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INDEX

TO

Federation

American
the

Among

VOLUME

of

IF.

Arts, The

59

Shops

72

236

Announcement
.

Arts

and

Crafts

and

Problem

Dennett
Mary Ware
Elliott
As to Clothes, Muger
Copley Society "Retrospe6iive

Out,

Way

The,

Decorative

the

Decorative

Matter

Deerfield

Fair,
in

Design

at

the

M.

Museum,

183
Gusiave

Rogers
30,

147,

Textiles

and

Museum

Boston

B.

57

The

Chinese

of

of

Fine

349

226, 295,
Jewelry

P.

237

in

as

B,

Edmund

Related

to

Sara

Peirce

Movement,
of

W.

Guild

Enamel,

Industries

Group

67,

40,

Experiences
Crafts

the

Rolf
Arts

White

Japanese Candlesticks, A,

104
290

and

388

Frederick

Cohurn
of

305

Arts,

Exhibitions,

Cjroup

of

341

'

Exhibition

Exhibition

Metropolitan

the

at

Jewelry,

Editorial

50

Arts, The

Ajts

Milton

209

275

Handicraft

at

Chipping

The

Campden,
413

Marie

Homespun,

T,

Garland

314

Illustrations:
Basket

Altar

Weaves

Cloth

361
facing 385

Chinese

Ador's

Gown

facing 237

Designs for Floor of Sanctuary,St. Paul's


Cathedral,Detroit
45, 46, 47,80
Embroidery from Fisherton-de-la-Mere
facing 384
Embroidery Class
Book-plates
35, 36, 37
Glass Bottles
facing 81
Group of Type Faces, A
253
Candlesticks
facing 275
Japanese Bronze
MetropolitanMuseum
facing 346
Marks

of the

Societies

Different

Arts

and

Crafts

262, 263, 298, 299


Necklace
in Silver and Pearl
facing 228
in Silver and Topaz
Necklace
facing 228
Old Bindery Showing Tools, An,
facing 305
Old Deerfield Street
facing 157
Part of the Hingham Exhibition
facing 229
Part of the TravelingExhibition
facing 32
Interior of Shop of Melrose
Society facing 156
Yacht
Gold
Trophy
facing 119
Printer's Tools
256
Reed
Baskets
facing 358
87
Rings
Sampler from Venice
facing 286
facing 287
Sampler from Algiers
Sign made for the Norwell Society facing 156
Bowl
Silver Punch
facing 41
6
Spoon Maker's Tools, The
Spoon Maker, The
facing
g
and Fairies
Titania, Oberon
facing 204
Used
Tools
in Bookbinding
facing 322
Duke
Theseus, Hippolyta and Athenians
facing 205
8
Various
Teaspoon
Stages in a Hand-made

of the Arts

Influence

and

Crafts

Movement

Manual

Training,Arthur F. Payne
Letters
78, 153, 270, 302,
Luckahauks, Louis y. Deacon
Making a Hand-forged Spoon, Elizabeth
upon

B.
I

New
on

II

157
81

379

High School Produftion


Nights Dream," Helen

of

"

summer
Mid-

Plumb

202

Notice

432

Pageant of Spring,A

119

Possibilities of Inherent

kets. The, Luther

Design in

Weston

Bas-

Reed

Turner

360

Potteryat Home, W. P. Jervis


Principleof Handicraft, A, Carl Purington
Rollins

Tools, The, Carl Purington Rollins


Raising the Standards of Craftsmanship
Relation

315

91

Printer's

of the Archited

The,

Frank

to

the

Craft

Rings, Laurin

C. Baldwin

Hovey

251
19

er,
Work371

Reviews
f

249

Masque of Midsummer, A, S. O. H.
Merry Quest, A, Madeleine Tale Wynne
My Experiencesin Reviving Old Embroideries,
Notes

411

Stone

Mrs.
-

243

75
86

Martin

Societies:
Baltimore
*"

Boston
Bourne

Chicago
^

Charleston
Columbus

32, 68, 133,


33,

68,

105,

189, 264, 300,


134,

190,

401,

399

428

265, 335

136, (b)i43
192

(b)^5

Cincinnati

300

Deerfield

153

Deer

Lodge

Detroit

(b)26.M
34, 70,

162, 229, 376,

107,

Evansville

iii,

13

Dudley
Greensborough

^6'

'^^

Hartford

39,

Haverhill

39"i45.

Hingham
Klansas City

(b)99,iii,

i')S

139,

3-^

229,

303

13^
150,168,301,335
269

Melrose

Montague
Minneapolis (Guild)'
Minneapolis (Society)
National
League 29, 61, 103,
234, 303, 338, 339,
New
Jersey
New

^o.

170
40,
124,

377,

171,

301

155,

195,

412,

431

(b)98

York

40,

iii,

171

Norwell

153,

173^

300

Peterborough
Philadelphia
Portland (Maine)

118, 175, 232

(b)63,175
71, 177,

Providence

409
1

Rockford

180,

79

(b)i86

Aspefts of Ireland's Industries,Mrs.


Harry Bottomley
Stained Glass in Chartres Cathedral, Cecil

Some

Headlam

363
392

'

T. Garland

E"cperiment,A, Marie
326
A,
Suggestionto Arts and Crafts Societies,
Clara Dyar
221
Tile Floors in St. Paul's Cathedral,Detroit,
Successful

Marian
Tools

Used

V. Loud
in

41

Bookbinding, Elizabeth

Gris-

"\

'

com

Morot

319

Utility

Way
Ways
William

Some

of

y.

Louis

p"

Madeleine

Samplers,

Two

of

Our

Tale

Wynne

Popular

Stones,

Deacon

Out

for

We

do

Morris,

The,
13,

Craftsmen,
It,

285

A,

The
Walter

Mira

Edson

197
280307

Crane

97

iHANDICRAFT

PUBLISHED
THE

NATIONAL

FOR

LEAGUE

HANDICRAFT

SOCIETIES

VOLUME

IV

MONTAGUE
THE

DYKE
1911-1912

MILL

OF

t"^iV

HAKDIGRAli^T
a
"

TOL.

IV

APRIL

MAKING

NO.

HAND-FORGED

ELIZABETH

ROB

191

ABLY

in

trade

B.

no

does

SPOON
STONE

other branch
such

smith's
of the silver-

difference

in

price

the hand
between
legitimately
for
'"made and the machine made spoon. Briefly
stated,
stock isfirstrolled
jY*^
""irniodernfa"lory-madespoon,the
that is
ci*os^ rolled,
to get the graded thickness
V*]^'''?*^
The spoon outline is then obtained by means
fi^-.liteded.
blanks
thus formed
are
vT'^
\W cutting-outdies. The
of dies,which
itmck
set
ornament
up by another
1^ froilt and back, and even
into
bend the spoon
ks proper shape,at the same
time stamping the rey
and the maker's
mark. If a spoon
ifimed"sterling"
mark
*tt made
by this latest of processes, the sterling
result

as

comes

be found
as

"

the

was

raised

on

when

case

the surface instead of incised,


the

done

separate-

the workman's
ftotn firstto last,
part is to feed the
iilvferto the machines, and the time requiredin the
is again reduced
leodkiiig

that
so
jp!Oiips,

fart of
"

marking was

^Hic

net

each

man

by working the men


knows
only his own

in

little

result.

of these mechanical
devices,
perfeftion
dy^ fowered priceof bullion (forunlike most
other
Oonmiodities the pric^of silver has steadily
declined),
fixes
which
the
with
.WbA
these,
sharp competition,
extreme

'

.*"'""-.""""""".".

HANDICRAFT

the

retail

should

ounce,

an

price of

all be credited

because
blessings,
of

this line of table-ware

of the

dollar

the list of man's

on

wider

much

so

at

distribution

beautiful,cleanlyand durable metal in this


indispensablelittle utensil of daily use. An open
minded
of human
consideration
needs can
sult
only rein satisfaction that the world
in generalis using
and enjoyingthe sterling
in so much
spoon
er
greattions.
quantitiesthan was
possibleunder earlier condiNo
distinction results in these days from
ing
bethe

born
With

with

"silver

in one's
spoon
of the machine

the

development
hand-forger of thirtyyears ago has
altogetherdisplaced; no one
among
for the work
silversmiths is training
as

is the

and

matter,

in

Even

still holds

find both

to

this

himself

the

younger

in another
lost

species

naturalists have

which

find

To

lines

manship
reputableworkis no longeran easy

skill and

mechanical

most

few. who.

the

artistic

proper

restraint
attention

the minor

to

the

the world

ages,

human

feelingin

get

details which

total of all that is beautiful

sum

in

and

in form

love

of

enjoyment from studied


and from
intelligent
ornament,

who
surroundings;

their

To

pigeon,for

found

and

much

as

product, the

tombinedis^rare intleed.

sense

as

carrier

scouringthe country.
along hand made

been

the

he will be

century

quarter

mouth."

go
in

to

make

up

life,as weU

art.

such

be

may

attributed the

hand-forged workmanship,
and
man

variations
is

creature

which

with
will

of moods

limited
the

demand

elusive

for

tions
grada-

cause
into it, becreep
which
be
cannot

HANDICRAFT

gearedand
the

belted

These

machine.

of
furnishings
eye

dwell

may

and

speeded with
cultured
those

home,

precisionof

the

in tellers

seek

the

which

thingsupon

in restful comfort

in the

and

enjoyment,

therebyconvertingthe high tension of the business


day into a lower voltagewhich shall ensure
repose.
One
who
ing
contemplatestryinghis hand at the makof spoons
should not
forgetthat in his day and
generationthe old time spoon-maker in this country
made
to
was
serve
an
apprenticeshipof four years,
which
that he is likely
as a reminder
may well serve
find in it

to

He

should

more

than

at

first appears.

enough of his metal to


fa"^ established by the experienceof more
hundred
silver
years, that only sterling
him
More
than 925
satisfadorily.
parts
will

be

crabbed

know

soft for service; less than

too

in the

working

and

finish.

than

three

will

serve

pure metal
that will be

take

den- the metal

again,and
fire skin

repeatedblows
tillit requiresannealingover

know

"

not

the

desirable

should

He

will

accept

also that

that this process


covers
be removed
which
must

will harand

over

the oiitside with

before the silver

properlyfinished. He should feel that it is


to
not
playingfair with a would-be customer
put a
the silver which
surface
on
temporarilyconceals
this ^^fire,''
leavingit to be revealed later in distressing
be

can

black

sort

when

put

into

use,

for fire

on

the

in any attempt
to polish
only shows the more
it off by ordinarycleaning.
will have
the problem of puttingsome
to
meet
of a finished surface on his work, and it is hard-

surface

He

blotches

HANDICRAFT

ly likelythat one of the old


spoon-maker
by a veteran
find any

adherents

was

power

the

had

spoons

marks

of

hand,

on

fingersinto
of the
the

bowl

palm

Today
or

the

series of

brushed

pan

covered

of wet

to

or

the

rough
polished by

were

leather,which

finisher dipped his

often

become

so

inside
with

loused
cal-

shaved.
inevitable

macl^ine seems
for

processes,

the

foot. When

rubbing the
fingertips,and the rest

be

of

silversmith

rouge,

hand, which

it had

maker

Hunnewell

with

The

bench.

spoon

reniove

pin

his

with

to

exacting

most

This

file,they

the

to

of his

that

the

and

wooden

fastened

was

fourscore,will

over

among
craft work.

been

hammer
a

now

Farrington "
in his earlydays as
a
provided either by hand

and

described

processes

even

disciplesof modern
was
apprenticed to
Boston

time

the

in this process,
of silverJs
finishing

both

complicated and exa(^ing,and the processes


differ materially
do not
however
the work
is made
;
and polishing
bobbing and buffingand soratchbrushipg'
all necessary
'are
to a rightfinish
The
departui'elies in the speedingof the lathe and
v

in the

attitude

of

the

finisher himself.

The

hand

speeds low, and works carefully,


respefting
the workmanship and bringingout
its beauty.The
trade worker's
lathe is speeded much
sitating
higher,necesfast work if the finisher is not to grindthrough
his metal. He
has no
interes^tin, the wprJ^niraqship
preceding,except it may- be to disguisedefeds, but
he prideshimself
in the even
bright
ne"s, of the hUck
in speed,
centres
polishedsurface. Hi? effort chiefly
that being the thingthat.bringshim recognition
and
worker

HANDICRAFT

beauty under
Presupposingthat
take

to

ready for

such

the

treatment.

the would-be
of

care

worker

these

making of a hand
(See illustration.)
anvil requires first attention.
The
6x8

less than

be

to

not

are

are

we

and

methods

tools in the

prepared

which

working

of

consideration

has

processes

of silver

all forms

to

common

lose, all its distinctive

would

Handwork

advancement.

himself

now

the

quired
re-

forgedspoon.
Its face

inches, and

ought
weigh

it should

pounds upward. The top surface should be


fifty
highlypolishedand decidelyconvex, to facilitate the
The
shank
spreadingof the metal under the hammer.
from

under

side is made

on

the

vil

block, which
blows
8

timber
worker
a

the

an^

peated
firmlyset to resist the rethe heavy hammers.
An
upright
of a height to allow the
square,
while
forging,or to sit by using^

of

stand

high stool,and
be

fitted into

be

be

must

inches

to

to

bedded

relied upon
hammers
are

on

withstand

foundation,

cement

the

impact. (SeeA)
counted
Three
set.
a
They are short
and stubby handled, as different as they can
well be
from
of slender,interesting
the great variety
shapes,
can

that
meet

the

of hollow

hammerer

his needs.

five

The

pounds, used
peening hammer,
Not

much

it

end.

second

heaviest

accumulates

ware

being

term

paid to

used

almost

hammer

to

common

is

the

to

weighing nearly

one,

in the first processes,

attention

hammer,
The

to

is called the
other

round

end

wholly

is similar

to

at

trades..
of this.

the

peen

the first only

and has both


ends
carefullypolished.The
lighter,
third is a planishing
end being
hammer, its rounded

HANDICRAFT

The

Spoon

Maker's

Tools.

mm^mmimmmmmt^mmtm^^

"

HANDICRAFT

with

convex,

well
his

these

at

them

highly polished surface. One


heavy sluggingimplements, and

looks

conclusions

own

for successive

the

to

as

that

arm

draws
wield

can

hours.

making the bowls a punch of steel is required,


with
the size of the spoon.
varying in dimensions
be about
Its length should
six inches, which
will
allow it to be held comfortably while
the bowl
is
being struck up. On one end it presents a flat face
The
the hammer.
to
opposite end is ground and
bowl. This latter end
faced to the shape of the spoon
is made
have a correspondingmatrix,which
must
by
pouring melted lead into a mould and pressingthe
punch into the hot fluid,leavingit there long enough
For

lead

for the

to

set.

If the

are

spoons

to

be

made

in

considerable

worked
with
quantitiesa drop hammer
foot stirrupis helpful in striking
a
up the bowls.
A bowl punch is useful only for the smaller
spoons.
The
largerones, like salad and berry spoons, have
a

matrix

which

hollowed

out

the silver is driven

in

hard

with

wood

block

punches by

intp

process
obtained

and the final outline


half-hollowing,
little shop in the
stakes. Each
by hammering over
of
sets
days of the hand-forged spoon had its own
bowl
punches, all like enough to each other generally
ersome
speaking,but varyingenough to provide a bothfeature
in matched
work.
(See illustration
called

The
the

size of

blank
is relative to the
spoon
be made.
Ordinarilyit should

piece to
before
startingfrom one-fifth
the finished piece. It must
than

to

one-fourth
have

size of

weigh
more

thickness

HAMDICRAFT

Various

Stages in

Hand-made

Teaspoon.

HANDICRAFT

that

will

provide

allowance

the

at

for

for the

with

4^

in.,gauge

little more
is

to

than

hammer,
and

The

ounce.

blank

its side

on

with

narrowed, and

is

The

division

said,a

an

Then

handle.

matter

"Iallowed

for

to

the

man

the

bowl

at

division

few

the

forger'sfirst move
edges with the big
of

additional

bowl

blows

the

thickened.

time

same

the

and

is, as the cook


spoon
far from
of "jedgement," but it is not

for bowl

blows

nature

requiresa rectangularstrip,^'^^x
B."S., and weighs at the start a

roughly marking

stem

The

11,

strike the

short

too

them.

blank

teaspoon

of

desired

of gauges, while
than second
untrained, is no more
works

width

length.A
puzzling enough to the

knowledge
who

the

it is much

start

be made

must

stock

sufficient

bowl, and while

the

next

and

fall on

f
the

for handle.
broader

surface,and

are

mer,
again delivered with the peen end of the big hamstruck
horizontallyalong the surface. This
lengthensand spreads the stock, and it becomes
ridgy and shovel like in appearance.
The
as

metal
often

as

soon

resents

it hardens

such
must

severe

be

treatment,

taken

to

the

and
blow

with the peen hammer


ing
strikpipe. Another
course,
lengthwiseblows along the tipand bowl, further
lengthensthe spoon, spreadingthe tip,and greatly
unlikelystill another
broadening the bowl. Not
will be required,
before it is properlythickcourse
nessed
and spreadto receive the pattern outline.
have conIn each course
described the forgermust
tinually
in mind the necessary
gradingfor thickness.
A good hammerer
providesa liberal toe to the spoon

HANDICRAFT

lo

being the point farthest

(thetoe
tip),so

that

hardest

many

point will

not

tip at

the back

is

for it

^stock

of

wear

this

at

If

the

must

be

left

at

cut
to

removed

from

the

comes
years which
into the bowl
line.
out-

be

this

struck

up,

point.A

enough
tip calls

correspondingdie, for except it is needed for


of a tip is too
-a singlespoon
on
only, the filing
be left thick and
lengthy and costly.The stem must
and strong, so that there
rigid,and the bowl even
will be no
tendency for it to buckle and break after
find often enough in
it is shaped; a fault that we
and one
that patchwork can
the old coin spoons,
make
aiever
good.
The
fore
temptation of the trade (which as we said besells by weight)is to recommend
the extremely
heavy gradesand need not hold with the forgedspoon,
harder
than
does the
for forging leaves the metal
method.
One
die struck
better give attention
may
in keepto
balance, choosing a weight that seems
ing
refined quality
with the more
of the dinner
vice,
serwhen
it is sold by weight,as we
which
latter,
find in its boarding house
form, certainly
gives us
for

the

creeps.
blank
The

spread to take the patbeing sufficiently


tern
outline,and that having been marked
in, the
be trimmed
off and filed to the
outer
edges must
outline. These
edges can be worried off by filing,
but strong cuttingshears greatlyfacilitatethe work.
The

pattern

is much

The

used

next

it with

outline

may

be

made

of paper,

or

if it

good medium.
ing
step is the shaping of the bowl, by strikthe bowl
punch into the matrix,outlines
zinc

is

HANDICRAFT

ii

the tools. A queer


torted
disamong
objeftresults from this,for the handle, which

of which

as
an

shown

are

yet has

no

proper

angle which

is

contour,

seems

that

more

brought by
of

ladle

it into

than

ing
by bendshaping
and
filing

The
be shaped
handle
must
now
spoon.
the
it into the regulationform. When
is finished there
it is here

still remains

that the

maker's

the
sense

smooth
of the

artistic has

its.final

opportunity.
The
slightvariation that separates the rigidand
commonpladb from an outline and balance that will
of inborn
tive
intuicomes
give delightand satisfaction,
and

senses,

craftsman

is

at

the

heart

of all that the

ern
mod-

strivingfor.
Nature
is never
prodigalin combining the ingredients
artist although happily she
that compound
an
distributes in most
of us, in irregular
portions,enough
and
of the mixture
build upon
to
develop.It very
often
glected,
happens that this potentialasset is left nean"l that work
lence
acquires a technical excelwhich
makes
it commendable,
lackingall the
while
the finer qualities
which
to
our
beauty loving
instinCls respond.
When

at

last the

spoon

lies before

us

in its final

requiresthat it shall have the guarantee


of its qualityshown
by the sterlingstamp,
natural pride of workmanship leads to affixing

shape,
and

is

the

law

These
mark.
be struck on
must
distinguishing
with special
stamps before it is ready for the process
known
to
as
which, since it is common
finishing,
silver-makingin all its forms, need not be specially
some

described.

HANDICRAFT

12

So
that

make
lot

are

rtained
and

with

on

little
a

kind

from

spoon

from

of

will

later

and
of
and

same

the

first

lot

lot,

the

If

the

work

outlines

and

to

works

his

as

made

spoon

itself, somewhere

only
attitude

the
be

with

without

better

grows

counted

with

determine

hold

will

oftentimes

in,

he

line

to

relationship, but

asserts

worker,

the

revelation
his

heart

degenerating,
feeling

for

its

develops.

beauty

his

the
within.

man

hand

his

he

of

in

at

dozen

compared

to

made

be

cannot

close

crept

to

die, which

the

second

is

and

cost

close

so

of

mood

enough

quite

real

the

the

have

tendencies

and

If

but

them

the

variations

slight,

work.

enough

marvels

one

unending,

bear

second

the

expense

spoons

that

precision

duplicates

this

in

on

an

the

These

keep

can

Still the

weight.

go

if

that

sense

end

to

together

reduce

nearly duplicate

so

involves

made

pradiicable.

work

the

be

can

considerably

to

beginning

reason.

spoons

is saved

time

from

singly

spoon

beyond

dozen

required

are

it

puts

If

make

to

that

stages

many

brings

mind

machine,

is

asleep,

for

backsliding.

only

that

sturdy

the
at

result
least

into

arm

is

than

worse

holds

the

its

own

shop,
with

and
the

without

HANDICRAFT

THE

UTILITY

13

OF

POPULAR

OF

SOME

OUR

STONES

LOUIS

J.

DEACON

impressions gleaned from several years


have
experience as a miner-mineralogist

THIl
of

more

the

fsiSt has

sea

or

than

convinced

ever

me,

and

I believe

been

graduallyimpressed upon jewelry


craftsworkers
that there are opportunities
generally,
as
appreciated,for procuringmotifs
yet only slightly
rambles
for their work
in tripsafield,
along country
highways and byways, cursory inspectionsof old
quarriesand gravelpitsand meanderings upon our
river

beaches,

all of which

localities

are

apt

which
become
yieldstones
positively
gems when
properlytreated by the lapidist.
What
family of the mineral kingdom yieldsmore
colors of the
"popular gems" than quartz? What
in this predomibe found duplicated
rainbow
cannot
nating
to

mineral?

And

will

yet where

we

not

find

quartz, of which

ed
hardlya singlespeciesis not adaptart? From
the clear pellucid
rock
to the lapidary's
crystaland ranging through all the shades of color
from
the faint lemon-yellowof the citrine,to the
steel color of the cairngorm. Amethysts
or
deep smoke
of the palestlavender
dish-purp
shadingto the rich,redand then
of the majesticSiberian gems;
the translucent
green of the chrysoprase.
.

But

the

commoner

jaspersof
opaque
and traps are

forms, the chalcedonies, the


all shades, the colored conglomerates
to

be

picked

up

on

nearlyall the

HANDICRAFT

14

To

roadsides.

fill a

would

alone

I believe

it is safe

that will

allow

will

accept

color
a

or

of quartz
possibilities

volume.

say that praftically


any stone
cuttinginto the cahochon shape and
to

high polish,showing

combinations
and

gem

the

enumerate

is thus

color,may

of

quite suitable

pleasing

some

well

for

be

termed

settingor

mounting.
And

this leads

into

discussion

of

of the

some

semi-precious" or "ornamental"
ly
which
are
recognizedand definite-

so^-called^^

newer

stones,

many
described

of

in the report

Survey

Primarilyof
the

me

quartzes,

for the

course,

of the

past year

United
soon

States
to

this class of

among

be

logical
Geocoming.
forth-

stones

perhaps the latest named


beautiful, translucent, water-worn

of which

apricotine,a
pebble found on many
beaches, although the

of
best

our

tide-water

or

are

is

estuary

examples so far are from


the shores
of Delaware
Jersey.This
Bay in New
of a slice
is of a very rich pink, reminding one
stone
facft it takes its name,
of a ripeapricot,from which
tidious
the pebble is poHshed it is worthy of fasand when
treatment.
tain
Approached in color only by cershades
of coral,it has this advantage of being
with a shimmering
richlytranslucent and oftentimes
similar to the aventurine.
lightsomewhat
er
exploited,the commonMany new
agates are now
forms being the so-called "Lake
Superioragates"
but properly
striped
speakingthese are the beautifully
and interlineated
little carnelian pebbles found
on
upthe smaller lake beaches
throughout the states

i6

HANDICRAFT

inclusion

circular

in

an
radiatingcrystals,
asteriated spot in the midst of a most
charming effe"9:of an alreadyharmonizing playof colors,which
has prompted me
the name
of
to give to this stone
*'

occurs

star-malachite/'
ancient

How

mentioned

is the

gem

jasper!We

will find it

of Exodus
and
early as the Book
againin Revelations,for one of the gates of the Holy
City is formed of jasper,accordingto John.
are
Nearly all the uncrystalline,
quartzes
opaque
jasper,and pebblesof this stone will be found upon
the

as

beaches

streams,

in

of almost

our

rivers

and

lakes

and

colors

ranging from almost black to


browns, as well as pinks and blood-

pale tans and


reds,lightand
colors

all

dark

mentioned

greens, with all or


in combination.

of the

checks
or
showing marked
is suitable for the lapidaryto form
into desired
cracks
and the finder will be rewarded
shapes for setting,
with a highlypolished,
richlycolored,though
usuallyopaque stone worthy of the embellishment
of a setting.
so-called "Swiss
The
lapis,"so much shown by the
other than a slightly
dealers,is none
per
jasporous
gem
treated with Prussian
this
blue. And
artificially
the only dyed stone.
A very deep
is by no
means
emerald
and
color is given to
permanent
green
chalcedony which was
originally
pale, translucent
to
imitate, or as a substitute for,chrysp"designed
favor and is much
ter
sought afprase, but has found
merits. This is regardedas an
ly
entireits own
on
different stone
from
chrysoprase,the beautiful

Nearly every

one

if

several

not

HANDICRAFT

17

apple-greenvarietyof chalcedony,whose
a
golden leek,was bestowed
upon
ancient

Greeks.

Plasma

is another

for

darker

name,

dicatin
in-

it by the

jasper,
of which
the bloodstone
of India is a variety;although
the plasma of lighter
color, (palesage-green
and sometimes
ender
lavslightly
tingedwith a brownish
is known
as
heliotrope,and this stone
tint,)
is very attractive,owing to its slighttranslucency
and

soft,neutral

Who

is

name

green

colors.

familiar

not

with

the

well

known

crocido-

lite or

"tiger-eye,"so popular in years gone by, and


now
enjoyingsomething of a revival ? The cleverest
efFeft of this gem
is imparted by selecting
the thin
should
have considerable
cut, yellow stones, which
translucency,closelyresembling the Ceylon chrysoberylor precious"cat's-eye," but with which it
is in
To

no

related.

way

the

enumerate

requirethe

mention

craftsworker

is

which
the

list of quartz

of many

more

I believe

with

would
every

is yet

one

will,be appreciatedby

after artistic novelties

and

which

I think

slightmention.
This
of chalcedony closelyresemis a form
stone
bling,
and allied to, the chrysocolla
tioned
previouslymendefined as a greenish-grey
and can
be briefly
sions
chalcedony,heavilycharged or stained with incluof copper-green
malachite,producing a very
showy and efFeftive gem, to which I have arrogated
of "prase-malacite."
the combination
name
I have
endeavored
While
idea of the
to
give some
is

worthy

of

gems
which

familiar,although there

should, and

seeker

entire

some

3R^n"i|"mnPB^itaMi("!".

HANDICRAFT

i8

less

common

it is

not

be

forms

the

arts

the

trifling

can

narrative
be

all

every

of

cost

of

as

left

mentioned

for

other

and

for

crafts,

commonly
later

many

utility

outlay

polishing.

article.

to

are

nevertheless

no

may

the

in

suitable

at

cutting

such

suitably

have

way

procured

be

wayside;

the

in

are

useful

quartz

that

by

up

that

can

of

presumed

picked

stones

with

-^^^,.^^-^i

A
be

in

than
ther
furmet

HANDICRAFT

19

THE

RAISING

STANDARDS

OF

CRAFTSMANSHIP

nothing has done so much to


bring the craftsmanship of this country up to
tious
its present dignifiedposition as the conscienwork
of the many
juriesof the arts and crafts
societies. The
Jury of the Boston societyhas now
is believed

IT

been
the

in adlive

service

for

than

more

of its efforts may,

success

attributed

that

to

the faft that

to

several

years, and
largeextent, be
ten

of the

present

rors
Ju-

organizationof the
that the general trend
Jury in 1900. This means
of the Jury's basis of judgment has been constantly
infusion of new
maintained, while the constant
Ju^
into the body, has prevented its decisions from
rors
For
un
or
progressive.
becoming in any way narrow
some
years past the Jury has presented a report at
the annual
meeting of the Society.These
reports
have in the past been so widelyquoted that it seems
mitted
"f generalinterest to publishin full the report subto the last annual
meeting.
have

been

Report
Any
the

one

looking over

past few

in their

tenor.

the

servingsince

of

the

years, would
Comment
of

the

Jury.

reports
notice

and

of the

Jury for
distinft change

recommendation

in

steady improvement, have taken


the place of criticism;,and the day seems
far
not
distant when
the Jury's report will have
deal
to
of advancement
with generalconditions
than
more
conditions
of criticism.
with particular
the

presence

HANDICRAFT

20

high standard of work is immediatelyto


take the placeof the present one, but the improvement
has been steadyand satisfactory
and the general
material submitted
to the Jury has been
average of
is little vi^ork now
from
trained
people ungood. There
in the knowledge of design and workmanship;
Not

that

there is littleleft of self-conscious

aestheticism;

and the
given place to what is saner
class of objectsis rising
to higherground.
pot-boiling
effort combined
with better understanding
Greater
and in some
have led to results which
are
gratifying
admirable; witness some
cases
masterly examples
tinguish
in silverwork, in jewelry,and in iron, of such disqualitythat the "commended"
tag, the
highestpraise of the Jury, falls short of adequate
expression.
and a recognition
It is this higher qualityof work
of the hand
machine-made
of the superiority
over
have
cess
brought reputation and sucwork, which
to
our
Societyand drawn discrimmatingpurchasers
to our
shop; and not the thingsof less good
qualitywhich find a ready sale,and bring in money
to

has

bizarre

the

craft

the

the

But

and

of material
sold

in

qualitythan
make

to

which
progress
does
not
upon,

amount

and

man

the

the

we

salesroom.

rooms

that

mean

is

not

be; and

for admission

steadyincreasingscale
There
is no
question that what
of brain and heart
as
qualities
in

ourselves
congratulating

are

passed by

it should

standard

the

considerable

the

Jury and shown


in
distindlly
poorer

so

it will continue
of craft work

to

er,
high-

of excellence.
is needed
and

as

much

skillful hand

is

HANDICRAFT
and

comparison

constant

zi

association

with

the best

companionship
objectsof the past; and intelligent
craftsmen
of old
with the productionsof. the master
for advancement:
and the
is surelythe best means
often repeat its recommendation
too
Jury cannot
be studied in our
that they should
Museum, in our
colle"Sions where
libraries and
own
they are easily
accessible.
Our

workers

do

avail

not

themselves

of

enough

of old faced
The
workers
the
opportunities.
same
problems which we do today, and the same
but with a simpler vision and
difficulties;
a
more
We
direft understanding and
deeper feeling.
can
least in studyingtheir achievements
at
wring some
and acquiresome
from them
of their
of their secrets
qualities.

these

The

Committee

on

Exhibitions

has instituted the

cellent
ex-

dred
practiceof providinga small group of kinof the past alongsideof the exhibitions in
art
be compared.
the two
where
can
our
rooms,
The
of the
practice of having different members
Jury meet those craftsmen who desired criticism upon
hasbeen
much
their work
more
complished
acsuccessfully
Walker, who meets
by Mr. C. Howard
them
cism
every Thursday morning for a personal critiand illustrated explanationof work
brought to
him, so givingin detail the opinion already
expressed
by the Jury.The criticism has thus acquired a unity
which

makes

it much

efficient then

under

less

graduallyraised and
and the Jury
response;

the

more

advantageous circumstances.
The

standards

workers

have

have

been

risen in

con-

HANDICRAFT

22

tinues
to

ask their

to

obtain

Mr.

C.

year

with

cooperation in a mutual endeavor


still higherqualityof excellence.

Howard

Walker

the

describes

followingcomments

the

work

and

of the

commendation
prafticalre-

"The

work

year has been


and

as

accepted by the Jury during the past


of a higherdegree of merit than heretofore
the work
has improved the standard

has been advanced.


requisitefor acceptance
stillexist examples which
"There
the productof
are
members
but which
show
of better
new
possibilities
mer
are
achievement, and which
accepted under the forin effedl when

standard

for the

which

are

better

no

ago.
But

on

the other

class

of

work

*'

salesrooms

in the

presence

needed

criticism. Thisfaft

than

more

the workers

than

those

of

accounts

some

articles

several

shown

couragement
en-

years

hand, there is a steadily


increasing
which
has not
only merit, but dis-

tindlion.
*'It could

considerable

justicehave been said


in
a few
years ago, that scarcelyany piece of work
had distinction. Originality
societies' salesrooms
and
artistic expression and good taste were
present, but

the

distinction

these

absent.
work

the year
Jury wishes
in which
cases

which

with
qualities
was

"The

with

from

comes

longer the case.


marked
ing
'commended'
by the Jury durhas been often distinguished
work. The
its appreciationof the spirit
to express

its criticisms

the criticisms

have

is

"f

skill of workmanship

consummate

This

the association

no

have
been

been
severe

In many
stated in n"

received.
and

HANDICRAFT

24

"Wood

carvinghas improved

frames

greater refinement

have

detail

than

charadler

somewhat.The

formerly,and

and

carved

carved

interesting

more

chests

of

similar

the peasant work


of Normandy
are
be found; but of fine,delicate,
elaborate
or

to

to

there

with

is none,

the

exception of

now

ing
carv-

few

table
no-

examples.
"Enamels
leave

have

much

Glass

"

improved
be

to

is

design and

color, but

desired.

Something

rare.

in

of the chara"Ser

and

pler
sim-

of the old Venetian

forms
"Bookwork

is of

various

glassis desirable.
degrees of merit, very

little of it

being important.
"The
followingobjeftsare desired:
"In
work
or
silver,silver grill
perforatedsilver for
tea-urn
stands,etc., lamp stands under blazers,etc.,
which
candlesticks
are
ornamented, card cases, cigarette
and

cases
"

New

one

of the

and

faft that delicate

handles

given to

decorative

dealers
finer

and

bisques are
work:

In many

covers.

Finer

should

cases,

the forms

forms, finer

be

while

bought of
clays and

desired.
music

rolls,portfolios,
etc., playing

cards cases,

rectangularmats

"Textiles:

woven

too

flutings

convex

Especial study

paintingis good

uncouth.

are

"Leather

to

or

concave

efFeftive is needed.

are

the

delicate

forms, not to be found


the shops, for tea-pots, sugar bowls, cream
ers,
pitchthe delicate
in
painted decoration
etc., with
colors. An
color, not in a dozen
appreciation

Ceramics:

in

caddies.

tea

work

as

which

not
large),
merely broken

well
has

circular

as
a

pattern

scarfs
stripes;

with

ones.

(not
em-

HANDICRAFT

ends; embroidered

broidered

work,
*'

25

medallions

for

que
appli-

etc.

dles
hancarving:umbrella handles, decorated
ad
useful objects;knife and fork handles; sal-

Wood
for

sides with
detail that is not
bellows
spoons;
in scale; boxes; small cabinets; panels that
coarse
may

be

useful forms,such

adaptedto

cabinet

as

doors,

drawer
of
fronts, etc., and for centers
pilasters,
and
which
chair backs; carved
perforatedscreens
also be used as panelssuch as Japanese Ramas;
can

carved

bed

this kind

Work
posts for pier glasses.
made
into interesting
furniture

posts;

of

be

by

can

framing simply.Carved
on

turningswhich

can

be used

furniture.

"Inlays of wood, ivory,metal, mother of pearl,etc.,


and of every class of work.
Very little of this work
has

been

done.

mese
"Engraved metal, like East Indian, Burmese, Siaor
Cingalesework in charafter but with original
design;see also Greek mirrors.

