7-88

Ring

J7-87

Tip

J7-90

Ring

J7-89

Tip

J7-92

Ring

J7-91

Tip

J7-94

Ring

J7-93

Tip

J7-96

Ring

J7-95

43

44

45

46

47

48

ADSL cable pinouts


This section describes the following ADSL cable pinouts:

ADSL-32 to dual-50-pin cable pinouts on page 267

ADSL-32 multi-connector cable pinouts on page 270

ADSL-48 to dual 50-pin connector cable on page 278

ADSL-32 to dual-50-pin cable pinouts


Figure 53 shows the 32-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable. Table 58 lists the
pinouts.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

267

ADSL cards

Figure 53: 32-port ADSL to dual 50-pin cable

Table 58: 32-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Tip

White/Blue

P1-33

P2-26

Ring

Blue/White

P1-1

P2-1

Tip

White/Orange

P1-34

P2-27

Ring

Orange/White

P1-2

P2-2

Tip

White/Green

P1-35

P2-28

Ring

Green/White

P1-3

P2-3

Tip

White/Brown

P1-36

P2-29

Ring

Brown/White

P1-4

P2-4

Tip

White/Slate

P1-37

P2-30

Ring

Slate/White

P1-5

P2-5

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-38

P2-31

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-6

P2-6

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-39

P2-32

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-7

P2-7

Tip

Red/Green

P1-40

P2-33

Ring

Green/Red

P1-8

P2-8

Tip

Red/Brown

P1-41

P2-34

Ring

Brown/Red

P1-9

P2-9

268

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ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 58: 32-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

10

Tip

Red/Slate

P1-42

P2-35

Ring

Slate/Red

P1-10

P2-10

Tip

Black/Blue

P1-43

P2-36

Ring

Blue/Black

P1-11

P2-11

Tip

Black/Orange

P1-44

P2-37

Ring

Orange/Black

P1-12

P2-12

Tip

Black/Green

P1-45

P2-38

Ring

Green/Black

P1-13

P2-13

Tip

Black/Brown

P1-46

P2-39

Ring

Brown/Black

P1-14

P2-14

Tip

Black/Slate

P1-47

P2-40

Ring

Slate/Black

P1-15

P2-15

Tip

Yellow/Blue

P1-48

P2-41

Ring

Blue/Yellow

P1-16

P2-16

Tip

Yellow/Orange

P1-49

P2-42

Ring

Orange/Yellow

P1-17

P2-17

Tip

Yellow/Green

P1-50

P2-43

Ring

Green/Yellow

P1-18

P2-18

Tip

Yellow/Brown

P1-51

P2-44

Ring

Brown/Yellow

P1-19

P2-19

Tip

Yellow/Slate

P1-52

P2-45

Ring

Slate/Yellow

P1-20

P2-20

Tip

Violet/Blue

P1-53

P2-46

Ring

Blue/Violet

P1-21

P2-21

Tip

Violet/Orange

P1-54

P2-47

Ring

Orange/Violet

P1-22

P2-22

Tip

Violet/Green

P1-55

P2-48

Ring

Green/Violet

P1-23

P2-23

Tip

Violet/Brown

P1-56

P2-49

Ring

Brown/Violet

P1-24

P2-24

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

269

ADSL cards

Table 58: 32-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

25

Tip

Violet/Slate

P1-57

P3-26

Ring

Slate/Violet

P1-25

P3-1

Tip

White/Blue

P1-58

P3-27

Ring

Blue/White

P1-26

P3-2

Tip

White/Orange

P1-59

P3-28

Ring

Orange/White

P1-27

P3-3

Tip

White/Green

P1-60

P3-29

Ring

Green/White

P1-28

P3-4

Tip

White/Brown

P1-61

P3-30

Ring

Brown/White

P1-29

P3-5

Tip

White/Slate

P1-62

P3-31

Ring

Slate/White

P1-30

P3-6

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-63

P3-32

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-31

P3-7

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-64

P3-33

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-32

P3-8

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

ADSL-32 multi-connector cable pinouts


The ADSL-32 multi-connector cable (CBL-ADSL-32-MC) is used to connect
three ADSL-32 cards to 4 standard 50 pin connectors.

270

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Figure 54: ADSL-32 card multi-connector cable

Pinouts for this cable are listed in Table 59 through Table 64 on page 277.
Table 59: P1 to P4 (channels 1-24)
Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Tip

White/Blue

P1-33

P4-26

Ring

Blue/White

P1-1

P4-1

Tip

White/Orange

P1-34

P4-27

Ring

Orange/White

P1-2

P4-2

Tip

White/Green

P1-35

P4-28

Ring

Green/White

P1-3

P4-3

Tip

White/Brown

P1-36

P4-29

Ring

Brown/White

P1-4

P4-4

Tip

White/Slate

P1-37

P4-30

Ring

Slate/White

P1-5

P4-5

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

271

ADSL cards

Table 59: P1 to P4 (channels 1-24) (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-38

P4-31

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-6

P4-6

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-39

P4-32

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-7

P4-7

Tip

Red/Green

P1-40

P4-33

Ring

Green/Red

P1-8

P4-8

Tip

Red/Brown

P1-41

P4-34

Ring

Brown/Red

P1-9

P4-9

Tip

Red/Slate

P1-42

P4-35

Ring

Slate/Red

P1-10

P4-10

Tip

Black/Blue

P1-43

P4-36

Ring

Blue/Black

P1-11

P4-11

Tip

Black/Orange

P1-44

P4-37

Ring

Orange/Black

P1-12

P4-12

Tip

Black/Green

P1-45

P4-38

Ring

Green/Black

P1-13

P4-13

Tip

Black/Brown

P1-46

P4-39

Ring

Brown/Black

P1-14

P4-14

Tip

Black/Slate

P1-47

P4-40

Ring

Slate/Black

P1-15

P4-15

Tip

Yellow/Blue

P1-48

P4-41

Ring

Blue/Yellow

P1-16

P4-16

Tip

Yellow/Orange

P1-49

P4-42

Ring

Orange/Yellow

P1-17

P4-17

Tip

Yellow/Green

P1-50

P4-43

Ring

Green/Yellow

P1-18

P4-18

Tip

Yellow/Brown

P1-51

P4-44

Ring

Brown/Yellow

P1-19

P4-19

Tip

Yellow/Slate

P1-52

P4-45

Ring

Slate/Yellow

P1-20

P4-20

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

272

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ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 59: P1 to P4 (channels 1-24) (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

21

Tip

Violet/Blue

P1-53

P4-46

Ring

Blue/Violet

P1-21

P4-21

Tip

Violet/Orange

P1-54

P4-47

Ring

Orange/Violet

P1-22

P4-22

Tip

Violet/Green

P1-55

P4-48

Ring

Green/Violet

P1-23

P4-23

Tip

Violet/Brown

P1-56

P4-49

Ring

Brown/Violet

P1-24

P4-24

22

23

24

Table 60: P1 to P5 (channels 25-32)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

25

Tip

White/Blue

P1-57

P5-26

Ring

Blue/White

P1-25

P5-1

Tip

White/Orange

P1-58

P5-27

Ring

Orange/White

P1-26

P5-2

Tip

White/Green

P1-59

P5-28

Ring

Green/White

P1-27

P5-3

Tip

White/Brown

P1-60

P5-29

Ring

Brown/White

P1-28

P5-4

Tip

White/Slate

P1-61

P5-30

Ring

Slate/White

P1-29

P5-5

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-62

P5-31

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-30

P5-6

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-63

P5-32

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-31

P5-7

Tip

Red/Green

P1-64

P5-33

Ring

Green/Red

P1-32

P5-8

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

273

ADSL cards

Table 61: P2 to P5 (channels 1-16)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Tip

White/Blue

P2-33

P5-34

Ring

Blue/White

P2-1

P5-9

Tip

White/Orange

P2-34

P5-35

Ring

Orange/White

P2-2

P5-10

Tip

White/Green

P2-35

P5-36

Ring

Green/White

P2-3

P5-11

Tip

White/Brown

P2-36

P5-37

Ring

Brown/White

P2-4

P5-12

Tip

White/Slate

P2-37

P5-38

Ring

Slate/White

P2-5

P5-13

Tip

Red/Blue

P2-38

P5-39

Ring

Blue/Red

P2-6

P5-14

Tip

Red/Orange

P2-39

P5-40

Ring

Orange/Red

P2-7

P5-15

Tip

Red/Green

P2-40

P5-41

Ring

Green/Red

P2-8

P5-16

Tip

Red/Brown

P2-41

P5-42

Ring

Brown/Red

P2-9

P5-17

Tip

Red/Slate

P2-42

P5-43

Ring

Slate/Red

P2-10

P5-18

Tip

Black/Blue

P2-43

P5-44

Ring

Blue/Black

P2-11

P5-19

Tip

Black/Orange

P2-44

P5-45

Ring

Orange/Black

P2-12

P5-20

Tip

Black/Green

P2-45

P5-46

Ring

Green/Black

P2-13

P5-21

Tip

Black/Brown

P2-46

P5-47

Ring

Brown/Black

P2-14

P5-22

Tip

Black/Slate

P2-47

P5-48

Ring

Slate/Black

P2-15

P5-23

10

11

12

13

14

15

274

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 61: P2 to P5 (channels 1-16) (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

16

Tip

Yellow/Blue

P2-48

P5-49

Ring

Blue/Yellow

P2-16

P5-24

Table 62: P2 to P6 (channels 17-32)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

17

Tip

White/Blue

P2-49

P6-26

Ring

Blue/White

P2-17

P6-1

Tip

White/Orange

P2-50

P6-27

Ring

Orange/White

P2-18

P6-2

Tip

White/Green

P2-51

P6-28

Ring

Green/White

P2-19

P6-3

Tip

White/Brown

P2-52

P6-29

Ring

Brown/White

P2-20

P6-4

Tip

White/Slate

P2-53

P6-30

Ring

Slate/White

P2-21

P6-5

Tip

Red/Blue

P2-54

P6-31

Ring

Blue/Red

P2-22

P6-6

Tip

Red/Orange

P2-55

P6-32

Ring

Orange/Red

P2-23

P6-7

Tip

Red/Green

P2-56

P6-33

Ring

Green/Red

P2-24

P6-8

Tip

Red/Brown

P2-57

P6-34

Ring

Brown/Red

P2-25

P6-9

Tip

Red/Slate

P2-58

P6-35

Ring

Slate/Red

P2-26

P6-10

Tip

Black/Blue

P2-59

P6-36

Ring

Blue/Black

P2-27

P6-11

Tip

Black/Orange

P2-60

P6-37

Ring

Orange/Black

P2-28

P6-12

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

275

ADSL cards

Table 62: P2 to P6 (channels 17-32) (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

29

Tip

Black/Green

P2-61

P6-38

Ring

Green/Black

P2-29

P6-13

Tip

Black/Brown

P2-62

P6-39

Ring

Brown/Black

P2-30

P6-14

Tip

Black/Slate

P2-63

P6-40

Ring

Slate/Black

P2-31

P6-15

Tip

Yellow/Blue

P2-64

P6-41

Ring

Blue/Yellow

P2-32

P6-16

30

31

32

Table 63: P3 to P6 (channels 1-8)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Tip

White/Blue

P3-33

P6-42

Ring

Blue/White

P3-1

P6-17

Tip

White/Orange

P3-34

P6-43

Ring

Orange/White

P3-2

P6-18

Tip

White/Green

P3-35

P6-44

Ring

Green/White

P3-3

P6-19

Tip

White/Brown

P3-36

P6-45

Ring

Brown/White

P3-4

P6-20

Tip

White/Slate

P3-37

P6-46

Ring

Slate/White

P3-5

P6-21

Tip

Red/Blue

P3-38

P6-47

Ring

Blue/Red

P3-6

P6-22

Tip

Red/Orange

P3-39

P6-48

Ring

Orange/Red

P3-7

P6-23

Tip

Red/Green

P3-40

P6-49

Ring

Green/Red

P3-8

P6-24

276

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 64: P3 to P7 (channels 9-32)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Tip

White/Blue

P3-41

P4-26

Ring

Blue/White

P3-9

P7-1

Tip

White/Orange

P3-42

P7-27

Ring

Orange/White

P3-10

P7-2

Tip

White/Green

P3-43

P7-28

Ring

Green/White

P3-11

P7-3

Tip

White/Brown

P3-44

P7-29

Ring

Brown/White

P3-12

P7-4

Tip

White/Slate

P3-45

P7-30

Ring

Slate/White

P3-13

P7-5

Tip

Red/Blue

P3-46

P7-31

Ring

Blue/Red

P3-14

P7-6

Tip

Red/Orange

P3-47

P7-32

Ring

Orange/Red

P3-15

P7-7

Tip

Red/Green

P3-48

P7-33

Ring

Green/Red

P3-16

P7-8

Tip

Red/Brown

P3-49

P7-34

Ring

Brown/Red

P3-17

P7-9

Tip

Red/Slate

P3-50

P7-35

Ring

Slate/Red

P3-18

P7-10

Tip

Black/Blue

P3-51

P7-36

Ring

Blue/Black

P3-19

P7-11

Tip

Black/Orange

P3-52

P7-37

Ring

Orange/Black

P3-20

P7-12

Tip

Black/Green

P3-53

P7-38

Ring

Green/Black

P3-21

P7-13

Tip

Black/Brown

P3-54

P7-39

Ring

Brown/Black

P3-22

P7-14

Tip

Black/Slate

P3-55

P7-40

Ring

Slate/Black

P3-23

P7-15

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

277

ADSL cards

Table 64: P3 to P7 (channels 9-32) (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

24

Tip

Yellow/Blue

P3-56

P7-41

Ring

Blue/Yellow

P3-24

P7-16

Tip

Yellow/Orange

P3-57

P7-42

Ring

Orange/Yellow

P3-25

P7-17

Tip

Yellow/Green

P3-58

P7-43

Ring

Green/Yellow

P3-26

P7-18

Tip

Yellow/Brown

P3-59

P7-44

Ring

Brown/Yellow

P3-27

P7-19

Tip

Yellow/Slate

P3-60

P7-45

Ring

Slate/Yellow

P3-28

P7-20

Tip

Violet/Blue

P3-61

P7-46

Ring

Blue/Violet

P3-29

P7-21

Tip

Violet/Orange

P3-62

P7-47

Ring

Orange/Violet

P3-30

P7-22

Tip

Violet/Green

P3-63

P7-48

Ring

Green/Violet

P3-31

P7-23

Tip

Violet/Brown

P3-64

P7-49

Ring

Brown/Violet

P3-32

P7-24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

ADSL-48 to dual 50-pin connector cable


Table 57 lists the ADSL-48 card pinouts.

278

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Figure 55: 48-port ADSL to dual 50-pin cable

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

279

ADSL cards

Table 65: 48-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable pinouts


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Binder group

Tip

White/Blue

P1-2

P2-26

1 (Blue)

Ring

Blue/White

P1-1

P2-1

Tip

White/Orange

P1-4

P2-27

Ring

Orange/White

P1-3

P2-2

Tip

White/Green

P1-6

P2-28

Ring

Green/White

P1-5

P2-3

Tip

White/Brown

P1-8

P2-29

Ring

Brown/White

P1-7

P2-4

Tip

White/Slate

P1-10

P2-30

Ring

Slate/White

P1-9

P2-5

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-12

P2-31

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-11

P2-6

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-14

P2-32

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-13

P2-7

Tip

Red/Green

P1-16

P2-33

Ring

Green/Red

P1-15

P2-8

Tip

Red/Brown

P1-18

P2-34

Ring

Brown/Red

P1-17

P2-9

Tip

Red/Slate

P1-20

P2-35

Ring

Slate/Red

P1-19

P2-10

Tip

Black/Blue

P1-22

P2-36

Ring

Blue/Black

P1-21

P2-11

Tip

Black/Orange

P1-24

P2-37

Ring

Orange/Black

P1-23

P2-12

10

11

12

280

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 65: 48-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Binder group

13

Tip

White/Blue

P1-26

P2-38

2 (Orange)

Ring

Blue/White

P1-25

P2-13

Tip

White/Orange

P1-28

P2-39

Ring

Orange/White

P1-27

P2-14

Tip

White/Green

P1-30

P2-40

Ring

Green/White

P1-29

P2-15

Tip

White/Brown

P1-32

P2-41

Ring

Brown/White

P1-31

P2-16

Tip

White/Slate

P1-34

P2-42

Ring

Slate/White

P1-33

P2-17

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-36

P2-43

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-35

P2-18

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-38

P2-44

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-37

P2-19

Tip

Red/Green

P1-40

P2-45

Ring

Green/Red

P1-39

P2-20

Tip

Red/Brown

P1-42

P2-46

Ring

Brown/Red

P1-41

P2-21

Tip

Red/Slate

P1-44

P2-47

Ring

Slate/Red

P1-43

P2-22

Tip

Black/Blue

P1-46

P2-48

Ring

Blue/Black

P1-45

P2-23

Tip

Black/Orange

P1-48

P2-49

Ring

Orange/Black

P1-47

P2-24

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

281

ADSL cards

Table 65: 48-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Binder group

25

Tip

White/Blue

P1-50

P3-26

3 (Green)

Ring

Blue/White

P1-49

P3-1

Tip

White/Orange

P1-52

P3-27

Ring

Orange/White

P1-51

P3-2

Tip

White/Green

P1-54

P3-28

Ring

Green/White

P1-53

P3-3

Tip

White/Brown

P1-56

P3-29

Ring

Brown/White

P1-55

P3-4

Tip

White/Slate

P1-58

P3-30

Ring

Slate/White

P1-57

P3-5

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-60

P3-31

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-59

P3-6

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-62

P3-32

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-61

P3-7

Tip

Red/Green

P1-64

P3-33

Ring

Green/Red

P1-63

P3-8

Tip

Red/Brown

P1-66

P3-34

Ring

Brown/Red

P1-65

P3-9

Tip

Red/Slate

P1-68

P3-35

Ring

Slate/Red

P1-67

P3-10

Tip

Black/Blue

P1-70

P3-36

Ring

Blue/Black

P1-69

P3-11

Tip

Black/Orange

P1-72

P3-37

Ring

Orange/Black

P1-71

P3-12

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

282

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ADSL cable and port pinouts

Table 65: 48-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable pinouts (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

Binder group

37

Tip

White/Blue

P1-74

P3-38

4 (Brown)

Ring

Blue/White

P1-73

P3-13

Tip

White/Orange

P1-76

P3-39

Ring

Orange/White

P1-75

P3-14

Tip

White/Green

P1-78

P3-40

Ring

Green/White

P1-77

P3-15

Tip

White/Brown

P1-80

P3-41

Ring

Brown/White

P1-79

P3-16

Tip

White/Slate

P1-82

P3-42

Ring

Slate/White

P1-81

P3-17

Tip

Red/Blue

P1-84

P3-43

Ring

Blue/Red

P1-83

P3-18

Tip

Red/Orange

P1-86

P3-44

Ring

Orange/Red

P1-85

P3-19

Tip

Red/Green

P1-88

P3-45

Ring

Green/Red

P1-87

P3-20

Tip

Red/Brown

P1-90

P3-46

Ring

Brown/Red

P1-89

P3-21

Tip

Red/Slate

P1-92

P3-47

Ring

Slate/Red

P1-91

P3-22

Tip

Black/Blue

P1-94

P3-48

Ring

Blue/Black

P1-93

P3-23

Tip

Black/Orange

P1-96

P3-49

Ring

Orange/Black

P1-95

P3-24

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

283

ADSL cards

284

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

14

SHDSL CARDS
This chapter describes the MALC SHDSL cards and explains how to
configure them. It includes:

Overview, page 285

Activating SHDSL cards, page 289

Configuring SDSL interfaces, page 292

Configuring SHDSL interfaces, page 297

SHDSL pinouts, page 303

Delivering power and data to a Raptor 100 SHDSL-LP, page 308

Overview
This section describes the following SHDSL cards:

24-port SHDSL card (G.SHDSL-24) on page 286

SHDSL-24 card (SHDSL-24-LP) on page 287

SHDSL 4-wire card (G.SHDSL-4W-12) on page 289

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

285

SHDSL cards

24-port SHDSL card (G.SHDSL-24)

The 24 port SHDSL card supports the G.991.2 (SHDSL)


standard.