"Ivories

in useful

"Enamels:
"Glass:

and

cloisonnees

champleve

glassof the Murano


becoming a thing of the

delicate

glassis
work

shapes.

in Venice

existed. There

is

is

no

tian
type. Veneern
past, the mod-

meretricious,yet

why

reason

this

enamels.

no

cannot

finer

art

be done

here; also engraved glass.


"Bookwork:

graving,
plateenpieces,vignettes,

Lithographicdesigns,copper
plates for

head

and

tail

etc.

"Figure
For

the

work

in all materials."

Jury: J.

T.

Coolidge,

Jr.,

Chairman,

26

HANDICRAFT

SOCIETY
SOCIETY

OF

BIOGRAPHIES

ARTS

AND

DEER

CRAFTS,

LODGE

MONTANA

Societyof Arts and Craftsof Deer Lodge,


Montana, was
organized in the spring of

THE

1903.
Warder

Mrs.

"of the

society with

Mrs.
Vonnie

Irwin

Hiland

Webb

Higgins founder and president


Mrs.
R. Lee
tary,
Kelley as secre-

A.

offered

Sumner,
to

Treasurer,

give the

members

and

Mrs.

sons
free les-

followingcrafts; china painting,laceand sewing.


making, embroidery,basketry,bead-work
Small
classes in basketry,bead-work, embroidery
and sewing met
for about
one
year.
in

The

the

second
at

the

year it was
homes
once

decided

to

have

each

month

social
and

the

ings
meet-

ness
busi-

meetings and classes at the libraryhall.


The
membership which increased to forty-onepersons,
consisted
mainly of home-makers, who had
little time to study any of the arts with the idea of
agreed
being artists or craftsmen; therefore it was
the
and
to
study art in its relation to the home
school. "Art
the production of picdoes
not
mean
tures
and statues
the pra"lical
cation
applionly;it means
of the knowledge of the beautiful
the
to
needs
of dailylife."
In September, 1905,
a
was
printed,the
year book
Society,now
having for its objectthe studyand promotion
oration
of the arts and crafts includinginterior decand landscape gardening,desiring
especially

HANDICRAFT

27

appreciatethe work of the best artists


and craftsmen, and to have exhibits whenever
sible.
posPapers followed by discussions were
given on
ry,
Colonial Furniture, Oriental
Rugs, Pottery,BasketLace
and Embroidery, each atOld China, Old
tended
by an exhibit.
of Women's
Clubs
In June the State Federation
had
a
largearts and crafts exhibit in Deer Lodge,

to

learn

to

the

first held

The

fourth

in the

year
Domestic

on

dening.Material
excellent

exhibit

illustrated

an

of

for

the "Needs
Art

Four
Art

by

most

of

sions
discus-

of

William

excellent

Living" by

Mass.; "The

etc.

lecture

Flemish

on

of the

Morris

was

lectures

were

Miss
Arts

and

Dutch

of the

State

discussions

Home-Maker,"

Hopes
read

Maude

held,

was

and

papers

the

by

and

Knowles

Schools."

our

loaned

Clubs

of Women's

was

and

and

papers

paintings

given by Miss Eloise


University of Montana.
During the next year several
were
given on the" Education

art

to

Architedlure, Landscape Gar-^


and Coloring for the House, Harmony

Federation

General
and

devoted

was

Color, for specialrooms,

of
An

state.

at

secured

and
the

ings.
meet-

"The

"

Summers

Fears

of

ton,
Bos-

Crafts

Movement,"
with exhibit,by Miss
Mary C. VVheeler of Helena,
Mont.; "Industrial
Education," by Professor A. J.
Art
in the
Helena, Mont.; "Industrial
Condon,
School," and exhibit,Miss Alice Dinsmoor, Butte,
Mont.
The

sixth

year

of

the

Society a

committee

took

HANDICRAFT

28

charge

of

excellent
houses

ledlure and

exhibit

entertainment
held

was

An

course.

consistingof plans of
decoration, curios, old

and

yards, interior
and texsilver,china and glass,laces,embroideries
tiles
modern
and
handicrafts
of the
by members
Society.Mrs. M. R. Davey of Butte, Montana,
exhibit of the work
done
an
by students of
gave
public schools.
During the past year the Societyarranged for two
le(9:ures on
art
by C. B. Armstrong of Idaho Falls,
Idaho,"Composition" and ^^'The Meaning of Art."
The

and

ans

crafts

exhibit

the

was

best

in

the

historyof the organization,


especially
showing some
iine examples of embroideries
by pupils of Miss
tian
ChrisMary Bacon Jones of the Young Women's
Association
the

shop

of Robert

School

comb

School of New

Art

York, and from

Jarviein Chicago,and

in New

the New-

Orleans.

the past two


have
years four members
the metal work.
Miss MarjorieCatlin who

During
up

orders

for

buckles, bowls, pins, etc., has

beautiful

some

taken
takes

designed

things.
have

started

correspondence
Miss
in art embroidery with
course
Mary Bacon
Jones and the tendency is growing for the members
table covers,
desire to make
their own
to
buckles,
bowls, etc.
of the members

Three

The
and

program
talks

small
of the
Arts

on

exhibit

for

1910"

the

various

every

month

discussion.
and

Crafts

As

will

ii

many

Society are

arts

consist
and

of

crafts

illustrate the

to

of

the

also

members
members

papers
with
a

subject
of the
of

the

HANDICRAFT
Woman's

American

29

League

and

entitled

are

free

to

correspondencelessons from the Peoples University,


it is expected that classes will be organized
very
in china painting,
art embroidery,leather work,
soon
metal
The
Mrs.

and

work

other crafts.
many
officers of the Society are as follows; President^
Marvin

First

Trask;

Mrs.
H.
Vice-President^
E. Stetson; Second Vice-President^
Mrs. S. S. Koehler; Secretary^Mrs.
Harry G. Willard; Treasurer^
Zella
Miss
Hayes; CorrespondingSecretary^Mrs.
Irwin
Warder
Higgins.
The
consist
of
Standing Committees
Program,
Membership, City Beautifying,School
ment,
Improveand Banquet.
Exhibition

r
CONFERENCE

ANNUAL
NATIONAL

OF

LEAGUE

OF

THE

HANDICRAFT

SOCIETIES
Executive

IHE

Committee
the

with

to

the

change

the

date

last week

in

of the

June

of

May

18. A

Museums

May

22,

conference
sent

will

is
so

Annual

to

be held

that the
seems

and

date

sele(9:ed

ately
immedi-

American

Washington

on

of

commencing on
for the
League

Further

League members
by mail,
be publishedin the May issue

from

Association

Boston

fortunate;

20,
the

of

in

cordance
ac-

large majority
the question,
on

the American
in

voted, in

Conference

19

closes

Arts, which

meeting of

voted

May

to

of

Convention

following the
Federation

wish

societies which

of the

has

and

notice
the

will be

program
of Handicraft.

HANDICRAFT

30

EDITORIAL

changes which have been


in the physical
made
craft
of Handiappearance
will please our
readers. The
new
year
with many
starts
expressions of hearty good will
the
and it is the hope of the Editors
make
to
azine
magbetter throughout Volume
IV
much
that
so
be dispelled
fore
beany doubt as to its permanency
may
the words
of greetingto the readers of Volume
is

IT

are

that

hoped

the

written.

It is the intention

to

make

Handicraft

broad

as

field will
in its scope
its limitation
of size and
as
terest
permit and every efFort will be made to make its inwide
the condition
of the
as
as
territorially
handicraft

The

allows.

movement

Editors

subjeftsto
criticism

will

always welcome
suggestionsas to
and friendly
be presentedin Handicraft
will be appreciated.
"

The

present

which

has been

Hitchcock

rates

do

not

the

post-office,

the request

and

President

of Postmaster
Taft

for the

for
very

craftman.

question,namely, the increase prooriginal


posed
for second'-class
or
we
periodicalliterature,

the

care

to

which

brought up,
This

of

has
periodicaladvertising,

on

distinf): interest
With

"

general criticism
precipitatedby

General
increased

"

deal

here:

but

that
the

interest

attempt
craftsman

is that

of

in the
at

has
man

more

vital questions

increased
an

who

interest
uses

rates
at

the

has
stake.

po^t-

HANDICRAFT

32

ganization
department. It may be that the present oris adequate and as good as possible;it
be that the proposed non-partisan "DirecStor
may
with the divorce
of the department from
of Posts"
with
all connexion
is the corre6t solution.
party politics
cavil that the post-office
But
it is beyond
has grown,
partly
through carelessness,
partly
through
cunning, to be the formidable adjundtof various political
parties,while the service has not kept step

of

the

with
We

the
urge
of

demands
upon

made

upon

all craftsmen

it.
who

realize the

tance
impor-

stri6tly
non-partisan,efficient,sive
progresall means
in their power
to
use
to
post-office
bring to the attention of the Congress (and various
will suggest themselves
different persons)
to
means
and social life of
the great necessity
to the business
the craftsman, to the intelledtual life of our
people,
of such a radical readjustmentin the post-officedepartment
will result in a postalservice at least
as
in
as
good as that enjoyed by our fdlow craftsmen
R.
Europe.
a

r
WITH

THE
The

BALTIMORE:
held

its Annual

SOCIETIES
Handicraft

Meeting

Club
on

of

the

timore
Baling
even-

Saturday,February 25, at the residence of


the President,J. Hemsley Johnson, Esq. Before the
business
Froelicher,Professor
meeting, Dr. Hans
of art criticism at Goucher
College,gave a most
interestingaddress on '* Style."The
encouraging
of

HANDICRAFT

33

growth of the Club along several lines was


reported,
that of the Shop, the sales showing an increase
especially
the previous year of 30^^,
and the
over
December
for

the

sales

an

are

year

increase

47^. The officers


President^ J. Hemsley Johnson j
C. Corner; Second

First

Thomas
Vice-President^
President^Louise Dawson;

Treasurer^ Laurence

Following
Club

27.

The

League
an

Vice-

Sarah
RecordingSecretary^
Secretary^
Emily E.Graves ;
; Corresponding

Ireland

the

of

the

will

Fowler.

H.

example of several
hold an
auction, to

Travelling Exhibition
is in Baltimore

exhibition

of

of the
take
of

the last week

the
silver,

work

societies,
place April

the
of

National

March,

and

of several individual

craftsmen, beginning the same


date, will continue
through April 14. On Saturdayevening,March
25,
Mr.

Theodore

address

on

Hanford

Pond

Handwrought

The

will

givean illustrated

Silver.

ing
Societyof Arts and Crafts held durMarch
its first specialexhibition of photographs,
block
modellingand wood
prints.Numerically the
photographs made the most
important exhibit,
prints
Allen
from
the Misses
of Deerfield,
being shown
and May Hallowell
Loud, Lois L.
Joseph P. Loud
M.
Astle, Alice Austin, Edgar I.
Howe, Ernest
of Boston, Paul FourEvans, Helen M. Murdock
and George W.
Bacon
nier of Columbus, Ohio
of
in the
described
iron lock
Wyncote, Penn. The
last issue has been shown
ley
during March at the Copexhibition
of Decorative
Society'sretrospective
Boston

HANDICRAFT

34

of the very
Arts, being one
workmanship shown.
"

"

Deer

Lodge:

Societyof

The

of Montana

modern

"

annual

second

and

Arts

pieces of

few

Crafts

held

was

of the

Banquet
at

the

College

Friday,February 24. A musical program


was
bers
given from eight to nine, then the memand their guests repaired to the dining room
been
feast had
where
a
prepared.The
sumptuous
toasts
witty and
by the ladies and gentlemen were
the
tress,
brilliant,
being as follows: Toast Misprogram
Miss
Mrs.
Margaret Gothlin; "Welcome,"
on

"Madam

iel
President," Professor DanGuests, the Gentlemen," Mrs. H.
Leary; "Our
ley;
R. Fancher;"The
Ladies," Dr. R. Harmon-Ash-

M.W.Trask;

Crafts

and

"Arts

in the

School," Miss EmHouse," Mrs. W.

Club
TrafFord; "Our
magene
L Higgins; "Toasts," Rev. F. E. Bancroft.
"

"

The

Society of Arts
and
Crafts in Detroit
a
very large and interesting
and
exhibition of book-plates,containing several thousplates.The Detroit Societyhas been very much
Detroit:

There

with
gratified
and

wish

to

is

current

the responses

which

have

especialthanks

express

Cheney, Secretaryof
for his

at

the California
invaluable

most

to

been

received

Mr.

Sheldon

Book-Plate
assistance.

sociatio
AsSome

largeexhibits,notablyMiss
Margaret Kearsley of Detroit,Mr. Walter Conway
Prescott, Mr. Sheldon
Cheney and Mr. T. Henry
all the
be impossible to mention
It would
Foster.

of the colledlors

have

sent

HANDICRAFT

individual
are:

exhibitors, but

among

the

Spenceley,Frances D
Bruce
Brown,
Rogers,

Frederick

Chouteau

Eleanor

3;

Walls

best

eleh
E.

an

H.

known

ty, Frank

Garrett,

entine
Plaw, George Wolfe
Plank, C. ValDonald,
Edgar Fisher, A. N. McKirby, William
Wilbur
Macy Stone, A. W. Clark, Claude

Bragdon

and

many

others.

HANDICRAFT

36
various

From

sources

have

come

fine collciSions of

of the late E. D.

about
French, totalling
plates,and forming the nucleus of an
seventy-five
unusually fine and varied collection,in which a)l
stylesand methods are represented, G. W. Plank
the work

charming wood-cuts, excellent


Frederick
art.
Spenceley
examples of this delightful
has sent
nine signedproofs of his beautiful engraved
plates;Frances
Delehanty has a group of unusually
decorative
plates,photo-gravures and wood-cuts.
has

Claude

colleilion

of

Bragdon is representedby numerous


simple in designand treatment, but very

plates,
decorative.

HANDICRAFT

38

man
HerAmong Detroit designersmay be mentioned
F. C. Baldwin
McEwen,
Hager, Alexandrine
and
Liggett;the local colle6tors who
J. Edward
have sent exhibits are Miss Margaret Kearsley,who

has

of the well

one

Mrs.

known

colle(9:ions in the

try,
coun-

Walter

who. has a largenumber


Russell,.
rian
of interesting
plates,Mr. Henry M. Utley, libraof the Detroit
and Mrs. Emory
Public Library,

Wendell.

"

The

exhibition

whole

is

most

which
reprc^sentative

has

ever

salesroon"of

the

country, and

as

the

of the

one

largestand
held in this

been

self
Societyadapts it-

admirablyto the purpose of such an exhibition.


The
of special
Society is arranging for a number
evening meetingsfor various clubs and societies who
exhibition
the
interested in the subjed. The
are
on
has proved one
of the,most
and
whole
interesting
held by the Society.
has ever
been
valuable which
A

VERY

ended

Stone

March

on

of the
5. The

of Mr.

work

Arthur

of the colledion

gem

a'tall"silvtr va^e.decorated^wdr'a

was

in

fine exhibition

ridi^

^s^igo

piece of work. There


also a cream
were
jug and sugar bowl, decorated
with a charming design chased
the edges;
around
number
of bowls, plainand decorated; a pair of
a
a
gold inlay,

very
of

very

beautiful

tongs and
asparagus
This exhibit attracted a

ornami^tal

flat ware.

attention,and
in the

shared

with

**

great: deal of

the

book-plateexhibition
which
the publictakes

generalinterest
in the Society
at this time.
The
Detroit:
closingledbures
Design in Fine and Industrial
very

fine exhibit

in
Art"

the

by

course

on

Professor

HANDICRAFT

Walter

delivered

Sargent were
le"ftures

These

39
on

given under

were

March

17.
the auspicesof the

Society of Arts and Crafts


largelyattended by students, young
Detroit

and

teachers

3 and

and

were

very

architedls,
typograph

others.

the

of the
auspices of the Social Cbmmittee
Smith of Boston
Society,Mr. Joseph Lindon
gave a
''The Discovery and Opening of a Royal
ledure
on
in Egypt." Thcledlure
illustrated from
Tomb
was
drawings and paintingsby Mr. Smith and wa"given

Under

at

of Our

the Church

Fatheron
"

The

Hartford:

Herbert

Industries

"

Crafts

and

meeting in February
Randall, who gave an

"Primitive
was

Arts

March

the

at

Club

had

studio

informal

of

lightful
de-

Mr,

talk upon

of

Plymouth Colony" which


objeds from his large
many

illustrated with

coUedion.
"

"

"
.

We

into the
-glad'to welcome
League the Arts and Crafts Societyof Haverhill,
Massachusetts, which was
organizedin May, 19 10,
and appliedfor membership in the League in March.
held on
Its firstannual
March
8, at
meeting was
the Public Library,and the reports showed
that much
had been accomplished duringthe firstyear. Classes

HAVEI^^HItL:

have

been

amount

of permanent
meetings have

Ten

of which

held

are

were

in several crafts and

considerable

equipment is alreadyacquired.
been
held during the year; all

well attended.

heartygreetingsto

the

Handicraft

Haverhill

craftsmen.

extends

HANDICRAFT

40

Societyof Arts and Crafts held


February 12, at the Industrial SKop
was
given by Mrs. H. C. Olbetg on

Minneapolis

meeting

on

talk

\vhere

"The

Use

The

and

of Flax."

Abuse

flax in various

with

talk

The

from

stages

was

the

lustrat
ilraw

ing
weavgoods,a Norwegian girl
Such
at the loom.
prafticaltalks ar'e.sure to give
of the
people a better understandingof the nature
tinct
materials
in which
they work arid should be of disadvantage.

the

produft to

woven

"

"

'

"

"

'""''.

'

'

'

New

The

York:

annual

of the National

Entertainment

Society of Craftsmen
evening February 27.

was

held

on

Monday

EXHIBITIONS
HANDICRAFT

INCLUDING

WORK

APRIL
Boston:

Society
0/ Arts

The

and

Crafts^9

and

Crafts^1 22

Park

St.

Ecclesiastical Work.
20-29*
Detroit
"

'er

Pottery.
:

The

Street.

Exhibit

Society
of Arts

'"'"
"

6^ the handicraft

Basketry,Rugs
Philadelphia:
South

Earm-

Eleventh

and

wbrkers
Reticelli

of
cut

Peterborough:
work.

CraftsGuilds l^S"^^y

j/r/j arid

Street:

"l"

Furii ishihes for Country

-?"

Baskets..
.1

";

HoU:5esv
"

".

I "RA

H A ND
VOL.

IV

THE

MAY

TILE

ST.

PAUL'S

DETROIT

MARIAN

V.

LOUD

EpiscopalCathedral
of which

NO.

IN

CATHEDRAL,

THE

191

FLOORS

F T

of St.

troit,
Paul's,De-

Messrs.

"
Cram, Goodhue
teresting
inis intensely
Ferguson are the architects,
not
onlyas a beautiful example of modern
but also,
Gothic architecture,
to the craftsman
cially,
espeof several striking
features of its
account
on
interior. The
in fa6t all
reredos,choir-stalls,
pulpit,
the furniture of the chancel,is of carved wood, done
of the finest Gothic traditions;a very
in the style
notable pieceof work. This reredos will be familiar
to

all Boston

readers of Handicraft

exhibition there

at

the Museum

of Fine

as

it

was

on

Arts before

beingsent to Detroit. The largeeast window, made


ful
by Heaton, Butler " Bayne of London, is a beautipieceof glassmosaic, decorative rather than pictorial;
the whole
end of the church
with a
filling
wonderful
glow of color,of which the predominant
is a rich turquoiseblue. And
the tile
tone
finally,
of this article.
floor,the subjeCl:
know
that the Pewabic
It is interesting
to
Pottery
the contract for supplying
this floor tilein open
won

competitionwith
and

the best

while the window

comes

in the country;
potteries
from England and the

HANDICRAFT

42

wood-carving from

Boston, the

tile is

a proentirely
duct

of Detroit.

speaks well
of
catholicity
It

for the

geniusof the archite""t and


Gothic
style,that all these

the

elements

blend

unity is enhanced,
Editorial
Note.]

ONE

into

rather

of its most

whole

than

notable

whose

ferent
dif-

essential

impaired, by

art

the

achievements

them.

has

ry
by Mary Chase Perand Horace
J. Caulkins, in the floors of
St. Paul's Cathedral, Detroit, Michigan.
tions
Although departingfrom long established convenin paving, they have maintained,consistently,
of the Gothic
the spirit
period,in which
stylethe
been

church
In

the

given to

America

is built.
three

porches, the square


buffs and ambers,

main

six-inch

un-

with
the
set
glazed tile in soft
wide groutingcharacteristic of Pewabic
work, give
suitable to the
the impression of breadth and stability
entrance

of such

strufture.

Unity of design is not sacrificed by the variation in


Avenue
the paving of the Hancock
porch. Four
with modelled
inch natural clay tile are
inserts.
set
The
border, togetherwith those of the other porches
Gothic, consistingof simple arrangements
are
essentially
and
in varying
of squares
triangles,
of brown, soft green and the quiet blue which
tones
gives the key-note to the whole design.
is impressed,
Standing within the doors of the nave, one
with what
at once,
sympathy the designer
and
with the archite6t. Deeper in tone
has worked

HANDICRAFT

smaller
which

in size than

has

one

breadth

One

of the

the tiles of the main

entered, they
aisles and

is led forward

instinctive

by

From

this

wise

occupy
of each

at

the

seem

to

porch from
increase

the loftiness of the


the

blue

spottingof

stands

he

43

ceiling.

border

narrow

throughout the

the

and

the

field until

steps of the choir.

point the design is taken up in glazed


tile. The
of the handpressed
delightful
irregularities
tile add to the beauty of the ivoryand brown
tones
bordered
of the field,
in
by large Gothic triangles
mellow
panels,set diamondgreen and blue. Three

an

the middle
lies

twelve

angel form,

of tiles modelled
note

which

we

line of the aisle. In the


inch

while

the

tile

bearingin

borders

are

low

made

ter
cenlief
re-

up

in ecclesiastical

have

been

designs.The blue
merged
followingis nearlysub-

in the

and green of
cloudingof the brown
these angel panels,but is sufficiently
present to keep
us
expectant.
Stone
Sanctuary,where an
steps lead to the Outer
with modelled
set diagonally,
ivoryand brown field,
border
of vivid blue oblongs
inserts,and a staccato
modelled
tile,
alternatingwith square three-toned
for the glory of the Inner Sanftuary.
us
prepare
A magnificentborder
of iridescent tiles,
rious
bearingva-

types of crosses,

of

in

the Outer

tuary
Sanc-

of the human
Holy of Holies, significant
sacrifices requisiteto spiritual
attainments.
blue as those starry ceilings
a field of blue
as
old Egypt
lies the cross, glowing with the marvelous
lustre. A halo of tiny tiles
hues of Pewabic
of the cross, while
antique gold lies upon the arms
and

On

lies between

the

"

"

HANDICRAFT

44

the whole
the very heart from which
design radiates
iridescent disc bearing the form
of a pelican
is an
with
blood,
drops of her own
young.
church
the mother
the young
sustaining
Panels bearing the symbols of the four

feeding her
symbolic of
churches.

right,while other panels


tiles complete a designleavingnothing
in iridescent
be desired in form, color or religious
to
feeling.
Nowhere
in the world, we
believe,does there exist
resemblance
this of
floor bearingthe slightest
to
a
and this
St. Paul's. Perhaps its closest relationship,
the exquisitemosaics
in
in feelingonly, lies with
of Galla Placidia,
Ravenna.
the ceiling
of the Tomb
forms
the vault of
In the one, stately
move
across
with its goldHeaven's
blue; in the other the cross
en
halo glows in the blue of infinite space, symbolic
life and its divine aspirations.
of human
Evangelistslie

to

NOTES

left and

ON

THE

TILE

by freedom
generalare charafterized
in the fashioning,
having an undulatingplane on
All
softened
the surface, with
edges and corners.
in the clay,being made
the irregular
cut
shapes were
from
templets during the progress of the laying,
that there was
when
so
no
chipping or
necessary,
cuttingof the finished,burned tile.
In the unglazed portionsaside from the claycolored
like blue or green
by nature, those of deep tones
colored body, no-slipglazes
were
composed of solidly
being employed. Frequently the harder or lighter
these surfaces,
to
burning gave great play of tone
often running from
a
greenish-blueto a deep.
light,
The

tile in

HANDICRAFT

4;

"

HANDICRAFT

"Pelican"

Tile.

dull blue'in

the

"Forbidden

tile. When

same

Fruit"

Tile.

laid,the slightly

the whole
to
givingtexture
also givesa feeling
in appearance,
of security
mass
beneath
"tooth"
the feet; which, as the bishop
or
him feel "that
of the diocese expressed it, makes
he is not about to slipor slide."
In the glazedtile,
the color effefts are gained mainly
of the glazes,
by the management
chieflyin the
of combinations, sometimes
use
by using two tones
of one
color,or by superimposing a thin glaze of
color over
one
another, allowingthe under glazeto
show
through,quite in the order of using oil paint
on
a
canvas.
Frequentlythree glazes are used in
this way by firing
each time between
the application
of the glaze.In the aisle of the choir especially,
the border and center
panels are full of color,yet
always in subordination to the dominant
ivory and
uneven

brown
The
with

surface,besides

of the entire
process

followed

field,
for the

was
designsin relief,

the

productionof the tile


most
simple one, that

HANDICRAFT

48

noting whether
well,or whether
in which

case

to

given

any
it was

another

one

of tile tied together


group
refused to stay in its place;

immediately discarded, or

positionwhere

it would

moved
re-

relate itself

harmoniously with its neighbors.This


constant
meant
a
who,
oversightof the tile layers,
be to them, fortunately
thanks
worked
in sympathy
of the undertaking,even
with the spirit
though oft
untraditional
times with most
methods
of tile setting.
It has been asked
the scheme
how
for the general
worked
of
design was
out, and the infinite number
shapes and patterns developed.It would almost seem
itself out, or "grew" of itself.
that the idea worked
After
lettingthe general plan of the floor shapes
of the diflFerent portionssimmer
in ngjnd
and areas
for several weeks, together with much
readingand
and symbols of
sketchingof the various emblems
Christian
lettingalone entirelyall
art, resolutely
and closingone's mind
modern
and eyes to
efforts,
corative
currentlyacceptable traditions with their purelydeintent,the conceptions of the best period
soaked
of ecclesiastical decoration
in, and fairly
emThen
the generaltreatwith their spirit.
bued
ment
one
of the whole
floor,togetherwith the detail,
and
the various
ventionalizati
designs,rearrangements, and conof world-old
subje"ts,suggested
themselves
freelyand quickly,so that after all,the
sketched
entire outline and cartoons
were
in,
hastily
there was
of worin half a day. Thereafter
no
sense
ry
of the main
in the execution
idea in
or
difficulty
mind, nor were
during the progany changes made
ress
In other words.
of manufacturingand installing.
more

HANDICRAFT

it

was

been

notable

finished

theoretically
the
skilled

carrying
labor,

by

example

of

the

the

defined

out

or

49

time
in

of

design
From

mind.

the

artizanship

a6tual

the

idea

was

if

you

work

having

clearly

was

that

perhaps
will.

point

and

on,

merely

HANDICRAFT

5o

AS

TO

CLOTHES

HUGER

ELLIOTT

said

Common

WELL,"

statement

your

to

be

Sense, "suppose
it's not

Though

true.

personal conviction, let us state that


modern
without
costumes
are
ugly. And of course
I'll agree
that things in general
reservations
any
should
be ugly.Now
what
not
are
going to
you
my

"

"do about

it?"

*'Why,
'''Train

the

'''Beautiful
"and

at

start

children

children

the

"But

And

good

and

will

you
and

"

going
that

to

other

"

prince

big brothers'

set

home

admire

clothes, no

matter

"

snapped
and

yourselfup

bad

and

"

Taste?"

constitutes

what

Artist,

love

to

be the fashion."
may
I'll train their taste

what

"Are

foundations," said the

and
thingsartistic,
Sense;
theory," interrupted Common

their mothers'

"

the

taste'? Do

not

the

Cynic.

say 'Such is
the fashionable

fools of every age think their clothes just the


thing and smile atthe blindness of former swells ?
"

"

"Perhaps not," put in Common


they thought theirs the
didn't
laws

worry

much

about

Sense, "but
most

I imagine

comfortable, and

their relation

of

to

abstradl

beauty,"
Unconsciously,at least,they certainlydid," cried
and at the people
the Artist. "Look
at the Greeks
of the later Middle
two
periods where the
Ages
love of beauty pervaded all things
there we
find
beautiful clothing."
the most
"

"

"

HANDICRAFT
Common
"^

Sense

Wouldn't

in

toga

in

51

grinned at

you like to see


foot off the
a

"

the

Cynic.
rotund

my

ground

gracefulwake?"
The
Cynic grunted, Or
Hood's
tights!
"But
that's just it,"burst

draped
person
in front and trailing

my

"

lean shanks

my

in Robin

"

wear

clothes

from

the

that

showed

in the

how

Artist.

far

"Did

have

we

we

fallen

it would
be an
incentive
perfeft figure,
the development of the body. What's
the use
it's all in
strivingafter a good figure,when

hands

of the

"^And

do

we

can't

"I'm

of
the

dressmaker?"

or

Sense, "that
suppose," said Common
a
good figurewhen it passes?"
if you
sure," said the Artist,"and
can,

you
tell

not

it's just its


But
would

tailor

to

that

rareness

standards

our

take

makes

should

the

passing of an
Carlylesays somewhere

attention.

fine
be

able.
figurenoticesuch

Antinous

that
to

it

attract

that it is useless

when
expedt children to be born with fine figures
their mothers
as
we
dailypass such monstrosities
to

ere6l

in

bronze
know

can

we

and

legsare
"

marble

or

in garments

lines of the

the

by badly placed belts


"Phew!"
breath.

great

shall

as

How

men.

when

our

formless

as

arms

pipes
stove-

figureinterruptedor hidden
meaninglessflaps
the
Cynic. "Catch
your
Seamless
wear?
hygienic
"

or

commented
What

our

good figures
are,

what
cased

to

we

"

clothing?"
the Artist continued, "there
are
Theoretically,"
only two beautiful forms of clothing:those so loose
and flowing that they will reveal the outlines of the

"

HANDICRAFT

52

figurewhether
close enough

in motion

repose, and those fitting


Of course
to show
cessories
acevery muscle.
be added; cloaks and such
thingsto

may

or

of
give flowing lines: one
in a trailing
Why
gown.
who
adds to the beauty of
"Would

have
you
asked
the

women?"

It's not

*'

we

be

frock

in

man

do
a

we

ornamental,

of

brown-stone

Common

Sense

and

to

dress

must

"I

of

the

have

"If

I remember

in touch

is

costume

would

such

my

favorite
"

"

have
"

rightly,

with

have

not

besides

one

certain

sacred

to

thing,

me."

began

"

receive

to

does

to

be
not

me

the

Cynic,

by

if I

even

their

not

vention.
con-

went

to

"

costume

Common

it is kinder

"But

will

would

is

"What

most

plunged in.

They
in

on

the hideous-

to

"Yes, you would have such friends. It is


fault,but simply that they are over-ruled
dinner

blot

"

keep

to

they

as

Artist

the

he's

"

correft

whom

wouldn't

But

why

"

possible?Take

"

adds

saw

If I wish

friends

privilegefrom

you in those:
"I had
the Artist reddened
slightly,

them.

wear

man

"

only yesterdayI
"Well,"

"

front

coughed.

see

midst

"

woman

women

as

silk hat

and

coat

far

as

"

that

in the
even
landscape
conventional
surroundings.He

any

iiess

scene

take

men

of

never

Cynic.
questionof takingit from

shouldn't

the charms

"

tried

Sense
them

to

appear

explainedto
want

to

to

in

interrupt.
a

dress

their friends.

make

one's

self

that
And
con-

spicous."
"

Not

even

to

reform

the

world," sneered

the

Cynic.

HANDICRAFT

"Willingly, if that
yesterday.Therefore

do

it. But

I wasn't

born
the

going to begin with

am

"

"Poor

things!"

"And

live in the
itself

would

"

children, and

work

53

from

out

that

hope

gradual reform

the inner

may
of the

consciousness

their feelingfor beauty to such a


people. Educate
that they will develop practical
state
sense
common
clothingthat will be beautiful as well."
"But
clothes are
our
so
practicalnow," protested
Common

Sense.

favorite fourteenth
your
dress. Probablythe picSuresqueyouth who

century
owned

one

Think

of the

it

"Take

of those

lovelydoublets owned
he
sanitarycondition when

had

worn

"

year or so
"You
needn't
"when
no

you

say

and

in

The

to

Common

Hygiea,"
of

approve

As

corsets.

Sense

'way

ahead

cost, and

small

have

in winter

went

of those

are!

"As

on.

beauty

be

considered

We

old-time
have

can

ourselves

know

cleverlycontrived
and

cool

to

means

in summer;

for different functions

for

How

venient
con-

dailychanges
be fresh and

at

clean.

"

with

as

clothes

"

part of the useless formalities


lives. And

their

keeping warm
easilychanged garments

cried

our

is

of

mostly unnecessary"

"And

ones.

menace

health,our

to

has

yet

should

health

Artist,

in the

put

in this age of docSors, such


exist,is beyond me."

they
We

invoke

women
are
Cynic smiled sourly."The
paying patients,"he said, cryptically.

best

are

"

clothes,but

how,

allowed

up

other.

no

the
which

Artist:
we

being clean, as

"just

lumber

well

as

HANDICRAFT

54

beautiful

the

take

"

day, and
simple garment

times
a

Japanese. They

have

two

of the

Think

from

freed

eyes

to

the

it,as they have


slip on, and those

and

time

wrestlingwith collars
And
ugly! I tell you,

three

for

time

or

bathe

and

tistic.
ar-

involved

temper

ties, shoes

if you
could
blindness
of

but

and

once

in

gloves.
with

see

long habit,

the

would
clothes
shock
uglinessof modern
you. Put
in a frock-coat
the Apollo Belvedere
and silk hat;
in evening clothes in one
of Corot's
or imaginea man
how
custom
landscapes!And
just to show
you
blinds the eyes, look at a Gibson
drawing jj( twelve

back, and

years
look:

see

woman

in the

decked

five years

give her
"That's

clothes

thought them Grace personified.


the place of the Cynic here when
sailingalong in conscious
pride,

I usurp
I

foolish the women's

how

that time

at

yet

see

we

latest Paris

hence

creation,and

pidtureof

spasm."
true," assented

herself

realize

in that

that

rig will

Common

Sense.

"But

not

clothes."

of men's

fashions
"Every bit," said the Artist,"only our
don't change so
rapidly and are therefore not so
I suppose
realized why
noticeable. And
you've never
don't

men

"Ah!
The
of

well

our

"

because

it wouldn't

be

the

thing."

grimly. "It's because the forms


clothes are
so
ugly that to put them in color,
be noticeable,
would
shock
would
the form
the most
inartistic. Can
picSurea pair of
you

Artist

where
even

"

colors."

wear

scarlet

smiled

trousers?

offensive,having

Yet

the

scarlet

shape

trunks

of the

are

leg."

not

at

all

HANDICRAFT

56

with

body
begin
be

take

to

tailor's

Sense

Common

at

be
And

"AU
know

the

Artist.

logical,"
taking
the
that

rose,

casting

"What
he
the

same,"
I'm

and

old

the

on

very

body,

that

shape'

of

'out

dumped

or

of

shape

the
and

'baggy'

the

which,

garments

clothes

declared

are

are

they

moment

rushed

to

the

heap?"

glance

commiserating

dreamer!

to

Wants

fashion

to

said.

Cynic's
the

right

arm,

Artist
in

the
called

Theory."

two

after

turned

them,

away.

"you

HANDICRAFT

THE

57

COPLEY

RETROSPECTIVE

SOCIETY'S
EXHIBITION

DECORATIVE

ARTS,

OF

THE

BOSTON

more
Copley Societyhas once
performed
a distinft,
althoughtoo largelyunappreciated
service,to the art lovers of New
England
exhibition
of the Decorative
through its remarkable

THE

Arts

which

closed

on

March

represented an untold amount


of a largecommittee
whose
the exhibit
the

should

prove
of

30.