Table 66: SHDSL-24 specifications


Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

24 ports

Physical
interfaces

One (1) RJ-21X 50-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ITU G.991.2

Supported line
rates

72 Kbps to 2368 Kbps

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card


Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

286

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Overview

Table 66: SHDSL-24 specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

Metallic test
functions

Look-in test

Redundancy

None

Main
components

SLIC/Codec

Power
consumption

34.0 W nominal (all port initialized, no ports trained)


plus
0.79 W additional per active SHDSL interface
52.96 W maximum

SHDSL-24 card (SHDSL-24-LP)


The LP IN port on the MALC SHDSL-24-LP card provides
12 pairs of wires to deliver power. The power is combined
with the data and sent out over the 24 SHDSL ports to
downstream MALC devices. One MALC SHDSL-LP card
can provide power and data for 6 MALC devices.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

287

SHDSL cards

Table 67: SHDSL-24 -LP specifications


Specification

Value

Size

1 slot

Density

24 ports

Physical
interfaces

One (1) RJ-21X 50-pin telco connector for data

Standards
supported

ITU G.991.2

Supported line
rates

72 Kbps to 2368 Kbps

ATM support

Cell Relay switching onto ATM bus to Uplink card

One (1) DB-25 connector for delivering power

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):

288

VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Metallic test
functions

Look-in test

Redundancy

None

Main
components

SLIC/Codec

Power
consumption

34.0 W nominal (all port initialized, no ports trained)


plus
0.79 W additional per active SHDSL interface
52.96 W maximum

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Activating SHDSL cards

SHDSL 4-wire card (G.SHDSL-4W-12)


The 4-wire SHDSL-12 card provides longer reach and
higher line rates than the existing 2-wire SHDSL-24 card.
Combining two channels for one subscriber line provides
twice the bandwidth.
The channels that can be combined must be consecutive
pairs (for example, 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 23 and 24).
Table 68: SHDSL card 4-wire specifications
Specification

Value

Density

12 subscriber lines

Physical
interfaces

One (1) RJ-21X Champ 50-pin connector

Line
characteristics

ITU G.991.2 SHDSL

Redundancy

None

Nominal line
rate

Symmetric rate increments up to 4.6 Mbps

ATM support

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):


VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 255

Power
consumption

34.0 W nominal (all port initialized, no


ports trained)
plus
0.79 W additional per active SHDSL
interface
43.48 W maximum

Activating SHDSL cards


Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.
Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

289

SHDSL cards

The slots cards on the MALC have the following types and software images:
Table 69: MALC card types
Card

Type

Name of software image

G.SHDSL-24 and SHDSL-24-LP

5006

malcgshdsl.bin

G.SHDSL-4W-12

5030

malcgshdsl4w.bin

Creating card-profiles for G.SHDSL-24 or SHDSL-24-LP


cards
The following example creates a card-profile for a SHDSL card in shelf
1, slot 14:
zSH> new card-profile 1/14/5006 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcgshdsl.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
New record saved.

Creating card-profiles for SHDSL 4-wire cards


he following example creates a card-profile for a 4 wire SHDSL card in
shelf 1, slot 19:
zSH> new card-profile 1/19/5030 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: -----------> {}: malcgshdsl4w.bin
admin-status: -----------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}:
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}:
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: --------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}:
card-group-id: ----------> {0}:
hold-active: ------------> {false}:
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: ---------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:

290

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Activating SHDSL cards

....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record created.

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and the
begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This could take
a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the following is
displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

You can also use the slots command and specify the slot number of the
card to view the state of the card. For example:
zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
LOADING indicates the card is still initializing
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
0

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat
Fault reset
Uptime

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
RUNNING indicates the card is functional
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
59
enabled
1 minute

To view the status of all the cards, use the slots command without any
arguments:
zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 (RUNNING)
13: MALC ADSL (RUNNING)
15: MALC MTAC (RUNNING)

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

291

SHDSL cards

Viewing active redundant cards


Use the showactivecards command to view all active cards in the system
that are part of a redundant card group:
zSH> showactivecards
Shelf/Slot Group Id
Card Type
__________________________________
1:
1/14 333
MALC MTAC

Configuring SDSL interfaces


The following table summarizes the commands required to configure SDSL
interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Configure the type of SDSL interface and whether it is


acting as a CO or CPE device. See Specifying the type
of DSL interface on page 293.

update dsl-config index/sdsl


Where index is of the form shelf-slot-port-subport or a
user-defined string.

Configure specific DSL interface settings, such as


framing and compatibility. See Configuring an SDSL
interface on page 294.

update sdsl-config index/sdsl

Activate the interface. See Activating the interface on


page 296

update if-translate index/sdsl

Verify the interface is active. See Verifying the


interface on page 297

showlinestatus shelf slot port

Automatic baud rate adaption and fixed rate settings


When you select the sdsllatest line type for SDSL interface, or shdsllatest for
a SHDSL interface), the MALC can perform automatic baud rate adaption.
This allows receiving devices to communicate with transmitting devices
operating at different baud rates without the need to establish data rates in
advance. By determining the baud rate from the transmitting device, the
receiving MALC automatically trains to match the line rate of the incoming
data.
The automatic baud rate adaption process may take several minutes. This is
because the CO and CPE device modems use an algorithm to step through a
sequence of baud rates, where the devices establish a connection at each line
rate and then move to the next higher rate until they reach the final rate they
agree upon.
The following table describes how the fixed-bit-rate settings in the
sdsl-config and shdsl-config profiles affect training rates.

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Configuring SDSL interfaces

Table 70: Fix-bit-rate settings and modem train rates


CO

CPE

Then

Disabled

Disabled

highest available rate is negotiated.

Disabled

Enabled

Modems train at CPEs fixed rate.

Enabled

Disabled

Modems train at COs fixed rate.

Enabled

Enabled

Modems train at lowest fixed rate.

Configuration restrictions
The same card can support a combination of SDSL and SHDSL ports with the
following restrictions:

Configure the DSL modem in pairs (modems 1 and 2, modems 3 and 4,


and so on).

Adjacent modems (ports 1 and 2, 3 and 4, and so on) must have the same
line-type. Each DSL modem supports 2 DSL ports.

Adjacent modems must have the same framer-type (if configured for
SDSL).

Adjacent modems must have the same unit-mode setting.

Adjacent modems must have the same network timing recovery setting.

Other configuration settings, such as line speed, can differ for each line on the
card.

Specifying the type of DSL interface


Note: The IANA-ifType for SDSL interfaces is shdsl. The interface
name appears in profile indexes and system output.

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SHDSL cards

The dsl-config profile supports the following parameters:


Parameter

Description

line-type

The DSL type supported on this interface.


Values:
shdsl SHDSL. Not compatible with shdsllatest firmware.
sdsl SDSL. Not compatible with sdsllatest firmware.
shdsllatest Compatible with future versions of firmware code.
Required for autobaud.
sdsllatest Compatible with future versions of firmware code.
Required for autobaud.
Default: shdsllatest
Refer to the release notes for your device firmware revision
levels.

unit-mode

Specifies whether the unit is configured as a CO or CPE


device.
Values:
co
cpe
Default: co

line-status-trap
-enable

Specifies whether a line status trap should be sent whenever


the DSL line goes up or down. Note that this setting does not
apply to line status traps sent during system bootup. During
bootup, line status traps are not sent.
A DSL link down trap has a moderate severity level and a link
up trap has a low severity.
Default: enabled

To specify the interface as an SDSL line, set the line-type in the


dsl-config profile:
zSH> update dsl-config 1-1-1-0/shdsl
line-type: -> {sdsl}: sdsl | sdsllatest
unit-mode: -> {coe}:
line-status-trap-enable: -> {enabled}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring an SDSL interface


By default, MALC DSL interfaces are configured as SDSL CO interfaces
with a line rate of 1,552 Kbps.

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The sdsl-config profile supports the following parameters (all others should
be left at their default values):
Parameter

Description

config-line-rate

The line rate.


Values:
line-rate-144kbps, line-rate-160kbps, line-rate-192kbps, line-rate-208kbps,
line-rate-224kbps, line-rate-256kbps, line-rate-272kbps, line-rate-320kbps,
line-rate-368kbps, line-rate-384kbps, line-rate-400kbps, line-rate-416kbps,
line-rate-528kbps, line-rate-768kbps, line-rate-784kbps, line-rate-1040kbps,
line-rate-1152kbps, line-rate-1168kbps, line-rate-1536kbps, line-rate-1552kbps,
line-rate-1568kbps, line-rate-2320kbps, line-rate-176kbps, line-rate-240kbps,
line-rate-288kbps, line-rate-304kbps, line-rate-336kbps, line-rate-352kbps,
line-rate-432kbps, line-rate-464kbps, line-rate-496kbps, line-rate-560kbps,
line-rate-592kbps, line-rate-624kbps, line-rate-656kbps, line-rate-688kbps,
line-rate-720kbps, line-rate-752kbps, line-rate-816kbps, line-rate-848kbps,
line-rate-880kbps, line-rate-912kbps, line-rate-944kbps, line-rate-976kbps,
line-rate-1008kbps, line-rate-1072kbps, line-rate-1104kbps, line-rate-1136kbps,
line-rate-1200kbps, line-rate-1232kbps, line-rate-1264kbps, line-rate-1296kbps,
line-rate-1328kbps, line-rate-1360kbps, line-rate-1392kbps, line-rate-1424kbps,
line-rate-1456kbps, line-rate-1488kbps, line-rate-1520kbps, line-rate-1584kbps,
line-rate-1616kbps, line-rate-1648kbps, line-rate-1680kbps, line-rate-1712kbps,
line-rate-1744kbps, line-rate-1776kbps, line-rate-1808kbps, line-rate-1840kbps,
line-rate-1872kbps, line-rate-1904kbps, line-rate-1936kbps, line-rate-1968kbps,
line-rate-2000kbps, line-rate-2032kbps, line-rate-2064kbps, line-rate-2096kbps,
line-rate-2128kbps, line-rate-2160kbps, line-rate-2192kbps, line-rate-2224kbps,
line-rate-2256kbps, line-rate-2288kbps
Default: line-rate-1552kbps

fix-bit-rate

Enables or disables automatic baud rate adaption.


Values:
fix-bit-disable This value enables automatic baud rate adaption. If the CO and CPE
devices have different line rates at startup, the lower of the two rates will be selected.
fix-bit-enable This value is used for static (set) baud rates.

ntr

Network timing recovery (NTR) specifies that the system synchronizes with an
external (network) clocking source.
Values:
ntr-enable the system synchronizes with the network.
ntr-disable the system relies on its own clocking source.
Default: ntr-disable

power-scale

Adjusts transmit power in small increments to compensate for minor differences on


power between units.
Values:
17664 For loop lengths from 0 to 10 feet (0 to 3.05 meters). Equivalent to -3.39db.
20992 For loop lengths less than 4000 feet (1219.2 meters). Equivalent to -1.9db.
29952 For loop lengths greater than 4000 feet (1219.2 meters). Equivalent to
1.19db.

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SHDSL cards

Note: If SDSL ports require network timing, network timing


recovery must be enabled for each port by setting the ntr
parameter in to ntr-enable.
The default sdsl-config profile enables automatic baud rate detection (if
the DSL line-type is sdsllatest). To specify a particular line rate, update
the profile:
zSH> update sdsl-config 1-15-1-0/shdsl
Please provide the following: ([q]uit)
config-line-rate: -> {line-rate-1552kbps}: line-rate-752kbps
fix-bit-rate: -> {fix-bit-disable}: fix-bit-enable
connect-mode: -> {flowpoint-mode}:
ntr: ---------> {ntr-disable}:
framer-type: -> {atm-clear-channel}:
power-scale: -> {17664}: 20992
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Note: If you are setting a fixed rate for the interface, both sides must
have the same setting or the line will not train.

Activating the interface


Activate the interface using the if-translate profile. The following
example activates the SDSL/SHDSL line in shelf 1, slot 15, port 1:
zSH> update if-translate 1-15-1-0/shdsl
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {156}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {15}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {shdsl}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {false}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the rest of the interfaces similarly.

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Configuring SHDSL interfaces

Verifying the interface


The showlinestatus command displays the status of the interfaces in the
system. The following example displays the status of the line in shelf, slot
15, port 1:
zSH> showlinestatus 1 15 1
Search in progress .........
.................
GroupId --------> 129
Status ---------> ACTIVE (1)
TxClk ----------> NONE (1)
RefClkSrc ------> NO
If_index -------> 128
Peer If_Index --> 0
Shelf ----------> 1
Slot -----------> 15
Port -----------> 1
SubPort --------> 0

Configuring SHDSL interfaces


The MALC supports 2-wire and 4-wire SHDSL cards. These cards support
SHDSL as defined in ITU G.991.2. The cards are configured in the same way,
except that the line rates for the 4-wire card are different.
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure SHDSL
interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Configure the type of SHDSL interface and whether it


is acting as a CO or CPE device. See Specifying the
type of DSL interface on page 293.

update dsl-config index/shdsl


Where index is of the form shelf-slot-port-subport or a
user-defined string.

Configure specific DSL interface settings, such as


framing and compatibility. See Configuring an SDSL
interface on page 294.

update shdsl-config index/shdsl

Activate the interface. See Activating the interface on


page 296

update if-translate index/shdsl

Verify the interface is active. See Verifying the


interface on page 297

showlinestatus shelf slot port

Specifying the type of DSL interface


The system creates dsl-config profiles for SHDSL cards with the
appropriate settings.
zSH> get dsl-config 1-6-1-0/shdsl
line-type: -> {shdsllatest}:
unit-mode: -> {co}:

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SHDSL cards

line-status-trap-enable: ->

{enabled}

See Configuring SDSL interfaces on page 292 for a description of the


values in the dsl-config profile.
SHDSL interfaces have the same configuration restrictions as SDSL
interfaces. For details, see Specifying the type of DSL interface on page 293.

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Configuring a SHDSL line


The shdsl-config profile supports the following parameters (all others should
be left at their default values):
Parameter

Description

shdsl-config-line-rate

The line rate. If the shdsl-fix-bit-rate parameter is enabled, the line will attempt to
train at this rate. Note that the DSL modem uses 8kbps for ATM framing and other
ATM overhead, so that effective line rate is 8kbps less that the configured rate. Note
that some of these rates (indicated by line-rate-4w) are only supported on the 4-wire
SHDSL card.
Values:
line-rate-72kbps, line-rate-80kbps, line-rate-136kbps, line-rate-144kbps,
line-rate-200kbps, line-rate-208kbps, line-rate-264kbps, line-rate-272kbps,
line-rate-328kbps, line-rate-336kbps, line-rate-392kbps, line-rate-400kbps,
line-rate-456kbps, line-rate-464kbps, line-rate-520kbps, line-rate-528kbps,
line-rate-584kbps, line-rate-592kbps, line-rate-648kbps, line-rate-656kbps,
line-rate-712kbps, line-rate-720kbps, line-rate-776kbps, line-rate-784kbps,
line-rate-840kbps, line-rate-848kbps, line-rate-904kbps, line-rate-912kbps,
line-rate-968kbps, line-rate-976kbps, line-rate-1032kbps, line-rate-1040kbps,
line-rate-1096kbps, line-rate-1104kbps, line-rate-1160kbps, line-rate-1168kbps,
line-rate-1224kbps, line-rate-1232kbps, line-rate-1288kbps, line-rate-1296kbps,
line-rate-1352kbps, line-rate-1360kbps, line-rate-1416kbps, line-rate-1424kbps,
line-rate-1480kbps, line-rate-1488kbps, line-rate-1544kbps, line-rate-1552kbps,
line-rate-1608kbps, line-rate-1616kbps, line-rate-1672kbps, line-rate-1680kbps,
line-rate-1736kbps, line-rate-1744kbps, line-rate-1800kbps, line-rate-1808kbps,
line-rate-1864kbps, line-rate-1872kbps, line-rate-1928kbps, line-rate-1936kbps,
line-rate-1992kbps, line-rate-2000kbps, line-rate-2056kbps, line-rate-2064kbps,
line-rate-2120kbps, line-rate-2128kbps, line-rate-2184kbps, line-rate-2192kbps,
line-rate-2248kbps, line-rate-2256kbps, line-rate-2312kbps, line-rate-2320kbps,
line-rate-2368kbps line-rate-4w-384kbps line-rate-4w-512kbps
line-rate-4w-640kbps line-rate-4w-768kbps line-rate-4w-896kbps
line-rate-4w-1024kbps line-rate-4w-1152kbps line-rate-4w-1280kbps
line-rate-4w-1408kbps line-rate-4w-1536kbps line-rate-4w-1664kbps
line-rate-4w-1792kbps line-rate-4w-1920kbps line-rate-4w-2048kbps
line-rate-4w-2176kbps line-rate-4w-2304kbps line-rate-4w-2432kbps
line-rate-4w-2560kbps line-rate-4w-2688kbps line-rate-4w-2816kbps
line-rate-4w-2944kbps line-rate-4w-3072kbps line-rate-4w-3200kbps
line-rate-4w-3328kbps line-rate-4w-3456kbps line-rate-4w-3584kbps
line-rate-4w-3712kbps line-rate-4w-3840kbps line-rate-4w-3968kbps
line-rate-4w-4096kbps line-rate-4w-4224kbps line-rate-4w-4352kbps
line-rate-4w-4480kbps line-rate-4w-4608kbps
Default: line-rate-2320kbps

shdsl-transmit-powerback-off-mode

Indicates if transmit power backoff is used on the other end of the loop. When enabled,
the transmit power is reduced in steps of 1dB from 0 to 6 dB according to the received
power.
Values:
backoffdisable
backoffenable
Default: backoffenable

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SHDSL cards

Parameter

Description

shdsl-fix-bit-rate

Normally, if the CO side and CPE side select different line rates at startup, the lower of
the two rates will be selected. By using the fix bit rate the CO side can override the
default procedure and require startup at the rate specified in the
shdsl-config-line-rate.
Values:
fix-bit-disable This value enables automatic baud rate adaption, where the DSL
modem will train at the best achievable rate. If the CO and CPE devices have different
line rates at startup, the line will train up to the highest rate supported by both devices.
fix-bit-enable This value is used for static (set) baud rates. With this option, the line
will attempt to connect at the rate configured in the shdsl-config-line-rate.
Default: fix-bit-disable

shdsl-ntr

Determines the clocking on the SHDSL line.


Values:
ntr-local-osc The line uses the systems internal clock. Also known as local timing.
ntr-refck-8KHz The line uses an 8KHZ clock derived from a timing source such a
T1/E1 interface.
Default: ntr-local-osc

shdsl-clock-offset

This parameter is used to help achieve a low frequency wander and jitter between
network and DSL system clock. This value can only be set on devices configured as
CO in the dsl-config profile.
Values:
-100 to 100 (in parts per million)
Default: 0

shdsl-repeater-id

This value identifies if the STU is being used as a repeater.


Values:
noChangeRepeater
repeaterDisable
repeaterEnable
Default: repeaterDisable

shdsl-standard

Determines the SHDSL standard used.


Values:
annex-a G.991.2 Annex A. Typically used in the United States.
annex-b G.991.2 Annex B. Typically used outside the United States.
Default: annex-b

shdsl-startup-margin

Specifies the minimum desired target margin in dB for the local line conditions during
startup. Used to negotiate the bit rate during startup.
Values:
0 to 10
Default: 6

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Configuring SHDSL interfaces

Parameter

Description

shdsl-wire-mode

This setting disables or enables 4-wire-framing.


Values:
four-wire-disable Four wire framing is disabled. Use this setting for the 2 wire
SHDSL card.
four-wire-enable-bit-interleave Sends one bit on channel 1, then one bit on channel
2, as described in the ITU-T G.991.2, section E.2.
four-wire-enable-byte-interleave sends one byte on channel 1, and then one byte on
channel 2, as described in ITU-T G.991.2, section E.7
four-wire-enable-non-interleave Sends 12 bytes on channel 1, 12 bytes on second
channel 2.
Default: four-wire-disable

shdsl-frame-sync

Not supported.

shdsl-decoder-coeffA

21 bit value corresponding to the decoder coefficient A or B, as defined in the G.991.2


standard. Note that the default value is bit-reversed, when compared against the
recommended polynomials in the G.991.2 standard. Thus when you enter the 21-bit
value, it should be written bit-reversed also.

shdsl-decoder-coeffB

Values:
0 to 2097151
Default: 366 (for shdsl-decoder-coeffA)
817 (for shdsl-decoder-coeffB)
shdsl-power-scale

Adjusts transmit power in small increments to compensate for minor differences in


power between units. The formula for the adjustment is:
adjustment (in dB) = 29952 * 10(shdsl-power-scale / 20)
The following values are recommended for different loop lengths.
Values:
17664 For loop lengths from 0 to 10 feet (0 to 3.05 meters). Corresponds to -3.39dB.
20992 For loop lengths less than 4000 feet (1219 meters). Corresponds to -1.9dB.
29952 For loop lengths greater than 4000 feet (1219 meters). Corresponds to
-1.19dB.
Default: 29298

To configure an SHDSL interface update the shdsl-config profile:


For a 2-wire interface:
zSH> update shdsl-config 1-6-1-0/shdsl
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
shdsl-config-line-rate: ------------->
shdsl-transmit-power-back-off-mode: ->
shdsl-fix-bit-rate: ----------------->
shdsl-ntr: -------------------------->
shdsl-clock-offset: ----------------->
shdsl-repeater-id: ------------------>
shdsl-standard: --------------------->
shdsl-startup-margin: --------------->

{line-rate-2320kbps}: line-rate-1552kbps
{backoffenable}:
{fix-bit-disable}:
{ntr-local-osc}:
{0}:
{repeaterdisable}:
{annex-b}:
{6}:

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SHDSL cards

shdsl-wire-mode: --------------------> {four-wire-disable}:


shdsl-frame-sync: -------------------> {45}:
shdsl-decoder-coeffA: ---------------> {366}:
shdsl-decoder-coeffB: ---------------> {817}:
shdsl-power-scale: ------------------> {29298}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

To configure a 4-wire SHDSL interface update the shdsl-config profile:


zSH> update shdsl-config 1-6-1-0/shdsl
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
shdsl-config-line-rate: -------------> {line-rate-2320kbps}:
line-rate-4w-4608kbps
shdsl-transmit-power-back-off-mode: -> {backoffenable}:
shdsl-fix-bit-rate: -----------------> {fix-bit-disable}:
shdsl-ntr: --------------------------> {ntr-local-osc}:
shdsl-clock-offset: -----------------> {0}:
shdsl-repeater-id: ------------------> {repeaterdisable}:
shdsl-standard: ---------------------> {annex-b}:
shdsl-startup-margin: ---------------> {6}:
shdsl-wire-mode: --------------------> {four-wire-disable}:
four-wire-enable-byte-interleave
shdsl-frame-sync: -------------------> {45}:
shdsl-decoder-coeffA: ---------------> {366}:
shdsl-decoder-coeffB: ---------------> {817}:
shdsl-power-scale: ------------------> {29298}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activating the interface


Activate the interface using the if-translate profile. The following
example activates the interface line in shelf 1, slot 6, port 1:
zSH> update if-translate 1-6-1-0/shdsl
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {156}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {15}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {shdsl}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-6-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

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SHDSL pinouts

Activate the rest of the interfaces similarly.

Verifying the interface


Use the dslstat command to displays the status of the interface:
zSH> dslstat 1-6-1-0/shdsl
General Stats:
------------AdminStatus..................................UP
DslUpLineRate (bitsPerSec)...................2320
DslDownLineRate (bitsPerSec).................2320
DslMaxAttainableUpLineRate (bitsPerSec)......2320
DslMaxAttainableDownLineRate (bitsPerSec)....2320
Out
Octets...................................1921747131
Out Discards.................................0
Out Errors...................................0
In
Octets....................................1921797746
In Discards..................................0
In Errors....................................0
ATM LCD Count................................1
DSL Physical Stats:
-----------------DslLineSnrMgn (tenths dB)....................384
DslLineAtn (tenths dB).......................246
DslCurrOutputPwr (tenths dB).................75
LOFS.........................................1
LOLS.........................................1
LOSS.........................................1
ESS..........................................9
CRC Errors...................................0
Inits........................................1

SHDSL pinouts
This section describes the following pinouts on the SHSDL cards:

SDHSL-LP connector on page 303

SHDSL-LP IN connector on page 304

G.SHDSL 4-Wire pinouts on page 306

SHDSL-24 pinouts on page 307

SDHSL-LP connector
Table 74 lists the SHDSL connector pinouts.

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SHDSL cards

Table 71: SHDSL-24-LP pniouts


Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Power

Channel 1 ring

26

Channel 1 tip

POS

Channel 2 ring

27

Channel 2 tip

NEG

Channel 3 ring

28

Channel 3 tip

POS

Channel 4 ring

29

Channel 4 tip

NEG

Channel 5 ring

30

Channel 5 tip

POS

Channel 6 ring

31

Channel 6 tip

NEG

Channel 7 ring

32

Channel 7 tip

POS

Channel 8 ring

33

Channel 8 tip

NEG

Channel 9 ring

34

Channel 9 tip

POS

10

Channel 10 ring

35

Channel 10 tip

NEG

11

Channel 11 ring

36

Channel 11 tip

POS

12

Channel 12 ring

37

Channel 12 tip

NEG

13

Channel 13 ring

38

Channel 13 tip

POS

14

Channel 14 ring

39

Channel 14 tip

NEG

15

Channel 15 ring

40

Channel 15 tip

POS

16

Channel 16 ring

41

Channel 16 tip

NEG

17

Channel 17 ring

42

Channel 17 tip

POS

18

Channel 18 ring

43

Channel 18 tip

NEG

19

Channel 19 ring

44

Channel 19 tip

POS

20

Channel 20 ring

45

Channel 20 tip

NEG

21

Channel 21 ring

46

Channel 21 tip

POS

22

Channel 22 ring

47

Channel 22 tip

NEG

23

Channel 23 ring

48

Channel 23 tip

POS

24

Channel 24 ring

49

Channel 24 tip

NEG

25

Not used

50

Not used

SHDSL-LP IN connector
The LP IN port on the MALC SHDSL-24-LP card provides 12 pairs of wires
to deliver power. The power is combined with the data and sent out over the
24 SHDSL ports to downstream Raptor 100 devices. One MALC SHDSL-LP
card can provide power and data for 6 Raptor 100 devices.

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SHDSL pinouts

Figure 56 shows the pin locations for the MALC SHDSL-LP power
connector. Table 72 on page 305 lists the pinouts.
Figure 56: SHDSL-LP power connector

Table 72: Power connector pinouts


DB-25 pin

Delivers power to
MALC SHDSL-LP port

Function

Colors

POSV1

White/Blue

14

NEGV1

Blue/White

POSV2

White/Orange

15

NEGV2

Orange/White

POSV3

White/Green

16

NEGV3

Green/White

POSV4

White/Brown

17

NEGV4

Brown/White

POSV5

White/Slate

18

10

NEGV5

Slate/White

11

POSV6

Red/Blue

19

12

NEGV6

Blue/Red

13

POSV7

Red/Orange

20

14

NEGV7

Orange/Red

15

POSV8

Red/Green

21

16

NEGV8

Green/Red

17

POSV9

Red/Brown

22

18

NEGV9

Brown/Red

10

19

POSV10

Red/Slate

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305

SHDSL cards

Table 72: Power connector pinouts (Continued)


DB-25 pin

Delivers power to
MALC SHDSL-LP port

Function

Colors

23

20

NEGV10

Slate/Red

11

21

POSV11

Black/Blue

24

22

NEGV11

Blue/Black

12

23

POSV12

Black/Orange

25

24

NEGV12

Orange/Black

13

N/A

Not used

N/A

G.SHDSL 4-Wire pinouts


The 4- wire SHDSL-12 cards use standard RJ-21X pinouts. Table 73 lists the
port pinouts.
Table 73: 4- wire SHDSL-12 pinouts

306

Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Port 1 ring

26

Port 1 tip

Port 13 ring

27

Port 13 tip

Port 2 ring

28

Port 2 tip

Port 14 ring

29

Port 14 tip

Port 3 ring

30

Port 3 tip

Port 15 ring

31

Port 15 tip

Port 4 ring

32

Port 4 tip

Port 16 ring

33

Port 16 tip

Port 5 ring

34

Port 5 tip

10

Port 17 ring

35

Port 17 tip

11

Port 6 ring

36

Port 6 tip

12

Port 18 ring

37

Port 18 tip

13

Port 7 ring

38

Port 7 tip

14

Port 19 ring

39

Port 19 tip

15

Port 8 ring

40

Port 8 tip

16

Port 20 ring

41

Port 20 tip

17

Port 9 ring

42

Port 9 tip

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

SHDSL pinouts

Table 73: 4- wire SHDSL-12 pinouts (Continued)


Pin

Function

Pin

Function

18

Port 21 ring

43

Port 21 tip

19

Port 10 ring

44

Port 10 tip

20

Port 22 ring

45

Port 22 tip

21

Port 11 ring

46

Port 11 tip

22

Port 23 ring

47

Port 23 tip

23

Port 12 ring

48

Port 12 tip

24

Port 24 ring

49

Port 24 tip

25

Not used

50

Not used

SHDSL-24 pinouts
The SHDSL-24 card uses standard RJ-21X pinouts. Table 74 lists the port
pinouts.
Table 74: SHDSL-24
Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Channel 1 ring

26

Channel 1 tip

Channel 2 ring

27

Channel 2 tip

Channel 3 ring

28

Channel 3 tip

Channel 4 ring

29

Channel 4 tip

Channel 5 ring

30

Channel 5 tip

Channel 6 ring

31

Channel 6 tip

Channel 7 ring

32

Channel 7 tip

Channel 8 ring

33

Channel 8 tip

Channel 9 ring

34

Channel 9 tip

10

Channel 10 ring

35

Channel 10 tip

11

Channel 11 ring

36

Channel 11 tip

12

Channel 12 ring

37

Channel 12 tip

13

Channel 13 ring

38

Channel 13 tip

14

Channel 14 ring

39

Channel 14 tip

15

Channel 15 ring

40

Channel 15 tip

16

Channel 16 ring

41

Channel 16 tip

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

307

SHDSL cards

Table 74: SHDSL-24 (Continued)


Pin

Function

Pin

Function

17

Channel 17 ring

42

Channel 17 tip

18

Channel 18 ring

43

Channel 18 tip

19

Channel 19 ring

44

Channel 19 tip

20

Channel 20 ring

45

Channel 20 tip

21

Channel 21 ring

46

Channel 21 tip

22

Channel 22 ring

47

Channel 22 tip

23

Channel 23 ring

48

Channel 23 tip

24

Channel 24 ring

49

Channel 24 tip

25

Not used

50

Not used

Delivering power and data to a Raptor 100 SHDSL-LP


This section describes how to connect the MALC SHDSL-LP card to a Zhone
Raptor 100 SHDSL-LP device. The MALC SHDSL-LP card delivers power
and data on the same wires. For distances of 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), two
pairs of wires delivering power are required.
The specifications for the cables delivering power are as follows:

2 wires per port

26 AWG (0.4 mm) or 24 AWG (0.5 mm)

The LP IN port on the MALC SHDSL-24-LP card provides 12 pairs of wires


to deliver power. The power is combined with the data and sent out over the
24 SHDSL ports to downstream Raptor 100 SHDSL-LP devices. One MALC
SHDSL-LP card can provide power and data for 6 Raptor 100 devices.
The wiring diagram below illustrates the wiring connections for power and
data being transmitted over the same pair of wires to a single MALC. To
power multiple MALC devices, uses the pinouts described in Table 72 on
page 305 to match SHDSL ports to the power pairs. Each set of four pins can
power a single Raptor 100.
For the SHDSL data connector pinouts, see SHDSL pinouts on page 303.

308

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Delivering power and data to a Raptor 100 SHDSL-LP

Figure 57: Example power and data delivered over the same wire pairs for one
Raptor 100

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

309

SHDSL cards

310

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

15

POTS CARDS
This chapter describes the MALC POTS card and explains how to configure
it. It includes:

24-port POTS card (POTS-24 and POTS-900-24), page 312

48-port POTS card (POTS-TDM-48 and POTS-TDM/PKT-48), page 313

Configuring POTS ports, page 317

Overview
The following cards provide POTS interfaces:

POTS 24 card. See 24-port POTS card (POTS-24 and POTS-900-24) on


page 312.

POTS 48. See 48-port POTS card (POTS-TDM-48 and POTS-TDM/


PKT-48) on page 313.
Note: For information on ADSL+POTS cards see ADSL cards on
page 213.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

311

POTS cards

24-port POTS card (POTS-24 and POTS-900-24)

The 24-port POTS cards provide access to traditional 2-wire


analog voice circuits using tone dialing. They support loop
start and provides echo cancellation. The POTS cards
communicates with the Uplink card over the MALC TDM
and control bus. POTS voice traffic is converted from
G.711-encoded voice to ATM AAL2 and transmitted to the
voice network by the Uplink card. A standards-based voice
gateway, such as the MALC converts the voice traffic back
to TDM and forwards it to a class 5 switch.
The POTS-24 card supports 600 ohm impedance. The
POTS-900-24 card supports 900 ohm impendance.

Table 75: POTS-24, POTS-900-24 specifications


Specification

Density

Size

1 slot

Density

24 ports

Physical interfaces

One (1) RJ-21X 50-pin telco connector

Line characteristics

2 wire POTS, Loop Start


600 Ohm line impedance (POTS-24)
900 Ohm line impedance (POTS-900-24)
40mA loop current @ 18,000 feet loop length (long reach)

Metallic test
functions

Look-out tests

Ring generation

Ring voltage supplied through Ring Voltage bus


Ring Voltage Generator located on MT/Ringer/Alarm card
External generation possible through Ring Generator
access port on MTAC/Ring card.

312

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Table 75: POTS-24, POTS-900-24 specifications (Continued)


Specification

Density

Redundancy

None

Main components

ST Micro SLIC/Codec

Power consumption

12 W @ 30 mA nominal (no ports off hook)


plus
1.44 W additional per active POTS interface
46.56 W maximum

48-port POTS card (POTS-TDM-48 and POTS-TDM/PKT-48)

There are two models of 48 port POTS cards:

POTS-TDM-48 supports traditional 2-wire analog voice


circuits using tone dialing. It communicates with the
Uplink card over the MALC TDM bus and the control
bus. POTS voice traffic is converted from G.711-encoded
voice to ATM AAL2 and transmitted to the voice network
by the Uplink card. A standards-based voice gateway,
such as the MALC converts the voice traffic back to TDM
and forwards it to a class 5 switch.

POTS-TDM/PKT-48 supports traditional TDM voice as


well as packetized voice for use in a VOIP network. This
card supports loop start and provides echo cancellation. It
communicates with the Uplink card over the MALC
packet bus and the control bus. POTS voice traffic is
packetized on the card and sent to a standards-based voice
gateway, such as the MALC voice gateway card. There the
voice traffic is converted back to TDM and forwarded it to
a class 5 switch.

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313

POTS cards

Table 76: POTS-TDM-48 and POTS-TDM/PKT-48 specifications


Specification

Density

Size

1 slot

Density

48 ports

Physical
interfaces

One (1) 96-pin telco connector

Line
characteristics

2 wire POTS, Loop Start

Metallic test
functions

Look-out tests

Ring
generation

Ring voltage supplied through Ring Voltage bus

40mA loop current @ 18,000 feet loop length (long reach)

Ring Voltage Generator located on MT/Ringer/Alarm card


External generation possible through Ring Generator access
port on MTAC/Ring card.

Redundancy

None

Power
consumption

32 watts maximum

Configuring POTS cards


Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.
Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.
The slots cards on the MALC have the following types and software images:
Table 77: MALC card types

314

Card

Type

Name of software image

POTS-24

5002

malcpots.bin

POTS-900

5002

malcpots.bin

POTS-TDM-48

5047

malcpots48.bin

POTS-TDM/PKT-48

5047

malcpots48.bin

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring POTS cards

MALC cards with 48 POTS ports can be configured to operate in TDM mode
or in packet voice mode, depending on the model of card installed. This
requires setting the card-line-type in the card-profile.

Configuring 24 port POTS cards


The following example creates a card-profile for a POTS card in shelf 1,
slot 13:
zSH> new card-profile 1/13/5002 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcpots.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
New record saved.

Configuring a POTS 48 card for TDM voice


1

View the type of card installed in the system:


zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 F (RUNNING)
2: MALC DS3 F (LOADING)
8: MALC POTS 48 (LOADING)
10: MALC MTAC FC (RUNNING)

The POTS card in slot 8 is a POTS-TDM-48 card, which supports TDM


voice only.
2

Create a card-profile for the card in slot 8:

zSH> new card-profile 1/8/5047 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcpots48.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:

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315

POTS cards

hold-active: ----------> {false}:


weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: pots indicates TDM voice only
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Configuring a POTS 48 card for packet voice


1

View the type of card installed in the system:


zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 F (RUNNING)
2: MALC DS3 F (LOADING)
6: MALC POTS 48/with Packet Voice (LOADING)
10: MALC MTAC FC (RUNNING)

The POTS card in slot 6 is a POTS-TDM/PKT-48 card, which supports


packet voice.
2

Create a card-profile for the POTS-48 card in slot 6:

zSH> new card-profile 1/6/5047 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcpots48.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: pots-pv indicates packet voice
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and
the begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This
could take a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the
following is displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

316

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring POTS ports

Configuring POTS ports


Note: The MALC POTS-24 and ADSL+POTS-32A-2S cards do not
support pulse dialing or ground start signaling.
The following table summarizes how to configure a POTS interfaces on the
MALC:
Action

Command

Configure the POTS gain settings. See


Configuring POTS settings on page 317.

update analog-if-cfg-profile index/voicefxs


Where index is of the form shelf-slot-port-subport or a user-defined
string.
For typical applications, the settings in this profile do not need to be
modified.

Configure the POTS signaling. See


Configuring signal type and ring
frequency on page 320.

update analog-fxs-cfg-profile index/voicefxs

Activate the POTS interfaces in the


if-translate profiles. See Activating
POTS interfaces on page 321.

update if-translate index/voicefxs

For typical applications, the settings in this profile do not need to be


modified.

Configuring POTS settings


Modify the following parameters in the analog-if-cfg-profile if you need to
change the gain settings for each voice line:

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

317

POTS cards

Parameter

Description

if-cfg-impedence

Specifies the terminating impedance of analog voice interfaces.


Values:
ohms600complex 600 Ohms + 2.16uF
ohms900complex 00 Ohms + 2.16uF
Default: ohms600complex

if-cfg-receive-tlp

The receive TLP is the signal level to the customer premises equipment (CPE). The
receive signal range is +3 dB to -9 dB. A positive number adds gain, a negative
number adds loss to the analog signal after decoding from PCM. For example, a
receive TLP setting of -6 dB will generate a voice signal at -6 dB level.
Values:
fxsrtlpn9db
fxsrtlpn8db
fxsrtlpn7db
fxsrtlpn6db
fxsrtlpn5db
fxsrtlpn4db
fxsrtlpn3db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsrtlpn2db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsrtlpn1db
fxsrtlp0db
fxsrtlp1db
fxsrtlp2db
fxsrtlp3db
rtlpnummeric
Default: fxsrtlpn6db

318

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring POTS ports

Parameter

Description

if-cfg-transmit-tlp

The transmit TLP is the signal level from the customer premises equipment (CPE).
The transmit signal range is +9 dB to -3 dB. A positive number adds loss, a negative
number adds gain to the analog signal before encoding to PCM. For example, a
transmit TLP setting of +3 dB will set a loss of 3 dB to generate a 0 dB PCM signal.
Values:
fxsTtlp9db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsTtlp8db (not supported on the POTS 900 card)
fxsTtlp7db
fxsTtlp6db
fxsTtlp5db
fxsTtlp4db
fxsTtlp3db
fxsTtlp2db
fxsTtlp1db
fxsTtlp0db
fxsTtlpN1db
fxsTtlpN2db
fxsTtlpN3db
Default: fxsTtlp0db

if-cfg-pcm-encoding

Line encoding.
Values:
alaw for E1.
mulaw for T1.

if-cfg-receive-tlpNum

Receive Transmission Level Point (RTLP) settings control the amount gain or loss
added to the incoming signal after it is decoded to analog. To incrase the signal level
set the RTLP setting to higher values. The default is 0 dB.
Values:
-160 to 85 (in tenths of dB)
Default: 0 dB

if-cfg-transmit-tlpNum

Transmit Transmission Level Point (TTLP) controls the amount of gain or loss added
to a voice signal before it is encoded to digital PCM. To increase the signal level,
reduce the TTLP setting to lower value.
Values:
-175 to 70 (in tenths of dB)
Default: 0 dB

If you need to modify the gain settings, update the analog-if-cfg-profile


for each interface. For example;:
zSH> update analog-if-cfg-profile 1-3-1-0/voicefxs
Please provide the following: (q=quit)
if-cfg-impedence: ------------>{ohms600complex}: modify if required
if-cfg-receive-tlp: ---------->{fxsrtlp0db}: modify if required

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319

POTS cards

if-cfg-transmit-tlp: --------->{fxsttlp0db}: modify if required


if-cfg-trunk-conditioning: --->{idle}:
if-maintenance-mode: --->{off}:
if-cfg-pcm-encoding: --->{mulaw}: alaw | mulaw
if-cfg-receive-tlpNum: -----> {0}:
if-cfg-transmit-tlpNum: ----> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configuring signal type and ring frequency


Modify the following parameters in the analog-fxs-cfg-profile if you need to
change signalling type and ring frequency for each voice line:
Parameter

Description

signal-type

The method by which an off-hook condition is indicated.