The

of work

exhibition
on

the

part

sole regret could be that


of loss,rather than
source

hoped-for means
adding to the funds of the
looked
lovelier
Society.Surely Copley Hall never
than on
this occasion, with the walls entirely
ered
covwith rare and beautiful tapestries
of the different
periods,so skillfully
hung as to give an efFedt of
fifteen hundred
The
unity and of blending tones.
in cases
or
more
rare
mostly shown
objeftswere
which
had been
made
for the purpose,
as
especially
and crafts exhibition
of 1907, lending
at the
arts
harmonious
efFe^ which
is impossiblewhen
rowed
bora
of different stylesand colors are
used.
cases
It is impossibleto describe
in any detail the large
all of the decorative
number
of articles representing
interested will find the
are
crafts,but readers who
handsome
illustrations
cataloguewith its numerous
useful
and
full of information; copies of which
it is believed, still be
secured
of the
ley
Copcan,
perhaps
Society.The range of the exhibit can
best be shown
vided
by noting that the catalogueis diunder
the followingheads : Paintings,
Armor,

HANDICRAFT

58

Brass

Bronze,

Original

and

Such

Miscellaneous.
and

wealth

and

detail,

colleftors,

owners

of

descriptions

short
Such

this

issue,

vents

has

the

pieces
the

whole,

and

collector
find

to

objedts

in

thing
some-

were

known
un-

been

previously

retiring
the

Handicraft

that

hoped

is

these

by

wide

very

of

disposition
"lent

numerous

labels.

anonymously"
It

the

Fans,

The

having

not

shown

was

as

certain

was

Lace,

standard,

museum

of

while

publicly,

many

art

and

of

most

imagined.

Many

interest.

that

tery,
Pot-

Books

exhibition

be

of

branch

to

the

readily

may

any

shown

of

beauty

indicates

ry,
Jeweland

Miniatures,

so-called

the

of

were

Glass,

it is realized

when

shown

Pottery,

list

niture,
Fur-

Embroideries,
Porcelain

Prints,

Colonial

Oriental

Dress,

ter,
Pew-

Plate,
Work,

Early

and

Persian

American

Bindings,

of

Iron

Brocades

Oriental

almost

Copper,

Porcelain,

European

in

Sheffield

Furniture,

Dra^wings,
Samplers,

range

Silver,

Tapestries,

Sculptures,

series
but
been

of

different

criticisms

through

an

unavoidably

may
seftions
had

been

unfortunate

delayed.

later
of

the

publish
it.
exhib-

arranged
series

for
of

e-

HANDICRAFT

THE

AMERICAN

the

FEDERATION

second

THE

59

annual

convention

held

be

OF
of

ARTS
the

eration
Fed-

Washington, at the
Willard
Hotel, on May 16, 17 and 18 and
is of such generalinterest that we
give
program
is

it in full for the

PRELIMINARY

to

of

convenience

PROGRAM

OF

THE

second

Federation

CONVENTION
OF

D.

WASHINGTON,

The

readers.

our

FEDERATION

AMERICAN

THE

in

annual
of Arts

convention
will be

ARTS

C.

of

held

OF

in

the

American

Washington

on

will be held
sessions
May 16, 17 and 18. The
morning and afternoon at the Willard Hotel, which
will be headquarters for the delegates.

May
First Session:

16.
The

Federation,

Reports of the Secretaryand


of
of the Treasurer; Reports of Chapters; Address
tions.
Nominathe President; Reports of Committees;
Address

of Welcome

Second

AdvertisingArt,

Session: Industrial

Industrial

School

of

Future

of the

Alvah

Frank

Arts

Parsons; A

Art, Leslie

W.

Miller; The

Galleryof Art,

National

Walcott.

Evening receptionat

National

privateresidence.

Charles

D.

HANDICRAFT

6o

May
First Session:

Federation

The

17.
Tea?n

"

Work

J*

seums,
Clearing House for Art Mumen's
Kent; Cooperation with WoHenry W.
hibition
Clubs, Mrs. E. W. Pattison;TravellingExMeans
of Cooperation, Leila Mechas
lin;
a
Art in the Schools, Henry Turner
Bailey.
as

Session: Art

Second
Relation

The

the

for

People,

of

Sculpture to Landscape, Lorado


ican
Taft; The Art Outlook, John W.Alexander; AmerHandicraft, Huger Elliott;Pageantry,George
Pierce
The

Baker.

Oftagon

will be open

visitors from

to

to

1 1

P.M.

May
First

Knowledge

The

Session: Art
of Form

Second

in America
A.

paper,

The

Value

of State

man

Page;

Town

The
H.

Larned;

Hamlin;
Laurel

Session: Art

Second

Edwin

F.

Art, William

in American

Unwin;

W.

F'irstpaper,

"

D.

Education,

in its Relation

Education, Col. Charles

Training

18.

Art

and

Architedlural

Roman

Tradition

Harris.

the Citizen,

Commissions,

Walter

Gil-

Planning in England, Raymond


and
the Client,
Artist,the Architeft

Blashfield.

evening receptionwill

the

Pan-American

Union,

the

of the International

Bureau

of American

which

General

Lloyd Warren,

An

to

to

members

of

the

be

given the delegatesat


beautiful

new

home

Republics,
Diplomatic Corps and

HANDICRAFT

6i

At

of the

time

the

will be

Officials

prominent Government

convention

invited.

colleftion

of

larged
en-

can
photographs of important works by Amerisculptors,assembled
by the National Sculpture
Federation
Societyfor circulation by the American
of Arts, will be on
view in the Corcoran
Gallery of
Art.

ANNUAL

OF

THE

CONFERENCE
LEAGUE

NATIONAL

HANDICRAFT

THE
be

SOCIETIES

Annual
held

May
sessions

Conference

in Boston

19 and
the
on

These

days were

follow

the

OF

on

of the

League will
Friday and Saturday,

191 1, with

20,

additional

followingMonday if necessary.
selected because
they immediately

Convention

Federation

of the American

closes in Washington on
Arts,,which
and precede the meetings of the American

the

of

which

of Museums
It is
but

the
room

address
rcdor

open

in Boston

of

the

of welcome
of the

Museum

by

Museum,

of

Fine

Dr.

Arthur

and

the

i8th,

tion
Associa-

on

possibleto give a final program


sessions on
Friday will be held

not

ness
busi-

at

May

this time

in the

Arts

22.

with

ture
lecan

Fairbanks, Di-

President's

address

The
of the
rest
by Professor H. Langford Warren.
to
day will be given over
reports and discussions,
address at four o'clock
lowed
be folwith probably an
to
by an informal receptionat the Museum.

62

HANDICRAFT

On

Friday

evening
Mr.

by

given
Hindu

Saturday
the

on

will

afternoon

address

an

colleftions

the

be

of

the

probably

The

silver,

jewelry,

Certain
the

of

size

articles

represented

every

Society

next

be

June

15,

the

Articles

exhibit.
delivered

to

by

in

at

charges

be

held

and
bridge
Cam-

at

Francke

Hugo
Museum.

Germanic

for

will

coming
iron

have

year

to

the

photographs.

It

League

street,

prepaid.

be

will

wood

and

submitted,

be

intended

Park

the

wrought

limitations

being

business

EXHIBITION

Exhibit

Travelling

Great

"A

to

Professor

TRAVELLING

be

India."

devoted

by

will

on

Southern

will

session

le"lure

Smith

Madura,

at

morning

with

Lindon

Joseph

Festival

illustrated

an

larger

Boston,

the

pieces
that
the

in

exhibit
not

on

urged

represented
for

ving.
car-

placed

be

is

clude
in-

later

must

than

HANDICRAFT

6+

the-less,interested
and

aims

of the

Guild

and

its

welfare.

Honorary

Members:

have

who

members

of the

Jury

given voluntaryservice

in the

and

ers
oth-

running

Guild.

of the
The

in the work

of

government

the Executive

the

Guild

is in

the

hands

of

Committee,

of a President,
consisting
ers
othVice-President,Treasurer, Secretaryand two
elefted at the annual
bers.
meeting of Guild mem-

The

Shop
the

to

There
man

and

is in

Committee

is responsible

Guild

Jury, consistingof a Chair-'


Committee
annuallyby the Executive

elefted

design and

who

manager
Committee.

Executive

is also

several

charge of

other

members;

workers, elefted

craft
and

architefts,teachers

the

by

of the

chairman

the

of

Executive

Jury. No

ticle
ar-

accepted for sale in the Shop until it has


weeks
passed the Jury. The Jury meets
every two
and its endeavor
of design
is to keep the standard
and technique as high as possible,taking into consideration
and
limitations of the
the possibilities
verdifts
of the Jury are
medium
employed. The
that any
craftsman
so
on
carefullyrecorded
may
applicationhave the benefit of a just and impartial
is

criticism.
The

Executive

third

Monday

Classes
in the

also

to

Committee
in the

in various

month

branches

different work

inaugurate a

to

of craft work
It is

rooms.
course

first and
every
transaft Guild business.

meets

of

arc

held

hoped eventually
leftures on
pertinent

HANDICRAFT

65

List of crafts representedby Guild members:


subjefts.
book-binding,portfoliowork, leather work,
stained
jewelry,metal work, illuminating,
stencilling,
glass,woodcarving,embroidery,modelling,pottery,
basketry,weaving, decorative illustration. Special
held from time to time and are
exhibitions
are
ful
helpwell as interesting
the crafts workers
to
to
as
the public.
The
quired
opening on November
14 of the recentlyacaddition
the Shop, was
marked
to
by an
exhibition and sale of jewelry,
pottery and lace work,
which
lasted until December
the Shop's
31. As
enlargementit offers
capacityis doubled by the new
telligen
increased
for the into crafts workers
opportunities
and appreciativedisplayof their work.

MORRIS

WILLIAM

THE

Crafts

Art

THE

is in the

School

midst

that

season

SOCIETY,

of

seems

in

Columbus, Ohio,

successful

to

OHIO

COLUMBUS,

season,

point ahead

to

and

many

of greater success,
of
greater in the sense
increasingforces and broadening influence. The

seasons

school

large,which is justas well


that are
for
for things comparativelynew
feeling
But it contains
their proper way of useful expression.
contain
already,quite as completelyas it will ever
is

at

present

faftors

not

with

abound
can
cause

be

no

are

essence

goodly objectalways in sight,there

doubt

of workers

that

of the

of any
and
educational enterprise,
namely,a great sincerity,
honest forces
Where
these two
a
great enthusiasm.
those

them,

of

and

the

ultimate

students

and

attraction

patrons.

to

the

HANDICRAFT

66

During

the present

have

been

the efForts of the instructors

season

ing
chiefly along the line of metal-work-

and

usual
wood-carving. The
array of larger
metal thingshas been produced, the trays and bowls,
The
etc.
however, has
greater and intenser efFort,
the jewelry,which
been
bestowed
has been
upon
handled
from the practical
side and
very successfully
considered
for its artistic value. The
as
delightfully
in the school
out
are
designsworked
required to be
and are
never
reproduced. A case of
always original
is kept in the shop, for the interest of visitors
work
and

the

stimulation

of

students; and

the

colleftions of craft work

various

as

be

can

as

many

procured

students
are
presented from time to time. The
in their efForts,
and in a number
of instances
earnest
are
people of considerable previousartistic education,
that the general result of the shop labor is exso
ceptionally
gratifying.
are

The

school

is at present

JessieNelles

under

the conduct

of Mrs.

much
invigoratingpersonality
of the present activity
of the School
is,of course,
due. Mrs.
Nelles
She
is an
worker.
indefatigable
has great enthusiasm
and
great appreciation.She
turn,
gives herself unstintedlyto her pupils;and in reefFort from
she expefts the utmost
them, and
to

whose

gets it.
Mrs.

Nelles

has

executed

number

things,thingsthat
interesting
It is unnecessary
to
craftsman's
thingsare
But
are

it is

state

matter

unique, just as

it

the

are

of

unfailingly
highlyindividual.

sine qua

non^

that

ioned.
fashhonestlyand delicately
of great interest when
they
of delightwhen
is a matter

HANDICRAFT

they
that
It

beautiful

are

is both

is the

Mrs.

itself

of

house,

endeavor

which

Given

final

this
Craft

the

condition,
in Columbus

Shop

workers

more

of

fail of benefit

cannot

Society

affiliated, thus

atmosphere

pungent

work

produces
Morris

the

that

so

advantageously

larger,more

Nelles

beautiful.

and

intention

present

become

the

and

unique

for

secure

67

may

creating

appreciation

and

in all directions.

ultimate
be

must

to

of

success

beyond

tion.
ques-

r
EXHIBITIONS
INCLUDING

HANDICRAFT

WORK

MAY
Boston

Jewelry

7"

and

Arts

and

Crafts^ 9

Park

St.

Silverware.

Museum

Boston:

17

Societyof

Basketry.

3"16.
1

The

June

to

Society

of

Detroit:

of

7. Exhibition
Arts

The

and

Ave.

Arts^ Huntington

Fine

of

modern

work

by

The

Crafts.

Societyof Arts

Crafts^ 122

and

er
Farm-

Street.

Samplers,

principally old,

with

few

modern

amples.
ex-

HANDICRAFT

68

WITH

SOCIETIES

THE

BALTIMORE
Baltimore

The

the

TravellingExhibion

last week

in

March,

ed
visitits

amples
ex-

of the
illuminatingand many
printing,
bookplates creating specialinterest,while here as
elsewhere, the leather was
a
disappointment.
The
date
silver exhibit which
opened on the same
showed
work
of great interest by each of the five
and
Mr.
exhibitors, Mr. Blanchard
Woolley of
HanBoston, Miss JessieWilliams, Mr. Theodore
of

Pond

ford

Mr.

and

Alexander

DeFontes

of

more.
Balti-

26, Mr. Pond


Saturday evening, March
address
"The
Craft
of
on
interesting
gave a most
illustrated with views showing the
the Silversmith,"
used in the making of handwrought silver,
processes
and examples of old and modern
work. A pleasant,
informal
bers
receptionfollowed for the local memOn

and

their friends.

exhibitions,with

These

consignments, have
successful

Easter

made

orders and
new
interesting
a
particularly
brightand

season.

...

Boston:

number

bition
April 15 an exhiwork
which
of ecclesiastical
brought out a
of interesting
piecesof craftsmanship ranging

from
to

The

small

Society closed

enameled

largemodelled

on

easter

crosses,

tableau

for

the

cards, etc.,
Sacred

Heart

Church, Taunton, one of three such panelsdesigned


Sullivan, architect,and modelled
by
by Matthew
I.

Kirchmayer. Mr.

Kirchmayer

was

also

repre-

HANDICRAFT

sented

by

carved

and

readingdesk

colored
"

Maginnis
dos

oak

an

69

oak

font

cover

for the office of

at

photographs of the rereDetroit : the original


ing
draw-

reredos,by Frank

of this

church,

same

and

Walsh,

for the cathedral

for the

E. Cleveland

of

Cram,

F'ergusonwas also shown


togetherwith
of other drawings from
the same
number
source.
a
had an
Arthur
S. Williams
interestingexhibit,the
most
important piece being a brass alms bason with
a
design in appliedbrass stripsrivetted in place,the
ecclesiastical symbols being
pierced discs representing
of appropriate
pierced and backed with enamel
color. Arthur
chalice,paten and
a
J. Stone showed
flagon recently completed for a memorial
giftto
Mr.
Trinity Church, Concord, Massachusetts.
George J. Hunt showed a silver chalice designedby
Frank
". Cleveland
and a brass readingdesk. Small
Goodhue

"

in silver and

crosses

shown

were

Florence

by J.

enamel,

S. M.

set

with

stones,

Smith, E. Leslie Morgan,

Margaret Rogers, A.

Richmond,

A.

some

E.

Lawson, Agnes E. Shattuck, JessieE. Burbank, and


Ethel
S. Lloyd. Embroidered
stoles,amices, etc.,
shown
were
by Misses Carrie L. Morse, Cornelia
J. Crolius, Mary W. Strickland and Mr. Henry S.
Mr.

Dean.

H.

Cards
cola and

M.

S. Harlow
for Easter

showed
were

by

several
Nicola

minations.
illu-

Gion-

Andre

Koronski, and the Misses JessieH,


L. Goodrich, Clarice
PetreMcNicolI, Florence

mont

The
the

and

Cora

Committee

League

Greenwood.

in

charge of

Conference

is

as

local arrangements
for
follows: C. Howard

HANDICRAFT

70

H.

Walter

fessor
Pro-

and

Dyer

Warren.

Langford

Committee

salesroom

The

Mrs.

Chairman^

Walker,

the

report

new

year as
business
for

starting in with great promise, the


January showing an increaseof abouttwelve
percent,
and
over
per cent,
19 10, February seventy-seven
March
thirty-seven
percent. It is a questionhow long
take care
of the natural growth of its
the Societycan
additional

sales without
has

the

of

matter

room

and

suitable

more

committee

quarters

now

under

sideration.
con-

of
Society has recentlycompleted a number
special
important commissions, that for seventy-five
and a
eleftric lightfixtures for a western
customer
tant
goldyachtingtrophy,being perhaps the most imporin hand include
while the commissions
tant
impor;
The

work, silver services,etc.

ecclesiastical

Societyon March
30, held at
Fosthe Twentieth
Century Club, Mr. J. William
dick gave a talk,with
on
stereopticonillustrations,
in
"Impressions of the Arts and Crafts Movement
Europe and America."
At

meeting

For

Detroit:
the

middle

are

but

or

another

Societies

those

west,

little

occasional

of the

where

known,

exhibitions
of those

the

in

in
cities,
especially

"Village

it is very

where

has

become

well

established.

has

had

such

exhibitions; one

two

valuable

the
representing
communities
The

Industries"
to

work
such

Detroit
from

have
of

one

work

Society
Hingham,

HANDICRAFT

72

Each

member

there
many
alike
both
white
which

Miss

brought several shawls and


was
a
large display.Although there were
and
Cashmere
were
Paisleyshawls, no two
and the study of design,texture,
etc., proved
and instructive.There
several
were
interesting
silk shawls
of Chinese
embroidery
crepe
worked
and
ing.
were
exquisitely
very bewitchLear

present

showed

the

Societya

few

of the

mental
funda-

designswhich she had very cleverlydone in


water
colors,givingthose present an idea of the soft
blending of colors in the originalOriental shawls
and how
wonderfully well the old and very expensive
shawls
imitated in the cheaper variety.
were
The
successful,
meetings have been most
program
it is the intention
and
of the Society to continue
these
meetings, taking up for study the different
crafts.

r
AMONG
silver

THE

THE

punch

bowl

SHOPS
illustrated in the frontispiece

Shop of Robert Jarvie of Chicago for Mr. Charles


L. Hutchinson, who
of that city,
a club
presented it to the CI iff Dwellers
writers,musicians, craftsmen
composed of painters,
and artists of various sorts.
It is especially
interesting
was

made

that this bowl


to

the Club

by

The

should

have

by

of its charter

two

made

been

Through the courtesy of the Field


History,Mr. Jarvie obtained

sented
pre-

members.

Museum
a

and

tural
of Na-

plastercast

of

HANDICRAFT

73

Indian (clifF
bowl and
pre-historic
original
dweller)
adapted the design for the silver bowl from this. In
Hutchinson
his presentationspeech Mr.
remarked
added
the originalcliff dweller
the
interest
on
craftsman
might have taken in his bowl as he squatted
his work, shaping the vessel with
his hands
at
and crudelyetchingin the pattern with his thumb
the ages and seen
nail,could he have looked down
craftsman
another
"ClifF Dweller"
reproducingand
glorifyinghis bowl in precious metal with all the
skill that civilization has brought.
The
bowl
is entirely
handwrought, being made in
two
pieces.It stands ten and a half inches high and
an

has

diameter

of sixteen

inches.

The

decoration

on

and chased. While


the patrepoussed
tern
is intricate in its working out, it produces a
and dignitywhich
is the
feelingof great simplicity
prevailingcharafteristic of all Mr. Jarvie'swork.
the

outside

is

elaborate

An

was

form

of

bowl,

and

unusual

for the preceremony


sentation
arranged,the dedication taking the

playdealingwith
and

called

"The

the

historyof the original


Masque of Quetzal's

Bowl."
The

opening

reveals

scene

the

studio

of

an

ficer,
Arti-

pairing
antiques,who is engaged in reOn
his table stands
some
Egyptian figurines.
He is interruptedby the entrance
of a queer
a bowl.
drawn
old antiquarianwho
has been
into the shop
that there is something there
by an instinftive feeling
a

which
opes

of

restorer

would
that

the

vessels which

be

of great interest to him. It develantiquarianis a colle6);or of drinking

have

personalhistory.For instance^

HANDICRAFT

74

he

says, "I
from
which

rested

have

two

Hamilcar

in Sardinia

and

I have

on

the

little black
drank

earthenware

native

his way
to
gobletwhich

cups
when
he

wine

of Sicthe conquest
ily,
touched
the lipsof

into line at A"tigalleysswung


um."
of Lost
In truth, the Antiquarian is a Hunter
who
has the giftof restoring,
ting
Visions,one
by wetlie in
their lipswith
which
wine, the dreams
ancient
goblets.
He
light,
regardsthe Indian bowl with enthusiastic defor he
bowl
recognizes it as a ceremonial
tecs.
from a temple of Quetzal,the dawn-god of the Az-

Anthony

He

when

demands

imprisoned
of poets

the

visions

and

refuses

that

he

of the

paintersand
his fantastic

be allowed
ancient
makers

to

west

for

of music.

plea,and

the

free its

set
a

The

circle
tificer
Ar-

Antiquarian

him
pelling
coma
sadly,but he has left behmd
wine in
suggestionabout the placingof new
old goblets.
The
of the Artificer is aroused
curiosity
he tries just a few
bowl
and
drops. The
begins
he empties the
to
glow. Fascinated
by his success
of his flagon.
As he gazes
contents
eagerlyinto the
bowl the lightsdisappear.
When
on
they come
again his vision is seen
upon
the stage. It is the interior of an Aztec
temple. The
old King lies dead
his bier before the altar.
upon
Two
priestschant before their idols,praying for
of the dead King'ssoul to the regions
the admission
of the blest. The
King enters, and by various
young
wiles and devices
strives to gain possessionof the
bowl
which
from
Quetzal had drunk on the night
before his mysticalbanishment.
After a long struggle
goes

out

HANDICRAFT

High Priest,driven

the

desperationby

to

the

urgency

Chief, dashes the sacred bowl upon


young
temple floor before his gods.A thunder of drums

the

of
the

and
In

75

cymbals
the

third

workshop,

and

the

the

Antiquarian returns
convinced
now
Artificer,

scene

and

lightsagain disappear.

the

the

magic, gladlygives him

bowl

do

to

to

the

of his

with

as

he

will. The

Antiquarian then stepped to the footlights


and delivered the bowl with an appropriatesentiment
Hutchinson
who
Mr.
to
presented it to the Cliff
Dwellers.
After
a
speech of acceptance
by Mr.
Hamlin
Garland, President of the Club, the bowl
was
immediatelyput to its proper use, the unprison*
!

ing of visions
The
play was
and

written

Thomas

Sawyer Goodman;

Kenneth

composed by

Frederick

and

Wood

the incidental

were

enected

Conway, while
remaining parts

Hart

rendered

and

members

of the

the

Stevens
music

tiquarian
Stock; the parts of the An-

the Artificer

and
Robertson

by

by

Donald

the music
taken

by

was

other

Club.

r
REVIEW
The

Stone
K.

Age

North

Moorehead,

M.A.

Co.

sale

"

JI7.50 net,

For

by Warren
flin
Houghton, Mif-

America,
volumes.

by Handicraft
carriageextra.
of earlier

Book

Service.

time, even
up to the
ly
evidentbest periods of handicraft
work, was
of sophistication.
It is not reasona
person

THE
not

in

craftsman

HANDICRAFT

76
able

to

work
France

who

that the men


suppose
of the Gothic
monuments

carved
of

stone

England

had

any wide knowledge of what


other lands and
former
times had

of

the

stone

and

ers
carv-

done.

this isolation
independence and daring which
of the main
developed is undoubtedly one
causes
for the charm
and vigor which
in such
is inherent
of today is not, and cannot
But the craftsman
work.
be, an unsophisticatedunit working apart from his
fellow craftsmen
and untouched
by what has been
done, or what is being done today,in his craft. Not
only the work of his neighborsof today,but of his
/ellow toilers in every land and of all ages, is ready
his hand
and a necessary
at
part of his equipment
if he aims to tell,through his craft in the language
of today,a story which
will
those who
to
come
are
and by which
understand
they will judge him and
his civilization. It is with this thought in mind
that
volumes
have
been
Mr.
Moorehead's
approached,
of today,who
wishes
and to the student-craftsman
understand
the nature
and the historyof his
to fully
The

materials

that he
these

contain

is hard

to

wealth

them

may

use

two

handsome

with

of information
the modern

imagine how

fullest intelligen

the

volumes
and

to

seem

It
inspiration.
user

of

stone

in

fail to be thrilled and impressed with


can
any form
this amazing record of the uses
to which
prehistoric
man

put

so

stubborn

followers

through

bit

to

by

bit

of

the

control

man's
with

over

Nature.

of

how

have

One

his

added
acquainted
un-

examples of stone
implements
barbaric
peoples will be amazed

the

prehistoricand

material,and
succeeding ages

HANDICRAFT

to

the

see

the
of

patient
the

ing
they acquired in fashionshapes by chipping with bone;
ing
displayed in the careful finish-

difficult

flint into
and

skill

of

amount

skill

ground

intended

-j-j

objefts which
only useful but

stone

be

to

not

festly
mani-

were

beautiful

as

well.
The

volumes

two

profusely illustrated with photogravur


and
line drawings, showing

are

half-tones
four

over

thousand

of

record

aided
are.

have

lines

the

Moorehead
of

assistance

which

patience

along
Mr.

characteristics

those

and

objefts and

of

his

been

has

many

been
the

brought
development.
in his

colored

cases

furnished

by

and

ward
for-

securing the
have
subjeft who

other

collectors

man

in

volumes

the

genuity
in-

perseverance,

fortunate

liberallyin making
In

of

amazing

an

have

interested

men

forming

what

they

illustrations

interested

in having

stone

While
the
clearly understood.
and illustrations are
matter
mainly descriptive of
objects,the other phases of life in the Stone

Age

are

text

subject more

dealt

examples
use

The
there

of

with, the illustrations

able
showing remarkpottery, weaving, basketry and the

of

copper.
of

scope
are

the

work

chapters

on

Implements,
Hammer-stones

Bone, Copper,
an3 Miscellaneous

and

is indicated

by the
Chipped Implements,

Flint

Celts

Hammers,

Textile

and

Agricultural
Axes, Scrapers,

Ground

Stone, Shell,

F'abrics, Pottery,

Objecfts.

facft that

Hematite

HANDICRAFT

7S
Handicrafts

in

Co.

$2.10

sale

pages.
Handicraft

by

Tuke

C.

McClurg

Book

Service.

A.

postpaid.

COMPREHENSIVE

A
the

For

Mabel

by

OtSavo, 228

Priestman.
"

Home,

the

crafts for the

survey
of

use

in the home

woman

of the

beginners.It
who

wants

to

arts

is written
take

the

and
for
next

beyond the crude forms of decoration


now,
happily,in disrepute;and while it falls short of giving
detailed information,as general treatises must,
it will serve
well if it excites a healthy
its purpose
curiosityabout good and bad in decoration. The
an
chapters cover
astonishinglywide field from
"artistic
furniture
and
darning" to home-made
for the beginner to start
give sufficient information
steps

"

"

on.

As

incentive

has considerable
seen

of

fit to

to

value; but
her

warn

better home

readers

we

decoration
wish

the book

the author

againstthe

heinous

had
sin

first attempts
in strange arts as presents
friends. The
book
is thoroughly well

givingtheir
to

their

in Edinburg.We
printed(and adequatelyillustrated)
wish that all books
issued in America
art
on
might
be as well printed.
R.

r
LETTERS
lio the Editor:
wifh
amateurs
help some
designsfor China Painting.Will you kindly tell
what
opinions on the subjeS ?
you think of my
think
that if amateurs
paint china at all,they

1HAVE
me

been

asked

to

HANDICRAFT

8o

using naturalistic
but
to

few

forms

amateurs

keep

the

to

in

succeed,

can

simple

purely decorative

so

conventional

way;

it is much

safer

There

treatment.

objefbswhich can be secured in white porcelain


of good shape, which
lend themselves
to overclined
inare
glaze paintingof conventional
designs*We
of table
to
agree that the overglaze decoration
are

many

china

is unfortunate

done,

if

to

leave

and

that

ware

all,in underglaze painting,so


surface smooth
and pleasant to

at

the

"

"

To

such

should

be

treated

as

the touch.

"

the Editor:

AG

REE

in

the

entirelywith
letter of Helene

the

sentiments

Wurlitzer,

expressed

in the

March
.

It does

issue of Handicraft.
the

of the

name

that
unnecessary
designer,etc., should be printed so
seem

the laws of copyright have


conspicuously. I suppose
something to do with it; but surely,by the exercise
the part of the designer,the
of a little 'ingenuityon
could
information
be conveyed in a less
necessary
be no possibleobjeftion
can
objeftionable
way. There
sign:
of the artist appearing on
the dethe full name
to
but

dctraft

it

can

from,

be used
the

so

effefb of

as

to

the

add

to, rather

whole.

The

than

tures
signa-

designer and printer as they appear on


a
Japanese print are instructive examples. Will not
the designersof cards and calenders
put their minds
if they cannot
this problem, and
devise
see
on
something better than the present method?
of

the

A.

McEwEN.

part

of the Tile

Floor

in Si.

Detroit,

Paul's

Cathedral,

HANDICRAFT
IV

VOL.

JUNE

191

MERRY

SOME

NO.

QUEST

MADELINE

years

YALE

in

ago,

WYNNE

London,

this

met

con-

vival

gentleman who holds high in his right


hand
a
glassof wine; his left hand, in stylish
his hip.
rests
lightness,
upon
I was
completely captivatedby his red coat and by
his green- lined hat beneath
of yellow hair.
I noted
the
the

When

his

tufts

two

appreciationthe full-skirted coat and


white-clad
legs spread apart in masterful width;
low
shoes
were
firmlyplanted on the greensward.
His
his habit of
was
rakish, while
pose
knees

togethergave
calf of the leg downward.
I first caught sightof him
of the

him

show

with

bracing his
the

which

and

window

for my
own,
into the
me

he

thus

and

on

he

fine

was

from

sweep

on

the

side
out-

the inside. I marked


became

the lure that

delightof an old Wardour


that spendthrift's
Street antiquityshop
delight
that den of iniquitous,
slidingprices.
My gay gentleman had retained his youthfulmein
led

dim

"

for

more

than

hundred

"

years;

he

was

bubbly, greenish bottle, a Black


blown
into being presumably in the
a

seventeenth
The

narrow

enamelled
Forest

on

bottle

sixteenth

or

century.
neck

of

the

bottle

was

fitted with

HANDICRAFT

82

metal

rim

and

around
the

on

in German
in

top with

graved
gallantgentleman I found enside a pleasingsentiment
done
the effeft that he pledged his

the

reverse

amiable

into

den

ornamental

an

scriptto
the ruby wine.

I entered
this

had

it.

ring in
Walking

Schat%

the cork

thieves

of

chafferingwith

to

the

end

me

as

gentleman accompanied

that
I

the
the

went

host

of

convivial
of

out

the

door.
One

bottle

inevitablyleads

to

and

another

it

in

was

Salisburythat I next met my fate. This time it was


an
irridescent,green, bubbly, square lop-cornered
bottle that
looked
down
from
me
a
dusty
upon
shelf;on the flat front pranced a white, sophisticated
bounded
dog. His activities were
by the red patch
of earth which
fiantly
sparselyyieldeda coarse
grass derepudiatingany green ancestry or tradition.
The
encompassed by a yellow band and
dog was
there

ornamental

were

dashing dabs
beveled
This
had

blue

and

white

here

lovable

though

likeness

curious

to

mute

not

be

call

to

was

of dedu"t;ion
was

mute

"

apprised too

First there

He

there

floral forms

with
the

on

pampered dog; his face


mild eyed calf. He
ried
carhis appeal to me
by his

inscriptionbut made
superabundant joy; he too had seen
but I knew
that
two
years of life,
no

my

and

corners.

was
a

of

spots

mine.

of

because

he

the canny
emphaticallyof my

be the battle of

shillings.

hundred

or

responded to
dealer

must

intentions.

greed,and

the

war

HANDICRAFT

83

of the
Canterbury,one
lovelyday, reminiscent
but alluring
a modest
departureof the Pilgrims,
lady
ignominiouslythrust into
caught my eye. She was
companionship with rusty iron ware, and so dulled
the window
with grime was
through which I espied
At

her

that I almost

was

But

no:

not

vi"ftim of desire

she

was

flasklike bottle
She

wore

hung

but

reallythere
whose
shape

bodice

and

saw

her

and

merry
my
enamelled
fast

I knew

apron,

skirt
a

at

all ;

quest?
to

the

well.

so

blue

smart

embroidered

white

if I indeed

doubted

hint

over

which

ticity
of domes-

labor,and in her hand she carried


a
bouquet primly held in a frilled border.
She smiled
so
sweetly over her beaded necklet that
I felt she must
be acknowledging a toast
given by
could it be that to me
be
to
was
some
gay gallant;
lovers ! When
the joy of unitingsundered
awarded
I left the shop her hand
in mine.
was
of

not

Later

quest

brought to

mid

friend

blue

which

he
on

sort

of rim

in amiable
red

furtherance

of

my

bottle

fox

aleapingslenderly,
red surroundings;this bottle upon
and
ration
sportedhas lovely,wriggly lines of deco-

the

and

me

corners,

and

is fitted with

stopper that charafterizes

the

same

the others..

prudentlyfurnished New
England home, on the mantle-place,white panelled
and purelycolonial,
sit these four glassbottles. The
lightsifts through and reveals the bubbles that are
imprisoned in the glass,the surface has a fine suggestion
of iridescence and
the clashingjoy of the
And

in

now

our

otherwise

red, green, blue and white


dullest

of

days.

make

for cheerfulness

on

HANDICRAFT

84
The

bottles

lines of the

though the type


Just as in

is the

flowing,not

are

each

same

bottle

rigidand
is quite itself.

fine,large colle"fcion of these


bottles in the South
two
no
are
Kensington Museum
alike but the familly
likeness is unmistakable
and into
that case
dear four might step and merge
out
withmy
a
question.
bottles are
These
not
barbaric,they are not sophisticated
nor
are
they classic j they are just happy,
friendlySchnapsbudele.
tle
have
the botAlas! there are good people who
not
the

eye, and when


house and stands

friend

so

affli6led

into

comes

our

before Bottle Row,


coldlyunmoved
Colonial
Mantle, Massachusetts, I do not blame
I only
him from my intimate list,
him, I do not cross
the joy. I oflFerhim
some
am
sorry that he misses
other entertainment, well knowing that "It takes all
sorts

of wind

and

weather

to

make

up

year

and

sphere."Is it not worth while to have one's historical


even
imaginationawakened
by a bottle and to be taken
off into the upback two
three centuries,way
or
per
the glassblowing industry
Black Forest where
and
took root
flourished,the peasants buildingthe
kilns and carryingon
the work?
and to move
forced to be nomadic
on
They were
the fuel gave
the thriftygovernment
as
out, and
onward
followed
forests,drivingever
plantingnew
and finally
out, these naive glassblowers.
The
tries
were
wares
peddled around the settled counand
carried
into the world
out
were
by the
soldiers who
flasks
were
given the sentiment-bearing
filled with spirit,
and who
in turn
presentedto the

HANDICRAFT

maidens

glass

rolled

they

them
irons

of

That

the

gave

the

dusty

old

and
The

its

live

industry

attractive

then

and

government
the

country
its

to

wandered

flat-

given

thus

the

as

driven

was

progency

the

grants

fostered;

before

water.

cleared

and

that

in-

was

death.

forth

ijito

cities

seas.

soldier

to

revolving
her

echo

and

the

be

might

wise

were

hot

with

such

erations
assev-

unfolded

they

or

filled

rights

in

words

the

crust,

be

forest

born

over

responds
the

to

peasants

was

fro

biscuit

or

glass,

replanted
But

and

and,

greetings

surface

the

on

to

pie

on

with

rolling-pins

inscribed

as

85

Es
the

eyes,
lehe

lover
his

love

toast,

rolling-pin
but
mein

SchnatshudeUy

we

she

Schat%

words
of

and

longer

no

the

think

Schatz

his

died,

has

her
add

longer

no

reads

unwinding
and

"yes,

of

him
and

from
fore
beand

long

HANDICRAFT

86

RINGS
LAURIN

HOVEY

is intended

IT

MARTIN

in this brief article

to

show

few

of

making fingerrings.
in Fig. i is quite a rich ring
ring shown
although very simple to make, gauge No. 15 silver
being used. The first step is to draw the shape of
the ring upon
a
piece of silver. I find about the
method
of doing this
easiest and the most
accurate
of a
is to draw
a
straightline through the centre
piece of silver and divide this line into halves, and
and make
then take this point as a center
a
circle,
ways
The

the

diameter

of which

of the

ring.After

of the

central

is

great

as

doing this,draw

line

in

shown

as

the widest

as
a

part

line either side

A, Fig. i. It is now

lines
these straight
to connedl
very simple matter
the outline of the ring
with the circle. If you trace
lose in the tracingand
in the silver,
to
you are sure

much

it takes
are

also

not

so

by puttingin

the

not
to

the

all necessary
bend
a
ring.You
cut

groove

piece of
hammer.