Values:
fxsloopstart
Default: fxsloopstart

ring-frequency

Rate in cycles per second (Hertz) at which polarity reversal


occurs on ringing.
Values:
ringfrequency20
ringfrequency25
ringfrequency30
ringfrequency50
Default: ringfrequency20

ring-back

The ring back is requested if this variable is set to on.


Values:
on
off
Default: off

If you need to modify the signaling and ring frequency, update the
analog-fxs-cfg-profile for each interface. For example;:
zSH> update analog-fxs-cfg-profile 1-3-1-0/voicefxs
signal-type: ----> {fxsloopstart}
ring-frequency: -> {ringfrequency20} modify if required
ring-back: ------> {off} modify if required
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

320

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring POTS ports

Activating POTS interfaces


Update the if-translate records for the POTS interface to enable the line.
The following example activates the first POTS interface on the slot card
located in shelf 1 slot 3:
zSH> update if-translate 1-3-1-0/voicefxs
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {132}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {3}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {voicefxs}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-3-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the rest of the interfaces similarly.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

321

POTS cards

322

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

16

VOICE GATEWAY CARD (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)


This chapter describes the MALC Voice Gateway card and explains how to
configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 323

Adding a voice gateway card, page 325

Adding a redundant voice gateway card, page 326

Pinouts, page 327


Note: For information on the slot cards supported with the voice
gateway card, see Packet voice support on page 29.

Overview
The voice gateway card is a 2-slot card and is available
in 4, 8, 16, or 32 port configurations for flexible TDM
access off of Resilient Packet Ring (RPR), IP or ATM
networks. This card supports up to 32 T1/E1s for
concurrent voice calls (128 protected 1+1 T1/E1 ports).
For ATM voice networks, the voice gateway card
supports Broadband Loop Emulation Service (BLES)
to either GR-303 or V5.2 signals as well as Emulation
Loop Control Protocol (ELCP) to V5.2 signals on the
local exchange switch.
For IP access, the voice gateway card supports Session
Initiation Protocol Private Line Automatic Ringdown
(SIP-PLAR) to either GR-303 or V5.2 signals on the
local switch.
Both VOIP and VoATM voice connections can be run
exclusively or concurrently on the same MALC system
and voice gateway card.
A MALC system also supports simultaneous voice
gateway connections and subscriber line connections
that use the same uplink card. However, subscriber line

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

323

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

POTS or ISDN connections cannot be directly connected to the voice gateway


card on the same MALC system.
The following connection types are supported.

Voice over ATM:

BLES to GR-303 or V5.2

ELCP to V5.2

Voice over IP: SIP-PLAR to GR-303 or V5.2

Table 78: Voice gateway card specifications


Specification

Description

Size

2 slots

Density

4, 8, 16, or 32 ports

Connectors

One (1) Champ 128-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ITU-T G.703

Supported line
rates

1.544 MHz, 2.048 MHz

Metallic test
function

Look-out test
Metallic loopback relay

Redundancy

Card redundancy

Power

55 watts

General

100/120 ohm balance

ITU-T G.704

Support for 8 IG over 32 T1/E1 facilities


960 call capacity for concurrent off-hook DS0s
ATM

AAL2 VoATM
VPI/VCI default values:
VPI: 0-7
VCI: 32-63
BLES-compliant, CAS Signalling over ATM AAL2:

324

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

G.711, G.726, and G.729a encoding

CAS, CCS and ELCP on V5.2

Configurable jitter buffer

Silence suppression
Echo cancellation (48ms tail echo)
Audio profiles 7,8,9,10 for VoATM

Auto detect fax/modem calls and switch to G.711, disable


echo cancel/silence suppression

Adding a voice gateway card

Table 78: Voice gateway card specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

ISDN

Allows ISDN telephony over packet networks

VOIP

SIP PLAR support for VOIP:

G.711, G.729a, and G.726 encoding

Configurable static or dynamic jitter buffer

Silence suppression
Echo cancellation (48ms tail echo)
Distributed SIP stack and RTP on every card
CAS and CCS
Auto detect fax/modem calls and switch to G.711, disable
echo cancel/silence suppression
RFC2833 CAS transmission
Configurable packet payload size

Adding a voice gateway card


To add a voice gateway card to the MALC, physically install the voice
gateway card in the desired slot location. Voice gateway cards are double-slot
cards that can be inserted into any slot except the first slot. After the card is
installed, create a card profile.
This example adds the voice gateway card to slot 3 and specifies the binary
file malct1e132vg.bin (for T1 connections). For E1 connections, specify the
malct1e132vgv52.bin file.
zSH> new card-profile 1/3/5040
sw-file-name: -----------> {} malct1e132vg.bin
admin-status: -----------> {operational}
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}
sw-enable: --------------> {false} true
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}
card-group-id: ----------> {0}
hold-active: ------------> {false}
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}
card-line-type: ---------> {unknowntype} ds1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

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325

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

Adding a redundant voice gateway card


The voice gateway card supports card-level redundancy. Configuring
redundant voice gateway cards requires 2 separate voice gateway cards and
intercard cabling to connect the cards.
Caution: Both cards in a redundant pair must be running the same
software version.
Although it may be helpful to place the redundant voice gateway cards close
to each other, redundant voice gateway cards do not need to be in contiguous
slot locations. Figure 58 shows redundant voice gateway cards with intercard
cabling installed.

active
fault
pwr fail

active
fault
pwr fail

Figure 58: Redundant voice gateway card cabling

8X
T1
E1

8X
T1
E1

ma0503

T
D
M

326

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T
D
M

Pinouts

Configuring redundant voice gateway cards


Caution: You must configure redundant physical interfaces on both
the active and standby cards. This applies to all redundant cards. In
addition, you must manually keep the configuration of the physical
interfaces on the active and standby cards in sync.
Note: When configuring the redundant voice gateway card, the
settings in the card-profile for the both cards must be identical.
To add a redundant card to the system:
1

Verify that active card has been configured with the same card-group-id
that is to be used for the standby card.

Install a second voice gateway card in an adjacent slot.

Create a card-profile for the second card:

zSH> new card-profile 1/3/5040 shelf/slot/type


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malct1e132vg.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}: enter the same redundancy group ID as the primary card
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}: assign a weight, if desired
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Once the card-profile has been saved, the standby card comes up and the
configuration and routing tables from the primary card are copied over.

Pinouts
This section provides the pinout for the following voice gateway cables:

Voice gateway non-redundant TDM cable on page 328

Voice gateway redundant TDM cable on page 333

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

327

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

Voice gateway non-redundant TDM cable


Figure 59 shows the MALC voice gateway cable. P1 to channels 1-8,
page 328 through Table 82 on page 332 lists the pinouts.
Figure 59: MALC voice gateway cable

Table 79: P1 to channels 1-8


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

TX 1 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-106

Blue

TX 1 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-105

Blue

RX 1 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-108

Blue

RX 1 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-107

Blue

TX 2 (tip)

White/Green

P1-110

Blue

TX 2 (ring)

Green/White

P1-109

Blue

RX 2 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-112

Blue

RX 2 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-111

Blue

TX 3 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-114

Blue

TX 3 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-113

Blue

RX 3 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-116

Blue

RX 3 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-115

Blue

328

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Pinouts

Table 79: P1 to channels 1-8 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

TX 4 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-27

Blue

TX 4 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-1

Blue

RX 4 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-79

Blue

RX 4 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-53

Blue

TX 5 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-28

Blue

TX 5 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-2

Blue

RX 5 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-80

Blue

RX 5 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-54

Blue

TX 6 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-29

Blue

TX 6 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-3

Blue

RX 6 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-81

Blue

RX 6 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-55

Blue

TX 7 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-30

Blue

TX 7 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-4

Blue

RX 7 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-82

Blue

RX 7 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-56

Blue

TX 8 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-31

Blue

TX 8 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-5

Blue

RX 8 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-83

Blue

RX 8 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-57

Blue

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Table 80: P1 to channels 9-16


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

17

TX 9 (tip)

Yellow/Orange

P1-32

Blue

TX 9 (ring)

Orange/Yellow

P1-6

Blue

RX 9 (tip)

Yellow/Green

P1-84

Blue

RX 9 (ring)

Green/Yellow

P1-58

Blue

TX 10 (tip)

Yellow/Brown

P1-33

Blue

TX 10 (ring)

Brown/Yellow

P1-7

Blue

18

19

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

329

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

Table 80: P1 to channels 9-16 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

20

RX 10 (tip)

Yellow/Slate

P1-85

Blue

RX 10 (ring)

Slate/Yellow

P1-59

Blue

TX 11 (tip)

Violet/Blue

P1-34

Blue

TX 11 (ring)

Blue/Violet

P1-8

Blue

RX 11 (tip)

Violet/Orange

P1-86

Blue

RX 11 (ring)

Orange/Violet

P1-60

Blue

TX 12 (tip)

Violet/Green

P1-35

Blue

TX 12 (ring)

Green/Violet

P1-9

Blue

RX 12 (tip)

Violet/Brown

P1-87

Blue

RX 12 (ring)

Brown/Violet

P1-61

Blue

TX 13 (tip)

Violet/Slate

P1-36

Blue

TX 13 (ring)

Slate/Violet

P1-10

Blue

TX 13 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-88

Orange

TX 13 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-62

Orange

RX 14 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-37

Orange

RX 14 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-11

Orange

TX 14 (tip)

White/Green

P1-89

Orange

TX 14 (ring)

Green/White

P1-63

Orange

RX 15 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-38

Orange

RX 15 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-12

Orange

TX 15 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-90

Orange

TX 15 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-64

Orange

RX 16 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-39

Orange

RX 16 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-13

Orange

TX 16 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-91

Orange

TX 16 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-65

Orange

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

330

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Pinouts

Table 81: P1 to channels 17-24


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

33

RX 17 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-40

Orange

RX 17 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-14

Orange

TX 17 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-92

Orange

TX 17 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-66

Orange

RX 18 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-41

Orange

RX 18 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-15

Orange

TX 18 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-93

Orange

TX 18 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-67

Orange

RX 19 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-42

Orange

RX 19 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-16

Orange

TX 19 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-94

Orange

TX 19 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-68

Orange

RX 20 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-43

Orange

RX 20 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-17

Orange

TX 20 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-95

Orange

TX 20 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-69

Orange

RX 21 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-44

Orange

RX 21 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-18

Orange

RX 21 (tip)

Yellow/Orange

P1-96

Orange

RX 21 (ring)

Orange/Yellow

P1-70

Orange

TX 22 (tip)

Yellow/Green

P1-45

Orange

TX 22 (ring)

Green/Yellow

P1-19

Orange

RX 22 (tip)

Yellow/Brown

P1-97

Orange

RX 22 (ring)

Brown/Yellow

P1-71

Orange

TX 23 (tip)

Yellow/Slate

P1-46

Orange

TX 23 (ring)

Slate/Yellow

P1-20

Orange

RX 23 (tip)

Violet/Blue

P1-98

Orange

RX 23 (ring)

Blue/Violet

P1-72

Orange

TX 24 (tip)

Violet/Orange

P1-47

Orange

TX 24 (ring)

Orange/Violet

P1-21

Orange

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

331

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

Table 81: P1 to channels 17-24 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

48

RX 24 (tip)

Violet/Green

P1-99

Orange

RX 24 (ring)

Green/Violet

P1-73

Orange

Table 82: P1 to channels 25-32


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

49

RX 25 (tip)

Violet/Brown

P1-48

Orange

RX 25 (ring)

Brown/Violet

P1-22

Orange

TX 25 (tip)

Violet/Slate

P1-100

Orange

TX 25 (ring)

Slate/Violet

P1-74

Orange

TX 26 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-49

Green

TX 26 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-23

Green

RX 26 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-101

Green

RX 26 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-75

Green

TX 27 (tip)

White/Green

P1-50

Green

TX 27 (ring)

Green/White

P1-24

Green

RX 27 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-102

Green

RX 27 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-76

Green

TX 28 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-51

Green

TX 28 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-25

Green

RX 28 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-103

Green

RX 28 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-77

Green

TX 29 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-52

Green

TX 29 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-26

Green

RX 29 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-104

Green

RX 29 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-78

Green

TX 30 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-118

Green

TX 30 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-117

Green

RX 30 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-120

Green

RX 30 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-119

Green

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

332

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Pinouts

Table 82: P1 to channels 25-32 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

61

TX 31 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-122

Green

TX 31 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-121

Green

RX 31 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-124

Green

RX 31 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-123

Green

TX 32 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-128

Green

TX 32 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-127

Green

RX 32 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-126

Green

RX 32 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-125

Green

62

63

64

No connection

P-129
P-130

Voice gateway redundant TDM cable


P1 to channels 1-8, page 328 through Table 82 on page 332 lists the pinouts.
Figure 60: MALC redundant voice gateway cable
18
916

1724
32
ma0503

25

26

105

130

130

105

26

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

333

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

Table 83: P1 (P2) to channels 1-8


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

TX 1 (tip)

White/Blue

P1(P2)-106

Blue

TX 1 (ring)

Blue/White

P1(P2)-105

Blue

RX 1 (tip)

White/Orange

P1(P2)-108

Blue

RX 1 (ring)

Orange/White

P1(P2)-107

Blue

TX 2 (tip)

White/Green

P1(P2)-110

Blue

TX 2 (ring)

Green/White

P1(P2)-109

Blue

RX 2 (tip)

White/Brown

P1(P2)-112

Blue

RX 2 (ring)

Brown/White

P1(P2)-111

Blue

TX 3 (tip)

White/Slate

P1(P2)-114

Blue

TX 3 (ring)

Slate/White

P1(P2)-113

Blue

RX 3 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1(P2)-116

Blue

RX 3 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1(P2)-115

Blue

TX 4 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1(P2)-27

Blue

TX 4 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1(P2)-1

Blue

RX 4 (tip)

Red/Green

P1(P2)-79

Blue

RX 4 (ring)

Green/Red

P1(P2)-53

Blue

TX 5 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1(P2)-28

Blue

TX 5 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1(P2)-2

Blue

RX 5 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1(P2)-80

Blue

RX 5 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1(P2)-54

Blue

TX 6 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1(P2)-29

Blue

TX 6 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1(P2)-3

Blue

RX 6 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1(P2)-81

Blue

RX 6 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1(P2)-55

Blue

TX 7 (tip)

Black/Green

P1(P2)-30

Blue

TX 7 (ring)

Green/Black

P1(P2)-4

Blue

RX 7 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1(P2)-82

Blue

RX 7 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1(P2)-56

Blue

TX 8 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1(P2)-31

Blue

TX 8 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1(P2)-5

Blue

10

11

12

13

14

15

334

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Pinouts

Table 83: P1 (P2) to channels 1-8 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

16

RX 8 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1(P2)-83

Blue

RX 8 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1(P2)-57

Blue

Table 84: P1 (P) to channels 9-16


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

17

TX 9 (tip)

Yellow/Orange

P1(P2)-32

Blue

TX 9 (ring)

Orange/Yellow

P1(P2)-6

Blue

RX 9 (tip)

Yellow/Green

P1(P2)-84

Blue

RX 9 (ring)

Green/Yellow

P1(P2)-58

Blue

TX 10 (tip)

Yellow/Brown

P1(P2)-33

Blue

TX 10 (ring)

Brown/Yellow

P1(P2)-7

Blue

RX 10 (tip)

Yellow/Slate

P1(P2)-85

Blue

RX 10 (ring)

Slate/Yellow

P1(P2)-59

Blue

TX 11 (tip)

Violet/Blue

P1(P2)-34

Blue

TX 11 (ring)

Blue/Violet

P1(P2)-8

Blue

RX 11 (tip)

Violet/Orange

P1(P2)-86

Blue

RX 11 (ring)

Orange/Violet

P1(P2)-60

Blue

TX 12 (tip)

Violet/Green

P1(P2)-35

Blue

TX 12 (ring)

Green/Violet

P1(P2)-9

Blue

RX 12 (tip)

Violet/Brown

P1(P2)-87

Blue

RX 12 (ring)

Brown/Violet

P1(P2)-61

Blue

TX 13 (tip)

Violet/Slate

P1(P2)-36

Blue

TX 13 (ring)

Slate/Violet

P1(P2)-10

Blue

TX 13 (tip)

White/Blue

P1(P2)-88

Orange

TX 13 (ring)

Blue/White

P1(P2)-62

Orange

RX 14 (tip)

White/Orange

P1(P2)-37

Orange

RX 14 (ring)

Orange/White

P1(P2)-11

Orange

TX 14 (tip)

White/Green

P1(P2)-89

Orange

TX 14 (ring)

Green/White

P1(P2)-63

Orange

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

335

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

Table 84: P1 (P) to channels 9-16 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

29

RX 15 (tip)

White/Brown

P1(P2)-38

Orange

RX 15 (ring)

Brown/White

P1(P2)-12

Orange

TX 15 (tip)

White/Slate

P1(P2)-90

Orange

TX 15 (ring)

Slate/White

P1(P2)-64

Orange

RX 16 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1(P2)-39

Orange

RX 16 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1(P2)-13

Orange

TX 16 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1(P2)-91

Orange

TX 16 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1(P2)-65

Orange

30

31

32

Table 85: P1 (P2) to channels 17-24


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

33

RX 17 (tip)

Red/Green

P1(P2)-40

Orange

RX 17 (ring)

Green/Red

P1(P2)-14

Orange

TX 17 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1(P2)-92

Orange

TX 17 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1(P2)-66

Orange

RX 18 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1(P2)-41

Orange

RX 18 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1(P2)-15

Orange

TX 18 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1(P2)-93

Orange

TX 18 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1(P2)-67

Orange

RX 19 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1(P2)-42

Orange

RX 19 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1(P2)-16

Orange

TX 19 (tip)

Black/Green

P1(P2)-94

Orange

TX 19 (ring)

Green/Black

P1(P2)-68

Orange

RX 20 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1(P2)-43

Orange

RX 20 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1(P2)-17

Orange

TX 20 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1(P2)-95

Orange

TX 20 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1(P2)-69

Orange

RX 21 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1(P2)-44

Orange

RX 21 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1(P2)-18

Orange

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

336

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Pinouts

Table 85: P1 (P2) to channels 17-24 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

42

RX 21 (tip)

Yellow/Orange

P1(P2)-96

Orange

RX 21 (ring)

Orange/Yellow

P1(P2)-70

Orange

TX 22 (tip)

Yellow/Green

P1(P2)-45

Orange

TX 22 (ring)

Green/Yellow

P1(P2)-19

Orange

RX 22 (tip)

Yellow/Brown

P1(P2)-97

Orange

RX 22 (ring)

Brown/Yellow

P1(P2)-71

Orange

TX 23 (tip)

Yellow/Slate

P1(P2)-46

Orange

TX 23 (ring)

Slate/Yellow

P1(P2)-20

Orange

RX 23 (tip)

Violet/Blue

P1(P2)-98

Orange

RX 23 (ring)

Blue/Violet

P1(P2)-72

Orange

TX 24 (tip)

Violet/Orange

P1(P2)-47

Orange

TX 24 (ring)

Orange/Violet

P1(P2)-21

Orange

RX 24 (tip)

Violet/Green

P1(P2)-99

Orange

RX 24 (ring)

Green/Violet

P1(P2)-73

Orange

43

44

45

46

47

48

Table 86: P1 (P2) to channels 25-32


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

49

RX 25 (tip)

Violet/Brown

P1(P2)-48

Orange

RX 25 (ring)

Brown/Violet

P1(P2)-22

Orange

TX 25 (tip)

Violet/Slate

P1(P2)-100

Orange

TX 25 (ring)

Slate/Violet

P1(P2)-74

Orange

TX 26 (tip)

White/Blue

P1(P2)-49

Green

TX 26 (ring)

Blue/White

P1(P2)-23

Green

RX 26 (tip)

White/Orange

P1(P2)-101

Green

RX 26 (ring)

Orange/White

P1(P2)-75

Green

TX 27 (tip)

White/Green

P1(P2)-50

Green

TX 27 (ring)

Green/White

P1(P2)-24

Green

RX 27 (tip)

White/Brown

P1(P2)-102

Green

RX 27 (ring)

Brown/White

P1(P2)-76

Green

50

51

52

53

54

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

337

Voice Gateway Card (VG-T1/E1-32-2S)

Table 86: P1 (P2) to channels 25-32 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

55

TX 28 (tip)

White/Slate

P1(P2)-51

Green

TX 28 (ring)

Slate/White

P1(P2)-25

Green

RX 28 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1(P2)-103

Green

RX 28 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1(P2)-77

Green

TX 29 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1(P2)-52

Green

TX 29 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1(P2)-26

Green

RX 29 (tip)

Red/Green

P1(P2)-104

Green

RX 29 (ring)

Green/Red

P1(P2)-78

Green

TX 30 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1(P2)-118

Green

TX 30 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1(P2)-117

Green

RX 30 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1(P2)-120

Green

RX 30 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1(P2)-119

Green

TX 31 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1(P2)-122

Green

TX 31 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1(P2)-121

Green

RX 31 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1(P2)-124

Green

RX 31 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1(P2)-123

Green

TX 32 (tip)

Black/Green

P1(P2)-128

Green

TX 32 (ring)

Green/Black

P1(P2)-127

Green

RX 32 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1(P2)-126

Green

RX 32 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1(P2)-125

Green

P2-130

Black/Slate

P-129

Green

P2-129

Slate/Black

P-130

Green

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

Cross
connect
between
P1 and P2

338

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

17

VDSL CARD (VDSL-16)


This chapter describes the MALC VDSL card and explains how to configure
it. It includes:

Overview, page 339

Configuring VDSL interfaces, page 342

VDSL-16 and VDSL-16+Splitter pinouts, page 343

Overview
Very high bit rate DSL (VDSL) transmits high speed data
over short reaches of twisted-pair copper wire. The shorter
the distance, the faster the connection rate.
The VDSL-16 is a single-slot 16-port VDSL subscriber line
card, which provides increased bandwidth (up to 52 Mbps
downstream and 4.223 Mbps upstream over short distances)
to accommodate video applications. All ATM traffic from
the 16 subscriber lines is cross connected to VCLs on the
MALC uplink card. Loop access for metallic test functions
is provided.
The VDSL-16 card can be used with the Zhone Residential
Gateway (ZRG) to provide video, voice, and data
applications. The VDSL card connects to neighborhood
Optical Network Units (ONUs), which connect to the
central offices main fiber network backbone. This
architecture allows VDSL users to access the maximum
bandwidth available over twisted-pair, copper phone lines.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

339

VDSL Card (VDSL-16)

Table 87: VDSL-16 card specifications


Specification

Value

Density

16 ports

Physical
interfaces

One (1) RJ-21X Champ 50-pin connector

Line
characteristics

QAM encoding using up to 256-bit constellations

Redundancy

None

Nominal line
rate

Up to 52 Mbps downstream and 4.223 Mbps upstream

Power
consumption

35W nominal

Reed-Solomon interleaved forward error correction (FEC)

plus
0.3W per active port
48 W maximum

ATM

Default VPI/VCI ranges (per port):


VPI: 0 to 1
VCI: 32 to 127

Compliance

Asymmetric CO design ITU plan 998 compliant frequency


division duplexing (FDD)

Power
consumption

35W nominal
plus
0.3W per active port
48 W maximum

Creating card-profiles for VDSL-16 cards


Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.
Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.
VDSL-16 cards on the MALC have the following types and software images:
Table 88: VDSL-16 card type

340

Card

Type

Name of software image

VDSL-16

5026

malcvdsl.bin

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

The following example creates a card-profile for a VDSL-16 card in


shelf 1, slot 3:
zSH> new card-profile 1/3/5026 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: -----------> {}: malcvdsl.bin
admin-status: -----------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}:
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}:
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: --------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}:
card-group-id: ----------> {0}:
hold-active: ------------> {false}:
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: ---------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record created.

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and the
begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This could take
a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the following is
displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

You can also use the slots command and specify the slot number of the
card to view the state of the card. For example:
zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
LOADING indicates the card is still initializing
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
0

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #

:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

341

VDSL Card (VDSL-16)

CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat
Fault reset
Uptime

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
RUNNING indicates the card is functional
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
59
enabled
1 minute

To view the status of all the cards, use the slots command without any
arguments:
zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 (RUNNING)
13: MALC ADSL (RUNNING)
15: MALC MTAC (RUNNING)

Viewing active redundant cards


Use the showactivecards command to view all active cards in the system
that are part of a redundant card group:
zSH> showactivecards
Shelf/Slot Group Id
Card Type
__________________________________
1:
1/14 333
MALC MTAC

Configuring VDSL interfaces


The following table summarizes how to configure a VDSL interfaces on the
MALC:
Action

Command

Configure the VDSL settings. See


Configuring VDSL interfaces on
page 342.

update vdsl-config index/vdsl


Where index is of the form shelf-slot-port-subport or a user-defined
string.

Configuring VDSL interfaces


1

Update the vdsl-config profile. Make sure the mode parameter is set to
vtu-o on the MALC, and the CPE side (ZRG) is configured as vtu-r. Also
set the maximum constellation (us-max-const) to 64 Mbps on both ends
of the VDSL connection.

zSH> update vdsl-config 1-3-1-0/vdsl


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
mode: ------------> {vtu-o}: vtu-o for CO equipment; vtu-r for CPE devices
plan: ------------> {plan-998-l}:
us-pbo: ----------> {upstream-power-backoff-enable}:

342

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

VDSL-16 and VDSL-16+Splitter pinouts

ds-sym-rate-sel: -> {ds-sym-rate-sel-bit-7}:


ds-min-margin: ---> {24}:
ds-ber-limit: ----> {one-e-minus-05}:
ds-max-rate: -----> {207900}:
ds-max-const: ----> {qam-128}:
ds-rs-frame: -----> {rs-255-239-143}:
us-sym-rate-sel: -> {us-sym-rate-sel-bit-3}:
us-min-margin: ---> {24}:
us-ber-limit: ----> {one-e-minus-05}:
us-max-rate: -----> {70875}:
us-max-const: ----> {qam-128}: qam-64 both ends of connection must match
us-rs-frame: -----> {rs-255-239-16}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the VDSL interface:


zSH> update if-translate 1-3-1-0/vdsl
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {222}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {3}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {vdsl}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {none}:
ifName: -----------> {1-3-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

VDSL-16 and VDSL-16+Splitter pinouts


VDSL-16 cards use standard RJ-21X pinouts. Table 89 lists the port pinouts.
Table 89: VDSL-16 card pinouts
Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Channel 1 ring

26

Channel 1 tip

Channel 2 ring

27

Channel 2 tip

Channel 3 ring

28

Channel 3 tip

Channel 4 ring

29

Channel 4 tip

Channel 5 ring

30

Channel 5 tip

Channel 6 ring

31

Channel 6 tip

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

343

VDSL Card (VDSL-16)

Table 89: VDSL-16 card pinouts (Continued)

344

Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Channel 7 ring

32

Channel 7 tip

Channel 8 ring

33

Channel 8 tip

Channel 9 ring

34

Channel 9 tip

10

Channel 10 ring

35

Channel 10 tip

11

Channel 11 ring

36

Channel 11 tip

12

Channel 12 ring

37

Channel 12 tip

13

Channel 13 ring

38

Channel 13 tip

14

Channel 14 ring

39

Channel 14 tip

15

Channel 15 ring

40

Channel 15 tip

16

Channel 16 ring

41

Channel 16 tip

17

Not used

42

Not used

18

Not used

43

Not used

19

Not used

44

Not used

20

Not used

45

Not used

21

Not used

46

Not used

22

Not used

47

Not used

23

Not used

48

Not used

24

Not used

49

Not used

25

Not used

50

Not used

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

18

T1/E1 ATM 32 CARD (T1/E1-ATM-32)


This chapter describes the MALC T1/E1-ATM-32 card and explains how to
configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 346

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces, page 350

Configuring IMA groups, page 358

T1/E1 32 port TDM cable, page 359

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

345

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Overview
The MALC T1/E1-ATM-32 card provides 32 T1/E1 UNI or
IMA ports. All ports must be configured as either UNI or
IMA.

Table 90: T1/E1 32 specifications

346

Specification

Description

Density

32 ports

Physical
interface

Custom 130-pin amphenol connector

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

A cable is provided that breaks out to 4 non-terminated wire


bundles for connecting to patch panels.

Overview

Table 90: T1/E1 32 specifications (Continued)


Specification

Description

ATM support

ATM Quality of Service types supported:

CBR, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR


Fair Weighted Queuing
Per VC and per QoS buffering

ATM Forum specifications:

UNI 3.0, UNI 3.1 compliant. Note that ILMI, SVCs,


point-to-multipoint are currently not supported.

UNI 4.0 compliant for PVC features only. Note that ABR,
SVCs, SPVCs, Multicast, and Anycast are not currently
supported.

Partial support for Traffic Management 4.0 including:

QOS levels described above

Connection Admission Control

Traffic descriptor specification

VPI/VCI ranges:
VPI: 0-7, VCI: 32-63 per UNI interface or IMA group.
These values cannot be changed.

Number of supported connections:


VCLs: 224 per card
VPLs: 32 per card
Total ATM connections: 256 per card

AAL5 termination:

AAL5 SAR for in-band management VC termination


RFC 1483 routed termination supported

16 IMA groups are supported, as described in the ATM forum


AF-PHY-0086.001. Note that UNI and IMA mode are not
currently supported on the same card.
Redundancy

None

Power
consumption

27 watts

Creating card-profiles for T1/E1-ATM-32 cards


Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

347

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.
T1/E1 ATM 32 cards on the MALC have the following types and software
images:
Table 91: MALC card types
Card

Type

Name of software image

T1/E1-ATM-32

5032

malct1e1atm32.bin

he following example creates a card-profile for a T1/E1-ATM-32 card in


shelf 1, slot 15:
zSH> new card-profile 1/15/5032 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malct1e1atm32.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: e1 | ds1 | e1-ima |ds1-ima
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Note: To change from a T1 to an E1 interface in an existing


card-profile record, first delete the card-profile record, create a
different card-profile record with the desired card-line-type setting,
and then save the new record.

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and the
begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This could take
a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the following is
displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

348

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

You can also use the slots command and specify the slot number of the
card to view the state of the card. For example:
zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
LOADING indicates the card is still initializing
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
0

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat
Fault reset
Uptime

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
RUNNING indicates the card is functional
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
59
enabled
1 minute

To view the status of all the cards, use the slots command without any
arguments:
zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 (RUNNING)
13: MALC ADSL (RUNNING)
15: MALC MTAC (RUNNING)

Viewing active redundant cards


Use the showactivecards command to view all active cards in the system
that are part of a redundant card group:
zSH> showactivecards
Shelf/Slot Group Id
Card Type
__________________________________
1:
1/14 333
MALC MTAC

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

349

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces


This section explains how to configure DS1/E1 interfaces. It applies to the
TDM Uplink card (ports 9 through 16) the T1/E1 IMA card, and the T1/E1 32
port card.
Note: For redundant systems, configure the DS1 interfaces on both
the active and standby cards.
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure DS1
uplink interfaces on the MALC:
Action

Command

Update the DS1 interfaces, which specify the basic


parameters of the DS1 line, including framing,
encoding, and clocking. See Configuring DS1/E1
interfaces on page 350.

update ds1-profile 1-1-port-0/ds1


where port is from 1 to 8 (for the IMA Uplink card)
9 to 16 (for the TDM Uplink card)
1 to 32 (for the T1/E1 32 card)
If your system is redundant, configure the DS1
interfaces on both the active and standby cards.

Activate the DS1 interfaces in the if-translate and


line-group profiles. See Activating a DS1 interface on
page 353.

update if-translate 1-1-port-0/ds1


where port is from
1 to 8 for the T1/E1 IMA Uplink card or
1 to 16 for the T1/E1 TDM Uplink card
1 to 32 (for the T1/E1 32 card)

The ds1-profile configures both T1 and E1 interfaces.


T1 interfaces on the MALC have the following defaults:

ESF framing

B8ZS coding

Robbed bit signaling

CSU mode

Line build out of 0 feet

E1 interfaces on the MALC have the following defaults:

350

E1-CRCMF line type

HDB3 coding

Line build out of 0 feet

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces

The following table describes the supported ds1-profile parameters.


Parameter

Options

line-type

The type of DS1 circuit.


Values:
esf Extended Super Frame.
e1Mf : G.704, table 4a, with TS16 multiframing
enabled for E1 circuits.
e1CrcMf : G.704, table 4b, with TS16 multiframing
enabled for E1 circuits.
Default: esf for T1
e1 for E1

line-code

The type of Zero Code Suppression used on the


interface.
b8zs: a specific pattern of normal bits and bipolar
violations used to replace a sequence of eight zero bits.
hdb3: High Density Bipolar of order 3. A code used
for E1.
Default: b8zs for T1
hdb3 for E1

send-code

This parameter is used for bit error rate (BER) testing.

circuit-id

Enter a circuit identifier for the interface, up to 36


characters.

loopback-config

This parameter is used for loopback testing.

dsx-line-length

The length of the DSX WAN interface in feet. This


parameter provides information for line build out
circuitry.
Values:
Dsx0 0 feet for the line build out (LBO) setting.
Dsx133 133 feet for the LBO.
Dsx266 266 feet for the LBO.
Dsx399 399 feet for the LBO.
Dsx533 533 feet for the LBO.
Dsx655 655 feet for the LBO.
Default: 0

line-status-change-trap
-enable

Specifies whether a trap is generated whenever the line


state changes.
Values:
enabled
disabled
Default: enabled

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

351

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Parameter

Options

ds1-mode

Type of interface.
Values:
dsx DS1 interface is DSX
csu DS1 interface is CSU
other Interface is neither CSU nor DSX
Default: csu

csu-line-length

This parameter provides information for line build out


circuitry.
Values:
csu00 0 dB line build out.
csu75 -7.5 dB line build out.
csu150 -15.0 dB line build out.
csu225 -22.5 dB line build out.
Default: csu00

transmit-clock-source

Specifies the clock source for the interface. See for


information about configuring the system clock.

cell-scramble

Indicates whether ATM cell scrambling is enabled for


this interface. Both sides of the connection must agree
on whether scrambling is enabled.
Values:
true Cell scrambling enabled.
false Cell scrambling disabled.
Default: true

coset-polynomial

Indicates whether the coset polynomial is used to


calculate the ATM header error control (HEC) value.
Both sides of the connection must agree on the method
of calculating the HEC value.
Values:
true The coset polynomial is used to calculate the
HEC value.
false The coset polynomial is not used to calculate the
HEC value.
Default: true

Configuring a DS1 interface


The default values are appropriate for most applications. If you need to
change them, update the ds1-profile for the interface:
zSH> update ds1-profile 1-1-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
line-type: ----------------------> {esf}:
line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}:
send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}:

352

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring DS1/E1 interfaces

circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}:


loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}:
signal-mode: --------------------> {none}:
fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}:
dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}:
line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}:
channelization: -----------------> {disabled}:
ds1-mode: -----------------------> {other}:
csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}:
clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}:
transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming}:
cell-scramble: ------------------> {true}:
coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}:
protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}
signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart}
ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0}
line-power: ---------------------> {disabled}
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activating a DS1 interface


Activate each DS1 interface by updating its if-translate profile:
zSH> update if-translate 1-1-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifindex: -----> {1}: .
shelf: -------> {1}:
slot: --------> {1}:
port: --------> {1}:
subport: -----> {0}:
type: --------> {ds1}:
adminstatus: -> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {0}:
ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

After you update the profile, a log message appears indicating the line is
active:
1/1: alarm_mgr: : l=167: 01:01:01 Major T1 Up Line
1:1:1:0

Continue updating each DS1 interface. When all the interfaces are active,
proceed to configuring the IMA groups.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

353

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Configuring IMA groups


Note: For redundant systems, configure the IMA interfaces on both
the active and standby cards.
For more information about IMA, refer to the ATM Forum Inverse
Multiplexing for ATM (IMA) Specification Version 1.1 (AF-PHY-0086.001).
The following table summarizes the commands required to configure IMA
groups on the MALC:

354

Action

Command

(Optional) Update the ima-group-profile, which


specifies the basic settings of the IMA group,
including the number of transmit and receive links
and the clocking. See Configuring IMA groups on
page 358.

update ima-group-profile 1/slot/1


If your system is redundant, configure the IMA group on
both the active and standby cards.

(Optional) Move the default IMA links to different


groups. See Moving IMA links on page 358.

imalink move SourceIMAGroup


DestinationIMAGroup ds1Interface

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

where slot the slot that contains the card).

Configuring IMA groups

The following table describes the supported parameters in the


ima-group-profile.
Parameter

Description

groupSymmetry

The symmetry of the Inverse Multiplexing over ATM


(IMA) group. Symmetry determines whether the transmit
and receive sides of the IMA link must be configured and
how traffic is sent over the links.
Values:
symmetricOperation Both transmit and receive IMA
links must be configured and the system can transmit and
receive traffic only if both sides of the connection are
active.
asymmetricOperation Both transmit and receive IMA
links must be configured, but the system can transmit and
receive traffic even if both sides of the connection are not
active.
asymmetricConfiguration Transmit and receive links
do not have to be configured and the system can transmit
and receive traffic even if both sides of the connection are
not active.
Default: symmetricOperation

minNumTxLinks

Minimum number of transmit links required to be Active


for the IMA group to be in the Operational state. If the
number of active links falls below this value, the link
drops and the redundant link (if any) takes over.
Values:
1 to 8
Default: 1

minNumRxLinks

Minimum number of receive links required to be active


for the IMA group to be in the operational state. If the
number of active links falls below this value, the link
drops and the redundant link (if any) takes over.
Values:
1 to 8
Default: 1

txClkMode

Transmit clocking mode used by the near-end IMA


group.
Values:
itc Independent Transmit Clock. Indicates that IMA links
do not all use the same transmit clock. Each IMA link
derives clock from its associated DS1 interface.
ctc Common Transmit Clock. Indicates the transmit
clock of all IMA links are derived from the same source.
When set to ctc, the MALC derives the IMA clocking
from the system clock.
Default: ctc

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

355

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Parameter

Description

txImaId

The IMA ID currently in use by the near-end IMA


interface.
Values:
0 to 255
Default: 1

txFramLength

The frame length to be used by the IMA group in the


transmit direction. Can only be set when the IMA group
is startup.
Values:
m32 32 cells
m64 64 cells
m128 128 cells
m256 256 cells
Default: m128

diffDelayMax

The maximum number of milliseconds of differential


delay among the links that can be tolerated on this
interface.
Values:
0 to 100
Default: 25

alphaValue

The number of consecutive invalid ICP cells allowed


before the system changes from a Sync state to a Hunt
state.
Values:
1 or 2
Default: 2

betaValue

The number of consecutive errored ICP cells allowed


before the system changes from a Sync state to a Hunt
state.
Values:
1 to 5
Default: 2

gammaValue

The number of consecutive valid ICP cells allowed before


the system changes from a PreSync state to the Sync
state.
Values:
1 to 5
Default: 1

356

testLinkIfIndex

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link.

testPattern

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link.

testProcStatus

This parameter is used for testing the IMA link.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Configuring IMA groups

Overview
The following MALC cards support IMA groups:

T1/E1 IMA Uplink

T1/E1-ATM-32

Each card supports 16 IMA groups. The MALC T1/E1-ATM-32 card


provides 32 T1/E1 UNI or IMA ports. All ports must be configured as either
UNI or IMA. When these cards boot up, the system creates the IMA groups
and assigns the T1/E1 links to the following groups:
Links

IMA group

1-4

5-8

9 - 12

13 - 16

Empty

Empty

Empty

Empty

17 - 20

21 - 24

10

25 - 28

11

29 -32

12

Empty

13

Empty

14

Empty

15

Empty

16

Note: (T1/E1 32 card only) IMA links 1-16 can only belong to IMA
groups 1-8 and links 17-32 can only belong to IMA groups 9-16.
Note the following about multiple IMA groups:

In a redundant Uplink configuration, you must configure IMA groups on


both the active and standby cards

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

357

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Before moving IMA links to another group, the system performs a CAC
calculation to determine whether moving the links will violate ATM QoS
settings. If so, the link will not be moved.