After

in

lines in the mechanical

described.
in

shown

as

at

it into shape. You


filing
it accuratelydrawn, as

construction
I have

bend

to

in

have

to

sure

which
way
then sawed
out

step is

time

more

ring and
to

piece

of

and

is

B, Fig. i. The

next

solder

It is

ends.

the

and use
silver in this groove
finish curving it over
You
can

it is curved

outline

ring bender in order


begin by bending it in a
wood.
Place
the straight

have

can

The

soldered

the

next

curved
a

end

drel.
ringman-

step is

to

HANDICRAFT

88

bend

thin band

of silver around

the

stone.

I would

file the top of the


onto

The

ringflat and then solder this band


the ring as shown
in E, Fig. i.
designon this ringis next built up. The design

consists

of balls and

wire

which

are

soldered

onto

the

is carved
ring,but the ring under this ornament
simply.The balls are easilymade by placingsmall
pieces of silver on a piece of charcoal and playing
the blow
er
pipe flame upon them. I should then soldthese balls together
in threes,and then solder these
The
four groups
to the ring.
on
next
step is to take
small piece of silver or a piece of flat wire as
a
in D, Fig. i, saw
into it a short distance
shown
and spread it as shown
in the illustration. You
now
bend this wire to fit the curve
of the ringand solder
it in. After
having done this you are ready to*
finish the ring as there are no more
to be
solderings
First file the inside of the ring and then file
made.
the outside of the ring so that it blends
the wire on
into the main
ring.After having thoroughly filed
the ring inside and out it is ready to be polished.
small brushes
In polishinga ringof this sort, use
on
with
and
will find it
the motor
tripoliwax
you
After it is thoroughlypolished,
quitea simplematter.
the ring will be greatlyimproved by a little carving.
Then
heat the ringand put it while hot into a weak
solution
then
wash
of sulphuric acid, and
it in
oxidize
You
it by warming the ring
water.
can
and dippingit into a weak
solution of silver
slightly
and rub off^
the stone
of sulphur.You
set
now
can
as

In

much

Fig.

of the
2

oxidation

I have

you wish.
illustrated another
way
as

of

con-

HANDICRAFT

struftinga ring.The
shows

left hand

side

of

A, Fig.

2,
this

first step.

Cutting out a blank in


makes
it simpler.
way
Instead
hole and
of drilling
a
sawing out the space
at the
point at the righthand side of A, Fig. 2, I
find it is easier to get a good curve
the leaf by
to
with
sawing from the outside into the point marked
a

the

89

small

afterwards

point of contaft.
drawing B, Fig. 2, shows

The

but

then

in

run

little solder

the

at

can

a, and

model
the

the

veins

leaves
must

be

to

the

great

carved

next

extent

with

the

step. You
with a file

engraving

tools. After

making a box settingfor the stone, you


with the engraving
touches
can
put on the finishing
tools,polishthe ring and set the stone.
Fig.3, illustrates the "paved" settingwhich is a
of inlayingthe stone
in a thick piece of
process
metal.

making a ring of this kind, you should use a


piece of silver about 9 gauge. You begin with a thick
in C, Fig. 3, and
hammer
piece of silver as shown
in
it out
longer and thinner at the ends as shown
D, Fig. 3. The
ring is then curved and soldered.
In

The

next

step is to flatten off the top, then

with

your
shown
in

engraving tools,engrave out a space as


A, Fig. 3, to receive the stone.
In settingthe stone
in this process
you place the
ring over the mandrel and spread the metal against
the stone
can
by using a small chasing tool. You
into a great varietyof designs in
the metal
carve
this process.

The

in different ways.

metal

about

the

stone

can

be treated

HANDICRAFT

90

You

can

the

engrave

tool

After

cut.

few

shows

leaves

touch

sort

stone

can

be

and

In

to

then

them

do

Fig.

I should
and

the

to

the

first step

setting.The

the

you

In

this

points

of

the

setting of this
just as if it were
a

the

ling
model-

first been

carved

do

about

say

soldered
carve

out

prongs

are

that

of

this

line

around

as

shown

the

shape

shown

as

C.

of

in

It is then

gauge.
in

the

A, Fig.

around

shaped the
D, Fig. 5.

like

prongs

15

space

it is much

They

the

shown

as

kind

this

simple shape

to

ered
sold-

separately and

engraving tools. It is
carving after the forms have
main
ring.
of
making a prong
process
ver,
silis to take a strip of thick

the

onto

has

of
a

file

with

illustrates

after

the

space

made

in

of the

most

soldered

will be

only
making

flowers

then

carved

been

is

stone,

stone.

afterwards

are

out

4, and

be

to

step

this under

of

only a
illustration
G,

it. The

the

out

making

saw

B, Fig.

round

In

flowers

the

on.

better

stone.

the

flat

the

then

can

where

of

use

position with

in

engraving tools.
illustrates a ring which

easier

design

simple setting and

Fig.

the

I have

as

the

set

about

be held

the

edges

you

band

first engrave

you

with

in

of

when

stone

by

the

up

points bearing against

Fig.3,

to

more

the

process

rap

this

doing

made

have

hammer,

the

it and

undercut

illustrated,then

chasing

for

space

After

top,

C, Fig.

5.

5. The

the

seftion

you

bent

top

of the
you
can

a-

next
so

that

prongs

have

file

graved
en-

out

HANDICRAFT

PRINCIPLE
CARL

MONG

OF

HANDICRAFT

PURINGTON

ROLLINS

the

"principlesof handicraft,"which
have stood for a good many
unyears as an
ment,
challengedcredo of the arts and crafts move-

ylA
^

JL

91

there is

one

I confess

which

interest. It is numbered
"Social

reads:

has

four

been

in the

of ticular
parlist and

cooperation: modern

craftsmanship
requiresthat the idea of patronage be superseded by
that of reciprocalservice and
cooperation." Since
each is allowed
we
a loose
are
organizationof craftsmen
his own
glosson what may be called "that
fourth principle."
We
bothersome
have had it glossed
time to time (thereis a certain
for us
from
joy in
noting how of all the principlesin the list it alone
have been aswe
sured
provokes discussion and criticism!):
that
words

the

must

we

a
say
leaves the craftsman

have

we

"

also been

read

not
sort

into it any

than

more

of

free

Delphic utterance
it as he
to interpret

told that it

means

the

which
wishes

most

that

of social
into it in the way
is likelyto raise violent hopes

be read

readjustment,
which
or
antipathies
But in spiteof interpreof the inquirer.
in the mind
ter
the principle
and inquirer,
is steadily
glossedby
the world
the world, and the glosswhich
givesit is
determinism.
written
by the hand of economic
can

Economic
to
set

determinism

is

doftrine

which

comes

of economic
largelyfrom the current
thought
It teaches
Marx.
free by Karl
that the institutions
due to its economic
of a people are
direftly

us

HANDICRAFT

92

necessities
do"lrine
it

and

developments.

unequal to, and


outlook, and societya
of the

us

and

art

at

the task which

gives us a broader
basis. For
philosophical
concretely,that
means,

once

more

crafts

revolutionary

will from

releases the human

was

This

it

from
the
longer regard commercialism
idiotic viewpoint of the studio,as an
ugly,aimless
whom
ever,
monster
to be fighting
we
are
hopelesslyforbut as a phase of the world
of men
movement
ic
Economto adjustthemselves
to their surroundings.
can

we

no

determinism

that

It is to

be

determinism

economic

other

"blessed

hope

and
and

run,

noted

words"

it is

the total avoidance

one

days of
danger of
word"

wielded

now

and

cessary
ne-

it also

"blessed

us

new

once

happiness.But

over

is

there
a

last

in the

becoming

exercisingthe tyranny

is

experience,and

livingnow

are

we

commercialism.

and

world

of the

phase
teaches

that commercialism

teaches

with

pregnant

of the

of "blessed

risks

by

to

words"

be
is

impossible.
The

"blessed

words"

into comfortable

came

with
downfall
power

the rise of
of the

which

us
tyrannizeover
circumstances
and good repute
the bourgeoisie,
followingthe

feudal

states

now

and

of the great nobles. The


the tradingclass,have

their

the

wreck

bourgeoisie,
representing
ty
imposed upon sociein
place and condud^

conceptions of man's
the world, and have done
as
a
so
necessary
to their own
a
emancipation. This was
step in the march
became

classes and

the

of progress : when
captain of industryand

creeds

with

of the

his ideas

of the

ry
corolladous
tremen-

the franklin

infused

all

nobilityof

HANDICRAFT
trade

rendered

he

93

distinft

service

old garments
become
worn
the ideas which
clothed

as
so

out

the

unfit for
bourgeoisiebecame
has a holy interest for
than the mustering of
mede:

for it marked

world

consciousness.

the

of this great world


that there can
come
of how

that bothersome

disreputable,
aspirationsof the
The

Paris

mankind

of

only by

movement

of

any

mune
com-

portant
less im-

not

the barons

to

But

race.

and

use.

advent

It is

the

to

Runny-

at

class into

new

proper
ciation
appreof the proletariat
us

inkling

an

fourth

of the credo
principle
be put into praftice:
ing
can
justas only an understandof the argument
of the holy books
of the new
make
movement
can
plain to us that the principle
of social cooperation in our
and crafts bill of
arts
important principlein it,and is
rightsis the most
of the doftrine of economa re-statement
ic
praftically

determinism.
It is essential

that what

to be the expression
say shall be understood
individual craftsman, and not a statement

about

am

of

to
an

of the
for

they are

beliefs of

quite at

leaders of the
with
the various

cannot

movement

of the

societies.

settlement:

there

the

justsaid,and

movement

variance

movement

those

I have

as

with

the

ideas

what

whole

of the

in this country and,


majorityof the members

ably,
probof

Nevertheless,the arts and crafts

remain
is work

sort

for it

of artistic Shaker
to

do

in the

open.

place as part of a world movement


fourth
and that bothersome
greater by far than itself,
principleis our chief link with the largermovement.
be thought that reciproI do not
how
it can
see
It

must

take

its

HANDICRAFT

94

cal

and

service
in

can

the conclusion

avoid

craftsmen

mundane

external and

them.

want

we

how

see

to

are

circumstances

quite attainable

be

resulted

that if

not

one

have

ciprocal
re-

must
cooperation we
give all
equalityof opportunityand condition,

an

to

do

and

service

know

supersede patronage

cooperation can
societyof unequals : I

The

as

revolt

which

soon

as

of the

we

now

tively
collec-

we

has
proletariat
of
possibilities

conception of the
man's
with the
organizedlife on earth,which comes
rejuvenatingvigorof the "wind which blows before
of the renaissance."
is no
There
the dawn
longera
question of the ultimate triumph of all the forces for
of
change which are comprehended under the name
the
resistance
of the
socialism:
bourgeosie has
but the end
to anger,
changed from superciliousness
is no longer doubted
by many of the ablest generals
of the opposition.
In such a struggleas this what
is the craftsman
to
do?

If

in

would

we

be

would

new

listen

attend

to

meddle

and

not

the

leaders

the

movement

easilybe proven. Years behind


development, or perhapsrather
that

here

should

have

of the

bougeoisiein

have

taken

England
leaf from
tedius

strange

the
it

shown

arts

might

her

book

and
seem

of

advisers

our

have

thought
in England, as can
Europe in industrial
industrial experience,
so

of the

movement

the ultra-conservative
this country.
crafts movement
that

we

led

But

should

experiences

experimenting which

it

petty affairs,

own

leaders

the

not

our

Not

matter.

it is

of

some

to
striftly

in the

of

to

at

and

least

ings
lean-

since

we

itself from
also take

forego the
one

of the

HANDICRAFT

96

the

allegianceto

This
socialistcause.
allegiance
as a necessary
came
sequel to his varied experience
in design,manufaduring and commerce.
It was
his

could

best

diffusion of
his

was

socialism

be

to

matter

to

seems

to

wherein

art

well and

trulylived,must

in

today
answers

lone

bring about
would

make

the

man
crafts-

the

utter

which
artistic,

all

as

the main

this,men
something
of his

current

the very flower

drawn

in order

which

as

and

are

plicable
inex-

daily

crown

life.

busy

of the

and

spiteof

it was

he

bring about

to

natural

in

aside from
indeed

lesson

The

with

And

aim.

one

work, when
a

forces which

beauty,both

and

of

work

rejeftMorris's

to

apt

of the

estimate

mature

be

from
be

Morris's

this

conclusion

that the

craftsman,
that perfeftstate
of society
the simple flowering of life
:

allyhimself

the forces

with

orderliness and

for that future

decorum

There
is no
force
way.
in the world
which
all
at
except socialism
Socialism
and
socialism
to the demand.
aunmistakable

most

offers

solution

for

the

anarchy

which

the

achieved, and which has been


bourgeoisiehas finally
ualism
notoriouslythe death of all art. Complete individof the arhas meant
complete disintegration
chiteftural
thing
arts, and only as we
get back to somesuggestingthe orderliness of the medieval
but on
a larger
scale,do we begin to pick up
guilds,
ing.
the all but lost thread of a widely extended
art feelThe
will

give

art:

and

with

is bound

craftsman
him

the

whatever

conditions

conditions
have

may

never

to

be

to

work

most

for that which


favorable

to

his

happened in the past,


quiterepeated,the best

HANDICRAFT

for

guarantee

It is a

it

offers,as

from

that

ence,
experimen.
crafts-

other

put into

to

tice
prac-

principle of handicraft,

vague

else

nothing

of many

and

socialist

Morris's

from

the

to

honor

in the

definite way

and

simple

otherwise

an

lesson

our

lesson

it is the

handicraft,with

craftsman, is found

It is

propaganda.

favorable

condition

of artistic

the

to

future

greatest output
livlihood

97

today does,

hope

and

worth

fightingfor.

WILLIAM

HOWHath
heart

voice

and

fruitful

but

strenuous

the

ere

While

life

joyful

his
loved

Woven

in

name

her, and

wonders

Life's

labor

battle

in song

Beyond

of

seas

of

song

and

of

hope

and

the

from

art

"

strife;

knife.

'gainstgreed of fadory and mart


he, too, depart.
morning must

yet with

Blazon

loom

in the

soul

strove,

Ah!

In

strong

that

"

by beating

lift the

Who

The

ceased

craftman

That

Who

That

it be?

can

"

That

To

MORRIS

Death's
House

and

of the

cries

the

"

air is rife?

England's book of gold.


who
wrought her legends fair,^
in design.
written
press

and

chillinghand
Beautiful
Walter

loom
that

"

shall

spiritrare.

Crane

shrine.
enfold

HANDICRAFT

98

BIOGRAPHIES

SOCIETY
THE

ARTS

AND

CRAFTS

NEW

OF

JERSEY

Crafts

Societyof New
Jersey
was
organized in January, 1909, as a result
of a meeting held the previous springunder
man's
the auspicesof the Science
Department of the Wocall was
Club of Orange. The
given to the
handicraft
local professional
workers
to make
a joint

THE

exhibition

Arts

of

in the

their

public a

this line. Miss


talk

on

and

SOCIETY

the

arts

work, with

an

idea

of awakening

interest along
intelligent

more

Mira

Edson

and

crafts

of

New

York
and

movement;

gave a
before

taken
of those
were
meeting adjourned,names
were
interested,to be called
sufficiently
present who
result of that subsequent
a
togetherlater. It was
call that the present societywas
eventuallyformed.
Its objeft is to draw
togetherthose persons who
who
desire to become
craftsmen
or
are
craftsmen,
nation
stimulate an ambition
to
to
produce by the coordiof brain, eye and hand, worthy results along
the

and

arts

and
of

crafts

lines,and

the

community

to
at

foster among
large,better

its

bers,
mem-

standards

taste.

To

this

end, meetings are

held

once

month

in the

for necessary
ness
busiOrange LibraryAuditorium
and for the presentationof pertinentsubjeds,
There
craftsworkers.
is also a yearly
by professional
East

exhibit

of the

work

of members.

year the societyhas secured a studio,centrally


of the members
teaas
a
located,and used by one
This

HANDICRAFT

work

morning. This

each
for

afternoons, and

the

in

room

salesroom

of five

Jury

execution

but

and

the

of the

all work

shelves.

from

time

instruction

good

admirable

an

work

at

for class

studio

ting
set-

members,

before

lowed
it is al-

only excellent
adjudged essential.

Not

worthy design is

formed

are

arises,with
Metal

for the

to

as

forms

passingon

admission

Classes

99

to
as

time,
low

as

rate

demand
as

sible.
pos-

work, basketry,stencil designing

leather

and

cuttingare the crafts taught at present.


The
societyalso takes a keen interest in accessible
other
or
exhibitions,along these lines,in Museums
publicbuildings.
There

is but

three

dollars

The

members,

year.
societyhas adopted

was

and

the dues

are

resultingfrom
money

class of

one

craft-mark

competition, for

which

of its own^
a

prize of

offered.

followingare the officers;President^Mrs. A..


B. Hopper; First Vice-President^
Mrs. J. E. CheseCorres^
Second Vice-President^
Miss J. Mahon;
man;
ponding SecretaryMiss E. Drayton; Recording Sec^
The

.^

retary^ Mrs.
Webb.
THE

SOCIETY

C. Allen; Treasurer ^yirs. Thomas.

M.

OF

ARTS

AND

CRAFTS,

HINGHAM,.

MASSACHUSETTS

Hingham Societyof Arts and Crafts was


of Oftober, 1901.
organizedin the month
The
exhibition
and
Societyhas a permanent
in the buildingof the Hingham
Water
salesroom

THE

HANDICRAFT

loo

Co.,

South

ham

R.R.

This
and

St.,

The

the

from

Hing-

Station.

is open
every
Saturday afternoon.

room
on

walk

minute's

one

handicrafts

of the

and

Tuesday

Societyat

Thursday

present

are,

ing
dye-

of raffia for basket


ket
materials, bas(vegetable),
making, rug making, embroidery and netting,
spinning and weaving, bead-work, cabinet-work,
the making of candles from the wax
of the bayberry
and
metal-work, toy furniture,photographs,printing
designing.
,

and

Baskets
As

soon

as

rugs
the

the firstindustries

were

attempted.

organized the

societywas

basketrybecame
apparent.
baskets
Many different shapes of waste
reproduced and two or three stylessuch

interest

in

luncheon

and
and

sizes of

flower

baskets

mending

trays and

and

sewing

letter baskets

are

"forget-me-not"baskets with
to nature,
designedto hold a bunch
which
as
are
intimatelyconnected
the

baskets

are

One
on

for violets with

delicate

in the

of the
which

The

day

are

durable

members

well

as

legion.There are
the coloringtrue
of these
with

work

flowers

Hingham

Then
over

with
specialty
and give an
air

old-fashioned

an

owns

rag rugs are


England braided
a

wicker

as

there

glass
^

violet shades.

the

New

pie,picnic
the shapes

baskets

Plvmouth.

is with

"Sabbatia"

been

as

made, while

also

as

have

loom

woven.

grandmother's
Societyand are most

rugs of
this

of comfort

our

and

repose

tq

room.

In

metal

work

forging has

been

atsuccessfully

HANDICRAFT
in

tempted

loi

and

brass, copper

silver,the gorgeous

color of the

enamellingsuggestinga butterfly's
wing
a
or
humming bird.
ruby-throated
of the chief aims of the Societyis to revive the
One
old white embroidery of our
grandmothers.This it
uses
reproduces and adapts to modern
keeping as
of the Colonial needlewomen.
closelyas possiblethe spirit
have been adaptedfrom
Cross-stitch designs
old

"samplers."
Complete outfits

for bedroom

are
furnishings

made

in the netted

entire canopies for four-posted


fringes,
bedsteads, besides the smaller doilies for the dining
table.

Photographs of
ham

Hingscenery in and around


artistic in composition and in bution
distri-

most

are

of

natural

lightand

shade.

Bayberry dips,rendolent
and

woods,

have

used

Hingham

to

be

called

industrywas
always astir,sendingmost
But

Indies.

machines
made

as

in the

came

into

more

driven

which

cannot

quickly and

was

of her output to the West


of other industries,
when
and

the

buckets

cheaply,hand

could
work

be
was

several

owns
now

be

sole survivor
sets

of

these

of

these

old tools

duplicated.Until very

ly
recent-

incapacitated
by age and infirmities)
has used these tools in making nests
of boxes
buckets, pigginsof different sizes and colonial

(beingnow
and

use

when

town"

out.

handworkers,

he

case

"bucket

its height:Hingham

at

George Fearing, the

Mr.

of the pastures

wide-spread reputation.

bucket

the

they are

as

toy furniture.

HANDICRAFT

I02

i
has

Hingham
ware

heard

was

die

have

for

Alden

house

that

this
this

to

the
The

of
of

week

not

younger

furniture

for

Carver

and
tov

old

colonial

in

it

chamber,

its

rors
mir-

for
ing
hav-

color.

was

for

John

suitable

one

top

baby

mirrors

seats;

lady's

the

at

years,

from

my

will

art

reproducing

the

choose

natural

very
trademark

the

days

usually

takes

place

July.

Walter

Mrs.

Spalding;

Corresponding

several

President

are:

Presidents^

Recording

should

sale

officers

H.

for

cooper

Bucket."

annual
third

sizes

the

are

John

background,

society

few

toy

of

pictures

of

and

fore

the

one

historic

"Hingham
The

last

different

in

appropriate
With

the

reproduction

are

baby

in

wooden-

its

The

rush-bottom

with

exadl
and

town.

from

Chairs
an

the

the

for

hammer

of

in

designs

famous

busy

the

to

modelled

houses,

toy

parts

come

choice

many

are

all

in

the

days

however,

out,

men

old

the

in

been

always

W.

Treasurer^

Secretary^

Secretary^

^Mx.

Miss

Miss
Emma

Eliot

Putnam;

Vice-

Hersey

and

uel
Sam-

Miss

Emma

Emma

Dr.

B.
R.

Clark;
Willard;

Southworth.

HANDICRAFT

I04

Museum

Germanic
the
A

Boston

the

by

Mr.
On

of the

one

of

guidance

under

handicraft

Museum,

the

arranged

of

care

was

its

tary,
secre-

Whiting.

east,

showing

The

conference

on

Lindon

Joseph

Friday evening

its

of the

rooms

Society

delightful talk

of

of

exhibition

really exceptional
in

under

Francke.

Professor

curator,

shown

Harvard,

at

of

some

his

voted

officers, and

of

its
the

in the

experiences

gave

far

slides.

lantern

many

Smith

of

appreciation
courtesy

of

the

work

Museum

the

authorities.

EXHIBITIONS
WORK

HANDICRAFT

INCLUDING

JUNE
Boston

May

to

17

Arts

Museum

and

of

ArU^

Fine

7. Exhibitions

June

Ave.

Huntington
by

the

Society

of

Crafts.
The

Peterborough:

Handicraft

Workers

of

Peter--

borough.
28.

Annual

Sale.

to

p.m.

Town

Hall.

JULY
Hingham:

The

Hingham

Societyof Arts

and

Crafts.

HANDICRAFT

WITH

105

SOCIETIES

THE

The
Museum
BOSTON:
the Societyof Arts

of

Fine

and

Arts

Crafts

vited
in-

has

to

hold

specialexhibition in one of its ground floor galleries


The
to
May 17, running for three weeks.
open
lected
Societyis planning to make this a very carefullyseexhibition
done
be

by

its members

of the

best

work

in the various

which

has

crafts. This

been
will

during the days of the League conference.


The
hibition
Societyis also arrangingits annual springexof jewelry,which
also opens
May 17.
On
at the
May 4 a supper was
given for members
of the Twentieth
rooms
Century Club, ninety-three
the tables and
to
sittingdown
enjoying a social
hour and
followed
esting
a
half,which
was
by an interand instructive address by Dr. Denman
W.
Far East and
Eastern
Ross on "The
Art;" being
of the recent
account
an
tripto Japan, Corea, China
and
Cambodia
by Dr. Ross and Mr. Joseph Lindon

open

Smith.

J. Stone has recentlyfinished a very


beautiful gold yacht trophy from
design of Mr. C.
eleven
Howard
Walker.
This trophy stands about
inches
high, is of 14-karat gold throughout and is
of beautiful
workmanship. It is to be presented to
Mr.

the

Arthur

winner

of the schooner

race

from

New

London

the auspices of the Eastern


Marblehead, under
Yacht
Club, the cup being donated by Commodore
F. Lewis
Clark of Spokane, Washington.
In its rear
gallerythe Societyhas held three special
to

HANDICRAFT

io6

exhibitions

Pottery exhibit closed


during May. The
on
May 2, having included especiallyfine examples
of his former
by Prof. Charles F. Binns, and two
F. Baggs and
The
F. E. Walrath.
pupils, Arthur
also well representedwith
Paul Revere
Pottery was
ing
work, other exhibitors beexamples of their recent
corated
Dedham,
Hampshire, Grueby potteriesand dechina
from
Mrs.
Kathryn E. Cherry, Miss
Matilda
Middleton, Mr. Sidney T. Callowhill, Mrs.
Bessie
T.
Mrs.
and
Cram,
Mayhew,
Julia W.
others.
The

Basketry exhibit which


a
largecolle"tion of
Miles

Mary

closed
reed

baskets

others

Blanchard,

Arthur
F.
Hersey, Mrs.
Ward,
Rosemary Cunningham
W.

while

Clayton,

were
grass baskets
and
baskets
willow

Decrfield.

17
In

will

be

the

Individual
of

Mr.

deferred

same

Frank

weak

was

Mrs.

and

iss Margaret

jewelry

have

in the

another

A.

with

done
exhibits

much

baskets,

M.

ticulars
Roundy. Paropening on May

notable

two

of the

and

workers
than

to

of

issue.

Shaw

few

B.

Hamilton

in raffia

case

Rogers. These
precious stones

E.

I. Evans;

held, during May,

were

Frederic

gold and
the Society and,
way,

until

Exhibition

jewelry

with
of

exhibition

Allena

Minnie

by

sent

by

Walter

Blanche

and

only example being by Alice


to the Jewelry exhibition
as

the

The

Hersey,

cluded
in-

Miss

from

Mrs.

from

16

May

on

others

the

hibits
ex-

one

other

are

doing more

most

members

working

raise the

Society.

by
by

in the

standard

of

HANDICRAFT

Detroit:
was

The

107

first Bulletin

publishedin April.It

bulletins

from

time

they will

to

of the

is planned to

time,
be

Detroit

as

issued

Society
publishthese

occasion

seems

to

tervals,
regularinbut whenever
there is anything interesting
and
to
record; and will be used to keep the members
friends of the Societyin touch with the work.
Copies
free on application
of the bulletins will be furnished
;
only a very few of the first issue are left.
Plans
for the School of Design are
finite
taking very dein December
last recommittee
ported
shape. The
that the |"25,ooo required had been pledged.
formed
and
In the early spring an association
was
incorporated under the laws of the state and the
elefted: Frank
C. Baldwin
followingtrustees
ident
(Presof the Detroit
Society of Arts and Crafts),
B.
Clarence
A. Black, George G. Booth, William
J. Caulkins, John M. Donaldson,
Cady, Horace
GinsJeremiah Dwyer, Charles L. Freer, Bernard
J. Hecker,
burg, H. J. Maxwell-Grylls, Frank
H. Holt, William
Frederick
Conrad
A. Livington,
S. Russell,
D.
PfeifFer,Gustavus
Pope, Walter
William
C. Weber.
B. Stratton,and William
eledled the followingofficers :
These
trustees
recently
Frank
C. Baldwin, President; John M.
Donaldson,
Vice-President; H. J. Maxwell-Grylls, Secretary;
S. Russell.
Horace
J. Caulkins, Treasurer; Walter
The
invited George T. Hamilton, of Vinetrustees
he did and
to
land, N. J., to come
Detroit, which
the trustees
Mr.
after a satisfaSorymeeting with
Hamilton
was
engaged to a"t as teaching director
warrant;

of the

school.

not

at

any

HANDICRAFT

io8

Mr.

Hamilton

will

come

to

Detroit about

July i,and,

co-operationwith the board of trustees, will start


immediately at work on the preparationof courses
of instrudion, purchasingequipment, etc., so that
the school may
be ready to open
ber.
early in SeptemIt is proposed that the school
shall make
the
study of design, both historical and applied,the
basis of all its instrudion.
Inasmuch, however, as
be successfully
vorced
dinever
design can
taught when
from
its practical
it will be the
application,
aim of the trustees
to
provide instruftion in such
branches
of handicraft
of great importance to
as are
the community, thus making the school an
tant
imporfeature in the life of the city.In arrangingthe
in

the indito
meet
every effort will be made
idual wishes of students. The
fees for instruction in
classes

all classes

will be

classes
the
The

kept

will be held

as

low

as

for those

possibleand
who

cannot

ing
even-

attend

regularcourse.
trustees

have

not

decided

on

location

for

housing the school, but it is expedled that this will


Whatever
location is sebe determined
on
shortly.
lefted,it will be considered but a temporary arrangit is the expectation that the school will
as
ment,
Museum
of
a
eventuallybecome
part of the new
have given every
Art. The
of the Museum
trustees
encouragement

to

the

movement.

April 8 to 22, a specialexhibition of Mrs.


Shaw's
jewelry,consistingof
Josephine Hartwell
held at the rooms
of the
some
twenty pieces,was
of the
Detroit Societyof Arts and Crafts. The
gem
collection
was
perhaps a pendant of aqua marines.
From

HANDICRAFT

109

in platinum, very graceful


set
pearls,and diamonds
in design and exquisitein color; even
more
striking
necklace
of irregular
a
was
opals,with flat links of
pierced and carved gold and silver,in conventional
leaf designs.
This

exhibition

metals

revelation

Crafts

and

"Arts

was

Jewelry"
semi-precious

and

to

means

many
the use
here

stones:

whom

to

of base

gold

and

used
without
with the finest gems,
platinum were
loss of originality
in design or of the
the slightest
in the workmanship. These
element
of personality
with the most
rich enough to be worri
jewels were
elaborate
toilettes;they possessedall the intrinsic
value of the commercial
produft,plusthe
jeweller's
sign;
and appropriatedegreater artistic value of original
rich and even
daring,but always harmonious
skilled workmanship. It
color combinations; and
was

only

of great regret that the exhibition could


ucationa
such a short time in Detroit,as its ed-

matter

remain

value
The

has

been

the

year. It has

come

the

the

of

has

that

most

been

warmest

from

be

great.

very

embroidered

of

filetlace,from
one

to

linens,reticelli and
ers,
Workthe PeterboroughHandicraft
been on view throughoutthe month,

exhibition

which

felt

was

successful

to
particularly
gratifying

commendations

those

who

exhibitions

have

of the work
themselves

seen

of
note

have
this

and who
find that
home
original
that done in Peterborough fullyequalsthe best produced
abroad. Apart from
of the
the artistic quality
admire
the exceptionalgood sense
must
work, we
feels
of the Peterborough Handicraft
Workers; one

Italian work

in its

HANDICRAFT

no

the

admirable

work

which

at

the

It is

fitness and
makes

of their

use

their

logicin

choice

inherited

of

aptitude,

allowingfree playfor individual originality


in design.
pleasantto be able to record that the success
same

time

of this exhibition

has

been

than

more

{Tes-

success

time.

On

April 19 the Societyheld its customary Spring


and their friends. The
rooms
Reception for members
decorated
were
beautifully
by Mrs. Sidney Corbett,
and other budding branches, and
with pussy willows
downpour
spring flowers.' In spiteof a continuous
all day,the receptionwas
well attendof rain lasting
ed.
served
Tea
was
by the Social Committee, and
the occasion
proved to be both pleasant and profitable.
of
given to displaymany
Opportunity was
mand
dein use, and a lively
the exhibits in the salesroom
it was
for baskets
when
seen
suddenly arose
how
to the purbeautifully
they adapted themselves
poses
of decoration, holding flowers,branches, or
cake baskets.
plants,or for use as sandwich
trays and
On

May

close

its

31
rooms

the

Society of

for the

summer.

present quarters expireson


of different arrangements
the

Fall,it has

seemed

and

Arts

that
which

Crafts

The

lease

date,and

on

are

to

be

will

on

the

account

made

in

into new
inexpedientto move
in
with the prosped of another
move
quarters now,
trade is not
few months; especially
the summer
a
as
All exhibits will therefore be returned
to
very large.
consignorsduring May; and the Societywill open
its rooms
again in the Fall with an entirelynew

HANDICRAFT

112

there

underlyingfeelingand the
has often been talked of that we
need a school,
need workshops connedled
with our
ty.
Socie-

matter

that

we

The
done

always been

has

demand

to

order

an

salesrooms

in the

is much

greater than

the demand

for well-made

for work

be

to

the

supply,particularly
We
have
objedls.

comparativelylittle hand-wrought silver;there have


orders recentlyfor hand-wrought ironwork
been
that we
have been
unable
hinges and door knobs
fill.All this has brought home
to
stronglythe question
be done to help this generalmoveof what
can
ment
leadingtoward a well-trained group of people
to
supply this demand.
"New
needs a wellYork, with its many industries,
than any
equipped industrial art school almost more
other city in this country, yet to learn the textile
trades one
of
must
go to the Pennsylvania School
ton
Industrial Art in Philadelphia,
for pottery to Tren"

"

and
few

for metal

students
and

work

in the

to

metal

Teachers

Providence.
work

There

classes

College,but

at

these

are

Pratt

classes

stitute
Inare

only a small feature in these institutions of general


The
of Art and the
Metropolitan Museum
learning.
Museum
for the Arts of Decoration
Cooper Union
contain a wealth of material which, if studied by the
York
New
workmen, would
place this country in
the front ranks
then

of the industrial

world.

It would

not

foreignersto design our


dustrial
goods and to make them. A large,well-equippedinpolitan
art
school,closelyaffiliated with the MetroMuseum, is the great need. As a first step
this end the Craftsmen
toward
Societymight at once
be

necessary

to

get

HANDICRAFT

establish

in connection

workshops

and

113

rooms,
its sales-

with

existingschools where
the theory of art and design is taught."
Mrs. Wilmerding advocated
a
great art university.
would
the art life of the city.It would
Here
centre
of Columbia
unite the department of architedlure
tional
University,the paintingand sculpture of the Nawork
of
Academy of Design, the normal
Teachers
College and a complete industrial art
filiate
school, under one
generalmanagement,
closelyafwith the Metropolitan Museum
and
partly
supportedby the cityand state funds.
Mrs. D. B. Deane, speakingfor the Art Department
said in part :
of the Alliance
Employment Bureau
''Three

with

cooperate

years
art

an

ago,

when

department, it

findingwork in the art


usuallygraduatesof some

of

more

were

to

bureau

the

to

do

the
into

Alliance

the

for

work.

for the

was

trades

for those

art

school,who

It

found

was

who
positionsthan applicants
work, and the problem soon
a

search

Bureau

for well-trained

art

ganized
or-

purpose

students,
applied

that

there

were

fitted

resolved
workers

self
itpable
ca-

with
placesrequiringspeed combined
filling
skilled craftsmanship.In these days when
the art
trades are
multiplyingso fast,and the standard of
demanded
work
art
by the publicis steadily
growing
ployers
better, something should be done to put emof

in
that
means

art

their
of

school

the

trained

requires.There
bridgingthe gulf that

should

diredl

touch

with

work

and

the

art

school,which

trade.
would

It

assistants
be

lies between

some

the

tinuation
might be a congive a supplementa-

HANDICRAFT

114

ry
the

in

course

earning a living;one that would


the dearlybought beginningsof

place of
experience."

Mr.

George

Brush,
at

of

one

the School

leading

our

of the National

Design, dwelt on the lack of beauty


surroundings of the art student.
present
can
a
man
or
woman
gain any appreciation
young
of beauty," he said, ''unless
permitted to
beautiful
objects?Dirty blank walls and

the

How

handle
broken

idealism
to
plastercasts are not conducive
production of beautiful objedls.Nothing
be too
precious or too beautiful for our art

the

or

Forest

mercial
com-

of

Academy
in

de

instrudlor

paintersand

"

take

should

students."
*'Let

ask

you,"

of Art

in the

me

reftor

should

the

question

the

establishment
would

in favor

and
and

your

plan

what

you

whom

said Dr.

James P. Haney,
High Schools, "suppose

be

of

with
one

Here

are

tonight;he
iron

he

was

school, and all

should

us

would
come

sound,
re-

ward
for-

for |"500,ooo, put


in operation,'I would
like to ask you

say,

'

going to
going to

teach

is

in

teach?

to

people we have got to


the public schools, and we
those people of whom
one
me

art

that

favor

we

'aye' that

an

among
is a check

are
you
difficult question

very
the

whether

to

as

industrial

an

answer

some

put

Di-

You

answer.

reach
must

school, and

that

will find it

In the first place


are

the

also

of your
he

wanted

people

try

number

gentleman engaged

business, and

to

to

reach

spoke

in the

know

in

to

mental
orna-

how

more
ation
apprecigoing to get in his workmen
of the thingsthey are
trying to do, and he

HANDICRAFT

when

as

is
one

boy

his trade. As

thingas learninga

you
trade

trade, and

all
now

know, there
;

you

learn

mighty lucky if
does not
feedingblocks into a
all day long,your
business
to
see
simply
machine
is kept running; that is the part

machine
the

of the

apprenticeshipsystem,
gone
ings
obligedto make certain of the draw-

was

part of

that part

that

and

he learned

such

no

dead

of the

spoke

115

trade

thousands

are

you
consist in

which

it is the

fate of thousands

and

city to learn,and they


learn it in a few weeks, and they are obligedto bind
themselves
into unions
to keep the price of wages
must
appreciation,some
try and get some
up. We
must
knowledge of design,into these people.We
somewhere
in the citya
try to establish somehow,
school which
shall aim to teach both day and night,
but largely
at
night to begin with, those who are
and
alreadyin a trade and who are willingto come
information
in regardto the refinements
get some
trade."
of design as applied to their particular
Mr.
D. Dean, chief of the division of Vocational
Arthur
York
State University,
Schools of New
was
unable

of

be

to

in this

men

present, but

in which
beautiful

he

him

letter from

said: "We

things,but

train
we

do

was

people to

not

ceived
re-

preciate
ap-

train these

tell boys that they ought


people to make them. We
be dodors, lawyers and ministers; we
to
get them
ready for such professionsin the high schools, and
then
we
provide them with higherschools and free
but
hospitalsand every sort of educational facility,
it comes
the question of fitting
when
to
people to
tell
their livingthrough the industrial arts
we
earn

HANDICRAFT

ii6

them,

'

Go

out

into the

pick it up/ This


contradidloryto the

world

unjust,un-democratic
of freedom
in
principles

and

and

is

definite steps should


the situation."
that

be taken

some

of Industrial and

Sykes,Director

H.

Frederick

Professor

Household

lieve
I be-

education.

American

Arts

to

rect
cor-

of the School
lege,
Col-

of Teachers

told of

in

foreignindustrial art schools, and


is a
trainingof expert workers
part: "The
questionin the United States at the present

Under

the

handed

while

down

that condition

from

existed

the schools

interestmgthemselves
Now,
trainingof the workman.

the

of the industrial revolution


the

centre

keep

on

was

to

man,

no

reason

because

and
for

in the

problem

with

the advance

becomes

machine

it is the

creator;

got ourselves

but
away

of efficient

centre

the faft also remains


from

of

changed ;

produSion. Certain industries,however,


demanding the hand work, the work of

individual

have

of interest

time.

ship
workman-

the situation has

fadlorysupersedesthe shop, the

the

good

master

there

ular
pop-

work, in the old

of

the tradition of

apprentice system,
was

condition

old, former

said

this tradition

that
of

still
the
we

good

and

good workmanship.
*'The
kind
to
to
me
problem seems
require a new
Abroad
of education
namely, specialization.
they
solved
have
Munich
has sixty-seven
it that way.
different types of institutions for sixty-sevendifferent
trades
stained glass,
printing,binding,etc. Berlin
hundred
and
further, with two
twenty-three
goes
art

"

"

different

courses.

bound

come,

to

And
whether

this

must

come

in connexion

here; it is
with

Teach-

HANDICRAFT

117

of Art
Metropolitan Museum
or
as
a
separate undertaking."
architefts' point of view
The
was
presentedby Mr.
Hewlett, of the firm of Lord " Hewlett.
J. Monroe
"The
thingwe need in our art,"said Mr. Hewlett,
of something praftical,
"is the evidence
something
call it so. We
if you choose
have
to
materialistic,
lot of highlytrained artists who
have
us
a
among
approached the subjeftof their art as artists pure
artisans. Saint Gaudens
and simple and not
as
proached
apthe other direftion,
and it
the thing from

College,with

ers

to

seems

the

that that is the difference

me

Gaudens

between

the

and

any other
the
is therefore

Industrial
sculptor.
education
most
art
tant
importic
problem today in our development as an artisnation, and the field of usefulness of a properly
York
is
equipped school of industrial art in New
of Saint

work

so

provide
enormous

"So

started

in New

and

York

all

it

as

to

of indefinite extension
and
possibility
achieved
success
growth.The remarkable

seems

me

that

you

don't need
you
of peoplewho
are

architecture

Arts

Architects,

now

extended

of the country,
for such an
dertaking
un-

don't

has
need

in mind.
a

lot of

building;but you do
interested
sufficiently
body
in the subjeftto say that they individually,
severally,
and they will serve
will start ateliers^
on
your governing
and work
this thing out by means
committee
money,
need
a

and

to

in

has

important architectural centres


the clue
to
furnishes, it seems
me,
the Societyof Craftsmen
as

to

so

the

by the system of atelier instrudlion


inauguratedby the Societyof Beaux
which

be laid

should

that its foundation

broad

HANDICRAFT

iiS

single ateliers^which

of

It is after
that

of

sort

the

on

who

men

which
a

of

matter

art

school

of

various

artistic

need

that

terest
in-

twenty

or

industries
It is

work.

it is

give

to

not

of

matter

of

amount

Committee

Daniel

C.

York,

vice
ser-

Art

Monroe

although

there
the

to

as

following

nent
perma-

Education

Arthur

Cutting,

J.

industrial

an

opinion

The

Industrial

Fulton

French,

of

school.

on

R.

New

difference

such

that

meeting

in

some

for

appointed:

the

needed

be

plan

of

sense

is

to

best

fifteen

expense;

willingness

the

seems

much

of

large

your

or

of

starting this thing."

in
was

dozen

services

very

and

interest

It

the

require

about

talk

intelligentheads

are

long period

large building. You

of

part

increased.

constantly

can

you

and

money

be

through

gone

that

thing

of

amount

have

you

will

was

D.

Dean,

J. Charles

Hewlett,

Burdick.

The

Peterborough:
Handicraft
on

Town

work,

Hall.

June
hooked

etc., in

the

for

the

and
season

exhibition

28,

from
will
and

rugs
Domestic

Salesroom
about

to

and

Department.
on

July

Concord
i.

street

held

in

Italian

rugs,

the

be

P.M.,

include
other

of

will

Peterborough

exhibition

The

baskets,

Society's Tea
open

of

Workers

Wednesday,

annual

the
cut

serves,
pre-

The
will

Gold

Yacht

Trophy,

Walker,
Designed by C. Howard
Exeeuled
J. Stone.
bj-Arthur

HANDICRAFT
VOL.

IV

PAGEANT

A
Given

Of

wind,

And

he

No

beast

But

doth

All
The

Of

cry
laysdown

world

The

year

chosen

Every

on

because
hold

to

rolled

liverywear
broidered

vair.

of

Spring

we

should

Spring has

cold.

our

to

honor.

has celebrated

to

the

not

the

Nor

do

we

even

rise

ing
com-

fitting
rus
cho-

universal

of the year.
with
ourselves

Queen
deck

garlands and walk in procession to our


Nor
do
singing,dancing and bearinggifts.
the mountain
of May
to
tops on the eve
the sacred fires that symbolize the sun's
power.

the

only rightand

voices

homage
pay our
this sober
do
age we

last,we

at

come

this festival in her

every age
and it seemed
add

old

his mantle

and

nation

cold.

puts off its raiment

and

In

his mantle

laysdown

Therefore,

declare

rivers seaward

silver studs

gold

wold

or

song

pleasantsummer

The

have

or

cold

air,

goes clad in cloth of


and season
fair.

with

founts, all

his mantle

bitter

rain, of

bird of wood

or

year

Detroit,
Society^

changed

of

SPRING

Arts

has

year

laughing suns

The

that

Fine

Of

NO.

OF

by the

THE

191

JULY

at

dawn

on

temples,
we

climb

and
return

light
to

May-day

HANDICRAFT

I20

and

fields

and
go into the woods
do we
gatherunder

our

poems
if we

But

our

little poems

on

the

laden

do

not

write

and

the

do

suredly
a-maying.Nor asin blossom
cherry-trees
and hang
to the trees

branches.

these

thingswe

at

can

least

turies,
pretend that we do them. Let us throw off the cenforgetthat we are grown
up and join in the
universal revel,for Spring is our
guest to night and
Spring is always young.

With

these

words, Primavera,

like

vision to the members


life,
brought new
Arts
Society gathered to celebrate
nations
Spring in a pageant of many
In

these

and

uncommon

beautiful

spiritof

new

of the Fine
the

return

of

and

ages.
tableaux
was

of

qualitywhich elevated them to the imaginative


artistic conception, and
made
plane of truest
them
an
original
production,unique in the annals

of

arts

creative

These

crafts effort.

and

evoked

visions

life remain

by

the

rich with

in

memory
which
no

vital

inspirationof
that

ing
return-

color

of

conception
copyistcan give.
The
thought of Spring in every nation and every
visualized in original
conceptions of poignant
age was
recall an
of which
evening
beauty the names
of pure delight.
A

Pageant

of

Spring

Songs
"Primavera"
from

Chorus

Pidlure

"

"Iphigenia in

Greece:
Spring Festival

Praise

of

in honor

of

Gluck

Aulis"

Dionysius.
Dionysius,at

Athens.

HANDICRAFT

122

jeftsand treatment, so that only the color


efFe"ts need be indicated.
and lighting
In the first place,the experiment was
made
a

number

of tarlatan

curtains

schemes

of

using

of different colors

for

backgrounds.Astonishinglyatmospheric effects
thus obtained,so that even
the most
crowded
were
the Greek
pifturesdid not look stifled. Take
cession
proas
an
example. In a frame six feet high,by
of them, the
were
posed, one
eightlong,six figures
and gold,ridingin a chariot; the
Priestess in white
colors of the others ran
the gamut
from
palegolden
color and puryellow,through warm
rose, to wine
ple.
follows : first a
For this the background was
as
curtain of black galateacloth; then curtains of tarlatan
in the followingsuccession, orange, lightyellow,
pink, lightyellow.The effeft of the whole was
that of sun-lighted
atmosphere. In the next pi"SI:ure
the background was, first,
green cheese cloth,of the
possiblegrass green, then brightdark blue
brightest
dark blue.
tarlatan,lightgreen tarlatan,and more
In lighting
red and amber
this pidlure,
lightsfrom

the

the

lower

left hand

gave

the

effe"l of fire

lightsat the top and opposite side


colors meeting and
the moonlight.The
two
gave
unusual
most
a
blending in the background make
and lovelycolor effedl.
In using these tarlatan backgrounds, strong crude
colors can
be used, as they are
that
so
transparent
able
they neutralize each other, and give a quite remarkplay of color. Especiallyis this the case when
used. We
used
different colored
four
lightsare
and white; we
found
that
colors,red, blue, amber
light;and

blue

corner

HANDICRAFT

any

one

red

had

amber

color

with

alone

used

be

to

gave

modified
touch

123

with

of

amber,

and

red

efFeft;

crude

sun-light was
and

white,

some

thus

so

on.

all the

In

the

backgrounds,

foundation

the

black

curtain;

was

left in

place throughout

changed

used:

were

dark
over

blue

over

dark

green;

of

number

blue

used

of

about

to

meet

over

this

line

five
the

feet
frame

at
at

curtains

this
were

be

can

nite
indefi-

almost

An

used,

and

periments
ex-

extremely interesting.
background, with a depth
deepest point, and curving

semicircular

other

green.

combinations

along
We

the

and

orange,

following combinations
ender;
lavlavender; lightblue over
over
pink; lavender
green

over

green

was

course

The

time.

every

that

over

of

was

its

are

the

ends;

this

done

was

to

a-

and
in many
of side curtains
was
difficulty
respedls successful,though it should have been made
with
the
Half
little wider
in comparison
frame.
a
the
arises from
the difficulty
in arranging tableaux
of the speftators get only a diagfadl that so many
onal
the circular
view; and
background simplifies
void

the

this

problem considerably.

If any

reader

experiments
the

Detroit

them;
details
work.

and
in

of

Handicraft

which

have

Society
in return,
their

power

knows
been

would
will
to

made
be

be

of

any

in this

further

direftion,

glad to hear
pleased to furnish

those

very

interested

in

of
any

such

HANDICRAFT

124

FIFTH

ANNUAL

NATIONAL

CONFERENCE
LEAGUE

OF

OF

THE

HANDICRAFT

SOCIETIES
annual

THE

held

in Boston

Arts

hold

to

conference

The

made

the

League

and
Arts

with

meetings in

the
the

the

at

20,

and

was

Crafts,

Museum
ture
largelec-

Museum.

the

at

of the

May 19
Societyof

having been

arrangements

room

on

of The

invitation

of Fine

conference

called

was

order

to

at

o'clock

ten

Secretary,
owing to the absence of Professor
Warren
(who was detained at Harvard)and of both
After
Vice-Presidents.
explainingthat Professor

by

the

would

Warren

Mr.

be

Whiting
Diredor

to
delegates

Boston

address

knowledge
statingthat
which

introduced

of the

in

and

which

of the
he had

arts

the

at

present

Professor
who

Museum,
to

he
and

learned

afternoon

welcomed

disclaimed
movement

much

from

banks,
Fair-

Arthur

the Museum

crafts

ing,
meet-

in
any

the

ing
charm-

intimate

although
Handicraft

he read
upon

He congratulated
the movement
regularly.
being representedby such an organ. Dr.

called attention

Fairbanks

to

was

the

first

faft

and

have

the fa"t that the

ton
Bos-

develope the idea of


though
combining the fine arts and the arts of design,alhad alreadyoutstrippedit in
other museums
branches.
He
some
expressed the belief that the
reach
the great public more
can
museums
readily
through the arts of design,since they bring the idea
have recof art close to dailylife. Foreign museums
ognized
Museum

this

to

thus

been

able

to

in-

HANDICRAFT

125

fluence

nities.
largelythe trade produdls of their commuThe
invited to make
the fullest
delegateswere
of the Museum
and the hope was
use
expressed that
and an inspiration.
its colle"SI:ions might prove of use
The
address
deferred until the
by the President was
afternoon
the reading of the
session, and by vote

minutes
The

of the

last conference

committee

credentials

on

waived.

was

reported

that

the

entitled to one
societies were
constituent
thirty-six
and eightdelegates.
Nineteen
hundred
societies appointed
of whom
forty-five
delegates,twenty-two
Five
were
present at the opening of the conference.
ing
additional
delegatesreported at later meetings,maka total of twenty-seven,
delegatespresent out of
reported for
forty-five
appointed. Mr. Eliot Putnam
had
that the committee
the Nominating Committee
found
it impossibleto make
of
set
up a satisfadlory
nominations
in time
to
notify the societies before
the
conference.
After
giving the question careful

consideration
that

the
to

it seemed

question

of the

the Executive

wished
that

to

if funds

clerical assistance

secretaryshipshould
of the

could
the

advisable

committee

Committee,

relieved

be

the

to

work

be

since

work.

raised

could

to

be

be

Mr.
It

ferred
re-

ing
Whit-

was

possible
provide for

continued

proposed the
H Lang: President^Profcssor
followingnominations
de Forest
ford Warren;
Mr. Lockwood
^;V^-iV^j/W^"/j,
and Mr. Huger Elliott;Executive
Commitiee^M'iss.
Helen
Plumb^
Emily B. Graves, Baltimore, Miss
execuDetroit, Miss A. C. Putnam, Deerfield. The

heretofore.

The

committee

therefore

as

126

HANDICRAFT

tive committee

to

Mr.

urer.
appoint the Secretaryand Treas-

F. Allen

Whiting reported, as Secretary,that


months
had elapsed since the Chicago
as
only seven
conference
it was
impossible to report on a full
year'sa6livities. The membership had been increased
ley
by the addition of the societies in Haverhill,Dudand Bourne, Massachusetts; Memphis, Tennessee,
and Rockford, Illinois. No societies had dropped
since the last conference, althoughit was
out
able
probthat
withdraw.

at

least

number

of

one

the

societies

would

soon

of

societies have
promisingnew
been
of
organized during the past winter, some
will undoubtedly seek
which
affiliation with
the
as
League as soon
they are well established. The
travelingexhibit which started out in July, 1910,
has justbeen returned. The
exhibition
for the coming
silverware,iron work
year will consist of jewelry,
and wood
carving,the plan being that the larger
pieces shall be represented by photographs,as suggested
The
at the Chicago conference.
two
traveling
libraries have
been
in use, one
in Detroit
being now
and the other in Portland, Maine.
Regret was
expressed that ten of the societies neisubmitted
written reports
nor
therappointeddelegates
for presentationto the conference, and the Secretary
carelessness
heretofore
reported the same
as
on
upthe part of a largenumber
of societies in replying
which
to questionsand supplyingthe information
in carryingon
is needed
the work
of the League
such as preferreddates for the exhibit,etc. He hoped
"

that

the

new

officers will have

less of this

to

con-

HANDICRAFT

tend
feel

that

one

and

shows
the

The

of

is

its
in

doing

and

to

will

give
enable

an

is,

after

unless
and
it

the
the

for

moral

and

officers

to

the

fit
bene-

should

it

carry

that

on

it

willing

are

financial

be

not

feel

and

not

whole

the

to

all,

work

necessary

do

members

societies

these

craft,
Handi-

of

organ

and

for

participated

volume

the

such

societies

existence

able

which

League

constituent

useful

of

of

subscribe

even

first

many

importance

movement.

kept

that

The

societies

the

should

societies

Handicraft.

not

seven

for

fund

guaranty

realize

do

only

that

the

that

regarding

societies

some

copy,
the

also

urged

responsibility

more

fa6l

in

He

with.

127

support
the

work

successfully.
Mr.

Whiting

Treasurer:

submitted

the

following

report

as

HANDICRAFT

128

TREASURER'S
Oftober

22,

STATEMENT.
1910

to

May

19,

191

1.

RECEIPTS:

Reports

from

societies

were

then

called

for

and

presented in alphabeticalorder from Amesbury,


(Mrs. Smith) Baltimore (Miss Graves),Boston (Mr.
Whiting), Bourne
(Mrs. Garland),Chicago (Secretary),
Detroit (Mr. Hoyt),Dudley (Mrs. Merrill),
ford
Hart(Secretary),
Evansville(Secretary),Greensboro
Hingham (Mr. Putnam), Kansas
(Secretary),
Melrose
lis
City (Secretary),
(Mrs. Hunt),MinneapoGuild (Mr. Flagg),Minneapolis Society(Secretary),
New
York
(Mrs.
(Mr. de Forest),Norwell
Power), Portland,Maine (Miss Thompson), Provi-

HANDICRAFT

I30

serve,

well

as

craft. He

of their

Eastern

from

the fundamental

felt that

countries

had

we

which

good design,and

of

source

know

to

as

principles

much

learn

to

had
told

always been the


of interesting
experiences

in India.

Mr.

Flagg

firms

were

manufa6lured

designsin
the

Minneapolis said that the


beginning to feel the demand

of

schools

of

wares

design for help


"

healthysign.
old question of Jury
The
of the

some

were

and

more

service

novel

commercial
for better

coming

were

which

was

features

to

seemed

discussed,as
of local work

brought out in the reports from the societies. At


the meeting adjourned to the Trustees*
room
4.45
Dr. Fairbanks
received the delegates
ally
informwhere
served and a very pleasant
after which
tea
was
social time was
enjoyed.
In the evening at Copley Hall the delegates
were
guests of the Society of Arts and Crafts and the
Copley Societyof Boston. Mr. Joseph Lindon Smith
as

of his inimitable

one

gave

temples
Hindu
a

Wat

Ankor

Festival

hundred

the

at

in

lantern

amusing

and

were

discourses
in

Madura,

Cochin

Southern

on

the

China

Hindu
and

India;

the

about

illustrate
to
being shown
freshments
retalk, after which
interesting
slides

served.

called to
was
Saturdaymorning the conference
order at 10.15
by the President, the first business
report of the
being the ele6lion of officers. The
discussed and it was
was
Nominating Committee
that a full set of nominations
felt advisable by some
should be made, and since the Boston
Societywished

On

HANDICRAFT

to

relieved

be

should

be

stated

that

of

the

changed.

be able

work,

that

the

Mauran

Miss

believed

she

131

that

the

headquarters

of

Providence
Club

Handicraft

presented the
liott,
President^Huger Elfollowinglist of nominations:
Mrs"
Providence; First Vice-President^
J. A.
Clarence
P.
Garland, Bourne; Second Vice-President^
Mrs.
Samuel
Hoyt, Hingham; Secretary-Treasurer
M.
Conant, Providence; Executive Committee^Miss
Plumb,
Emily E. Graves, Baltimore, Miss Helen
Detroit, Carl P. Rollins,Montague.
No
other nominations
being made, the convention
proceeded to the ele6lion of officers. Messrs. A. J.
I. Flagg being appointed tellers,
Stone and M.
ported
rethe ele6lion of the officers proposed by Miss
would

to

accept

and

the work

Mauran.
Mr.

Whiting asked for instructions regardingthe


now
exhibit,as the headquarterswould
traveling
go
that the societies should
to Providence, and suggested
be

notified

to

Boston,

articles

send

to

and

of the
a

Handicraft

of sele6lion

Club

"That
be

articles

that

The
Walker

the

submitted

instead

President
who

for the

exhibit. It

was

societies

be

exhibit

notified that the


be

sent

to

dence
Provi-

Boston."

to

then
gave

made

the

for the

of

also be

Jury of the Providence


ecutive
requested to a"t with the Exas
a
hibition,
Jury for the travelingex-

Committee
and

should

of

stead
Jury to be requested to a6l,inmittee
ComJury, with the Executive

Boston

Jury
accordinglyvoted
as

instead

Providence

arrangements

Providence

for the

to

an

called

Mr.
upon
informal
talk on

C.
the

Howard

present

HANDICRAFT

132

lowed
foldevelopment of handicraft schools. This was
W.
Ross
by a brief address by Dr. Denman
who
spoke of the need of trainingin design.
Mr. Walker
reportedfor the Committee
appointed
last conference

le"lure
a
prepare
that the Committee
the societies,
was

the

at

among

slides around

gatherthe

to

necessary
written.

be

could

question of joiningthe

The

for the

of Arts

next

Committee
A

to

with

to

The

Federation
to

tive
the Execu-

power.

was

close without

not

conference

to

as

since
deal

the usefulness

the

little

which

of work

definite

some

and

magazine

should

value

way.

great

required of

League as a whole did not value


to
sufficiently
give it hearty support in
The
interest of the delegates
present was
and

sense

motion

on

of the

continued,

and

further

The

formal
at

were,

o'clock.

however,

the Germanic

invited

Museum

it

any

its

gan
or-

every
fest
mani-

was

should

the
be

delegatesbe asked
Societybuy not less than
the

Handicraft.

sessions
I

that

Handicraft

that

that each

subscriptionsto

voted

was

that

meeting

recommend

four

it

the

craft,
of Handi-

entailed

be

not

from

statement

if the

one

to

talk

passed to the officers and governing


board
of the League for their services,and
of Fine
the Museum
Arts
for hospitality
extended
to the League during the conference.
Secretaryurged that the meeting should
retiring

vote

of thanks

referred

use

trying

which

American

was

year

for

of

the

The
to

in

then

conference

delegatesand
meet

at

three

Cambridge

friendis

o'clock

where

journed
ad-

at

Profes-

HANDICRAFT

Kuno

sor

133

described

Francke

the

colle6lions

in

of
charming and instruftive manner,
taking many
the reprodu6ltonsof old metal work
from
the cases
that the visitors might observe
them
more
closely.
felt that this informal
It was
meeting brought the
conference
to
a
pleasantending.

REPORTS
THE

Since
of

the

the

The

HANDICRAFT

last conference

Handicraft

sales for

even

showroom
a

has

we

League, the growth


been
most
vigorous.

increase of
an
19 10, show
of the preceding year, while

remarkable
have

made

of 19
increase

of work.

We

11

successful

largevarietyof crafts,aswellas

standard

BALTIMORE

December,

firstfour months

more

OF

of the

Club

December

% over
during the
47

the

CLUB

have

an

also

has been

there

of49^.

In

the

effort to exhibit,

increasingly
high
endeavoured,

as

in Baltimore, to secure
Southern
tries
indusfitting
and now
Southern
have representedmany
crafts,
which
the beautiful
carving,weaving and
among
Carolina
mountains
are
basketry from the North
The
of Baltimore
number
particularly
interesting.
craftsmen
is growing and it is a matter
of special
seems

encouragement

that

doing excellent
have
most

of which

exhibition

now

have

work.
held

been

been

T.
some

several

Some

during
noted
shows

current

press of Mr. Norman


is included
in which

have

now

we

A.
very

local silversmiths

hibitions
exinteresting

the

past

winter,

in Handicraft.

An

printingfrom the
of Baltimore,
Munder
remarkable

work.

Of

HANDICRAFT

134

great interest

for the

York

Critical

kier's

Fairchild

Edward

published by

New

cataloguesde luxe of the Loan


Munder,
Art, printed by Mr.

the

of Dutch

Colledtion
and

are

Sherman
and

Metropolitan Museum,

IntroduSiion

Golden

the

to

of

Hos-

Gospels^

tion
printed for J. Pierpont Morgan, Esq. This exhibitures
lecof printingcloses the season.
Only two
dress
have been given so far during the year, the adFroelicher, of
on
"Style" by Prof. Hans
the annual
Goucher
at
meeting of
College, made
Hanford
trated
the club, and Mr. Theodore
Pond's illustalk
for

the "Craft

on

fall include

the

unique
very beautiful and
will illustrate,
in tableaux
and

illuminated

an

book

of

costuming to be carried
the club. It is a pleasure thus to
such progress
during the year,
and

of

of

greater interest and

even

OLD

THE

opments,
devel-

entertainment, which

pantomime,

Plans

interestingnew

some

them

among

of the Silversmith."

COLONY

signing
ballads,the deout
by members
able

be
with

to

port
re-

outlook

an

success.

BOURNE

UNION,

MASSACHUSETTS.

BEG

we

to

have

submit
been

the

followingoutline

in existence

such

of

our

short time

work:
that

Old
prepared no formal report. The
Colony
Union
was
organizedFebruary 15, 19 1 1 in Bourne,
The
Mass., a township comprising seven
villages.
social and agriaim of the association
is industrial,
cultura
have

women

There

is

of about

two

and

children.

at

the

present

hundred
There

and
are

two

time

bership
mem-

all
seventy-five,
classes of

mem-

HANDICRAFT

135

bership,the regularmember
Bourne

and
We

where

the

have

over

one

associate

who
member

is
who

resident
is

of

ident.
non-res-

this year founded


industrial school,
an
hundred
children work
on
Saturday

ing
mornings. It is so organizedthat each child is earnsomething for his or her work, and so the school
in time will be more
The
than self-supporting.
girls
are
taught all kinds of needle work, basket and cane
weaving. The boys are learningsloyd and making
have
we
simple furniture. To encourage
agriculture,
arranged for an annual exhibition at which we ofFer
the children
to
prizes for the followingthings:potatoes,
squash, pumpkins and cut flowers all
corn,
planted and cared for by the children. A prize is
also offered for the prettiest
flower garden of twenty
feet. There
work
are
prizes also for original
square
in sloyd,needlework
and basketry.

We

have

contain

club

house

reading room

in constru6lion
for members

which
and

is

to

public
club
and
This
salesroom.
tea
room
buildingis to
be operated by the older girlsin the villages
that
in
they may in this way receive a complete course
domestic
training.
months
to have
are
we
courses
During the summer
to
members, in the followingthings:French
open
embroidery, Italian cut work, basket weaving, a
in agriculture.
There
will
in poultryand one
course
be a course
in applied design.
and pickles in our
We
receive jams, jellies
to
are
form
have
salesroom; these we
arranged to put in unibe in a positionto
jars,that we may at once
place them on a wider market than the local one.
a

HANDICRAFT

136
We

arranged to receive and ship in uniform


farm produce conforming to our
standards.

have
all

cases

There

are

number

of

different

and
villages
to
are
operation.We
for rugs and are
it as our
pattern
to

the

largeshops

orders

as

We

market.

on

year

to

be

to

set

will take
for the year. We
it
in the cities and secure
as
many

able

the

taken

Cod

Cape

in the

up

given as to their
have
bers
designssent in by memto
ing
buy the best design,adopt-

During the winter


weaving these rugs for

have

be

instru"lion

can.

we

will be

looms

looms

the

Y.

months
the

initial step
M.
C. A. I

our

summer

in

lishing
estab-

hope

next

that we
have accomplished
you
in
began work
great deal. Since we
all our time and thought
have
devoted
to

to

report

February we
to
organization.
THE

The

CHICAGO

ARTS

AND

of
principal
a6livity
the

last

year

has

been

CRAFTS

SOCIETY

ing
Chicago Societydurthe entertaining
of the

the

Societies at its convention


League of Handicraft
in 06lober, 19 10.
held for
Meetings were
three days in the Fine Arts Building,
the Art Institute,
Hull
House
and
the Universityof Chicago.
M.
R. French,
Addresses
were
given by Mr. W.
Miss Euphrosyne Langley, Miss Jane Addams, Dr.
Frank
Gunsaulus, Prof. W.I. Thomas, Prof. George
E. Vincent
and Prof. C. H. Judd.
there were
After the convention
no
meetings of the
Mr.
W.
K.
Cowan
Societyuntil February when
and instru6live
lecture
delivered a most
interesting
Old English Silver and Sheffield Plate.
on

National

HANDICRAFT

138
ARTS

An

AND

CRAFTS

EVANSVILLE

LEAGUE,

interesting
Japanese exhibit
Buildingin April,1910.

In

conne6lion

children's

informally.School
also work

work

Prizes

of members.

seum
Mu-

at

the ladies served'

the exhibit

with

held

was

was

display,

on

awarded

were

tea

best

to

work.

From

carried on.
January a shop was
sell were
accepted from members, other
Shop
imported from various sources.

November

Articles

to

to

goods were
paid expenses.

in the different branches

Classes

of

and

art

art-crafts

running since the shop closed. Teachers


who
have charge of these. Members
pay their dues
remunerated
Services of teachers are
are
by
eligible.
the League treasury. Pupilswere
given instructions

have

been

free.

THE

ARTS

Our
are

report
all
at

poor
were

CRAFTS

AND

doing a

little

this time;

Several of
money.
and
Miss
Welch,

and

We

hope

THE

have
to

up

06lober

our

best

our

have

and

few

netted

AND

next

us

workers, Mrs.

married

CITY

lines. We

Societyis very
January exhibits

and

gone
this

good prospects for

be in the

ARTS

in

something.Our

but
artistically

successes

states.

summed

be

can

KANSAS

SOCIETY,

very

little

Matthews
to

other

next

year

conference.

HANDICRAFTS

GUILD

OF

GREENSBORO

The

chief

interests

of the

Guild

in

its third

year

HANDICRAFT
centered

have
to

attract

salesroom

the

about

which

has

come

definite patronage.

class of articles

The

139

exhibited

and

sold

is

superior
that of last year and a wider
to
appreciationof the
value of the Shop to the community is noted.
It has been
impra6licable to have the Shop open
than one
cember
more
day in each week except during Dewhen
it was
kept open daily.
and
have
exhibitions
been
Le6lures
ceived
fairlywell reand a class in metal
condu6led
work
by a
member
of the Guild
has
helped to further the
Guild's

influence.

HARTFORD

The

work

of the

of increased

one

AND

ARTS

CLUB

Club

for year 1910-1


has been
1
Each
interest to members.
month

been

meetings have

CRAFTS

held, and this year

at

the homes

of former
have

years. Subje6lshave
been of vital interest to

regularledture course
been presented which
the

The

06lober

instead

of the members

J.

Club.

meeting was held at


sketches
English.Summer

L.

were

exhibited

The

November

and

Ceramics
and

the

at

Mr.

many

In

January

talk

was

on

novel

the home

of Mrs.

of Mrs.

English's
tained.
enterdelightfully

held

with

Miss

C.

Pitkin,Curator of
Memorial
ful
gave a delight"Old

pieces from

rare

was

Albert

Morgan

instru6live

by

the Club

meeting

Williams.

Louise

Mrs.

of the

Russian

H.

Pewter"

illustrated

his colledion.

evening was
given by
S. D. Stoddard. Russian
lated
transfairytales were
from
into English by a student
Russia. Songs
a

HANDICRAFT

HO
were

and

sung

refreshments

served

in

sian
Rus-

the

stylegiving the whole


thing a unique chara"ler. The
evening closed with questions to Mr.
ment
Traftenberg concerning the arts and crafts movein Russia
and the generallife there in relation
to

and

arts

music.

In

February

by

Mr.

Old

an

Colonial

Randall

Herbert

of

Plymouth. Refreshments

time

manner

with
of

one

rare

Besides

these

le6lure

by

old time

Frank

of

in

old

an

occasion

exhibitions

September

the

League

of

K. Weil

Helen

have

as

readingon

one

of the

Parsons

Art, subject,"Art

Living,"and
Circle," by Mrs.

illuminations.

flavor. The

Alvah

Rational

Several

served

were

enjoyment to all present.


social evenings,have been given:

Mr.

School

an

conne6led

personalnature

with

In

dall
Ran-

"

curios,and anecdotes

His

Mr.

The
Primitive
dustries
Incharming talk upon
of the Plymouth Colony," illustrated by
choice
objedlsfrom his large colle"lion of

many

York

given

was

in his studios.

gave

was

Evening

held

been

New

Fa6lor

"Rossetti

one

in
and

of

Cambridge.
during the year.

travelingexhibition

from

tional
the Na-

Societies,leather and

Handicraft

specialexhibition of
sale. During
silver. In December, the Christmas
January,textiles. In February,pottery and baskets.
In

November

15, Easter cards and prints.


During the latter part of May a specialexhibition of
the work
from
the different classes will be held in

March,

the

china.

shop

April

i"

rooms.

classes this year have


class in design has been
The

been

full of interest. The

conduced

by

Miss

Fay-

HANDICRAFT

in

of New

Barnham

ette

141

York, and very creditable work

block
illustrations,

all kinds

printingand

of

tile
tex-

executed
with success.
designinghave oeen
The
followingis the report of the wood-carving class
submitted
by Mr. Rood.
The

of 1910"

season

carvingclass

Hartford

of the

under

the

instruction

vard

of New

York.

The

course

held

marks

1 1

Mr.

of

for

planned

was

the fifth year of the


Arts and Crafts Club
Karl

Von

lessons,and

ten

Saturdaysduringthe months
December
and
January, with the
omitted, but by the desire of

lesson

was

Mr.

G.

There
who

lessons

in for

came

been

all but

two

Under

such

class

colonial
which

had

least

at

held

as

and

season,

in

the

one

which

to

the

carvers.