If you do not want a link to belong to any IMA group, it is recommended


that you admin down the interface in the if-translate profile. Do not use
the imalink remove command unless requested to by Zhone GSS.

Configuring IMA groups


The following example updates an IMA group to change the minimum
number of links in the group:
zSH> update ima-group-profile 1/1/1 shelf/slot/port
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
groupSymmetry: ---> {symmetricoperation}:
minNumTxLinks: ---> {1}: 4
minNumRxLinks: ---> {1}: 4
txClkMode: -------> {ctc}:
txImaId: ---------> {1}:
txFrameLength: ---> {m128}:
diffDelayMax: ----> {75}:
alphaValue: ------> {2}:
betaValue: -------> {2}:
gammaValue: ------> {1}:
testLinkIfIndex: -> {0/0/0/0/0}:
testPattern: -----> {-1}:
testProcStatus: --> {disabled}:
txTimingRefLink: -> {0}:
rxTimingRefLink: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Moving IMA links


To move IMA links from one group to another, use the imalink move
command. For example:
zSH> imalink move 1-1-1-0/atmima 1-1-2-0/atmima 1-1-1-0/ds1
Stack unbind successful.
Link moved successfully.

This command moves the DS1 interface 1-1-1-0/ds1 from IMA group
1-1-1-0/atm to IMA group 1-1-2-0/atmima.
If this is a redundant configuration, also move the IMA link on the
standby card:
zSH> imalink move 1-2-1-0/atmima 1-2-2-0/atmima 1-2-1-0/ds1
Stack unbind successful.
Link moved successfully.

358

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 32 port TDM cable

After moving the links, you can use the imalink show command to view
the links in the group:
zSH> imalink show 1-3-1-0/atmima
DS1 Links for IMA Group 1-3-1-0/atmima:
If Index
If Name
----------------------000736
1-3-1-0
000737
1-3-2-0
000738
1-3-3-0
000739
1-3-4-0

T1/E1 32 port TDM cable


Figure 61 shows the MALC T1/E1 32 port cable. P1 to channels 1-8,
page 359 through Table 95 on page 363 lists the pinouts.
Figure 61: MALC T1/E1 32 port cable

Table 92: P1 to channels 1-8


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

TX 1 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-106

Blue

TX 1 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-105

Blue

RX 1 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-108

Blue

RX 1 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-107

Blue

TX 2 (tip)

White/Green

P1-110

Blue

TX 2 (ring)

Green/White

P1-109

Blue

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

359

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Table 92: P1 to channels 1-8 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

RX 2 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-112

Blue

RX 2 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-111

Blue

TX 3 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-114

Blue

TX 3 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-113

Blue

RX 3 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-116

Blue

RX 3 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-115

Blue

TX 4 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-27

Blue

TX 4 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-1

Blue

RX 4 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-79

Blue

RX 4 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-53

Blue

TX 5 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-28

Blue

TX 5 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-2

Blue

RX 5 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-80

Blue

RX 5 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-54

Blue

TX 6 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-29

Blue

TX 6 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-3

Blue

RX 6 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-81

Blue

RX 6 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-55

Blue

TX 7 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-30

Blue

TX 7 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-4

Blue

RX 7 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-82

Blue

RX 7 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-56

Blue

TX 8 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-31

Blue

TX 8 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-5

Blue

RX 8 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-83

Blue

RX 8 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-57

Blue

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

360

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 32 port TDM cable

Table 93: P1 to channels 9-16


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

17

TX 9 (tip)

Yellow/Orange

P1-32

Blue

TX 9 (ring)

Orange/Yellow

P1-6

Blue

RX 9 (tip)

Yellow/Green

P1-84

Blue

RX 9 (ring)

Green/Yellow

P1-58

Blue

TX 10 (tip)

Yellow/Brown

P1-33

Blue

TX 10 (ring)

Brown/Yellow

P1-7

Blue

RX 10 (tip)

Yellow/Slate

P1-85

Blue

RX 10 (ring)

Slate/Yellow

P1-59

Blue

TX 11 (tip)

Violet/Blue

P1-34

Blue

TX 11 (ring)

Blue/Violet

P1-8

Blue

RX 11 (tip)

Violet/Orange

P1-86

Blue

RX 11 (ring)

Orange/Violet

P1-60

Blue

TX 12 (tip)

Violet/Green

P1-35

Blue

TX 12 (ring)

Green/Violet

P1-9

Blue

RX 12 (tip)

Violet/Brown

P1-87

Blue

RX 12 (ring)

Brown/Violet

P1-61

Blue

TX 13 (tip)

Violet/Slate

P1-36

Blue

TX 13 (ring)

Slate/Violet

P1-10

Blue

TX 13 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-88

Orange

TX 13 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-62

Orange

RX 14 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-37

Orange

RX 14 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-11

Orange

TX 14 (tip)

White/Green

P1-89

Orange

TX 14 (ring)

Green/White

P1-63

Orange

RX 15 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-38

Orange

RX 15 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-12

Orange

TX 15 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-90

Orange

TX 15 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-64

Orange

RX 16 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-39

Orange

RX 16 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-13

Orange

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

361

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Table 93: P1 to channels 9-16 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

To

32

TX 16 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-91

Orange

TX 16 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-65

Orange

Table 94: P1 to channels 17-24


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

33

RX 17 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-40

Orange

RX 17 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-14

Orange

TX 17 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-92

Orange

TX 17 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-66

Orange

RX 18 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-41

Orange

RX 18 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-15

Orange

TX 18 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-93

Orange

TX 18 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-67

Orange

RX 19 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-42

Orange

RX 19 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-16

Orange

TX 19 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-94

Orange

TX 19 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-68

Orange

RX 20 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-43

Orange

RX 20 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-17

Orange

TX 20 (tip)

Black/Slate

P1-95

Orange

TX 20 (ring)

Slate/Black

P1-69

Orange

RX 21 (tip)

Yellow/Blue

P1-44

Orange

RX 21 (ring)

Blue/Yellow

P1-18

Orange

RX 21 (tip)

Yellow/Orange

P1-96

Orange

RX 21 (ring)

Orange/Yellow

P1-70

Orange

TX 22 (tip)

Yellow/Green

P1-45

Orange

TX 22 (ring)

Green/Yellow

P1-19

Orange

RX 22 (tip)

Yellow/Brown

P1-97

Orange

RX 22 (ring)

Brown/Yellow

P1-71

Orange

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

362

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

T1/E1 32 port TDM cable

Table 94: P1 to channels 17-24 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

45

TX 23 (tip)

Yellow/Slate

P1-46

Orange

TX 23 (ring)

Slate/Yellow

P1-20

Orange

RX 23 (tip)

Violet/Blue

P1-98

Orange

RX 23 (ring)

Blue/Violet

P1-72

Orange

TX 24 (tip)

Violet/Orange

P1-47

Orange

TX 24 (ring)

Orange/Violet

P1-21

Orange

RX 24 (tip)

Violet/Green

P1-99

Orange

RX 24 (ring)

Green/Violet

P1-73

Orange

46

47

48

Table 95: P1 to channels 25-32


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

49

RX 25 (tip)

Violet/Brown

P1-48

Orange

RX 25 (ring)

Brown/Violet

P1-22

Orange

TX 25 (tip)

Violet/Slate

P1-100

Orange

TX 25 (ring)

Slate/Violet

P1-74

Orange

TX 26 (tip)

White/Blue

P1-49

Green

TX 26 (ring)

Blue/White

P1-23

Green

RX 26 (tip)

White/Orange

P1-101

Green

RX 26 (ring)

Orange/White

P1-75

Green

TX 27 (tip)

White/Green

P1-50

Green

TX 27 (ring)

Green/White

P1-24

Green

RX 27 (tip)

White/Brown

P1-102

Green

RX 27 (ring)

Brown/White

P1-76

Green

TX 28 (tip)

White/Slate

P1-51

Green

TX 28 (ring)

Slate/White

P1-25

Green

RX 28 (tip)

Red/Blue

P1-103

Green

RX 28 (ring)

Blue/Red

P1-77

Green

TX 29 (tip)

Red/Orange

P1-52

Green

TX 29 (ring)

Orange/Red

P1-26

Green

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

363

T1/E1 ATM 32 card (T1/E1-ATM-32)

Table 95: P1 to channels 25-32 (Continued)


Pair

Signal

Color

From

Binder

58

RX 29 (tip)

Red/Green

P1-104

Green

RX 29 (ring)

Green/Red

P1-78

Green

TX 30 (tip)

Red/Brown

P1-118

Green

TX 30 (ring)

Brown/Red

P1-117

Green

RX 30 (tip)

Red/Slate

P1-120

Green

RX 30 (ring)

Slate/Red

P1-119

Green

TX 31 (tip)

Black/Blue

P1-122

Green

TX 31 (ring)

Blue/Black

P1-121

Green

RX 31 (tip)

Black/Orange

P1-124

Green

RX 31 (ring)

Orange/Black

P1-123

Green

TX 32 (tip)

Black/Green

P1-128

Green

TX 32 (ring)

Green/Black

P1-127

Green

RX 32 (tip)

Black/Brown

P1-126

Green

RX 32 (ring)

Brown/Black

P1-125

Green

59

60

61

62

63

64

No connection

P-129
P-130

364

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

19

T1/E1 CES 12-PORT CARD


This chapter describes the MALC T1/E1 12 CES card. It includes:

Overview, page 365

CES card configuration, page 366

Pinouts, page 368

Overview
Circuit Emulation Service (CES) allows T1/E1 circuits to be
transparently extended across an ATM network or IP routed
network. CES across an ATM network is based on the ATM
Forum standard AF VTOA 0078.0000. Using constant bit
rate (CBR) ATM permanent virtual circuits (PVCs), CES
allows communication between T1/E1 interfaces (such as
T1, E1, E3, and T3). CES over an IP network transports T1/
E1 circuit data over an static IP routed network between
Zhone equipment endpoints and delivers the data to the
destination T1/E1 circuit.
There two types of CES: structured and unstructured. In
unstructured emulation (also known as clear channel
emulation) the entire services bandwidth is emulated and
reproduced at the target port. Structured emulation service
(also called channelized emulation) emulates a point-to-point
fractional T1/E1 (less than a full T1/E1 line). The frame
structure is maintained. Individual streams are visible and are
byte aligned. This allows the T1/E1 trunks using the
structured emulation service to break into multiple DS0
channels towards different destinations.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

365

T1/E1 CES 12-port card

Table 96: T1/E1 CES 12-port card specifications


Specification

Description

Size

1 slot

Density

12 ports T1/E1

Connectors

One (1) Champ 50-pin telco connector

Standards
supported

ITU-T G.704
ITU-T G.706
ITU-T G.703 (120 ohm balanced)
ATM Forum standard af.vtoa.0078.0000

Line
characteristics

B8ZS
HDB3
AMI
D4
ESF
SF

Supported line
rates

1.544 MHz, 2.048 MHz

ATM support

AAL1 circuit emulation

Metallic test
function

Look-out test
Metallic loopback relay

Redundancy

None

Power

15 Watts nominal

Default ranges: VPI 0-7, VCI 32-63

plus
0.75 W additional per active port
24 W maximum total.

CES card configuration


This section includes:

Creating card-profiles for T1/E1 CES 12-port cards on page 366

Configuring and activating the T1/E1 CES interface on page 367

Creating card-profiles for T1/E1 CES 12-port cards


The following example creates a card-profile for an T1/E1 CES 12-port
card in shelf 1, slot 12:
zSH> new card-profile 1/12/5034 shelf/slot/type

366

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

CES card configuration

sw-file-name: ----------->{}: malct1e1ces12.bin


admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {1}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: e1
card-atm-configuration: -> {vbnrt65rt30}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Configuring and activating the T1/E1 CES interface


The CES circuit frame type can be set in the ds1-profile during interface
configuration or in the cross connect command used to create the connection.
Table 97: Supported frame types
Line type

Description

Bundle format

e1

ITU-T G.704 without CRC-4

Structured

e1crc

ITU-T G.704 with CRC-4

Structured

e1mf

G.704 multiframing enabled

Structured

e1crcmf

G.704 multiframing enabled and crc


enabled

Structured

esf

Extended SuperFrame DS1 (T1.107)

Structured

d4

AT&T D4 format DS1 (T1.107)

Structured

e1unframed

E1 signal without frame synchronization.

Unstructured

ds1unframed

T1 signal without frame synchronization.

Unstructured

To configure a T1/E1 interface:


1

Update the DS1 profile to specify an unframed line type:


zSH> update ds1-profile 1-12-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
line-type: ----------------------> {e1}: e1unframed
line-code: ----------------------> {hdb3}:
send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}:
circuit-id: ---------------------> {e1}:
loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}:
signal-mode: --------------------> {none}:
fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}:

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

367

T1/E1 CES 12-port card

dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}:


line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}:
channelization: -----------------> {disabled}:
ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}:
csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}:
clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}:
transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming}:
cell-scramble: ------------------> {true}:
coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}:
protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}:
signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart}:
ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0}:
line-power: ---------------------> {disabled}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Activate the interface:


zSH> update if-translate 1-12-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: -----------> {321}:
shelf: -------------> {1}:
slot: --------------> {7}:
port: --------------> {1}:
subport: -----------> {0}:
type: --------------> {ds1}:
adminstatus: -------> {down}: up
physical-flag: -----> {true}:
iftype-extension: --> {none}:
ifName: ------------> {1-12-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Update and activate the rest of the interfaces, as required.

Pinouts
Table 98 describes the T1/E1 CES port pinouts. This card uses a 50 position
female champ connector.
Table 98: T1/E1 CES port pinouts
Port

368

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Pair

Signal

To

TX 1 Ring

TX 1 Tip

26

Pinouts

Table 98: T1/E1 CES port pinouts (Continued)


Port

Pair

Signal

To

RX 1 Ring

RX 1 Tip

27

TX 2 Ring

TX 2 Tip

28

RX 2 Ring

RX 2 Tip

29

TX 3 Ring

TX 3 Tip

30

RX 3 Ring

RX 3 Tip

31

TX 4 Ring

TX 4 Tip

32

RX 4 Ring

RX 4 Tip

33

TX 5 Ring

TX 5 Tip

34

RX 5 Ring

10

RX 5 Tip

35

TX 6 Ring

11

TX 6 Tip

36

RX 6 Ring

12

RX 6 Tip

37

TX 7 Ring

13

TX 7 Tip

38

RX 7 Ring

14

RX 7 Tip

39

TX 8 Ring

15

TX 8 Tip

40

RX 8 Ring

16

RX 8 Tip

41

3
2
4

5
3
6

7
4
8

9
5
10

11
6
12

13
7
14

15
8
16

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

369

T1/E1 CES 12-port card

Table 98: T1/E1 CES port pinouts (Continued)


Port

Pair

Signal

To

17

TX 9 Ring

17

TX 9 Tip

42

RX 9 Ring

18

RX 9 Tip

43

TX 10 Ring

19

TX 10 Tip

44

RX 10 Ring

20

RX 10 Tip

45

TX 11 Ring

21

TX 11 Tip

46

RX 11 Ring

22

RX 11 Tip

47

TX 12 Ring

23

TX 12 Tip

48

RX 12 Ring

24

RX 12 Tip

49

Ground

50

Ground

25

9
18

19
10
20

21
11
22

23
12
24

25
N/A

370

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

20

UNIVERSAL LINE CARD (ULC-ISDN-12)


This chapter describes the MALC ULC-ISDN-12 card and explains how to
configure it. It includes:

Overview, page 372

Viewing ULC card configuration profiles, page 375

ULC card pinouts, page 376

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

371

Universal Line Card (ULC-ISDN-12)

Overview
The Universal Line Card (ULC) provides line termination
for integrated services digital network basic rate interface
(ISDN BRI) over ATM and V5.2 networks. It provides a
U-interface over standard 2-wire local loops. It supports 12
U-interface circuits. Each port carries two B channels and
one D channel.
The ULC card supports ISDN-to-AAL2 and ISDN-to-V5.2
connections. The ULC card must be used with the
appropriate Uplink card for each application.
For ISDN-to-AAL2 configurations, use the ULC card with
an ATM-compatible Uplink card.
For ISDN-to-V5.2 configurations, use the ULC card with
the TDM/ATM Uplink card or the Voice Gateway card.
A ULC with POTS card is also supported. Contact your
Zhone Technologies sales representative for information.

Table 99: ULC-ISDN-12 specifications


Specification

Value

Size

1 slot

Density

12 ports:
1 D-channel and 2 B-channels per port

Physical
interfaces

One (1) RJ-21X Champ 50-pin connector

ISDN line
characteristics

144 kbps line rate


135 Ohm resistive line impedance
95V @ 45mA loop power
24 AWG 22,000 feet (maximum operational reach)
26 AWG 18,000 feet (maximum operational reach)

372

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Table 99: ULC-ISDN-12 specifications (Continued)


Specification

Value

Redundancy

None

DSL line
encoding

2B1Q

Nominal line
rate

80 kbps 5 ppm

Longitudinal
balance:

500 Hz to 40 kHz: greater than 55 dB

Input return
loss

greater than 20 dB, 10 kHz to 25 kHz


roll-off 20 dB per decade to 1 kHz and 250 kHz

Free-run line
rate (Stratum 4)
if timing
reference is lost

80 kbps 32 ppm

Power
consumption

1W nominal

40 kHz to 1 MHz: roll-off -20 dB per decade

plus
6W per active port

Creating card-profiles for ULC cards


Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.
Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.
ULC-ISDN-12 cards on the MALC have the following types and software
images:
Table 100: ULC-ISDN-12 card type
Card

Type

Name of software image

ULC-ISDN-12

5025

malculc.bin

The following example creates a card-profile for a ULC card in shelf 1,


slot 5:
zSH> new card-profile 1/5/5025 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malculc.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

373

Universal Line Card (ULC-ISDN-12)

upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:


admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {0}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
New record saved.

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and the
begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This could take
a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the following is
displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

You can also use the slots command and specify the slot number of the
card to view the state of the card. For example:

374

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
LOADING indicates the card is still initializing
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
0

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
RUNNING indicates the card is functional
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
59

Viewing ULC card configuration profiles

Fault reset
Uptime

: enabled
: 1 minute

To view the status of all the cards, use the slots command without any
arguments:
zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 (RUNNING)
13: MALC ADSL (RUNNING)
15: MALC MTAC (RUNNING)

Viewing active redundant cards


Use the showactivecards command to view all active cards in the system
that are part of a redundant card group:
zSH> showactivecards
Shelf/Slot Group Id
Card Type
__________________________________
1:
1/14 333
MALC MTAC

Viewing ULC card configuration profiles


Once the ULC card is enabled, 12 ulc-config profiles are automatically
created, one for each of the 12 physical interfaces on the card.
zSH> list ulc-config
ulc-config 1/5/1
ulc-config 1/5/2
ulc-config 1/5/3
ulc-config 1/5/4
ulc-config 1/5/5
ulc-config 1/5/6
ulc-config 1/5/7
ulc-config 1/5/8
ulc-config 1/5/9
ulc-config 1/5/10
ulc-config 1/5/11
ulc-config 1/5/12
12 entries found.

There is no need to update the ulc-config profile for ULC card. To view the
parameters in the profile, use the show command:
zSH> show ulc-config
ulc-port-type:--->
pots | isdn | ebs
ulc-trap-enable:->
enabled | disabled

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375

Universal Line Card (ULC-ISDN-12)

Parameter

Description

ulc-port-type

Identifies the ULC port provisioning.