The

to

4 p.m.

benches
hours
with

the
of

contains

and

1907,
could

not

tops

siderable.
con-

fine
a
buildings,
Mrs. Sigourney,
ter
during the win-

shop

for

wood

being temporarily
of

convenience

of instruction
short

of the

accomplishment

of

for the

Four

since

evening school

an

others

two

workers

the home

working classes,extension
added

of

years'experience.

two

the

and

dwellingonce

is used

and

attendants

circumstances

was

there

instruction

the

lessons.

more

or

one

fail to be enthusiastic

The

which

of Boston.

constant

have

days
holi-

the

regularmembers

eleven

were

November,

Christmas

all,after

in

be

to

majorityof
include February,

to

gildingunder

in

Keander

B.

class have

extended

was

fourteen

making

m.

of

on

the class the time

Rydings-

were

intermission

from
for

the

1 1

a.

luncheon.

HANDICRAFT

142

each

member

period

chests

The

interesting

season

in

among

tabourette,
Club

mirror
and

oak

frames

and

colonial

in

which
in

or

little

as

and

fireplace

membership

projecSs

of

this

mentioned
several

walnut,

now

and

one

fire

hundred

ture
picbench,

piano

bridal

elaborate

several

bench
is

be

may

carried

were

mahogany,

mahogany,

mahogany
a

much

as

inclined.

was

large
this

large

he

as

Many
out

working

screen.

and

fifty.

HANDICRAFT

SOCIETY
THE

BIOGRAPHIES

CHICAGO

ARTS

Chicago

THE

143

founded

it

felt the time

was

principlesof

the

The

of the

founders

members

arts

Miss

were

October

of the settlement

Starr, Prof. Charles


Ellen
Miss
Twose,

over

and

Societywas
27, 1897.

had returned

what

Morris
was

SOCIETY

Crafts

House

England full of enthusiasm


there by William
and

CRAFTS

and

Arts

Hull

at

Residents

AND

had been

and

ripe
crafts

his

from

plished
accom-

followers,

introduce

to

the
here.

movement

of its earliest
societyand some
Jane Addams, Miss Ellen Gates
Zeublin, Mr. George M. R.

Waite, Mrs.

Yale

Madeline

Wynne, Mr. Frank Hazenplug, Mr. and Mrs. Gus


Higginson,Mrs. Kate Watson, Miss Elizabeth Head
The
and Miss Louise
Anderson.
presidentsof the
Societyhave been Mr. George M. R. Twose, Miss
Elizabeth
R.
Head, Mr. Ralph Clarkson, Mr. W.
Gates and Miss Euphrosyne Langley.
Miss

Waite,

as

secretary and treasurer,

was

the

ing
mov-

Societyduring the first half of its


and the Society owes
existence
her its greatest
to
She kept its records,stimulated
its memsuccesses.
bers,
sold their products,wrote
innumerable
letters,
managed the exhibitions,loaningher studio for them,
ly
packed the boxes, arranged the meetings and secretpaid the yearly deficits from her own
purse. She
the
and
put her heart and strengthinto the work
Societythus publiclyacknowledges its debt of gratitude
spiritof

to

The

the

her.

motive

in

forming the Societywas

the

educa-

HANDICRAFT

144

of
people and the betterment
the first people the Societysought
heads
of departments in factories

of the

tion

Among
were

kinds, a6lual
the

publicschool

held. At

one

of

Annual

teachers.

these,in

city.
est
inter-

to

of

ous
vari-

different crafts and

in the

workers

the

exhibitions

connection

with

were

the Archi-

the rooms
of a
Society showed
workman's
how
sively
inexpendwellingand demonstrated
such
and yet how
and artistically
practically
could
home
be furnished
with thingsmade
chinery.
a
by ma-

(Sural

Club, the

the
important early activities was
spreading of the knowledge of the arts and crafts
work
throughout the middle, southern and western

One

of the

most

Letters

states.

written

were

clubs

various

to

and

and offering
tellingthem of the movement
then
exhibit of good work.
Such
exhibits
were
an
ing
concerngatheredand sent with letters of information
contained.
the different articlesthey
Many times
Mrs.
and
lecturers
were
supplied, Mrs.
Wynne
Watson
giving valuable service in this way. This
societies

often
which

led

to

the formation
fostered

were

of

and

men
Society.Prominent
were
brought to Chicago
were

Prince
The

Mr.

Charles

Kropotkin
famous

Labor

R.

Prof.

Museum

the

Chicago

and

the

east

for leCtures.

Ashbee, Prof.

and

crafts societies

helped by
from
Europe

Among these
Charles Zeublin,

Dow.
of Hull

outgrowth of the Chicago


of arts
Many branches
public schools.
taught in our
direCt

and

arts

Arts
and
There

House

was

Crafts

and

crafts
are

are

ciety.
Sowell

perhaps

HANDICRAFT

146

was

fine

was

interesting

most

display

wood

needlework,

of

the

metalwork,

carving,

and

the

has

society

in

is

bers

of

The

wood

finished

design,

this

and

results,

of

have

and

in

wood

department

members

the

plished
accom-

exhibit

an

took

loom

being

both

of

one

the

and

pleasure

permanent
notable

profit to

assets

the

men-

Society.
class

carving
of

supervise

the

Another

considerable

purchased

giving

Donahue

the

Society

the
of

which
is

upon

achievements
upon

N.

Mrs.

charge

of

and

skilled

H.,

J. J.

teachers

classes.

other

scope

classes

is in

Manchester,

season

year

The

keen.

has
a

the

greater

in

organized

June.

equipment,

The

minated
illu-

painting,

been

embroidery,

most

Society

which

have

interest

been

some

other

china

ry,
jewel-

Iettering,andotherequally

classes

year

jewelry,

The

there

handiwork.

During

place

and

year,

brasswork,

carving, embroidery,
work,ornamental

skilful

the

of

event

which

society hopes
work

its
it is

felt

good

are

the

and
are

materially

to

organize

crease
in-

several

needed.

financial

anticipated

basis, and

during

organization

this

is about

still
ond
sec-

tering.
en-

HANDICRAFT

147

EDITORIAL
is the Life of
^^Competition

ONE

of the

crafts

into

amusing

features

which

movement

conversation

Traded

seldom
the

or

of the

arts

and

finds its way

magazines

is the

breasts. The
in which
to our
we
hug that motto
way
middle
it to express
a
class,which
dition
conoriginated
at

time

one

extant,

is

a
essentially
trading

organized to barter in the market,


then over
firstover
raw
labor,finally
over
materials,
the wares
produced. The middle class manufadurer
is as much
a trader
by instinct and pradliceas is his
brother
the store
keeper, and all of his language is
trader. His ancestry wasin
thetalkofthe
trade(when
and
in the hands of some
not
gentleman of the road),
succeeded
and forein making regrating
stalling,
he has even
and
crimes
once
punished as such, respeftable.Nay,hehasgoneevcn further,andnotto be
class:

they are

regrater

or

at

or

forestaller is

opprobrium.
all ceasingto

to

penury
class trader,without

the middle

But

trader,has learned a
knows, at least the more

be

two, and he now


his fellows knows,

tantamount

thing or
able

of
^

that in order

competitive edifice standingat

keep

to

all he

must

his

shaky
pullout

the

foundation!
Only the small tradesman, too ignorant to
left to
what he is doing,and the craftsman
are
"Competition
has

army

gone
are

is the

life of trade"

by. His comrades


slowly working

out

know
shout

after the sion


procestrial
of the great indusa

scheme

for the

HANDICRAFT

148

workers.
competition among
wage
Still the craftsman
refuses to join the labor union,
is debarred
ber
by his very occupation from being a memof the middle
class,and proceeds to show his
clever appreciationof his independence and intelligence
by competing with his fellows to the top of
his speed ! It is all very funny,but it is pretty serious
for the craftsman, and incidentally
business
for artistic
little or none
of it in
was
production. There
the close guildsof the middle
ages (thosehalcyon
which
fond of talking
we
are
so
"daysof the craftsman
about),but, oh well, we are modern craftsmen!
well there
that competition is the life of
^e know
elimination

of

"

is

flaw

there

did

we

not

Trade

before.

see

is the

don't
word, and that isn't exaftlyright.We
be traders,we
be makers
to
to
want
want
are
we
craftsmen.Yes indeed, so we are; but we also have
next

"

to

sell

our

and

wares,

traders,and
successful

so

usual

as

craftsman

the

the

trader

smartest

!And

for

must

we

there's

time

is the

most

circle

vicious

our

be

complete!
I have

no

to

panacea

ourselves

offer. We

are

not

strong

of the unrestri"led

problem
to look
carefullyinto
competition of the arts

workers, and

what

by
we

ought

to

work

least

at

see

out

can

the

done

be

To
be sure
us.
petitionamong
Juries have recently undertaken
hand

as

to

the
stable
even

door

what

the workers

usual
after

should

to

the
to

enough

alone.
the

But

matter

and

crafts

limit

coAi-

long
advise

abused
before

make, thus

saking
for-

prafticeof locking the


departure of the horse. But

American
the

then, the various

arts

and

crafts societies work

HANDICRAFT

in

competition to
in

stores

of

that

me

is

societies

unrestricted

of

the while

question worth

so

send
far

California !It

southern

matter

which

value

of moderate

to

in this

vital

small

wares

Massachusetts

other,and

each

mercial
adively with the ordinarycomeach city.But crowning all ridiculousness

the

come

with

extent

some

yet compete

worse

149

of

signments
con-

from

as

to

seems

competition
any societyto

consider.

R.
"

Happily

comparative
which
than

in

peace,

the

concious

do

plenty,and
world
(and

if not

agitatethe
own
time) get

our

without

live and

craftsmen

most

"

"

their work

the great questions


never

themselves

aid of

the

in

more

so

worked

out

majority of

men.

offer its
to
province of Handicraft
readers a critical investigation
into the various questions
which
the movement
for a revival
concern
vitally
this
of the handicrafts,and it is in line with
policythat we have published in the June number
ethical aspectsof the movement,
an
essay dealingwith the
and that we
one
print in the present number
of the letters called forth by that article. Professor
teacher
of design and a writer
has been
Stimson
a
he calls it,and his comas
munication
on
"artist-artisanship"
But

it is the

is of much
needs

movement
we

welcome

any

interest. The

wish

Handicraft

to

endeavor

call the
to

new

and

crafts

and
of interests,
catholicity

wider

"

We

arts

to

"

extend

the boundaries.

attention
feature

of

the

readers

established

in

of
this

HANDICRAFT

150

The

number.
so

wide,

render

to

the

and

have

in Handicraft

interest

services

become

institute

Service

grown

it is called upon
to
that it has been cided
de-

diverse

so
a

which

has

Department.

This

will

find
specialdepartment where craftsmen
may
opportunitiesto pursue their craft in communities
and shops; where
designersmay learn of openings
where
for their talent, and
employers and crafts
advertise
their
shops desiringskilled workers
may
be

needs.
There
not

workers
in
many
niches
in their proper
are

"

might do

different

better under

who

movement

our

craftsmen

many

are

who

surroundings many
are
handicapped for
"

shops which
The
schools are
energeticand capable workers.
of designersand
turning out an increasingnumber
handicraftsmen, and it is in the hope of unitingopportunity
and

communities

and

that

worker

department and
in making

we

speak

it of value

we

have

established

the

for your hearty cooperation


to the movement.

r
WITH

THE

Mass:
A Problem and its Solution.
ELROSE,
rose
Something less than two years ago the MelSocietyof Arts and Crafts,after an existence

of several years, found


problem and
to

The

SOCIETIES

other

problem

numbered

itself face
its solution

face with

to

be

may

plexing
per-

of assistance

societies.
was

about

this. The
members
fifty

Society at
and

as

that
the

time

annual

HANDICRAFT

dues
the

151

with
dollar,the regularincome
occasional
exhibitions,etc., had barely

only one

were

of

help

for
expenses
pay, besides the necessary
notices, etc., the rent of a small carpenter'sshop,
sufficed

which

to

had

been

fixed up

and

used, with

some

comfort,
dis-

meetings and classes.


This building
afterward
down
and
however
torn
was
unable
find anything at all adethe Societywas
quate
to
for its needs, for it meant
a
or
room
rooms
could be heated
which
and lightedsuitable for day
and evening classes or meetings (which would
mean
pradicallythe entire rental of the premises)at a figure
of the Society.
even
approaching the entire revenue
In faft so
of the
some
discouragedwere
members
that it was
serious question whether
the
a
Societyhad better not give up.
terested
inof the members
who
much
was
Just then one
in its work
made
the
suggestionwhich
solution.
proved the pradical and very satifa"9:ory
This
of a prominent physician,
occupied
lady,the widow
in the very center
house
of the city,next
a
of the house
the Public Library,and at the rear
was
had been
a
cupied
unocgood-sizedstable which however
for

since

water

and

she

husband's

offered the

death.

erate
Societyfor a very modrental. In
it was
admirablysuited
ways
many
the needs of the Society,
located,
to
being centrally
The
well lightedand largeenough for all purposes.
some
ground floor consisted of a largecarriageroom
feet square and a smaller room
ing
containtwenty-five
harness
two
closets,etc., with running
stalls,
This

stable

her

gas.

HANDICRAFT

152

stairs

Up

coachman

down

to

fitted up

chimney,

for the

which

the first floor;the

ever
howrest

largeairy hay-loft.

was

As

the

The

been

had

room

extend

not

had

room

this

and

did

poor
with

small

floor

wooden

condition

the

in the

in
was
carriageroom
agreed to fill the space

owner

floor.
lay a solid cement
ty
Sociea heating plant.The
next
question was
purchased a second-hand, old-fashioned,round

stove

cinders

such

and

as

connecting by
coachman's

are
a

seen

long

in country
railroad stations,
pipe with the chimney in the

which

found

easilyheat
in the coldest
the large room
weather.
even
They
also extended
the gas pipes to give plentyof light
and
of cheap but artistic scrim
with
the addition
the windows,
curtains
at
burlap hangings, a large
glass-doorbookcase, chairs, tables, etc., loaned by
the members, and the installation of a largerug loom,
owned
the room
by the Society,in one
corner,
sented
prea

room,

very

attractive

was

appearance.
Society has

occupying it the
membership of nearly 150.
Since

to

increased

to

of a fair and
By means
number
of socials it has paid all of its bills,
made
a
improvements in its *'Shop" as the Society
many
calls its home, and
closes its year with
about
$2 5
in its treasury.
last winter
This
teachers

classes

it maintained
in

under

competent

basketry, embroidery, design,


wood
carving,leather work, rug weaving, etc., which
and has also opened
were
pradicallyself-supporting,
afternoons
and
its Shop Monday
tea
a
room
as

HANDICRAFT

154

One
and
see

with scientific intelligence


only examine
aesthetic sympathy the handicrafts
of nature
to
the vital and organicprinciples
of beauty in con-

need

struftive
are

work,

It is

imaginationin

equallywell

to

defense

in

man

and the

proofs

the

designand

pertinently
spired
in-

embellisn-

that, primarily,
everyone

known

work, alike in

of

matters

and
self-expression,
have
centuries, it must
and

most

skilful,wise

give greatest

been

beautiful

and

those

honor

work,

indebtedness
and

the

parasitehis
of the

the forests for those

food

citizens

their fellows
whom

to

would

consideration.

till relatively
late that social

gave
abandonment

self-support,selfthat,through enormous

led
and efFe"lively
efficiently

generalgratitudeand
not

for

of their work.

ment

who

handicrafts

and
superabundant that these most
diredtly
and
appealed to all primitive workers
their

had

or

the

naturally
For

it

treacheryand

was
ning
cun-

position.The slow
suppliesand protectionof

of river

false

fishingand

bottom-land

ty"
"in several(which initiated land tenures
agriculture
and began the graftof the city"boss"),together
with those pastoraldepartures (for"better
feeding
which
grounds" for the flocks)
inauguratedpatriachand so started the graft of
ism and primogeniture,
could
have
never
degraded
efFeftively
aristocracy,
and
the worker
who
taste
possessed intelligence,
skill. Societyhas always depended upon him, and in
efFeft

does

so

still. The

which
the
very zeal with
for his products by paying

parasiticclass compete
higher pricesin proportion to his greater skill and
this point. But the effort to "get from
taste
proves

HANDICRAFT

him"

results

the

155

skill "without

of his

nomic
giving eco-

equivalent" began early,on the part of the


and self-styled
who
cane,
aristocrat,
parasitic
(throughchisuperstitionand conspiracy)arrogatedand
which
usurped the greater part of the commonwealth
they had neither created nor deserved. Against this
social crime
of the grafting
element
historyreveals*
an

eternal

of

the

and

moral, intelledual

workers

material

movement

and

producers againsttheir oppressors.


Ward's
Ancient
Lowly gives this very fully,
shows
the guildor fraternity
spiritof cooperation
and
mutual
protection all the way along for

centuries, down

to

"free

our

brotherhoods"
The

and

"labor

and

great world, with


international

fundamental
and

service

the

and

descendant

masonries," "cooperative
unions"

Socialist

of

party

to-day.
come
be-

now

vidorious, is the direft

lutionary
evo-

of that

righteousstrugglefor
manhood
and self respeftin productive
social cooperation.* *
Stimson.
John Ward

r
MEETING

COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE

June5,i9 1 1 the
National
League of

MONDAY,
of the

njet

Street,Boston
Mr.

Voted
held

the

Hoyt,
That

at

eleven

Mrs.

Rollins

meeting

first Monday

and

of the

in each

cieties
So-

Handicraft

o'clock

Vice-President

Mr.

board

executive

Beacon

at

47
Garland

Mrs.

Conant

executive
month.

ing,
president.
pres-

board

be

HANDICRAFT

156
Voted:

To

the

postpone

TravelingExhibition

until

OSober.
Voted:

That

the

followingclasses of handicraft be
included
in the exhibition:
woodcarving, jewelry,
metal
work, printingand designsfor reprodu"iion,
textiles and needlework,
leatherwork, book-binding,
pottery and basketry.
Voted:
That
the plan of judgingarticles for the exhibition
be condudied
as
formerly the executive
"

board

and
Club

Voted:

committee

from

the Providence

craft
Handi-

addingas judges.
Mrs.

That

Garland

be

chairman

of

mittee
com-

of

to

the raisingof a fund


three, to investigate
purchase examples of handicraft to be used in

of said
members
other
travelingexhibitions. The
committee
to be appointed by the chairman.
The
eledted
was
followingnominating committee
to
present a list of officers for the League at the
annual
next
meeting.Chairman, Frank C. Baldwin,
Detroit,H. Langford Warren, Boston, J. Hemsley
Johnson, Baltimore.
The

board

executive

moved

vote

of thanks

to

Mr.

generosityin the past and his present


offer of printing,
without
tionery
charge,the League stafor the coming year.
Voted:
That
Mrs. Garland
of
appoint a committee
three to consider the publicationand management
Rollins

for his

of Handicraft.
Voted:
each

That
executive

Adjourned.

Secretary furnish a summary


craft.
meeting for publicationin Handi-

the

Nelly

Ferguson

Conant,

of

Secretary.

|i

HANDICRAFT

OF

MASQUE

"Man

ever

MIDSUMMER

journeyson

with

them

After the red rose-bordered

Ah,

BUT

"iries,dancing under

the lure

has

increased

hem,
the

"

moon.

potency

on

the

Magic Eve of St. John, the night of the


troit
Masque of Midsummer," given by the DeSocietyof Arts and Crafts in the same
shadowy
woodnook
that formed the background of last year's
"Masque of Arcadia." The group of citydwellers
who
respondedto the call of the open this year saw
before them at first,
however, a purelymortal revel,
the barriers of time
and
though across
space; the
in fafl, of a jollycrowd
of
concluding festivities,
and
old English green.
burghers
yeomanry
rainbow
At first simply seen
in
as
shifting
groups,
"

on

an

HANDICRAFT

TsS

the figures
againstthe dusk of the tree-boughs,
began to stand out as individuals;one saw
gradually
with
her distaff,
here
there
woman
a
a
dignified
tumbling urchin, a lass triggedout in rosy finery,
the rich farmer
condescending to the villagelouts,
the market-woman
of a
carryingher great mushroom
basket: all the types of" Bartlemy Fair" individually
cunningly to the general
telling,
yet subordinated
pi"ture.
of littlebells through the dark and in danced
A jingle
kerchiefs
the double line of the Morris with fluttering
and
tapping sticks; flute and clarionet struck up
the crowd
of Bray," and
*'The
Vicar
enjoyed its
of the
Morris
favorite dance
to the last note
off,"
littleminor
air. Meanwhile
a pedlarwas
ing
weavweary
his way
through the throng,his tray piledwith
and singinghis
brightwares
relief

*'

"Gloves
Masks

as

sweet

for faces

as

and

damask

roses.

for noses;

quoifs and stomachers


lads to give their dears."
For my
Of
no
course
English revel of the Renaissance
could end without
its strolling
performance ;
players'
of the "Rakes
in the middle of a rousingchorus
of
the pageant- wagon,
Mallow"
on
came
flauntingin
the mask
red, hung with evergreens and displaying
either side; out
the players
tumbled
of Comedy
on
finish make
with
to
up and costuming in the open
horse playand finally
broadest
to present that cream
Plaie.
of medieval
farces,the Revesby Sword
end at last"
Even
Midsummer
to an
Day "comes
and after the traditional joust of the hobby-horses.
Golden

HANDICRAFT

159

by twos
began to stragglehomeward
and threes,disappearing
the tree-boles to the
among
strains of the old catch
has a lame tame
My Dame

the

revelers

^*-

crane."
The
that

stage

at

now

claimed
was

was

by

in the

left empty for a space : one


moonrise
Midsummer
Eve

its own,

air; one

"Other

small

And

that
half

steps

faint music

more

realized
would

be

unearthlyrevelry

caught
beatingupon
blowing in

the

floor

the wind."

of little
gleam of moonshine
texture, the twinkle
abroad,
wings in the dark, and the fairyhost was
about
ringingtheir rounds and castingenchantment
mortals wanthe place: enchantment
in which
dering
two
in distress through the nightbecame
strangely
entangled,but which, through three magic tests, lets
them
their ultimate
rightto the mysterious
prove
good-willof the fairypeople.
Although the evening'sspectaclefinished to mortal
eye with the departure of the fairyhost, it lingers
A

still before
as

the

the

inward

"Vision

delightthat

eye

of

at

least

one

of the

dience
au-

Delight" in the truest sense,


finish of
attends
a
inevitably
upon
of

detail in presentment;
of color, of
related carefully
in
every case
efFedi of the whole.

mass,
to

of
the

ment,
move-

general

PROGRAMME.

Part I. The
the olden

peasants.
Tournament

festival of
Delight.A village
time, with old songs sung by a chorus of
dances.
Morris
Revesby Sword Plaie and
of the Hobby Horses.
Vision

of

i6o

HANDICRAFT

Part

II. A

Midsummer

of

John

EDITORIAL

NOTE

last

at

and

It would

awakening

the

to

Seem

as

yet, but

as

Society of
that all arts

awakening may
visible
its signsare
Arts
are

and
at

if the world

Crafts

the bottom

in

was

uglinessof

unnecessary

life. The

modern

The

The
ventures
adNight'sMadness.
the fairypeople.
Mary among

be slow
on

and

every

tial
par-

side.

ing
Detroit,believ-

offers

one,

no

a-

ization
of its energiesto the realpology for devotingsome
of beauty in the kindred
of pageantry,
arts
in this,
dancing and the drama. The greatest success
its latest effort,
ing
lay in the way in which those takinto the spirit
part in the performance entered
of the thing.There
in securing
no
was
difficulty
performers ; to them it was the greatest "fun," and
there
to

were

take

culture

requests for friends


many
have
thingsmust
part. These

upon

those

witnessingthem,

to
an

but

be

allowed

efFe"i for

especially

taking part; since to the young there is


Children
who
no
stronger appeal than the dramatic.
craft,
bored by pidiuresand blind to design and handiare
the beauty of
less definitely,
feel, more
or
dancing and pageantry. If we believe,as we must,
for being,"is it not
that
excuse
Beauty is its own
the part of wisdom
to
give our young people opportunity
those

upon

''

themselves
in the art that is
express
And
their nature?
that this opportunity

to
nearest

to

far

moved
possiblerethe usual theatrical surroundings,is
from
surelya positivegain\ the theatre is,or should and
mind; the
perhaps some
day will be, for the mature

should

be

given out

of

doors, as

as

HANDICRAFT

ancient
this

"Pan's

of

art

is

the

pageantry

is

meeting

common

music

i6i

in

the

night."

for

young

ground

and
for

old

all

who

alike;
hear

McE.

i62

HANDICRAFT

CONFERENCE
SOCIETY

OF

REPORTS

ARTS

AND

CRAFTS,

DETROIT,

MICHIGAN

LTHOUGH

Ljk
JL ^

but

since

Crafts

from

report

was

months

seven

the

has

Societyof

presentedbefore

passed

Arts

and

conference

of

League, time has not stood stillwith us. At the


annual
officers were
meeting in November, the same
the

C.

President,Frank

re-eleded:

idents,
Baldwin; Vice-Pres-

J. Maxwell-Gryllsand Miss Alexandrine


B. Stratton; Secretary,
McEwen;
Treasurer, Wm.
Helen
Miss
Plumb; Miss Mary Chase
Perry was
No
of the Executive
Board.
appointed the member
financial statement
be made
can
as
only half a year
has elapsedsince the last conference.
The
Society
H.

at

numbers

present

non-resident

Early in
meeting
the

December
of the

amount

members,

190
craftsmen.
the

President

Societyto

of

34

1^25,000

announce

had

been

of whom

called

are

special
that pledgesto
secured
by the
a

ing
five,for the purpose of foundof design. Steps were
school
a
immediately
the school, appointinga
taken toward
incorporating
of Trustees, and findinga suitable Dire6tor,
Board
should
who
"one
be," to quote the President,"not
merely a teacher of manual training,or a 'skilled
able to meet
but one
the public effe(9:ivecraftsman'
ly,and who would be, at once, an artist,a leader,

specialcommittee

and

of the

man."

of

Readers

accomplishment

of Handicraft
of the

first two

are

aware

steps; but

it

HANDICRAFT

164
of

making an activelyfresh start in a more


congenial
desirable
surroundingsin every
settingand more
way, earlyin the fall.
Returning to chronologicalsequence, the "special
for the

exhibitions"

past six months

include

al
sever-

beginningin Odiober;
hitherto
mentioned
the one
in this place,was
not
that of enameling and gold-and-silver-smithing
by
of Riverside,California.
Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Dixon
Ford
Dixon
for three
Mrs. Eda
was
years a pupil
of Alexander
Fisher of London, and to her naturally,
notable

"one

critical and

sensitive

inspiringinfluence
the

best

shows"

man

traditions

has been

taste
a

sound

of the

added

technique
craft.

Other

under

founded

his
on

exhibitions

by Arthur J. Stone, Mrs. Josephine Hartwell


portant
imShaw, George C. Gebelein and others. The most
which
the Societyhas
"special exhibition"
of architedure
undertaken
since the jointexhibition
were

and

the

allied

arts

held

two

years ago was


and modern.
of bookplates,
ancient

the

hibition
ex-

and
exhibition,
owing to the number, variety,
antiquarianvalue of the exhibits,and the valuable
privatecollediion represented,and also to the fa6l
commercial
that it had no
aspe"t whatever, stands
unique in importance.Throughout the four weeks of
its duration,the attendance
was
greater and interest
tion.
of the press more
generalthan at any previousexhibiIt also attained the distindion
of a brochure, illustrat
by originalplates,printedand published
privately,
describingthe coUeSion. Notices also appeared
Art and
in the Book Plate Booklet^
Progress^
and
other publications,
while in
Handicraft
many

This

HANDICRAFT

the

first issue

165

of the

of
venture
Bulletin^a recent
the Society,
notice was
to the retrospe"tive
ed
appendlist of all exhibitors
and designers,
thus making
a
it,so to say, an informal catalogueof the several
thousand
platesshown.
The
publicationof this Bulletin^it may be mentioned,
undertaken
at the suggestionof the execuwas
tive
board who
thought it would be an added bond
between
of bringing
members, as well as a means
the aftivities of the Societyto the attention of outsiders.
It will be issued
contain

from

time

to

time

and

will

briefs of lectures
exhibitions,
and meetings held by the Society.It will be
mailed free on application.
In the first number
besides
the book-plate article was
little sketch
of the
a
Handicraft
Workers
of Peterborough,whose
work
then on exhibition at the Society's
This
was
rooms.
is the third of the so-called
"Village Industries"
to

be

and
saw

The

notes

shown

on

current

in Detroit

Hingham,

it has

and

proved

like those

of Deerfield

of great value to all who


add, is fullymerited.

it. Its success,


we
may
plan of having special
meetings of outside

has

been

one

instance,a

has

held

time

the

with

clubs

this year with


good results. In
club of working girls
with their friends

continued

four

successive

study of

brief talk

some

meetings,taking up
branch

of handicraft

each

work,

of the Society.
by a member
Following the suggestion made last year of givinga
of related lefturesin placeof the unconne"ted
course
leftures of former
Sargent,of
years. Prof. Walter
the School of Education
of Chicago University,
gave
the generaltopicof" Dea series of five leftures on

HANDICRAFT

i66

intervals,
sign in Fine and Industrial Art" at fortnight
beginningFriday,January 20, at the Museum
follows: "The
tion
Relaof Art. The
as
subjediswere
Sources of Design,"
of Utility
to Beauty,""The
in Design," "The
Place of Ornament
Use
"The
in Design," "The
of Style in
Element
of Color
in every
were
Design." The results of this course
the audiences, large from
the beginning,
gratifying;
way
increased in number
the speakand interest,
er
and more
and his hearers becoming more
en
rap^
port^ and general regret being expressed that the
course

that

was

Mr.

so

soon

Sargent has

the desire in Detroit

design.
The
only ledure

It is

over.

done

for further

outside

not

too

great deal

much
to

instruction

this course,

and

to

say

stimulate
in

applied
one

for

arrangedby the
invited Mr. Joseph Lindon
social committee, who
Smith to Detroit, to speak on the "Discovery and
in Egypt." To
this audience,
Opening of a Royal Tomb
it is not
necessary to speak of Mr. Smith's
rarelyintimate way of takinghis audience down the
and
and
milleniums
findingthe world so human
of them.
modern
at the bottom
Regarded also as a
financial venture,
the affair was
an
unprecedented
which

admisson

was

charged,was

success.

charming "Spring Reception" given during


Easter week with specialsylvandecorations
gathered
and
arranged by Mrs. Sidney Corbett, and the
have been
both of which
"Twelfth
Night Revels"
in Handicraft
recounted
complete the roster of
entertainments
joy.
givenby the Societyfor its own
The

"

"

HANDICRAFT
and

in all

was

manifest

167
that "Art

can

tell the truth

obliquely."
It is not
altogethersurprisingtherefore that
efforts in their own
behalf should
bring about

these
un-

expeSed results.
Arts
Recently a largeclub in Detroit, the "Fine
Society,"called upon the Societyof Arts and Crafts
for their
to furnish
propertiesand settings
costumes,
The
closingmeeting of the season.
entertainment,
called a
which
was
der
unPageant of Spring,"was
"

the

direction

Society,who
Arts

and

were

of

members

two

also

Crafts, and

members

of the
of the

it

Fine

Arts

Societyof

of
represented,by means
livingpictureseach preceded by appropriatemusic
festivals celebrating
the reor
turn
descriptivereadings,
of Springin all lands and ages. For example,
the piftureof the "Festival
in Honor
of Dionysus
introduced by a chorus from Gluck's
at Athens"
was
Iphigeniain Aulis," the Druid Ceremony of Firethe Eve
of May,"
on
Beltaine,the Fires
lighting
of Bel," by a reading from
Yeats's
"Fergus, the
Druid," and so on throughout the eight numbers.
Each
illustrated pi"torially
a highlypoetic idea,
one
not
merely the copy of some
existingpainting,and
each was
as
"composed" as regarded its
carefully
technique of grouping, pose, symbolism of color,
be a poem
tail
or
etc., as would
symphony. In every deof costuming,settings
or
backgrounds and the
the aim was
than to deto suggest, rather
lighting,
the tableaux
that, for once,
pidi; the result was
stayedin their frames," and the spedators gained
world
efFeft.
of decorative
a
glimpse into a new
"

"

"

"

HANDICRAFT

i68

of
efFeft,

layalmost wholly
in the backgrounds and in the use of lightin a more
natural and beautiful way. These
sisted
backgrounds conand colors,
of gauzes
of varying thicknesses
to
arranged for each tableau in specialsequence,
suggest early dawn, sunrise, midnight and so on,
of the whole
while
back
series was
hung, always,
There
black velvet,which
gives no shadows.
being
of lightfrom
the gauzes,
reflexion
of
a
sense
no
and a real
imparted to the scenes
perspectivewas
background provided for the aftors,givingthem less
less detail but more
There
to compete
was
against.
beauty.
While
has been given, enough
but a bare outline
that in these performances
has been suggested
to show
the Societyof Arts and Crafts has taken, not
only
The

secret

step

of this

forward,
the

it presents

but

stage

as

a
a

of the

one

course,

step in

dirediion.

new

great popular school


best

ways

of

garding
Re-

of art,

educating the

standard
to a true
or
woman
ordinaryman
of beauty.Consideringthe small beginningsof four
limited resources,
the Society's
one
years ago and
but be impressedwith the wisdom
of the course
cannot
which
has led the Societyto its present positionwith
its greatlyincreased
opportunitiesfor service to the
community.

eye of the

SOCIETY

During
increased
been

OF

ARTS

the last year


from
67 to

held, one

AND

the

CRAFTS,

MELROSE

membership
Society's

has

exhibitions
have
129. Three
in June of last year of the previous

HANDICRAFT

class work,

winter's

and

169
exhibition

an

and

sale in November

justpast, an exhibition and


sale which
showed
improvement in quantity
and qualityof the work.
This comprised designsfor
various articles,
stenciling,
baskets,jewelry,wood carving,
leather work, pottery, lustre paintingon china,
weaving, and various kinds of lace and embroidery.
To
this we
fee
charged an admission,the entrance
being a pair of old rubbers, and the proceeds from
the sale of them
will go toward
the refurnishing
of
the Society's
rooms.
Last

on

November

May

15,
marked

it

feel that this has

to

our
rooms
open
Monday afternoon and

sale of articles each

for the
we

decided

was

successful
sufficiently

been

to

its continuance.

warrant

Classes

for instruction

have

been

formed

in

applied

design,embroidery,weaving, basketry,leather work


and wood
to add pottery,
carving,and we hope soon
metal
work
aiid book
binding to the list.
Our
bers
membership fee is one dollar per year and memjoiningclasses have been charged at the rate
dollars for six lessons.

of three

all been
have
into

without

met

liabilities have

special assessment,

sufficient balance

the

Our

in

our

treasury

to

and
carry

we
us

fall.

course

leftures

has

been

given us

at

Museum, one or two lediures have


been
given at the shop at regularclub meetings,and
have made
to the Bowl
rious
we
Shop and vapilgrimages
other craft shops.
Our
workshop and salesroom are located at 89 West
Emerson
Street,Melrose, in an unused stable which
the

Boston

of six free
Art

HANDICRAFT

I70

has

been

remodeled
partially

floor

we

have

and

the lower

and

the

and

all interested

for

work

for

serves

for

The

us

room

invite any
cordially
noon.
afterany Monday

on

GUILD

per
up-

class work,

exhibition,sale,tea

visit

HANDICRAFT

use.*
and

room

Society'smeetings.We
to

our

OF

MINNEAPOLIS

The

guildbeing a corporation instead of a society


different problem and
sarily
necespresents a somewhat
must
give a different report.