There is one entry per ULC port.
Values:
pots
isdn
ebs
Default: isdn

ulc-trap-enable

Enables the sending of line-level traps


from the device to SNMP managers.
Values:
enabled
disabled
Default: disabled

ULC card pinouts


The ULC cards use standard 50-pin male Champ connectors. Table 101 lists
the port pinouts for the 12 ISDN ports on the ULC card.
Table 101: ULC card pinouts

376

Pin

Function

Pin

Function

Channel 1 ring

26

Channel 1 tip

Channel 2 ring

27

Channel 2 tip

Channel 3 ring

28

Channel 3 tip

Channel 4 ring

29

Channel 4 tip

Channel 5 ring

30

Channel 5 tip

Channel 6 ring

31

Channel 6 tip

Channel 7 ring

32

Channel 7 tip

Channel 8 ring

33

Channel 8 tip

Channel 9 ring

34

Channel 9 tip

10

Channel 10 ring

35

Channel 10 tip

11

Channel 11 ring

36

Channel 11 tip

12

Channel 12 ring

37

Channel 12 tip

13

unused

38

unused

14

unused

39

unused

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

ULC card pinouts

Table 101: ULC card pinouts (Continued)


Pin

Function

Pin

Function

15

unused

40

unused

16

unused

41

unused

17

unused

42

unused

18

unused

43

unused

19

unused

44

unused

20

unused

45

unused

21

unused

46

unused

22

unused

47

unused

23

unused

48

unused

24

unused

49

unused

25

unused

50

unused

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

377

Universal Line Card (ULC-ISDN-12)

378

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

21

PON CARD (PON-OLT)


This chapter describes the MALC PON card and explains how to configure it.
It includes:

Overview, page 379

Configuring a PON interface, page 382

Overview
The PON OLT card is a single-port interface that bridges
copper and fiber media. It supports APON, as specified in
the G.983.1 and G.983.3 specifications. It provides head-end
termination of an optical network with 622 Mbps
downstream and 155 Mbps upstream rates. It supports 32
OLT units when used in conjunction with a splitter.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

379

PON Card (PON-OLT)

Table 102: PON OLT card specifications


Specification

Value

Size

1 slot

Density

32 subscribers

Physical
interfaces

SC fiber optic connector

Line
characteristics

Transmits voice and data traffic at a 1310nm wavelength


Receives voice and data traffic at a 1490nm wavelength
Receives video traffic at a 1550 nm wavelength

Redundancy

None

Nominal line
rate

622 Mbps downstream and 155 Mbps upstream

ATM support

VPI/VCI ranges (per port):


VPI: 0 to 63
VCI: 32 to 255
448 VC-switched connections and 48 VP-switched
connections.

Power
consumption

24 W nominal
28 W maximum

Creating card-profiles for PON OLT cards


Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.
Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.
The slots cards on the MALC have the following types and software images:
Table 103: MALC card types
Card

Type

Name of software image

PON-OLT

5031

malcolt.bin

he following example creates a card-profile for a PON OLT card in shelf


1, slot 5:
zSH> new card-profile 1/5/5031 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.

380

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

sw-file-name: -----------> {}: malcolt.bin


admin-status: -----------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: ---> {}:
upgrade-vers: -----------> {}:
admin-status-enable: ----> {enable}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -------> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: --------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ------> {false}:
card-group-id: ----------> {0}:
hold-active: ------------> {false}:
weight: -----------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: ---------> {unknowntype}:
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}:
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record created.

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and the
begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This could take
a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the following is
displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

You can also use the slots command and specify the slot number of the
card to view the state of the card. For example:
zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
LOADING indicates the card is still initializing
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
0

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
RUNNING indicates the card is functional

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381

PON Card (PON-OLT)

Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat
Fault reset
Uptime

:
:
:
:
:

FUNCTIONAL
enabled
59
enabled
1 minute

To view the status of all the cards, use the slots command without any
arguments:
zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 (RUNNING)
13: MALC ADSL (RUNNING)
15: MALC MTAC (RUNNING)

Configuring a PON interface


This section provides an example of how to configure a Zhone Residential
Gateway (ZRG) to interoperate with a MALC.
Configure the following parameters in the olt-onu-config profile on the
MALC:
Parameter

Description

onu-serial-number

Serial number from the ONU device.

onu-password

Password to access the ONU device.

network-ref-clk

Network reference clock usage flag.


Values:
true uses the clock source from the upstream
device
false uses the systems internal clock. Also
known as local timing.
Default: false

onu-hec

Header Error Control.


Values:
onuoff
onuRxCorrectionOnly
onuTxGenerationOnly
onuRxAndTx
Default: onuRxAndTx

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Configuring a PON interface

Parameter

Description

onu-loopback

Loopback mode for device.


Values:
onuNone
onuInward
onuLine
Default: onuLine

onu-overhead-size

Overhead size definition field.


Values:
onuOverheadSize3Bytes
onuOverheadSize6Bytes
onuOverheadSize12Bytes
Default: onuOverheadSize3Bytes

Configuring PON OLT to ONU connections


1

(On the MALC) Activate the PON OLT physical interface:


zSH> update if-translate 1-14-1-0/pon622
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {203}:
shelf: ------------> {0}:
slot: -------------> {0}:
port: -------------> {0}:
subport: ----------> {0}:
type: -------------> {pon622}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {false}:
iftype-extension: -> {ponolt}:
ifName: -----------> {1-14-1-0}:
redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

(On the MALC) Activate the connection to the ZRG ONU interface,
which is a subport within the PON OLT physical interface.
zSH> update if-translate 1-14-1-1/pon622
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ----------> {204}:
shelf: ------------> {1}:
slot: -------------> {14}:
port: -------------> {1}:
subport: ----------> {1}:
type: -------------> {pon622}:
adminstatus: ------> {down}: up
physical-flag: ----> {true}:
iftype-extension: -> {pononu}:

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383

PON Card (PON-OLT)

ifName: -----------> {1-1-1-1}:


redundancy-param1: -> {0}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

The MALC automatically creates olt-config and 32 olt-onu-config


profiles for each PON OLT card installed. It does not matter which one
you use.
3

(On the MALC) Update the olt-config profile on the MALC to enable
(the default) or disable auto learning of passwords on the connection
between the OLT and ZRG ONU:
Note: If you enable auto-learn in the olt-config profile, you do
not need to enter olt-onu-password in the olt-onu-config profile.

zSH> update olt-config 1-14-1-0/pon622


Please provide the following: [q]uit.
auto-learn: ------------------> {oltautolearnenable}:
cell-scrambling: -------------> {oltcellscramblingrxandtx}:
bip8: ------------------------> {oltbip8txgenerationonly}:
olt-hec: ---------------------> {olthecrxcorrectiononly}:
hec-rx-bypass: ---------------> {false}:
crc-rx: ----------------------> {true}:
overhead-size: ---------------> {oltponoverhead3bytes}:
delimiter-pattern: -----------> {162}:
delimiter-size: --------------> {8}:
cdr-pattern: -----------------> {192}:
cdr-location: ----------------> {0}:
cdr-active-high: -------------> {false}:
cpe-limit: -------------------> {4}:
lcd-limit: -------------------> {8}:
lcd-alpha: -------------------> {1}:
lcd-delta: -------------------> {2}:
tx-discard-non-matching-vpi: -> {false}:
utopia-discard: --------------> {false}:
sync-bytes-clk-divisor: ------> {1}:
tx-sync-bytes: ---------------> {txsyncbytesdisable}:
olt-loopback: ----------------> {loopbacknone}:
max-pon-distance: ------------> {200}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

(On the ZRG) View the onu-config profile on the ZRG, to learn the serial
number of the ZRG ONU device:
zSH> get onu-config 1-1-1-0/pon622
onu-serial-number: -> {6542027}
onu-password: ------> {}
network-ref-clk: ---> {true}
onu-hec: -----------> {onuoff}

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Configuring a PON interface

onu-loopback: ------>
onu-overhead-size: ->

{onunone}
{onuoverheadsize3bytes}

(On the MALC) After learning the serial number of the ZRG, enter it in
the olt-onu-config profile on the MALC:
zSH> update olt-onu-config 1-14-1-1/pon622
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
olt-onu-password: ---> {}: not required when autolearn is enabled
olt-onu-serial-num: -> {}: 6542027 The ZRG serial number
olt-onu-churn-key: --> {onuchurnkeydisable}:
line-status-trap-enable: -> {enabled}:
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

(On the MALC) Create traffic containers for the connections between the
OLT and the ZRG ONUs.
OLT traffic containers are similar to ATM traffic descriptors. Traffic
containers set up a bandwidth for a connection between an OLT and
ONUs. All connections that are in the same bandwidth can use the same
traffic container. If they need a different bandwidth, they use a different
traffic container.
Note: The guaranteed-bw and maximum-bw parameter values
in the olt-traf-cont profile must be a multiple of 63 and should be
equal.
zSH> new olt-traf-cont 1
guaranteed-bw: ---> {} 6300
maximum-bw: ------> {} 6300
cbr: -------------> {true}
cbr-compenstate: -> {false}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record created.

When the line is up, a message similar to the following will be displayed
on the console:
FEB 20 08:12:17: alert : 1/1/1025: alarm_mgr:
01:06:01:02 Critical ONU Up

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385

PON Card (PON-OLT)

386

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

22

METALLIC TEST ACCESS CARD (MTAC/RING,


MTAC/RING-2MHZ-CLK AND
MTAC-FC)
This chapter describes the MALC MTAC cards and explains how to configure
it. It includes:

Overview, page 388

Connecting the MTAC/Ring card, page 393

Testing a line, page 393

Connecting external alarms, page 395

Connecting an external clock, page 395

Connecting an external ring source, page 396

MTAC/Ring and MTAC-FC card pinouts, page 398

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

387

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

Overview
The MTAC/RING cards (MTAC/RING, MTAC/
Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC) provide metallic test access
for external test systems to verify the local loop conditions,
such as whether the loop will allow a particular service (for
example, POTS or DSL) to operate, or whether the line circuit
connected to the loop is operational.
The MTAC/RING cards also provide:

Ringing generation.
Access for an external ringing generator.
T1 or E1 external network clock source.
2.048Mhz clock reference (MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card
only).

Test equipment access to any line.


Line testing:
Look-out testing (toward the loop) for DSL and POTS
interfaces.
Note that the type of tests provided will vary, depending on the
type of card being tested.

External alarm relay closures (2, form-C)

External alarm inputs (12, wet or dry, normally open or normally closed)

Fan control and monitoring (MTAC-FC only)


Note: The MALC supports only one active MTAC/Ring card at a
time and a total of two cards in the system.
Note: The MTAC-FC card is only supported in the MALC 319. This
card must be installed in slot 10.

Figure 62: MTAC-FC card (MALC 319 only)

388

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

Ringing generator
The metallic test access card contains the ringing generator for POTS cards
installed in the MALC. Ringing voltage is supplied to all installed POTS
cards via a backplane bus. Note that only one MTAC/RING card can supply
ringing voltage to the system at a time.
The metallic test access card also contains a ringing voltage detector that
senses the absence of ringing voltage on the card itself or on an external
ringing generator (if one exists). If the ringing voltage detector detects a
problem, another MTAC/Ring card can supply the ringing voltage, or the
MALC can be configured to use another external ringing generator.

External test access


The MTAC/RING cards provide access to external test equipment through an
RJ45 connector for look-in, look-out, and bridging test access.
The test relays can be controlled by the command line interface (CLI) and
Zhone Management System (ZMS). Test relays on the POTS or DSL card can
connect any POTS pair to an RJ45 test access port on the metallic test access
card using the back plane to allow test access to any POTS or DSL line.
Table 104: MTAC/Ring, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk, MTAC-FC specifications
Specification

Density

Size

1 slot

Physical
interfaces

RJ48 test access port to connect to EXTERNAL test head.


Connects test head to 8 pin MT bus on backplane (supports one
port test simultaneously in system).
Serial control RS232D port available for controlling the MTU.
26 pin D sub connector that supports 12 alarm closures for
detecting various alarm types from collocated equipment.
Supports isolated closure, ground and 48VDC closure (states
and names provisionable in software).
RJ48C accepts DS1 or E1 external clock reference (all versions)
or 2.048Mhz clock reference (MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card
only), provisionable as system clock source.

Metallic test
functions

Look-out testing (toward the loop) for ADSL and POTS


interfaces (with the exception of ADSL 32 cards).
Note: The type of tests provided will vary, depending
on the type of card being tested.

Ring
generation

External ring generator voltage connector. Internal ring voltage


sine wave generator also provided for small scale deployments
(power ranges based on load from 15 REN total @ 86VRMS,
45 REN @ 40VRMS).

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

389

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

Table 104: MTAC/Ring, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk, MTAC-FC specifications (ContinSpecification

Density

Redundancy

1+1 card redundancy

Clocking

The clocking reference on the MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card


complies with ITU-T (CTR12) G.703 standard.

Power
consumption

8 W nominal
38 W maximum at full ringing load
The MTAC-FC card is required to be installed in the
MALC 319 chassis. The power consumption for the MTAC-FC
card and the chassis are 31 watts maximum with no ringing, 45
watts maximum at full ringing load.

Creating card-profiles for MTAC/Ring cards


Caution: Each MTAC/Ring card in a redundant pair must be
configured identically; the cards do not share state or configuration
information. In addition, you must manually keep the configuration
of the active and standby cards in sync.
Each card installed in the system must have a card-profile. Each type of slot
card requires different settings in the card-profile.
Tip: You can specify the name of the software image for a card in a
card-profile or a type-module. Each card of a particular type can
share a single type-module.
Settings in type-modules can be overridden by settings in
card-profiles.
MTAC cards have the following types and software images:
Table 105: MTAC card types
Card

Type

Name of software image

MTAC/RING

5003

malcmtac.bin

MTAC-FC

5012

malcmtacfc.bin

The card-profiles for MTAC/Ring cards require that the card-line-type


(which specifies the external clock source type) be specified.
To configure a redundant MTAC/Ring card, create a second card-profile for
the redundant card.
To enable an MTAC/Ring card:
zSH> new card-profile 1/15/5003 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcmtac.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:

390

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Overview

upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:


upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {2}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1 | e1 used for the external clock port
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

Creating card-profiles for MTAC-FC cards


Caution: Each MTAC-FC card in a redundant pair must be
configured identically; the cards do not share state or configuration
information. In addition, you must manually keep the configuration
of the active and standby cards in sync.
The card-profiles for MTAC-FC cards require that the card-line-type (which
specifies the external clock source type) be specified.
To configure a redundant MTAC-FC card, create a second card-profile for
the redundant card.
To enable an MTAC-FC card:
zSH> new card-profile 1/15/5012 shelf/slot/type
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
sw-file-name: ---------> {}: malcmtacfc.bin
admin-status: ---------> {operational}:
upgrade-sw-file-name: -> {}:
upgrade-vers: ---------> {}:
admin-status-enable: --> {operational}:
sw-upgrade-admin: -----> {reloadcurrrev}:
sw-enable: ------------> {false}: true
sw-upgrade-enable: ----> {false}:
card-group-id: --------> {2}:
hold-active: ----------> {false}:
weight: ---------------> {nopreference}:
card-line-type: -------> {unknowntype}: ds1 | e1 used for the external clock port
card-atm-configuration: -> {notapplicable}
....................
Save new record? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit:
s
New record saved.

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391

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

Verifying the slot card installation


After you save the card-profile record, the slot card in that slot resets and the
begins downloading their software image from the flash card. This could take
a few moments.
When the card has finished loading, a log message similar to the following is
displayed (if logging is enabled):
zSH> Card in slot slot-number changed state to RUNNING

You can also use the slots command and specify the slot number of the
card to view the state of the card. For example:
zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
LOADING indicates the card is still initializing
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
0

zSH> slots 13
Type
Card Version
EEPROM Version
Serial #
CLEI Code
Card-Profile ID
Shelf
Slot
State
Mode
Heartbeat check
Longest hbeat
Fault reset
Uptime

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

MALC ADSL
1
2
110006
No CLEI
1/13/5004
1
13
RUNNING indicates the card is functional
FUNCTIONAL
enabled
59
enabled
1 minute

To view the status of all the cards, use the slots command without any
arguments:
zSH> slots
1: MALC DS3 (RUNNING)
13: MALC ADSL (RUNNING)
15: MALC MTAC (RUNNING)

392

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Connecting the MTAC/Ring card

Viewing active redundant cards


Use the showactivecards command to view all active cards in the system
that are part of a redundant card group:
zSH> showactivecards
Shelf/Slot Group Id
Card Type
__________________________________
1:
1/14 333
MALC MTAC

Connecting the MTAC/Ring card


Before configuring the MTAC/Ring card, connect the card to the external test
access port. Figure 63 shows the connectors on the MTAC/Ring card.
Figure 63: External test access

External ring generator

External alarm connectors

Test access
External test access control

BITS clock access

Testing a line
The MALC creates mtac-profiles for each card installed in the system for
manually changing test modes. The MALC also enables connecting a
third-party device to the MALC MTAC card to set test relays. After
connecting the testing device, use the mtac-linetest command to set the relay
options. The default baud rate is 9600 bps. (This can be changed by
modifying the rs232-profile.)

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

393

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

The following command example sets and releases the relay:


zSH> mtac-linetest 1/8/48 lookout
Successful - In TestMode
zSH> mtac-linetest 1/8/48 release
Successful - Return to operational state

The following table describes the supported parameters in the mtac-profile.


Parameter

Description

ifIndex

Specifies the ifindex of the physical line to be tested. If


no line is being tested, this value is 0.
Values:
A physical interface on the system. In the format
shelf/slot/port/subport/type
Default: 0
This parameter cannot be modified while a test is in
progress.
The ability of a physical line to support a metallic test
may vary depending on the cards installed and the
external test equipment.

test_mode

Specifies metallic test mode for a given line. The test


mode can be changed only if the ifIndex parameter is
set to a nonzero value.
Values:
mtacModeBridge The subscriber line is metallically
connected to the MTAC test access port while the
subscriber is in service. To avoid service interruption,
the test head must be in high impedance (bridge) mode.
mtacModeLookIn The subscriber line is
disconnected and the service port is metallically routed
to the MTAC test access port. This allows the testing of
MALC service port using a external test head or where
the test head represents the subscriber terminal.
mtacModeLookOut The MALC service port is
disconnected and the subscriber line is metallically
routed to the MTAC test access port. This allows the
testing of line with or without a subscriber terminal.
mtacModeNone No MTAC test is in progress.
Default: mtacModeNone

The following example enables an external test device to access to the ADSL
interface on shelf 1, slot 3. port 1:
zSH> update mtac-profile 1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ---> {0/0/0/0/0} 1/3/1/0/adsl

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MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Connecting external alarms

test_mode: -> {mtacmodenone} mtacmodelookout


....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

To stop access to the interface, set the mtac-profile back to the defaults:
zSH> update mtac-profile 1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
ifIndex: ---> {1/3/1/0/adsl} 0/0/0/0/0
test_mode: -> {mtacmodelookin} mtacmodenone
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Note: The mtac-profile must be set back to its defaults before a line
can be specified for test access.

Connecting external alarms


The MTAC/Ring card has a 26 pin connector that provides alarm relay
contacts for up to 12 external devices. When an alarm condition occurs on the
external device, the MALC sends a trap. Each pair of pins can be assigned to a
different alarm. Use the num2str-profile to assign a description to an alarm
relay. The description is included in traps and log messages.
The num2str-profile uses an index in the form:
shelf/slot/282/alarm-contact

The following example adds a description to the first alarm contact of an


MTAC/Ring card in shelf 12:
zSH> update num2str-profile 1/12/282/1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
name: -> {Relay 1}: cabinet open
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Connecting an external clock


The MALC supports the following external clock sources:

BITs clock (requires the MTAC/Ring card)

2.048 Mhz external clock (requires the MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card)

Connecting a BITs clock to the MTAC/Ring card


The BITs clock on the MTAC/Ring card appears to the system as a T1
interface. To connect the clock source:

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

395

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

Connect the clock cable to the MTAC/Ring RJ-45 port labeled Clock.

Configure the system to use the clock, as explained in System clocking on


page 204.

Connecting a 2Mhz clock to the MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card


The BITs clock on the MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card uses pins 6 and 8 for
ground and pin 7 for the clock reference. To connect the clock source:
1

Connect the clock cable to the MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk RJ-45 port labeled


Clock.