The

three

There

at

are

in the

remain

present

various
total

The

officers

twenty-one

of business
articles

the

greater appreciationand
the

on

part of the

While

the

traded

students

taken

the

heretofore.

people employed
is

in demand

creasing
steadilyin-

indicate

taste
discriminating

more

in

courses

handicraft

have

jewelryclasses
registration.

the
in

now

done

public.

various

lead

as

same

departments.

amount

and

the

metal

and

at-

have

school promises to be well attended


coming summer
from the
by enthusiastic workers, principally
adjacentstates.
attend this
distant states
A number
of people from
thus combining a vacation
session each summer,
trip
terest
with study.The
guild anticipatesan increased inin the school department with the coming of
Irwin
Maurice
the newly appointed direSor, Mr.
Flagg.In all departments a largepartofthe work exeThe

See

Handicraft for July,

1 1

HANDICRAFT

172

28

members,

professionalmembers, total,
41; making the present membership to date: life,
professional,257, donors, 3.
II, associate, 104,
exhibitions
held at
were
During the last summer
L. L, and, through
Bar Harbor, Chicago, Belleport,
the courtesy of Mrs.
Leonard, at Edgartown.
of the Societywas
In the fall the main aftivity
centrated
conthe specialexhibition. This, owing
upon
to the
a
cooperation of the members, was
success,
not
only from an artistic,but from the financial
point of view.
sociate

advancement

distin6t

made

was

the

in

management
of each

exhibition,in that the work

of this

supervisedby those
carefully
in charge of each
members
craft.
particular
bition
Interestingillustrated articles relatingto the exhiThe International
appeared in : Art and Progress^
department

was

Studio^Arts and

by

Decoration.

of the

work

The

more

energeticefforts

the

the

under

management

of

the

of

Miss

series of leftures
attended
largely

was

This

comments.

financial

of

The

by

Lefture

Committee

Mason.

Frank

received

materiallyaided
The

Alvah

Parsons

but favorable

none

of leftures realized

course

gain to

the

scription
sub-

stantial
sub-

Society.

has also instituted

course

basketry by Miss Mary Aldrich


Institute,which is being well attended.
in

lessons

Pratt

and

Committee

Lefture

The

been

Societyhas

conference

recent

for New

York"
a

at

number

on

which
of

an

"Industrial

there

were

important

refle"ted great credit upon

Art

of

School

speakers representing
educational
the committee

stitutio
in-

HANDICRAFT

and
to

173

undoubtedly started
definite

Since
has

conclusion

in the

first of

January

pushed

with

the
been

discussion

steps have

been

under

able

the

the

to

of

prove

the

mittee
com-

fit
bene-

great

financial

possiblya

and

members,

of

management

selefted,that this will


to

Society

of the

vigor,and definite
hold during the summer
to
a
at
pelled,
Newport. It is fullyex-

exhibit
the

work

renewed

taken

comprehensive

future.

near

the

will lead

which

success

Society.

NORWELL

SOCIETY

OF

ARTS

AND

CRAFTS,

NORWELL,

MASSACHUSETTS

The

Norwell

Societyof

Arts

beginning in the autumn


basketry consistingof

ten

part of the social work

of

Rev.

the

by
that
So

interest

possible to

A
a
a

ladies

class in

started

was

First Parish

the

as

Church

its pastor

Drummond,

form

buildingwas
very reasonable
work
shop, or

had

this

no

this amount,
was

shown

was
a

ladies in the

stage, and
We

A.

when

1906

its

at

time.
much

many

Chester

of

had

Crafts

and

that

society of
town

offered for sale

buildingwas

thought

was

and

arts

crafts

skilled needle

were

price in the
salesroom,

it

just at

very
if we

best

as

ers.
work-

this time

for

location

for

arrived

purchased

for

at

that

;^300.

but interested friends loaned


us
money,
and in January, 1907, the Norwell
Society

incorporatedunder

the laws

of Massachusetts.

HANDICRAFT

174

For

first

the

two

only,but much was


the community
raise the
the
will

to

money
account

that

state

done
in

for

of baskets

social way

to

terest
in-

the

undertaking and to
To
the building.
dense
conin this direction
in the treasury

money

the last payment


upon
It was
found
necessary

consisted

in

pay for
of our
work

have

we

work

our

years

to

we

meet

building.
while establishing
market
a
and
crafts work
to
accept "gift shop"
addition. The
principallines are baskets,

arts

work

in

both

reed

our

carved
and cut
ed
leather,braidraffia,
chet
rugs, bayberrycandles,stenciled linens,Irish croand

The

and

embroideries.

only twelve
The

is

summer

days of

fifteen

or

of

consists

Societynow

the Marshfield

workers

are

to

any

but

extent.

of greatest

and the
aftivity
Fair our
Agricultural
days of

time

our

members,
fifty

over

harvest.
The

Salesroom

in Norwell

from

5.30

to

Each

year has shown


business. An endeavor
the
Last
with

shop open
July we
the

proved

rooms
a

source

every
had the
open

of

from
an

has

been

open

days
Fri-

on

June 17 to OSober
encouraging increase

will be made

this year
through July and

to

15.
in

have

day
August.
exhibit for ten days,
traveling
each day from
3 to 5.30. It
interest and
inspirationto our

members.

basketryhave been secured from time


and
time
to
quite latelyconsiderable interest has
in the al*t of dyeing.
been
shown
We
a reputationfor
hope to succeed in establishing
vegetabledyes,although as yet our atpermanent
Teachers

in

HANDICRAFT

have

tempts
make

to

been

crude

feel that

us

HANDICRAFT

175

succeed

can

we

WORKERS
NEW

just enough

with

if we

success

persevere.

PETERBOROUGH,

OF
HAMPSHIRE

Peterborough,New
Hampshire, are justat the close of another year's,
successful
from every point of view
work, the most
four
in the historyof the Society.We
have
now
departments: Italian cut work, baskets, rugs and a
last year.
added
domestic
department which was
This
department comprises home-made
jellies,
serves
preand picklesand it is our intention to add to this
the coming year fine sewing. Another
venture
new
The

the

Handicraft

which

past year
of

opening

Workers

tea

carried

room.

with
This

great favor
served

also

was

the

sales

as

Societyand this plan will be


beginning
through the coming season

for the work

room

met

of

out

of the

JulyI.

THE

ARTS

Purpose

AND

The

Philadelphiaa
be

had;

to

To
and

CRAFTS

GUILD

OF

PHILADELPHIA

of the Guild are


purposes
place where
good crafts

crafts

workers,

raise the standard

to

work

give to
may

market

for their duction.


proof beauty in dailylife

help the publicto an appreciationof the principles


of good design expressed by sympathetic
craftsmanship.
controlled
Guild and Shop are
Management: The
the Shop manby a board of six directors to whom
to

HANDICRAFT

176

of efficiency
responsiblefor the standard
in the Shop. No
articles are allowed
maintained
in
until they have passed
the Shop for sale or exhibition
of 20^
the Guild
is charged
jury. A commission
sales which
bership
on
together with the associate memfor paying the rent,
fees is used
manager
of Shop. The
Guild
and generalrunning expenses
is

ager

is

not

in the

run

there

be

used

for

surplusincome
the improvement

become

eleded, five Guild


and

to

are

Four
one

associate

teas

have

invited.

the

Guild

new

have

tenants

be eledied

the past year the


under
the laws
of

member

has

applied for

the annual

at

members

Guild

have

ing.
meet-

joined and

temporarilyresigned.Seven
given to which associates and

in the

Guild

The

arts

and

Studios

crafts
were

on

been

ship
member-

Guild

has

been

interested

property and

During

associate

new

be

aims.

incorporated

Pennsylvania. One

it would

time,

of Guild

Achievements:

has

individual; should

any

of its educational

Year's

Guild

at

furtherance
Past

of any

interest

others

movement

view

were

and

visitors

encouraged to go over the whole premises.The Shop


capacityhas been doubled and the old Shop made
available. Improvements in heatingand ing
more
lighthave

been

installed and
increased

jewelry.The

new

value

case

of

the

added
stock

for the
has

cessitated
ne-

expensive policyof insurance, and


more
complete prote"tionagainst fire and burglary.
All these necessary
improvements have added to the
a

more

running expenses
baldlyneeded. The

and

Shop

new

associate

sales from

members

April 19

10-

are

April

HANDICRAFT

177

;g7,oi6.oo,an increase of ;J936.ooover


the sales of the precedingyear.
exhibitions :
of special
The
Guild has held a number
Country-house Furnishings,April*,Baskets, May;
also
Italian
Work
Lace
in November,
Pottery,
sale
Jewelry and Silver Work
; February 6th, Special
1

191

were

Grueby Potteries; Exhibition of


March
of
Guild Work,
6th; TravellingExhibition
the National League of Handicraft
Societies,March,
togetherwitha SpecialExhibition of Silver by Arthur
of Newcomb

and

J. Stone,

of Boston.

Guild

The

planning for specialexhibitions to


and hopes to
each month
occur
during 1911-1912
crafts workers
and designers
by eminent
arrange ledures
in the Shop.
to be held at intervals

OF

SOCIETY

is

ARTS

Portland

The

AND

Societyof

Arts

five members,
of twenty
having been added during the
Ten

up

mere

MAINE

PORTLAND,

CRAFTS,

Crafts

and

sists
con-

now

members

eight new
past year.

ness
regularbusitaken
the followingsubje"tswere
programme,
Danish
eries,
embroid: hand
weaving,Indian basketry,
Navajo blankets,Japanese water colors,Cashand Paisley
shawls, dress accessories,old china

and

been

meetings have

Maine

Society,we

gems.
have

held. After

there

As

member

The

workers
of

take

up

felt that

design as

few

workers

paid specialattention

of the different crafts with


each

are

the

one

the end

in view

the

the
of

study
having

of them.

theyneeded

basis

to

in

for the

edge
thorough knowl-

crafts and

class

HANDICRAFT

178
of

designwas formed to study Dr. Ross' Theory of


Pure Design.They are beginningto applytheir principles
and are
doing very good work.
Affiliation with
the League has given us
a
good
standingin the community.
Handicraft
book

to

have
the

most

been

circulated

Societyare

the

among

bers
mem-

month.

every
The

and

stores

members

ing
placed on sale in the leadthe subscriptionsamong
the
increased. The
copies belonging

been

has

important
given in one

opening of

the

Memorial.

This

event

of the

Art

new

of the year

at
galleries

L.

Museum,

exhibition

included

the

was

hibition
ex-

the

formal

M.

Sweat

D.
the

work

of

craftsmen, such as china,bookbinding,Irish


crochet, point lace, jewelry,beadwork, stenciling,
Maine

ecclesiastical embroidery, wood


ing,
carvilluminating,
basketry,stained glass,embroidery,tooled and
illuminated
leather and weaving, and the traveling
exhibition
from
the National
League of Handicraft
Societies. The
work
consisted
jury for the Maine
of Mrs. Bertha
W.
sie
Quimby, Saco, and Misses JesL. Thompson
and Helen
M. Near, Portland.
This exhibition which
the first the Societyhas
was
held was
thusiasm
simplyan introduction. A great deal of enthe visitors and we
among
encouraged with the results of our work.
was

much
are

very fortunate
in which

to
a

aroused

to

assist the
museum

in

exhibit

Portland

school

having such

for

the

craftwork

feel
We

beautiful building
and

we

hope

Societyof Art in establishing


the study of designand representation.

HANDICRAFT

i8o

craftsman

members,

pay

for the

Our

exhibition

nominal

benefit of the

for the
fee

beingcharged to

of materials.

cost

successful

March

and

during February

and

sale which

held

was

in

May

was

its exhibits

one,

being the results of


workers
during the past

the labors of the craftsman


winter.
The

December

consignors,while
to

club

the

the

members

submitted

and

The

invitations

most

attractive and

members
and

to

see

the

consider

for this

of work
with

exhibition

each member

of articles

and

from

honor.
sale

were

was

promotion

that

the

members

who

are

of artistic work.

Handicraft
and

that

Club

is made

its affairs

are

up

mirably
ad-

committees, one
managed by competent
committee
tions
subscripbeing appointed to secure
which
for Handicraft,
nestly
magazine we are earendeavoring to support.

ARTS

The

maintained

was

limited

was

results of the club's workers

the

of enthusiastic

new

standard

Island

vite
to inprivileged
made
it possiblefor many
nonguest, which
of the club house
to
enjoy the hospitality

strivingfor
We

Rhode

springexhibition
althoughthe number

smaller, the

was

jury'sviewpoint

one

included

exhibition

work

AND

CRAFTS

of the

Rockford

SOCIETY,

Arts

ROCKFORD

and

Crafts

Society

active duringthe past year.


particularly
annual
fore,
heretoInstead
exhibition
of holdingan
as
room
salesthe societytried to establish a permanent
in "Craft
Cottage." Repairs on the cottage

has

not

been

HANDICRAFT

i8i

long in being completed,owing to no fault


before it felt
December
of the Society,that it was
in throwing open
its doors to the public.
justified
found in obtainingarticles,
was
Thegreatestdifficulty
craft workers
had alreadyplaced their work
most
as
had
and our
members
own
comparativelylittle.A
carried also,
very good line of Japanese printswas
salable than anything
and these proved much
more
were

so

feel that

else. We

maintain

cannot

have

we

that

salesroom
a
successfully
Rockford.
People do not

work

of merit

in

home

workers.

Articles

been

demonstrated

unsalable

here

for craft

support
dollars

ten

at

we

Chicago, placed at fifteen,


bought
purchasers and returned to Rockford.
by Rockford
standard
We
have kept our
high and shall continue
find the
do so as long as our
to
societyexists. We
purchasingpublicunable to discriminate between the
sham
manufactured
articles and the
high-at-any-price
dition
fair-priced,
honestly-madearticle. The financial conof our
tinue
societydoes not permit us to conthe public by maintaining
to
try to educate
salesroom
of merit ; it has therefore been
a
entirely
have

sent

to

discontinued.
The
a

Societyowns

weaver,

rugs
There

one

of its

during the

loom

and

members,

intervals

at

who

has

made

many

year.

have

been

during

the

classes
months

in craft work

would

in

sign
metal, basketryand de-

since

Christmas.

have

been

pupilshad applied.
Each
Sunday morning we have
devoted
to
art
topics,with

space

classes

employs

Other

started if any
in

announcements

per
newspaof

HANDICRAFT

i8z

exhibitions,

Chicago
and

work

bits

Regular

for

Several

preceded

by

Plans

for

of

Salon."

March:

Temples."
and
of
with
Rockford.

the

Arts

discussion

following

officers,

"The

February

the

Institute."
of

conditions

Art."

George
"Art
of

been
crease
inhas

sion
Discusof

ment
DevelopJanuary:
Old

"Some

May:

gramme.
pro-

Report

illustrations.

with

have

November:

Year.

of

by

programme

of

"Industrial

Illustrations

ing
even-

consequent

December:

Weaving/*

French

"The

the

Monday

meetings

Election

their

Society.

followed

with

The

Conference.

Chicago

these

supper

Oftober:

given.
of

picnic

first

the

and

own

our

business,

times

attendance.

in

been

held

are

month

artists

on

concerning

news

meetings
each

of

of

comments

World

April:

ments
"Com-

Inness

tion
Collec-

and

faftory

Labor"

girls

in

HANDICRAFT

THE

183

DEERFIELD

FAIR

"mid-summer

WHEN

Valley

in the Connecticut

comes

plan

we

pilgrimageto

our

Old

the

over

Deerlield,and whether
we
go a-foot
from
ferryand the mountain, or by trolley

Greenfield
four

the

Northampton,

or

quarters

of

the

or

automobile

by

inhabited

from

earth, we

meet

footingin the old street, and mingle


at a fair. For
as
something like a fair of the Middle
of
ages it is,perhaps, this displayof the handiwork
the Deerfield people, wrought through the year to
for the delightand the
be put forth at mid-summer
approvalof visitors and friends. And as in the Middle
Ages the fair goer had keen appreciationof the work
on

of

common

the

craftsmen,

preponderance

Deerfield

at

so

of those

who

have

shall find

we
an

terest
inintelligent

and

Let
this

understandingof the work.


which
each year
us
join the crowd
secluded
little valleytown
and go up

with

the

them

the exhibits
with
at

of Deerfield
the

Frankfort

excellent
of the
The

houses

knowledge that as
at Nuremberg
were

finest modern

and

street

at

the
wares

shall

we

out

down

nearly all

handiwork, equipped

merit,in Deerfield

vance
in ad-

great fair
of

find

most
some

craftsmanship.

great attraction
of the

Deerfield
with
of

or

which

street

one

seeks

this year is the memorial


bition
exhipaintingsof George Spencer Fuller,a

painterwhose

the old

town

paintingswhich

close and

renders
would

more

humble

affiliation

a group
interesting

otherwise

be

of unusual

HANDICRAFT

i84

merit; and
Road

Albany
and

color

Then

our

the
and

its booths

on

Street,where

shops

poetry

fair discloses

our

little of the

the

on

utterly
delightedwith the
greetingfrom these canvases.

onto

out

Bam

Crafts

be

to

of

the

into

troop

we

of

primness

its New

sent
a
England setting,
qualitynot wholly abwhen
for by
we
get inside,yet amply atoned
called to see, and by
are
we
beauty of the wares
generalair of comfort and happiness which pervades

the
the

the
The

staid gray posters


of the different
have

may

give us
houses,

of the

map

and

wise

are

we

town.

imbued

the
go down
nettingand tufted work

field for
at

blankets

end

and

feast of eye
insistent
more
with

The

dainties

Mrs.

north

end

we

Then

if

spirit,

Henry's
ing
(overlook-

Meadows,

the

chosen

swain) to

Miss

Arms's

find

woven

woolen

the old street, with


and a fine brick
houses

old

gray

sandwiches, ice
of that

ancient

appreciatedby
reed

nickle

festival

true

tents
con-

sign invitingyou to
and mind, and occasionally
a
sign of
character
callingyou to tarry and

list of Deerfield

raffia and

for

from

you may
all down

will find the

and

and

trees

church, you

commune

where

rugs. And

great shade

known

and

painter,botanist

the south

other

North

wonderful

those

the

and

names

guide us.

the

street
at

and
to

with

shall

we

street

the

and

feminine

countless

activities

willow

cream,

runs

baskets

cakes

and

handiwork

generations.
large:netting,
in great variety,

bayberry candles, pottery, stenciled


fabrics,photographs,blue and white needlework,
painting,etching,etc. And this year, too, Deerfield
woven

rugs,

HANDICRAFT

has

show

to

adding,
actual
is

it

is

the

best

who

interesting

touch

making

show

gives

is

At

any

interest

their
which

Deerfield,

held

there,

rate,

in

the

we

say:

probably,
and

variety

charm

of
that

say

ty
beau-

surrounding,
such

no

else

anywhere

visitor

crafts,

manufacture.

any

it is certain

the

to

open

to

at

in

exposed,

wares

ethical

in

show

ever

know.

the

of

at

distinctly good

those

and

of

process

It

the

always,

its workers

of

some

you

as

185

hibit
ex-

in

this

country.

is

always

and

so

easier

than

word

must

interest

of

blue

the

developments
for

the

the

medieval
the

fairs

of

in

spirit

said

white

this

of

little

There's

doing

the

see

of

which
the

walled
the

Mrs.

same

it: Deeriield

craftsmanship.

Deerlield
cities
love
has

the

of

Deer-

the

Queer-

has

missed

nent
perti-

more

with

good
much

the
and

Germany

caught

and

value.
to

exhibit
of

new

Allen,

been

Wynne
all

its

much

Howl,

makes

of

of
has

Helium

with

Misses

the

who

them,

over

designs,

new

note

workers

extraordinary

year,

its

new

he

the

for

and

that

samplers

touch

the

of

said

be

methods

to

Deerlield

the

sitting in judgment
and

comparing

France.
fun

be

failed

and

cuss

of

distinctly

also

and

work

photographs

show

may

field

in

recent

which
It

the

of

Appreciation

work

and
of

the

HANDICRAFT

i86

SOCIETY

BIOGRAPHIES

ROCKFORD

ARTS

AND

CRAFTS

SOCIETY

Rockford

Arts and Crafts Society


(Illinois)
was
organized April 7, 1905, with a
membership of live.Itsobjedwas to encourage

THE
handicraft.

Officers

elected, a

were

constitution

adopted and the society


spent the followingsummer
in weekly meetings for the study of design.
In the fall of the same
creased
inyear the membership was
to
fourteen, eight a"tive and six associate
the first exhibition
members, and in December
was
held.

classes

Study

lines of

craft

by

of

times.

always

limited

for exhibition.
educational

of great

pictureshave
made
largely
one

with

us

also been
up

once.

Three

held and

of articles from

one

tribes

The
of

has
and

been
uable
inval-

traveling
Handicraft

exhibitions
of Indian
once

of

craft,

inhabiting

Illinois.

northern
At

visited

This

worth

maintaininga high standard.


exhibition
of the National
League
has

the

to

ing
year. A jury consistfive a"tive members
pass

in

Societies

various

is held each

submitted

be

to

stated

at

sale,not

presidentand

all work

found

and

along

sional
occayear, with
criticism of articles made

submitted

members,

of the
on

nearly every

and

exhibition

work

work

and

members

An

been

discussion

frank

conducted

have

time

two

craft work
a

week

belongingto the societyfilled


to the public schools,resent
maining
in each building.
Sometimes
two

cases
were
or

HANDICRAFT

i88

all

Here

meetingsand exhibitions of the Societyare


held,and classes in jewelry,metal, basketry,
pottery
and designare conducted.
Here also is a loom owned
to order, and
by the societywhere rugs are woven
for exhibitions
The

and

committee

programme
at the

held

These

month.
which

supper,

announces

beginningof

meetings are
each

sales.

has

The

the

the year, and

its

gramme
pro-

the

ular
reg-

first Monday

are

often

been

found

followingis

evening of
preceded by a picnic
an

the

inducement

in

tendance.
at-

given

programme

this year:

Eleftion of officers.
Announcements,

October:
of
November:
December:

plans for year.


Report of the Chicago conference.
"The
Development of Weaving"

cussion
Dis-

with

illustrations.

January: "The
February:"Some

old world

"Industrial

March:

Salon."

French

Art."

April:Comments

on, and

Inness

of the Art

May:

coUedion
"Art

One

and labor"

educational

the establishment
issue of

George

Institute.
of conditions

Rockford.

branch
of

illustrationsof,the

with discussion

fadory girlsof

among

Temples."

an

local newspaper.
of and
notices
a

of the
art

column

societywork
in each

In this column

was

Sunday

ments
announce-

pertainingto exhibitions
on
throughoutthe country are givenand comments
artists and their work
lating
remade, also bits of news
to the local society.
The
including
membership at present numbers
thirty,
adlive,associate

and

student

members.

HANDICRAFT

WITH

189

THE

SOCIETIES

Mr. Arthur J. Stone recentlyfinished


BOSTON:
the gold racingtrophy from
designby Mr. C.
Howard

WaJkq^,

number.

This

is

which

illustrated in the

was

July

of three

ciety
trophieswhich the Soand
Crafts
of Arts
suppliedto the Eastern
Yacht
Club, the other two
being of silver. This
piece is of 14-carat gold throughout and stands on
modore
an
presented by Comebony pedestal,and was
F. Lewis
New
times.

London
Each

miniatures

This

Arts

conference.
work

shown

one

held

Marblehead

with

the

the

schooner
be

must

from

race

three

won

of the

silver-gilt
tograph
largertrophy in the phoone

notable

of the

for the three

selefted

and

receives

by

The

for the

Clark

winner

proved

exhibition
Fine

to

one

piecesat

the

recent

of
Society in the Museum
weeks
followingthe League

Exhibit

included

twenty

almost

cases

of

entirelyfrom the permanent


exhibition
of the Society,since the invitation from
the Museum
late to permit members
too
to
came
make
A number
of fine
important objectsespecially.
of them
made
rowed
borto
order, were
examples, many
for the occasion, such as the lovingcup and
silver fish tray lent by President Eliot,the silver and
gold vase and salver lent by Miss Marlow, the tea
service lent by Mr. Increase E. Noyes
all the work
of Mr.
Stone; the tea service by Mr. George C.
which
lent by Mr. and Mrs.
Gebelcin
Groswas
venor
Ely; the tea and coffee service (a Paul Re"

HANDICRAFT

I90

model) made

by Mr. George J. Hunt and lent


by Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Ayer; the silver and enamel
boxes
lent
by Miss Elizabeth Copeland which were
by Mrs. Montgomery Sears and the remarkable
collar and pendant of moonstones
mounted
in platinum
verc

the
was

lent

of Mr.

work

by

Mrs.

also lent

Eben

and

D.

Mrs.

F. A.

Shaw, which

Jordan. Mrs.

Fitch

bert
Gil-

and diamonds,
pendant of acqua marine
mounted
in platinum,the work
of the Shaws.
the two
In addition
of jewelry and
four
to
cases
of silverware,there were
of rarely
two
cases
cases
beautiful bookbindings,the work
largelyof Misses
Sears and St. John; three cases
of pottery, one
of
leather,one of embroidery,two of wrought iron and
of brass and copper
and a case
of printingand
two
the whole
On
felt that the exit was
hibit
illuminating.
of the dignified
a
was
splendiddemonstration
craftsman
has achieved.
positionwhich the modern
looked
visitor said,"The
As
so
one
things never
that they need the museum
well and it only shows
background and the surroundings they get here to
bring out their true value and worth." Surelyno one
could ask for higherpraise!

Bourne:

The

first season

Old

Colony

of free instruction

Union
to

has

opened
members, with

its
the

followingprogramme:
ing
(each consistwill start on
of twenty
Saturday,July
lessons)
8,with the followingschedule :Monday,8. 30-1 0.30,
Design; Tuesday, 8.30-10.30, Basketry; Wednes-

The

Summer

Courses

for

Children

HANDICRAFT

191

day, 8.30-10.30, Reticelli; Thursday, 8.30-10.30,


Basketry; Friday, 8.30-10.30, Embroidery; all in
Manomet
Hall.
Union
Saturday, Old
Colony
Grounds, 8.30, Poultry and Agriculture.
The

Courses

Summer
of

in

with

lessons)will

twenty

Manomet

adults

for

Hall, Bourne,

(each
be

held

will

and

course

temporarily

Monday,
Design, Mrs. Lila Swift; Tuesday, 1"3
Miss
Valentine; Wednesday,
1"3
Madame
Pelligrini;
Thursday, 1-3
Miss
Valentine; Friday, 1-3 p.m..
Mrs.

Walker;

Miss

Wilson.

Club

The
for

members,

Union

hundred

tea

ketry,
Bascelli,
Reti-

p.m.,

ketry,
Bas-

p.m..

ery,
Embroid-

ing,
Loom-weav-

reading

room

will

room,

Club

the

on

Members

present.

and

history of
July 4, with

grounds,

The

athletic
the

sports,
bake

given by
Old
to

and

was

Senator

Colony
be

known

of

friends, gathered

be

ball

Nye,

the

the

under

game
an

the

Union

is

The

morning
after

Old

about

pines

Cod

clam

pieces,
there

luncheon.

interestingaddress
of the day.
orator
issue a monthly
to
Bourne

five

Union,

the

enjoyed a Cape
band, of twenty-seven

served

as

The

and

Sagamore
played throughout the day. In

The

p.m..

p.m..

the

in

held

was

families

bake.

and

function

persons

their

p.m..

contains

salesroom

first social

Colony

on

which

1"3

1"3

10,

early in August.

opened
The

Friday,

House,

July

start

schedule:

following

the

sisting
con-

Bulletin,

were

fore
Bewas

letin,
bul-

HANDICRAFT

192

Carolina:

South

Charleston,

the last

At

ing
meet-

for the year of Handicraft


Guild, the President's
the past year's
annual
only summarized
report not
but

reviewed

its

the

Medieval

Guilds

years'work.
The
Guild
was
organized with the specificobje"Sl
in view
of working up to the requiredstandard
of
the best arts and crafts societies and
ing
then, accordits constitution,to be merged into the more
to
comprehensive organization.
ings
During the past two years it has had monthly meetfrom
November
through May at which time,
after business
was
transa"^ed, some
subje6lrelative
important events,

to

handicrafts

discussed.

or

It affiliated with

its first year


It

sent

and

was

the National

subscribed

creditable

very

two

for

exhibition

read

League

or

ing
dur-

Handicraft.
the

to

chian
Appala-

Expositionin Knoxville,Tennessee, and has


five regularsale and exhibitions
and the Traveling
craft
Exhibition
of the National
League of Handi-

had

Societies.

During the

ing
charmpast year the Guild enjoyeda most
address by Mr. Austin
S. Garver, President
of

the School
which

was

of

Design of

full of

(which

had

the Worcester

encouragement

Art
and

Museum,

useful

gestions
sug-

In April the
requested).
Guild listened with intense delightto the sparkling
and fascinating
talk of Mrs. Madeline
Yale Wynne,
who
by request gave an outline of the founding of
the Deerfield
Societyof Arts and Crafts and then
word pi"lurcsof some
of her
gave most
illuminating
recent
experiences in the far east, mentioning particularly
Oriental jewelry
motifs and workmanbeen

"

HANDICRAFT

ship,and at

193

the urgent request of the

showed
president,

of her

which
she
exquisitepersonalornaments
Her
had designed and executed.
magnetic personality
and beautiful work
to every
were
an
inspiration
C. Putnam
Annie
also spoke
one
present. Miss
and
afternoon
brieflyto the Guild the same
gave
valuable suggestionsin answer
to specialquestions.
of Handicraft
During the past year work by members
some

Guild

has been

submitted

for criticism

to

bers
mem-

of three

and
Its

recognized societies of arts and crafts


it has measured
up to the requirements.
mous
obje"lhaving been attained the Guild by unaniof

consent

meeting

became
and

of Arts

all members

merged

its last
at
present
into the Charleston
Guild

Crafts.

elected: President and


followingofficers were
^Mlss Eola Willis,(Founder);
Secretary
Corresponding
First Five- President^
Mrs.R.L.
Honour; Second FiceLa
Bruce; Recording Secre^
President^Mrs. J. W.
Catherine
Miss
Hey ward; Treasurer
tary^ Miss
The

Ethel
The

Andrews.

Charleston
a

salesroom

Jury

of selection

man^

Miss

Anna

Guild

of Arts

in the

and

tain
Crafts will main-

fall and

following is the
: Miss
Margaret Waring, ChairGilliland,Miss Elizabeth
Quale.

r
NOTICE
The
in the

name

July

of the author
issue

was

of "A

Pageantof Spring"
omitted. Apoloinadvertently

HANDICRAFT

194

gies
the

due

are

conduct

who
etc.,

hours,
hant

Clara

Dyar

who

contributed

article.

Societies

rooms,

Miss

to

to

etc.,

Mrs.

Lynn,

street,
for
of

invited

are

members

Women's

salesrooms,

summer

to

send

Bessie

information
Brown

Massachusetts,
of

Clubs.

the

New

ing
regard-

Cobb,
who

tea

wishes

England

lo

Naformation
in-

eration
Fed-

HANDICRAFT

196

\
The
and

Plumb

Miss

raising

other

used

be

to

in

members

two

of

of
fund

Baltimore

of

her

exhibitions,

Mr.

three

examples

purchase

committee

and

of

of

reported
Miss

were.

vestigate
in-

to

icraft
hand-

that,

the

Julia Lippitt

J. Templeman

Coolidge

Jr.,

Boston.

Voted:

concerning

wished

to

regard
their

place
given

responses
to

Garland

Mrs.

that

Society

the

reply

the

to

Handicraft

on

The

appreciation

of

her

by

secretaries

Traveling

the

magazine.

record

her

from

letter

of

Exhibition

lists

Secretary
the

prompt

societies

League

and

Detroit

of

officers

societies.

adjourned.

Meeting

Nelly
N.B.

of

committee

to

traveling

Providence,

Mauran,

Graves

Miss

Detroit.

chairman

as

the

from

letters

of

Garland

Mrs.

of

read

Secretary

The

August

meeting

Ferguson

will

be

Conant,
omitted.

Secretary,

in

of

I* SEP

13

ism

HAN^IjC
VOL.

IV

SEPTEMBER

THE

UTILITY
POPULAR

IN
a

STONES.
J.

OF

OUR

II*

DEACON

article written

former
to

SOME

OF

LOUIS

NO.

I9II

craftsworkers

the idea of gesting


sugthe possibilities
of procuring
with

motifsfor their work in tramps afield or


leisure rambles,at no
further cost
than the trouble
of an intelligent
of waysiderocks and stones
scrutiny
and the slight
ting
lapidaryexpense entailed in the cutand polishing,
the subje""l
of quartz was
pretty
well threshed out and yet not exhaustively.
So many beautiful examples are passedby with hardly
a
glancethat it might be instructiveto call attention
of the peculiar
formations
know
to one
as "conglomerate"
or
or

even

combinations
other

minerals

"Pudding-stone" is
rock

common

and

of quartz with other quartz


the name
as
implies.

the

best

will often

known
be found

of this rather
in the

form

largepebbles showing smaller


inclusions of varyingcolored quartz or jasperpebbles
of contrasting
ural
hues, held togetherin a sort of natof small

holders

element

or

or

matrix.

Sections of this rock

when

selected and then cut en cabochon make


properly
very
odd if not interesting
gems.
In a locality
and rock crystal
where
quartz crystals
abound, it is frequently
possibleto find sections of
* See

Handicraft for April, 1

1 1

HANDICRAFT

198

rocks, in

most

cases

with

slate

trap

or

covered

or

crusted
en-

sparklingcrystalsof varying
shades
of color, usually
to the base
rock,
pertaining
although frequentlyamethystine or of the smoky
cairngorm shade.
This
form
while
not
exactly a conglomerate, is
known
terial
as
drusy quartz and a specimen of this maselected so that the outer
surface shows
carefully
either a flat or somewhat
convex
shape,maybe sliced
out, and the base finished off leavingthe sparkling
surface in its natural state, making a most
unusual
"gem."
The
iron pyritesin the fine,small
"drusy" form
utilized

been

have

minute

to a

considerable

extent

in this

same

jewelersand curio dealers in


by enterprising
the highthe coal regions of Pennsylvania under
of " Pennsylvaniadiamonds."
sounding name
phur
This material owing to the great percentage of sulin its composition tarnishes
readilyand has
other jewelry,especsome
tendency to contaminate
ially
that set in silver,in its proximity after some

manner

little time.
To

humble

if

one

use

may

being cast

wayside are not all


be expected, neither
aside, for nearlyany

of

hardness

stone

the

by
as

may

sufficient

pleasingcolor
checks
the

surrenders

observing,nature

treasures,

Stones

of

is

who

one

be

may

result in

Many

an

old

and

free from

worthy

most

cases

abandoned

of the

will

such

many

homily.

an

suitable for
are

all

ment
treat-

deserving

clear translucent

bear

grinding,of a
damaging cracks and
attention and
lapidist's
be highlysatisfadlory.
to

quarry,

limestone

pit

or

HANDICRAFT

200

hair lines. This

or

makes

and
very pleasingstone
the slate itself is rather soft and hardly suitable

while

where much
is encountered, yet
wear
settings
the feldspar
sometimes
white quartz givesan added
or
strengthto the stone and renders it quitesuitable.
for

rich green, fairly


hard stone;
serpentine,
of mossy
translucence
milky,mottled and sometimes

Chromite,

to rich leek green


color,closelyrelated
pale cream
Zealand
to
nephrite or New
jade;and as before
of all colors;the black or
mentioned, the jaspers
very

dark

grey chert

or

flint often veined

with

white

hair

of various
feldspars
shades,often showing a chatoyancyorcat's eye efFed
when
properlycut; fine grainedlimestone,pinkish,
bluish and other shades; are all not often appreciated
eflFefts.
but yieldreally
very handsome
lines

of

quartz;

quartz;

rose

while often beautiful


Barites,fluorites and calcites,
in color and quiteabundant, especially
where
erns
cavare

the

located

(theviolet

amethyst

and

and

emerald

green

shades

in

hues) are
althoughif extreme

hardlysuitable for gems,


be execised by experiencedlapidists
to cut
stridUyaccordingto the cleavagelines,some

really
care

and

little close attention

polish

success

be attained.
may
mentioned
All the stones
a

ing
rival-

often be found
may
in the ordinarywalks or

with
bles
ram-

se"fcions of the country


and
all or
nearlyall will reward the searcher by yieldingwhat
in various

well be termed
''out-of-the-ordinary
gems."
may
let it be stated that one
of the richest
In conclusion
and

most

fine gem
beds

sources
surprising

stones

of New

will be the

for the

dry or even
England mountain

findingof really
running gravelly
streams!