Change the line-type in the ds1-profile for the MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk


card as in the following example:
zSH> update ds1-profile 1-21-1-0/ds1
Please provide the following: [q]uit.
line-type: ----------------------> {e1crc}: other
line-code: ----------------------> {b8zs}:
send-code: ----------------------> {sendnocode}:
circuit-id: ---------------------> {ds1}:
loopback-config: ----------------> {noloop}:
signal-mode: --------------------> {none}:
fdl: ----------------------------> {fdlnone}:
dsx-line-length: ----------------> {dsx0}:
line-status_change-trap-enable: -> {enabled}:
channelization: -----------------> {disabled}:
ds1-mode: -----------------------> {csu}:
csu-line-length: ----------------> {csu00}:
clock-source-eligible: ----------> {eligible}:
transmit-clock-source: ----------> {throughtiming}:
cell-scramble: ------------------> {true}:
coset-polynomial: ---------------> {true}:
protocol-emulation: -------------> {network}
signal-type: --------------------> {loopstart}
ds1-group-number: ---------------> {0}
line-power: ---------------------> {disabled}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

Configure the system to use the clock, as explained in System clocking on


page 204.

Connecting an external ring source


The MTAC/Ring card provides support for an external ring source to provide
ringing voltage for the system.

396

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

Connecting an external ring source

Caution: When connecting the external ring source, observe the


following:
If the external ring generator is non-isolated, connect the top pin to
the ringing voltage using a minimum 22 AWG wire, and leave the
bottom pin unconnected. See Figure 64 on page 397.
If the external ring generator is isolated, connect the top pin to the
ringing voltage using a minimum 22 AWG wire and the bottom pin to
-48V on the ring source. See Figure 65 on page 397.
Figure 64: Connecting a non-isolated ring source

Figure 65: Connecting an isolated ring source

After connecting the ring source, update the system profile to specify an
external ring source:
zSH> update system 0
Please provide the following: [q]uit.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

397

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

syscontact: ----------> {Zhone Global Services and Support 7001 Oakport Road Oa
kland Ca. (877) Zhone20 (946-6320) Fax (510)777-7113 support@zhone.com}:
sysname: -------------> {Zhone Malc}:
syslocation: ---------> {Oakland}:
enableauthtraps: -----> {disabled}:
setserialno: ---------> {0}:
zmsexists: -----------> {false}:
zmsconnectionstatus: -> {inactive}:
zmsipaddress: --------> {0.0.0.0}:
configsyncexists: ----> {false}:
configsyncoverflow: --> {false}:
configsyncpriority: --> {high}:
configsyncaction: ----> {noaction}:
configsyncfilename: --> {}:
configsyncstatus: ----> {syncinitializing}:
configsyncuser: ------> {}:
configsyncpasswd: ----> {}:
numshelves: ----------> {1}:
shelvesarray: --------> {}:
numcards: ------------> {3}:
ipaddress: -----------> {0.0.0.0}:
alternateipaddress: --> {0.0.0.0}:
countryregion: -------> {us}:
primaryclocksource: --> {0/0/0/0/0}:
ringsource: ----------> {internalringsourcelabel}: externalringsourcelabel
revertiveclocksource: -> {true}
voicebandwidthcheck: --> {false}
....................
Save changes? [s]ave, [c]hange or [q]uit: s
Record updated.

MTAC/Ring and MTAC-FC card pinouts


This section lists the pinouts for the following interfaces on the MTAC/Ring
and MTAC-FC (MALC 319 only) card:

External ring generator

External alarm pinouts

External test access

External test control

External clock pinouts (MTAC/Ring card)

External clock pinouts (MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card)

External ring generator


Table 106 lists the pinouts for the external ring generator.

398

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

MTAC/Ring and MTAC-FC card pinouts

Table 106: External ring generator pinouts


Pin

Function

Power

Common

External alarm pinouts


The MTAC/Ring and the MTAC/Ring-FC cards provide a 26-pin connector
for access to external alarms.
The MTAC/Ring card has 16-volt inputs that require external current-limiting
resistors (4700 ohm, 0.5 watt) for 48-volt operation. The MTAC-FC accepts
48-volt inputs directly. All alarm inputs are metallically isolated using
optocouplers.
Figure 66: MTAC/Ring card external alarm connector pinouts

Figure 67: MTAC/Ring-FC card external alarm connector pinouts

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

399

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

Table 107 lists the pinouts for the 26-pin connector for access to external
alarms.
Table 107: MTAC/Ring card external alarm connector pinouts
External alarm

Pin

Function

N/A

-48V supply for external contacts

Input (+)

Input (-)

Input (+)

Input (-)

Input (+)

Input (-)

Input (+)

Input (-)

10

Input (+)

11

Input (-)

12

Input (+)

13

Input (-)

14

Input (+)

15

Input (-)

16

Input (+)

17

Input (-)

18

Input (+)

19

Input (-)

20

Input (+)

21

Input (-)

22

Input (+)

23

Input (-)

24

Input (+)

25

Input (-)

26

48V return (+)

10

11

12

N/A

400

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

MTAC/Ring and MTAC-FC card pinouts

External test access


Table 108 lists the pinouts for the MTAC/Ring card external test access port.
Table 108: MTAC/Ring card external test access port
Pin

Function

Test in tip 1

Test in ring 1

Test out tip 1

Test out ring 1

Test in tip 2

Test in ring 2

Test out tip 2

Test out ring 2

External test control


Table 109 lists the pinouts for the MTAC/Ring card external test RS232
control port.
Table 109: MTAC/Ring card external test control port pinouts
Pin

Function

DCE Ready, Ring Indicator


(DSR/RI)

Received Line Signal Detector (DCD)

DTE Ready (DTR)

Signal Ground (SGND)

Received Data (RD)

Transmitted Data (TD)

Clear To Send (CTS)

Request To Send (RTS)

External clock pinouts (MTAC/Ring card)


Table 111 lists the pinouts for the MTAC/Ring card clock port.

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

401

Metallic Test Access card (MTAC/RING, MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk and MTAC-FC)

Table 110: MTAC/Ring card external clock pinouts


Pin

Function

Rx ring

Rx tip

Not used

Tx ring

Tx tip

Not used

Not used

Not used

External clock pinouts (MTAC/Ring-2Mhz-Clk card)


Table 111 lists the pinouts for the MTAC/Ring-2MHZ-CLK card clock port.
Table 111: MTAC/Ring card external clock pinouts

402

Pin

Function

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

Not used

GND

Clock reference

GND

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

INDEX
Numerics
32-port ADSL card
description 219
32-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable
cable description 267
pinouts 267
32-port ADSL+POTS card
description 221
32-port ADSL+Splitter card
description 223
32-port ADSL+Splitter-UK card
description 225

A
acronyms, described 13
activating slot cards
32-port ADSL+POTS card 234
32-port ADSL+Spiltter cards 234
32-port ADSL+Spiltter-UK cards 235
ADSL Annex A cards 235
ADSL cards 233, 366
description 193
G.SHDSL cards 290
POTS card 233, 236, 237, 315, 316
slot card installation 238, 291, 316, 341, 348,
374, 381, 392
ULC cards 373
ADSL
ADSL S=1/2 248
configuring tone ranges 242
downstream interface 244
upstream interface 245
voice splitters and 216
ADSL 2 and ADSL 2+
configuring 252
support 252
ADSL 48 port card
configuring 235
ADSL interfaces
verifying the interface 247, 255
ADSL+POTS-24 slot card
specifications 218

ADSL+POTS-32A-2S card
specifications 221
ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-2S card
specifications 223
ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S card
specifications 225
ADSL-24 slot card
specifications 216
ADSL-32A card
specifications 219
air filter, replacing 65
airflow, system requirements for 38
alarm cables and contacts
guidelines 75
specifications 75
alarms 400
external on MTAC/Ring cards 399
external on MTAC/Ring cards, voltage to
trigger 399
APS
configuration 139, 144, 164
connecting redundant cable 155
ATM
ATM to TDM interworking overview 22
Circuit Emulation Service (CES) 365
IMA groups
guidelines for 115, 185, 357
IMA groups, configuring 112, 182, 354
IMA links, moving to another group 116, 186,
358
overview of support 21
ATM cell termination connection
adding IP route to remote LAN 86
configuration 86
creating ATM VCL 86
creating IP interface 87
defining ATM traffic descriptor 86
verifying IP interface 86
ATM management connection
creating IP interface 87
ATM OC3-c interfaces
configuration 139, 155, 159
disabling SONET interface 142, 158
ATM traffic descriptor, definition of 86
ATM/TDM Uplink, splitting out using patch panel

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

403

Index

74
automatic baud rate detection
SDSL 292

B
backplane pins, installation of 51, 52
battery, safety precautions for 35

C
cables
cleaning fiber optic 79
DS3/E3 redundant 130, 133
installing cable management bracket 70
management bracket installation 70
cables and connectors
32-port ADSL to dual-50-pin cable 267
8-port T1/E1 to dual 50-pin 118, 120
alarm cables and contacts 75
ATM/TDM Uplink lines split out with patch
panels 74
cabling guidelines 67
NEC article 800 67
power lines 67
connecting OC3-c optical cables 68
covers 67
description 73
DS3/E3 cable 133
FCC regulations 67
ground minimum 59
non-redundant TDM uplink cable 190
OC3-c/STM1 cables 68
pinouts 77
ratings 41
redundant TDM uplink cable 187
rules 41
shielded 67
specifications 73
using ducts 38
cards
MALC t1/E1 12 CES 365
types 232, 290, 340, 348, 373, 380, 390
Uplink types 197
VG-T1/E1-32-2S 28, 323
viewing active redundant 292, 342, 349, 375,
393
CES 365
structured and unstructured 365

404

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

chassis
dedicated ground 36
dimensions 39
environmental specifications 39
fans 39
grounding and isolation 42
maximum temperature 38
number per rack 39
operating altitude 39
operating humidity 39
operating temperature 39
rack installation 47, 48
storage altitude 39
storage humidity 39
storage temperature 39
unpacking 45
weight 39
weight distribution 38
chassis dimensions 40
circuit breaker, specifications 42
Circuit Emulation Service (CES) 365
cleaning components 79
clocking 204
BITS clock ds1-profile on MTAC/Ring card
204
BITS clock on MTAC/Ring card 205
configuring system in system profile 209
eligible and non-eligible sources 210
external clock on MTAC/Ring 395
for SDSL interfaces 296
manually changing system clock 209
revertive 209
specifying DS3/E3 207
specifying OC3-c/STM1 208
specifying T1/E1 206
viewing system 210
commands
dslstat 303
get 139, 155, 159
ifxlate 87
showlinestatus 297
common return 41
compliance, specifications supported 43
configuration 159
ATM cell termination connection 86
ATM OC3-c interfaces 139, 155, 159
CLI disabled 88
local management channel 83
logging in 83
logging out 83

SDSL 296
SDSL/SHDSL interface 292, 297
SHDSL interface 297
specifying DSL interface 293
verifying interfaces 247, 255, 297, 303
configuring ATM data connection
ATM cell termination connection 86
configuring management interface
accessing the serial port 83
local management channel 83
logging in and out 83
configuring physical interfaces
ATM OC3-c interfaces 139, 155, 159
disabling SONET interface 142, 158
SDSL 296
SDSL/SHDSL interfaces 292, 297
SHDSL interfaces 297
specifying DSL interface 293
verifying interfaces 247, 255, 297, 303
connecting OC3-c optical cables 68
connecting OC3-c/STM1 cables 68
connecting power
power supplies 57
procedure 57
terminal block 57
craft interface 83
creating ATM VCL, description of 86
creating IP interface
adding route to remote LAN 86
description 87
ifxlate 87
specifying VPI/VCI pair 87
verifying the interface 87
creating IP management interface
description 87
cutoff requirements 41

D
DC power sources 41
DS3/E3
6 inch cable and 130, 133
DS3/E3 Uplink card
cabling description 133
DSL
ADSL S=1/2 248
fixed bit rate settings and training rates 293
DSL interfaces
SDSL configuration 296

specifying interface type 293


verifying the interface 297

E
E1 interface
defaults 108, 179, 350
E1, over ATM or IP circuit 365
electrostatic discharge, see ESD
environmental requirements
precautions 39
specifications 39
ESD
preventing 37
slot cards 37, 51
Ethernet 159
configuring
Gigabit Ethernet, configuring 158
Ethernet interface
configuration 84
creating a default route 85
creating a route from management PVC to 87
IP interface 84
route show command 85
verifying 85
verifying the route 85

F
feature overview 20
features
new in this release 11
fiber
cleaning cables 79
flash cards
card sizes in redundant pair 193, 326
functionality, feature overview 20
FXS
adding gain and loss 257, 317

G
G.SHDSL-24 slot card
specifications 286, 288
gain, adding 257, 317
Gigabit Ethernet
configuration 159
differences on high performance card 159
GigE-2 card

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

405

Index

line type 94
grounding
acceptable conductors 37
cable gauge 59
conductor requirements 55
dedicated 36
power 37
specifications for 55
system 56
torque applied to connectors 60, 62
two-wire power supply 42
using power supply connection 39
groupSymmetry parameter 113, 183, 355

I
ifindex parameter 394
IMA
group guidelines 115, 185, 357
groupSymmetry 113, 183, 355
links, moving 116, 186, 358
minNumTxLinks 113, 183, 355
parameters 113, 183, 355
IMA groups
configuring 112, 182, 354
installation
cable management bracket 70
connecting power 57
grounding conductors 55
installing slot cards 50
LEDs 61
mounting brackets 46
rack installation 47, 48
removing slot cards 53, 54
unpacking the system 45
installation precautions 38
airflow 38
cables and connectors 38
cabling ducts 38
chassis weight 38
environmental requirements 39
grounding 39
maximum temperature 38
ventilation 38
weight distribution 38
installing slot cards
backplane pins 51, 52
description 50
procedure 51, 52

406

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

interfaces
line speeds for DSL interfaces with fixed bit
rates 293
specifying type of MTAC/Ring card 390, 391
Inverse Multiplexing over ATM, See IMA
IP
addresses for redundant Uplink cards 84
Circuit Emulation Service (CES) 365
ISDN
overview 25

L
laser beam, safety precautions for 35
LEDs
description 63, 64
reading 61
redundancy 64
system described 63
line testing, MTAC 393
line-type
GigE-2 card 94
local management channel 83
logging
enabling/disabling for session 84
enabling/disabling over the serial craft port 84
logging in and out
description 83
logout command 83
timeout command 83
loss, adding 257, 317

M
maintenance
cleaning toolkit 81
replacing air filter 65
management
creating route from management PVC to
Ethernet 87
for dual non-redundant Uplinks 204
maximum temperature, precautions and 38
metallic cables
alarms 73
craft 73
Ethernet 73
G.SHDSL 73
specifications 73
minNumTxLinks parameter 113, 183, 355

modems
DSL training rates 293
mounting brackets
chassis 46
installation procedure 46
MTAC/Ring card
BITS clock on 204
configuring redundancy 390, 391
external alarm contacts 400
external clock reference 401, 402
ifindex 394
parameters 394
specifications 389
specifying line type for 390, 391
test_mode 394
MTAC/Ring external contacts 400

N
non-redundant TDM uplink cable
cable description 190

O
OC3-c/STM1
APS 144, 164
attenuation 139, 157
overview 31

P
packet voice
configuring POTS card for 316
parameters
IMA 113, 183, 355
MTAC/Ring card 394
pinouts
external alarm 399
pinouts, assignments for 77
PON
traffic containers 385
POTS
adding gain and loss 257, 317
configuring card for packet voice 316
configuring card for TDM voice 315
POTS card
24 port card overview 312
48 port card overview 313
600 ohm and 900 ohm 312

POTS cards
support for packetized voice 29
types 314
POTS-24 slot card
specifications 312
POTS-48 slot card
specifications 314
power
circuit breaker 42
using jumper for single supply 59
using supply for grounding 39
power connections 41
power feeds 41, 42
power specifications
cable ratings 41
cables and connectors 41
common return 41
connections 41
cutoff requirements 41
DC power 42
DC power sources 41
description 42
power feeds 41, 42
rated current 42
rated power 42
system 41
preparing for installation
grounding and isolation 42
installation precautions 38
safety precautions 35
selecting the system location 38
tools you need 37
profiles
ulc-config 375

R
rack installation
chassis 47, 48
procedure 47, 48
rated current 42
rated power 42
redundancy 31
configuring Uplink 193
connecting APS cable 155
DS3/E3 cables 130, 133
flash card sizes 193, 326
IP addresses and 84
LEDs 64

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

407

Index

MTAC/Ring 390, 391


viewing active cards 292, 342, 349, 375, 393
viewing status information about 200
redundant TDM uplink cable
cable description 187
removing slot cards, procedure for 53, 54

S
safety
standards 35
safety precautions
battery 35
description 36
laser beam 35
SDSL
clocking from network 296
SDSL/HDSL2 cards
configuration 296
SDSL/SHDSL interfaces
configuration 292, 297
selecting the system location 38
SFP 99
SHDSL
connecting LP card to Raptor 100 308
SHDSL interfaces
configuration 297
verifying the interface 303
slot cards
activating 193
ADSL+POTS-24 specifications 218
ADSL+POTS-32A-2S specifications 221
ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-2S specifications
223
ADSL+SPLTR-ANXA-32A-UK-2S
specifications 225
ADSL-24 specifications 216
ADSL-32A specifications 219
ESD 51
G.SHDSL-24 specifications 286, 288
installation 50
verifying 238, 291, 316, 341, 348, 374,
381, 392
MTAC/Ring specifications 389
POTS-24 specifications 312
POTS-48 specifications 314
redundancy 31
removing 53, 54
storing 50

408

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

types supported 18
Uplink-DS3/E3 specifications 126
Uplink-OC3-c/STM1 specifications 137, 148
Uplink-T1/E1 specifications 104
Uplink-TDM/ATM specifications 174
Small Form Factor Pluggables 99
SONET
disabling interface 142, 158
specifications
chassis dimensions 40
environmental 39
system cables 73
standards, support for IP 23
storing slot cards 50
system 204
activating slot cards 193
cables and connectors 67
clocking 204
configuring management interface 83
environmental dimensions
chassis 39
weight 39
Ethernet interface 84
feature overview 20
input power 41
maximum temperature 38
metallic cables 73
profile
updating 88
system profile 88
unpacking 45
Uplink cards 84
system environmental dimensions
chassis per rack 39
fans 39
operating altitude 39
operating humidity 39
operating temperature 39
storage altitude 39
storage humidity 39
storage temperature 39
system input power 41
system profile
clocking and 209

T
T1 interface
defaults 108, 179, 350

T1, over ATM or IP circuit 365


T1/E1 Uplink card
cable description 118, 120
TDM voice
configuring POTS card for 315
temperature, maximum 38
terminal interface, settings for 83
test_mode parameter 394
tone ranges, on ADSL card 242
tools for installation 37
types, listing of cards 232, 290, 340, 348, 373, 380,
390
types, listing of POTS cards 314
types, listing of Uplink cards 197

U
ULC card
hardware overview 372
pinouts 376
specifications 372
viewing ulc-config profiles 375
ulc-config profiles 375
Uplink 2-GE card
specifications 92
Uplink card
redundancy and IP addresses 84
Uplink cards
configuration 84
dual, non-redundant 200
dual, non-redundant and management 204
E1 defaults 108, 179, 350
redundancy configuration 193
T1 defaults 108, 179, 350
types supported 18
Uplink-DS3/E3 slot card
specifications 126
Uplink-OC3-c/STM1 slot card
specifications 137, 148
Uplinks
types supported 15
Uplink-T1/E1 slot card
specifications 104
Uplink-TDM/ATM slot card
specifications 174
Upljnk cards
flash card sizes in redundant pair 193, 326

V
V5.2
overview 25
ventilation, requirements for 38
voice
packetinzed voice support on POTS cards 29
POTS 24 card 312
POTS 48 card 313
voice gateway 28, 323
voice gateway
adding 325
cable pinouts 327
overview 28, 323
redundant card 326
voice splitters, ADSL card and 216
VOIP
support on POTS cards 29

Z
ZMS
CLI configuration disabled 88

MALC Hardware Installation Guide

409

Index

410

MALC Hardware Installation Guide