HANDICRAFT

Tourmalines,

beryls,

etc.,

etc.,

pebbles,

are

pebble

the

the

fragment,
off

and

worn

solid

most

easily
A

is

and

form
the

surfaces

leaving,

away,

here

usually

superficial

compact

of
in

the

last

and

of

shape

that

reason

solid

most

been

speak,

to

the

piece,

the

for

having
so

jasper

quartz,

chipped

the

core

purity

of

the

writer

time

will

or

which

is

apparent.

stream

as

bed

is

careful

the

wholesome

recommended

pleasure.

seldom

passed

examination

an

profitable

Many
for

found

advantageous
found

forms

various

frequently

very
as

201

hours

enrichment

have
of

recreation

to

all

as

been

thus

would

spent

shelves

cabinet

gained:
who

by

pradlice

combine

as

out
withallow.

as

for

well
the

which

profit

is
with

HANDICRAFT

202

NOTES

ON

TION

OF

HIGH

SCHOOL

PRODUC-

"MIDSUMMER

NIGHT'S

DREAM"
HELEN

Played by
and

the students

by
properties

PLUMB

of the Western

the Detroit

High

Societyof

Arts

School
and

j costumes

Crafts

June,

1911.

STENDHAL
was

once

asked

whether

he

had

a"ted. "Yes,
Shakespeare perfeftly
once:
playersin a barn;"
by a band of strolling
still think, with
those who
and there are
Stendhal,
best for Midsummer
that mediocre
playersserve
who
only suggest what the
Night's Dream; players
fancy shall fillin; instead of great a"^ors
play-goer's
and gets in the
whose
personality
overpowers
way.
Only a few weeks ago, a group of high school boys
assisted by the Societypf Arts and Crafts,
and girls,
in giving,in a rustic setting,
succeeded
a
ance
performof Midsummer
which, if not
Night's Dream
brilliant histrionically,
the most
was
naivelydramatic;
tions
which, happilyignorantboth of Shakespeare tradifull of vital signiand stage conventions, was
ficance
and remarkable
pictorial
beauty;and which
frequentersof the regular
gave to several constant
play-housesan hour or two of esthetic delightquite
of anything which
these houses
the range
outside
ever

had
But

in

to

seen

offer.

mer
impressions one gets from seeingMidsumperformed,are so wide
Night'sDream, however
the specthat,once
tator
range, so infinite in variety,
has peeped through the leaves of the enchanted
the

HANDICRAFT
all the

forest,he sees
thought spread
can

that

stares, "with

the

lover and

exchange

to

fabulous

or

beast, with

in the

lap of

for

part;

the

out

throughthe

angry

ass's

of
veyor
sur-

magic garden

how

one

world

ordnance

see

his loved

amorous

the

scale;instead,one

to
at

eyes

Shakespeare comedy," to
fairies and fools,flitin and
how

No

him.

country

amazed

of

kingdoms

before

out

map

203

lords

rest

and

of

ladies,

tall

trees

in the shadows

words;

and

head, layshead

how
and

ears

the

Fairy Queen.
But it is time to say something of the vital part of
the exquisite
one's pleasure,
pleasureof eye and mind:
tors.
something,too,of the performance of the youthfulacThe
English department of the Western
High
School of Detroit,feelingthat,in a very real sense,
would
a
productionof Midsummer
Night's Dream
provide a motive for regularclass work, made their
choices
solelyfor the educational value. It became
and an incentive
at once
to the whole
an
inspiration
considered
honor
be cast
to
school,and it was
an
a

when

of

one

the

obligedto drop out, half a dozen


the place.Miss
Mary Farnsworth
school

the
"

the

and

orchestra
Mendelssohn

offered

chorus

eleven

fairies

eagerlyfor

sprang
was

head

furnished

settingbeing used

interested

assistance.

As

was

the

coach;
the

sic
mu-

one
every-

"

time

for

for June 15, drew


set
performance, which was
of the School, Mr. William
A.
near, the Principal
realized that all their
Morse, and Miss Farnsworth
efforts would
for nothing, or very little,
if
count
they had to relyon the inadequateand unsuitable
the

local costumer;

and

all were

resolved

not

to

have

HANDICRAFT

204

Shakespeare." tt came
about,
Societyof Arts ahd Crafts was

"home-made
that the

fore,
theremissioned
com-

and
designand make costumes
erties,
propMechanicals'
Disguises,"for
includingthe
of thirty
-one
players and all within three
to

*'

cast

"

weeks'

time.

Nothing daunted,

the

from

committee

the

Society
of Arts and
Crafts first visited the grounds, as an
essential preoccupation for the designerof a stage
pidlureout of doors is the seledion of one
setting
which

be

can

devised

"set," wherein
a^ors, at every moment
as

the

ral
natu-

of the
groupings of the
play,will arrange themselves in conformitywith the
ing
laws of pidorialcomposition,e.g., making the leadcertain
lines of the stage picturesconverge
on
be utilized in important business
to
are
points which
of the several a"ts. The
settingdecided upon,
though the best available,was simplein the extreme;
one

thorn

tree

chestnuts

largehorse
this,with
the

the

at

of

screens

back

It then

the

stage, and

four

approximatelyat the corners


and
green boughs for the flies,

necessary" mossy banks,"


frame-work

of

the whole

formed

ic
scen-

for the

play.
the duty
or
became, for the designer,
of making
accordingto ones views
"

"

costumes

so

conform

to

the

mood

and

tense

opportunit
the

of the

or
contrasted,
color,harmonized
of texture, line,etc., that they would
immediately
much
of the essento the audience
tial
reveal,visually,
of the a"tion. Thus, for example, in the
nature
fairyscenes, brushing aside the sacred stage precedent
and opaque
of dressingfairies in white
colors.

play,by

means

of

HANDICRAFT

2o6

turesquely;and the hempen home-spuns presented


all grown
an
set of problems, but
entirelynew
TTie trades of Quince the
of one
root, authenticity.
Bottom

carpenter,

the

Flute

weaver.

the

bellows-

mender, etc., had to be expressed in the particularities


of dress,shoes, head-gear,tools,more
less
or
felt indeed that not one
But it was
of these
correctly.
the boys, enthusiastic
lost on
details was
before,
and
with
they played up to their costumes
props
contagiousgusto, which spread through the whole
"

"

cast.

Of

all the

surprisesand

designs disclosed

of the

for the

court

Athenians

other

vari-colored

greatest

robes

of

Duke

and

almost

an

the

at

attendants,with
themselves

saw

these

caused

was

where

scenes,

their

which

first time

for the

one

Hippolyta,and

shocks

radical

dress

hearsals,
re-

by the costumes
Theseus,

the lovers and


each

Oriental

other

in

richness;

the puzzlement gave way to the embarrassed


finally
exclamation:
Well,but,
why we thought Greeks
! "The
books never
white cheese-cloth
always wore
did you know?"
had colored piftures;"and
How
It was
with gratified
coming
surprisethat they saw how bethe classic simplicity
of line; that
to all was
"look
could really
one
pretty" in a filletor bandeau
with
conscious
without
a
"rat," and it was
pride
that the boys discovered
themselves, for once, as
the girls.
decorative
as
in anAnd
the play,talked of for months
ticipation
so
finally,
be the sole topic for weeks
in retroto
speft played itself out. One delightful
part of this
the
performance, pleasantto recall afterwards, was
"

"

"

"

"

"

HANDICRAFT

enthusiasm

with which

207

the

the
participants,

ers,
teach-

the parents, in fa"^ allthose associated with the


entered into it,and the wonderful
undertaking,
ap-^

largeaudience;both of which led


that somethingdistinctly
valuable
to the conviction
and significant
had been accomplished
for the school
and for the community.Also,the performancecalled
attention to the rapiddevelopmentin America
of
publicinterest in open-airdrama and pageantry,
which means
in every sense
of the word.
opportunity,
Somethingis offered that the publiclacks. The appeal
of playspresentedout
of doors is primarily
and imaginative;
the works
so are
spiritual
especially
of Shakespeare,
givenunder conditions so well in
of the year.
keepingwith the season
That
the drama is a regenerating
art, bearingrich
has been
promiseof alleviation and self-expression,
ers'
of the
in the organization
recognized
Wage EarnLeague" of New York.. What but that is the
explanationof the multiplyingDrama
Leagues"
in all our
greater cities? If they,and others,are to
succeed,it will be by justsuch enlightened,
tent
persisof
preciation

the

**

^^

enthusiastic efforts as

and
when

it comes,
of

In this

will

mean

this. Achievement,

the realization and fulfilment

great ideal.

High

School

in the audience

who

there were
performance,
recognizedthat here

many
was

further step in the correlation of art and the public


art throughexperience
schools;that by teaching
"

art

in

and plastic
forms
pictorial

"

new

force is

introduced into education.


with
It has been said,

some

that Americans
truth,

are

HANDICRAFT

2o8

artistic

not

real
is

in
of

spirit
not

small

to

are

have

school,

awaken

must

people

in

the

every

human
heart.

need

wasted.

thus

beauty

If

while

can

we

into

art

Whatever

will
which

is

we

it

still

by

will
be

create

an

the

lives

give

ministering
is

in

vating
culti-

calls

whatever
that

it

"catch

must

we

interest

duty.

things,
for

be

to

Bringing

beautiful,
of

essence

only

the
This

consciousness

art

sacred

things

to

to

is

its

later.

public

appreciative

spiritual

skill;

and

or

public,

an

that

artistically:

nor

grasped

enlist

is

comprehended.

ethically

art-loving
must

we

taste

our

be

fa6i

the

little

still

thing,

an

j"

young

is

to

but

play^

play

opportunity

an

of

their

implanted

tention
at-

the

HANDICRAFT

ARTS

THE

AND

CRAFTS
A

WAY

MARY

address
(^jin

209

DENNETT

the

DeerjUld Convention, 1909.)

problems is obvious, that


is not quite so obvious.
that there is a way
out
I could
time
spend a good deal more
be willingto listen to me
in merethan you would
ly
statingthe problems, and if I began the subject
that end, I might not get to the way out at all;
from
before the
if you will forgivemy puttingthe cart
so

THAT

there

at

AND

OUT

WARE

delivered

PROBLEM

are

"

horse, I will start with the way out


I go along.The
in the problems as

and

sandwich

very mention
criticism of things

problem, of course, involves


has the temerity
as
they are, and whenever
anyone
to criticise adversely^
thingsas they are, he is at once
requestedand often dared to make out a programme
have now,
which
is not only better than anythingwe
but is guaranteedinfallible and permanent.
Now, I
well surcan't do anything of the sort, as you may
mise.
I have a very real sympathy with the natural
it alreadyhas tried
that holds to what
conservatism
of

and

which

with

with

it has

suspicionupon

proven

advance.
with

discussion

entire

So I submit

chaiF

To

plunge

to

our

into

for the

my

the

of tions
suggestrustingthat the
from

advantage.

midst, then,
like

un-

handful

follow will cull the wheat

mutual

I should
scheme

possibleand

for

humility,I hope,

that is to

the

schemes

looks

familiar,and

become

to

without

present

organizationof

an

to

any

you a
and
arts

liminaries
pre-

rough
crafts

HANDICRAFT

2IO

societyin a laigecity(theconditions in small towns


and villages
ditions,
being distindlydifierent from cityconwould
necessitate
probable differences in
the most
people and its
plan).As the cityconcerns
be
it may
difficult,
problems are in many ways most
best

to

think

I would

of that first.

like to

such

see

societydivided

departments, each
others,but each having its own
separate

financial

support.

I will

one

into

four

affiliated with

the

and
identity

mention

the

its

own

least revolutionary

cational
departments first that is,the eduvote
department should dedepartment. This
of the
itself vigorouslyto improving the taste
and of the community
members
at large,first,
by
nially,
holding exhibitions,geiieral
ones, annuallyor bienand
small
of separate sorts
of
specialones
handicraft
often as feasible; second, by having
as
classes for the teachingof various
crafts;third,by
trated
giving lectures on any and all phases of art, illuswhenever
possible,and by any other means
of standards.
for the bettering
that might appear,
free
The
second department should be an absolutely
the names
of membureau
of information, by which
bers
listed and classified accordingto their craft,
are
of the

with
and

the

"

names,

This

customers.

without

any

addresses

and

list is

personal

to

references
be

given to inquirers,

recommendations
To

of clients

from

the

help the possible


his craftsman, there should
customer
to choose
the bureau
of information,
with
be, in connexion
exhibit, consistingof samples of the
a
permanent
themmembers'
work, selected by the members
secretary

of the

bureau.

further

HANDICRAFT

selves,and

211

subjeded to a jury of any sort. This


plan would
give equal opportunityto all members
be their only jury;
would
before the public,which
and the publicwould- then purchase the kind of art
and not
bad things,
The
it wanted
sort.
a censored
in course
of time, would
hang themselves,and if,
the public seemed
have
atrocious
to
at
taste
first,
that no
and insisted on buying work
self-res{Se"tin
mind.
It would
only be
jury would ever pass, never
the educational
a hint to
department to redouble its
efforts and elevate the publictaste by its exhibitions,
lectures,etc. Whatever
objectionsmay be offered
this point,and I know
there are many,
it secures
on
the one
that no one^ not
even
important principle,
between
esthetic
the
an
archangel,ought to come
producer and his public.
The
third department should be a trulyco-operative
the commissions
salesroom
charged for sales should
;
the cost
of the maintenance
of the salesroom,
cover
and

more

no

not

be drawn

not

salesroom

less. The

no

funds

should

for educational

or
purposes,
any
should the salesroom
have to be ported
supbe self-supartificial way;
it should
porting

upon

other; neither

in any
and
managed
among

those

should

be

sell horrors

and

in the

bad; but there

too

bad,
to

no

elected from
by a committee
who
are
consignors.Here again,there
jury whatever. If people wish to make

earn

wish

of which

one

to

bad

are

of art, it is,of course,

name

other

is that

things much
they should not

more

be

too

able

or
living;and no esthetic consideration
protecta possibleignorantpublicfrom ing
buya

stuff should

make

any

of us, who

may

feel

HANDICRAFT

212

good taste which we long to share with


to force our
others, willing
superiorchoice upon any
a man
one
else,at the expense of standingbetween
and his bread and butter. Right here is a great chance
Of
it makes
to
our
course,
get badly frightened.
hair rise to thinkof the thingsthat would be sent in to
an
un-juroredsalesroom, but on the other hand, a
rise no
can
stream
higher than its source; and can
and bravely,
if it requiresbravery^
not
we
serenely,
back on the broad faith (and I know
it is a true
rest
how
hard
one) that you can not kill out, no matter
from thehuman
race.
People
you try,the loveofbeauty
be sure
of that, and
will keep on
trying,we can
will try harder and faster and succeed
2. free people
quickerthan a suppressedand censored people.That
old repressiveway
is democracy and it is true. The
safer and saner, but all that glitters
is
appear
may
not
gold,and it is time the ugly ducklings had a
We
could remember, justby way of keepchance.
ing
in proportion to
our
up, that precisely
courage
room,
the hideous
things contributed to this free sales-

that

have

we

be the

must

whose
the

improve
This

taste

activities of the educational

business
of

it is

to

producer

raise standards

and

partment
deand

purchaser alike.

will

give ample scope for all the energy of the


few who
either born with good taste,
were
privileged
have had good taste
have acquiredgood taste or who
thrust

upon

of the
of

all

I know

the air is vibrant

with

jections
ob-

but before we
plan already,
I offer the proposal
their discussion,
to
may
fourth, last and most
important department
in this hypothetical
and
crafts society,
arts
to

come

them.
much

of this

HANDICRAFT

214

book-binding,the

minor

etc., whose

income

main

of metal

forms

is from

work,

etc.,

teaching,rather

producing,and in this class also, would


three peopleof independent means,
the two
or
come
handicrafts
who
as
an
indulgein some
amusement^
of students and teachers of design
fourth,a number
and a group
of architects,
and decoration
and fifth,
and last,and decidedly
lea$t,asmall handful of a"tucraftsmen, including
allyindependent professional
two
one
or
photographers.It will be seen that a"iual producersform
a
part of the
very insignificant
and that the
membership of arts and crafts societies,
interest in art and craft is built up and
spreading
without
to make
any sizeable body of handicraftsmen
that interest a substantial or permanent
thing.Most
and
societies have to be laboriously
artificially
ported,
supand inquiringinto the reasons
for this,we
fadts. Among
meet
these, is the fa"t
some
startling
much
we
that,however
enjoy the fascinating
things
and salesrooms,however
in the exhibitions
see
we
interested in particularcraftsmen,
much
are
we

than

from

somehow
not
own

sort

or

other

those

of

us

who

have

children

do

of our
anticipatehandicraft for the life work
We
can't fancy their doing that
boys and girls.
of thing for a livelihood,
usual
except under very un-

circumstances.

Now,

there

look

must

be

reason

some

business

the

beside

mere

habit

to
professions,
vide
profor our
children when
income
they are grown.
Why is it that we (and here I am speaking for the
public)that we let the handicrafts so scrupulously
alone, except for amateur
purposes? Not to spend

why

we

to

or

HANDICRAFT

215

simply this,
economic
an
disadvantagewhen
for anything besides culture
it comes
to using them
ly
in exactand education, for in this respectthey are
the same
predicament as all other kinds of dire"t
makes
who
production.For a man
things,that is,
manufadures
who
by himself,whether they happen
carved
and
to be artistic things like silver bowls
and
like cork-screws
chairs,or justutilitarian things,
makes
who
harnesses, the man
things,by the sale
of which
his living,
he earns
ploits
cannot^ unless he exbor
the labor of others,receive enough for his lamake
him willing
to go on
to
making thingsfor
unless he is driven to it and acthe rest of his life,
cepts
ter
the principle
that half a loaf is bethis fate,
on
of the man
than none.
And
this is just as true
sells his labor to an employer, and works
in a
who
who
as of the man
struggles
alongand works
fadlory,
for himself. Both men
get justabout their existence

any time leadingup


that the crafts are at

and

little

The

more.

to

it,the

reason

maximum

is

income

is pretty
maximum

and that
plainlyin sightfrom the first,
his brains
who
is not enough to satisfy
uses
any man
people who do no
enough to wonder
why so many
labor of any produdive sort at all receive
so
large
an

It

income.

is,of

course

fa"t that

work

of

art

can

only

wrought by an individual who is free to put his


and choice into his work, and so we
best ability
not
canically
expeft art from our fadlorysystem ; but economspeaking,the fadlory-handand the artistic
and
craftsman
at exactlythe same
are
disadvantage,
and
the craftsman
in order to help out
develop a
be

HANDICRAFT

2i6

fertile soil for the

obligedto help
same

out

growth

of art,

all other

we

find ourselves

exploitedpeople

at

the

time.

In other

words,

find

exactlythe cause
and briefly,
of this economic
it is found
disadvantage,
in some
form
to be just this: special privilege,
or
ingly
other,which part of the peoplehave (andan increassmall proportionalpart, too)and which
most
people have not. Equal opportunity for all is no
shallow
slogan born of oratorical demagogues, but
scientific plea, for the applicationof
it is a modern
the golden rule to life and work, as well as to home
We
and
can't possiblyavoid the responreligion.
sibility
of setting
ourselves to the work of discovering
of this economic
the chief causes
of this
inequality,
and of findingout
radical
some
specialprivilege,
of gettingsocietyrid of it. Now, fortunately,
means
don't have to work
diis all out by ourselves,alone
we
and unaided, but once
having seen the main point
there is no
hope for arts and crafts,or any of the
other
truly good thingsof life,without a nearer
approach to economic
justicethan we have now;
shall
and having seen
it become
willingto a"^. We
find ourselves
eager to joinin the several already
established efforts to win something likean application
of the golden rule in societyas a whole, as well as
individuals. And
between
so, by a simple process
find
and a simple use of conscience, we
of reasoning,
interest in
that it is impossibleto maintain
a useful
also wishing to share the
without
the arts and crafts,
and
responsibility
duty of achievingsocial justice.
We
are
obliged,then, to work for equalopportunity
we

must

out

HANDICRAFT

217

instead of for

will
To
do this work
specialprivilege.
surely mean
dabbling in what might possiblybe
and politics,
called religion
two
thingsdreaded and
tabooed
in all organizationsexcept
churches
and
parties,where they are said to belong.
political
of special
I wish I could deny that such forms
vilege
prithe tariff,
as
publicfranchises,banking monopolies,
and worst
of all,land monopolies, could have
their fangs drawn
moral
or
by other than political
pressure, but I can't ; and, after all,why should we
be afraid? If the golden rule is good enough to believe
in, it is good enough to apply,and it can't be
the
applied so long as we live in a societywhere
majoritycan not get the natural and complete return
for their labor.
this work
turn

If anyone

fears

general or
vague,
his attention to such concrete
are

that the demands

millennial,let
measures

of
him

toward

local option in taxation,


equal suffrage,
the initiative and
referendum, proportional
representation,free trade,the organizationof labor
and the abolition of monopolistic privileges
in land,
These
franchises,patents and banking.*
not
are
hazy,
Utopian schemes, but plain,practical
plans for fair
play,which we all think we believe in.
It is manifest
that I can
only hint at the possibilities
of the work
of this livelihood department of the arts
and
crafts societyto be. They are
multitudinous
and everlasting,
which
is somewhat
to
discouraging,
be sure, but they are
also appallingly
necessary, and
what
has to be done can
be done, so we
might as
well take hold with a will and not
be frightened
to
in-

social freedom

as

inertia because

there

is

so

much

to

be

done.

HANDICRAFT

2i8

Let

the livelihood

department of this new


society
itself to answering a stringof a dozen
set
questions,
something like this,by way of startingout :
of
1
Why is it that most
any craftsman
you know
can't aiFord to make
up a sufficient stock of goods
with
which
advertise?
to
Why is he compelled to
to sell one
thingbefore he can afford to make more?
What
of co-operation in a
the possibilities
2.
are
of workers
to
help out a situation like this?
group
don't the craftsmen
who
make
the luxuries,
3. Why
like silver and jewelry,use the same
grade of things
themselves
? Why
ford
in their own
homes
can't they afto
buy as good thingsas they make? Docs the
.

silver-smith

average
own

silver service?

grass

on

the

have

afternoon

Does

the

golflinks

have

who

man

time

tea

to

out
mows

of

his
the

playgolf?Why

not?
4.

is it that

Why

the

craftsman

productin competition with


of his own,
do
5. Why

to

his certain

salesrooms

exclusive

the

is forced

to

sell his

faftory-madecopy

ruin?

require specialprotection,

introductions
agencies and fees for mere
and recommendations, in order to succeed?
6. Why
does it take thirty-seven
separate pairs of
make
hands
to
a
ready-made coat ? And what does
it mean
who
to the lives of the men
belong to those
pairs of hands ?
thirty-seven
has not machiney given leisure to more
of
7. Why
man
can
help,
one
now
do, with machine
us, when
hundred
the work
that thirteen men
had to do, two
tivate
doesn't every one
have time to culyears ago ? Why
the

arts?

HANDICRAFT

8.

is it that

Why
use

an

statement

219

insurance

company
like this in its

can

tively
effec-

advertising:
most
people

"Carefullycompiled statistics prove that


at the age of sixty,
are
dependent on others for their
support"?
when
the cityof Rochester"
docs it mean
9. What
offers a prizecompetitionfor cottage houses for working
the best to cost
only 1^1500? Do I want
men,
live in a $iSOO
house?
Do
to
you?
does it mean
What
when
I o.
a manufadturingfirm
advertises by a blotter like this,saying:"An
ounce
of loyalty
is worth
a
pound of cleverness." Loyalty
and why?
to whom?
does it mean
when
What
the SaturdayEvening
1 1
Post publishesa real-estate advertisement, headed
"The
land is a king."Why
who
is he a
man
owns
king?Who
giveshim his power?
does it signify
that if Jesushad saved ;^i.00
1 2. What
adayoutof|t3.ooaday(anaveragecarpenter'swages
for every day of his life since his maturityto the
present day, counting out Sundays and three annual
holidayshe would have accumulated
onlya littleover
half million
dollars in about
a
1900 years?
.

And
And

so

on,

infinitum.

before

now,

I tell you

ad

we

proceed

to

the

discussion,may

very
you that I know
well that whereas
with all my heart in the
1 have tried to explain,
1 realtruth of the principles
ize
a

story

to

prove
I believe

to

principleso sound that somebody


can't apparentlypundture it in its weakest
spot. One
the other
small boys was
of my
own
realizing
day
that the way
of the transgressor is hard, and he prothat there

is no

HANDICRAFT

220

tested
while
there

just

to

that

me

little

his

was

being

were

"No,
Sol

remarked

who

wrong
all

got

mother,
shall
all

be

Jesus

as

did

said.

if

only

go

namely,

did
the

got
so

by
of

who

he

far

it,
that

people

came

aiid

him

course

only

flash

told

the

was

of

time

that,

Those

right,
you

in

it

punished.

satisfied
have

and

that

Quick

happy.

fix

to

way

while,

hard

free.

went

good
for

good

moralizing,
did

brother

very

had

always

he

my
who

right

answer

punished.'*
as

to

tradict
con-

HANDICRAFT

222

There

is

no

created

has
and

doubt

handwork

there

of and

and

arts

crafts

great interest in beautiful

in certain

artistic education
but

the

that

classes

the

in
seems

and

public
still to

indifference

to

be

ment
move-

design

has influenced

schools

and

where;
else-

such

general ignoranc
its fundamental
ciples,
prin-

leave

done.
perhaps its greatest work yet unSuch
an
a
true
effort,the attempt to create
sign
perception of beauty which will require good dedecorations
of the
in all the furnishingsand
home, is a labor needingthe cooperation of all the
useful and ornamental,
producers of those articles,
which
into our
enter
dailylife.
If manufacturers
be influenced
to employ good
can
designerswho have received thorough trainingin
will use their
of fitness and who
the artistic principle
material with the consideration
due its natural qualities
and adaptabilities,
the publicmust, in time,grow to
preferthe article of good to the one of poor design.
The
Japanesehave shown how possibleit is to make
the most
even
homely household utensils attractive
no
reason
why we
by good design and there seems
too
cannot
carry this splendidprinciplethroughout
manufactures.
This
our
ers
cooperationof great produc-

to

as

is so

necessary

its broad

sense,

citysome

means

as

to
to

the

arts

and

requirein

crafts movement,

every
of artistic education

in

manufacturing
for designers.

design,fostered by arts and crafts societies


and other artistic organizations
arebeginningtoshow
their good influence
in certain commercial
articles;
and persistencealong this line of effort must
be of
inestimable
value in molding the taste of our people.
Schools

of

HANDICRAFT
At

the

223

should

time, there

same

in the

generaleducation
This
of dwellings.
least fostered
by

system

some

furnishingand

might

also

schools

the

be

of

decoration

be

undertaken

or

of

design.But

there

at

this very important subje"l


should
be added
the public school
not
to
course,
supplementing the classes in design and manual
no

seems

why

reason

training,which
bring this about

are

To

generallyestablished.

so

would

require,of

great patience

course,

and
and

persistencein dealingwith school boards


is rather generally
public at large,which

the

with

pleased
would

its home
be

to

seem

the

of their direct relation

because

societies

effort

surroundings.Such
and
of arts
privilege

crafts

to

the

on

sub-

jea.
interiors

Model
scale
a

form

to

travelingexhibit
of

reference

with

life in different

constructed

be

should

city.These

decorated

could

for the
be

course

to

schools

furnished

incomes

and

neighborhoods and

small

habits

this would

of
and
of
quire
re-

several varieties of interiors.

interiors could be used to


Ugly and inharmonious
with the model
teriors
inillustrate,
effectively
by contrast
the possibility
of improvement when
income
make
certain changes posand opportunitywould
sible.
has publishedvery inThe Ladies* Home
teresti
y"?"r""7/
illustrations of the possiblechanges which
can

be

these

made

could

mothers

to

be

and

better

used

some

in

such

types of interiors and


a

Classes

course.

held

housekeepers might

be

simplestlaws

month

in the

schools

design

which

the

to

model

teach

the

interiors

would

once

for
a

of

illustrate.

HANDICRAFT

224

exhibit of wall-paper
tains,
traveling
samples,rugs, cursamplesof stained woods, furniture coverings,
for sofa cushions

covers

tables,fixtures

and

for gas

and

china,silver and glass,pottery, picelectricity,


tures
and plastercasts and photographsof furniture
could be selected. This
ficult
long list need not be difif packed in a specialcase
made
for
to handle

the purpose. The


to income

and

These

exhibits

by the

arts

and

arrangedfor
to

should be included

Clubs

the effort.Certain

visit the

for the

the

and

arts

from

clubs

and

such

club known

twice

illustrated

examples
rooms

month

or

visited the

from
arts

schools.

as

''

so

loaned

from

dealers. Later
and

Beautyin

crafts

rooms

the Home"

Christian

Women's

successful.

and

far

In

Associations.

Meetings
talks given

informal

decoration

furnishingand

apartments,

rooms

largeinstitutions

Christian

organized in the Young


and proved very
Association
the

the

then

keepers
house-

crafts exhibition

was

held

thus

days could
and

sent

could be organizedin
purpose
effort along other
allow educational

Women's

Young

would

clubs of mothers

the teachers

women's

Detroit such

on

to

same

factories which

lines;in

colle"Sied and

crafts societies which

these

accompanied by

were

erence
ref-

of dealers attached.

names

first be

might at

be identified with

as

with

the best models.

show

be

the

handwork
possible

Wherever

out

articles should be chosen

as

of

houses

possibleby
the

arts

in the
where

and

year
talks

and

appropriate
crafts

the
on

club
jects
sub-

of
specialinterest were
given by members
A visit to the Pewabic
the Arts and Crafts Society.
Potterywas also planned for the club.
of

HANDICRAFT

All

of

members

the

worked
in

the

writer

that

not

only

bring

outlook
far

horizons

Under

and

simple
a

crafts
for

Is

of

the

Home,"

this

its

lives

great
societies

goal.

impossible?

to

of

the

on

found

who

many

feel

this

proved

but
the

end

to

would

scale

homes

many

for

time

larger

who

women

enthusiasm

effort

such

beauty

the

to

Their

evening.

the

still

but

day

and

girls

were

the

during

study

225

larger
of

the

imagination.
but

generic

might

movement

with

title

the

ideal

of
be
of

"Beauty
started
William

the

in

by

arts

ris
Mor-

HANDICRAFT

226

EDITORIAL

THE

and

arts

last

the

rapidlyin

craftsmen

crafts

have

has

movement
ten

turned

various
years. The
better thingsfrom
out

year to year and up to the present time


raised. Unless
has been
some
steadily
undertaken
of those

who

are

soon

the

standard
is

movement

craftsmen, to fill the

educate

to

developed

to

go, there

will be

no

ranks
further

made.
In this country the best workmen
progress
of foreigneducation, having served abroad
are
years
have nothing corresponding
apprenticeship.We
with the apprenticeship
could
system in Europe, nor
for our
be successfully
established,
one
compulsory
school system would
ment.
handicap such a moveseriously
of

There

have

been

number

of trade

schools

what
these will
started,and it remains to be seen
schools
bound
be less
are
to
accomplish. These
successful than the apprenticeshipsystem abroad,
for the pupilsin these schools
be
must
necessarily
the graduatesof grammar
drawn
from
schools. In
Europe, the period of apprenticeshipis started at an
earlystage in the child's life. This we shall miss in
any trades school in this country, and in missing it
we
are
period in the
passingby that construdive
all his sensibilities are
child's life,the periodwhen
most
keenly alive. Our compulsory school system
would
ing
prevent children in this country from enjoytrades school,
to the full the advantagesof any
would
the child reared in Europe.
as
finished workmen,
who
If we
out
to turn
to
are
are

compete

with

those

reared

abroad

under

the appren-

HANDICRAFT

tice system, we
workmen
grow
where

art

must

start

with

up

born,

was

227

as

they do, and


trade.

In

of four

can

their
child

have

our

the

East,
do good
the design

wood-carving.A few lines suggestiveof


are
enough for him to start with, and he will work
the rest out himself. Generations
of schoolinghave
made
he is,for his earlyskill is inherited
him what
it remains
his ancestors;
for him
from
to
develop
and perfecSi
his power
and so pass it on to those that
come

after

How

him.

are

we

to

compete

with

the

school and train


who
product of such a system? We
the
the mind
only,neglectingthe key-noteto art
and
hand
of mind
actingtogether,impelled
power
thrill and throb of the pulse.The
only
by the same
is for us
for us
to
develop skilled workmen
way
children at an
to give our
earlyage every opportunity
We
must
to developthe skill of the hand.
turn
to our
publicschools. At least one-half of the school
"

should

curriculum

be

devoted

to

manual

this way and only in this way


we
may
and hand equallytrained,each in
mind
with

work.

In

hope to have
ordination
complete co-

the other.

experience,how many of us, sitting


at the margin of the tide,thrilled by the final glow
of a dying day brought to us across
the sea, from
in a golden web
at our
rippleto ripple,and washed
to
feet,have realized with a great pain our inability
it a part of the world's
capture this beauty,and make
M.T.G.
portion of joy.
From

our

own

...

It has

been

the aim

of
representative

to

make

the whole

Handicraft

field covered

broadly
by what

has

HANDICRAFT

228

known

be

to

come

of
the

associated

been
the

great

the

destined

of

which

thought

and

coherent

and

life of their

the

existence,

such

ideals

socialism

the

as

assured,

craftsmanship

and

movement

socialismis

inspiration.Whether
do

but

know;

not

subject,with
replete,is

is
intends

to

necessary
the

blityfor

either
in

the

of

revival

social, artistic

honest
of the
or

the

brief

but

or

its

opinions

handicrafts,

technical.

and

problem

that

phase
ature
literwhich

whole.

The

responsi-

assume

the

pages
on

hope

brief

as

any

of

those

publication

movement
not

to

good

to

the
of

the

history

definite
solve

into

of

appeals

to

in any

do

future

and

looked

the

expression

economic

its pages

and

the movement's

Handicraft

of

expression

the

which

represent

Editors

expressed

ideals

ence
influ-

Crane

read

it

and

leavening

and

which

part

of

is part

find in such

who

workers

make

to

means

because

elements

socialists

the

of

Cobden-

Morris,

socialists

wer^

the

That

time.

minds
gave

vital

its

pression
ex-

activities

esthetic

have

to

the

and

was

minds

in their

movement

the

and

early movement

Cobden-Sanderson

of the

of

In

thoughts

ment,"
move-

if freedom

movement.

social,economic

on

we

crafts

Ruskin, Carlisle, Morris, Crane

as

combined

the

the

cogent

Sanderson,

was

with

done

ph^se

any

whose

men

movement

men

to

and

^^arts

be

not

denied

were

has

could

this

and

the

as

pradical
are

open

subje"l

whether

views
to

the

ing
touch-

economic

HANDICRAFT

WITH

229

SOCIETIES

THE

Detroit Society
DETROIT:
having completed arrangements
The

of Arts

Crafts

quarters

of October.

has been
and
the

The

about

the middle

will be in the

rooms

justacquiredby

been

has

its present

Museum

the

which
building
School of Design;

new

from

adapted

privateresidence

from the
only two doors removed
Art, thus bringingthese various bodies

touch

with

Societyand

the

other. It is believed

each

School, being housed

roof, will be of the greatest mutual


takes
thusiam

and

under

aid; and

with
step forward
for the future.
confidence

this

new

policyof the Societywill undergo


be able
change, though it will certainly
conditions

to

exhibitions

committee

of

The

few

prosperous

is

Society of

The

hibition
ex-

largestock

in the various

lookingforward

to

branches

busy and

year.
"

HiNGHAM

quent
fre-

more

bitions.
largegeneralexhi-

will,as heretofore,keep

handicraft; and

the

to

of the best that is beingdone


of

under

standard.

en-

radical

no

and

one

carry stillfurther its


exhibitions and ^k"ne
special

shows,*' rather than


salesroom

high

expeds

planof havingnumerous
man

for better

arrange

that

the Society

growing

The

loan

to

is

uses,

of

in close

new

new

will be in every way


better suited to the needs of
The
Societythan the former rooms.
building,

which

the

its salesroom

will re-open

for

and

The

Arts

"

Hingham
and

Crafts

"

Exhibition.
held

The

its annual

Hingham
exhibi-

HANDICRAFT

ajo
tion
It

and

was

sale

financial

raffia and

were

Walter

Loring H)ill,
July 25, 26,

artistic and

an

There

at

reed

27, and

success.

baskets

made

by Mrs.
Thayer,

Mrs.

Hersey, Mrs. Arthur Hersey,Miss


Clark, Miss Sprague,Mrs. Prouse, Mrs. Smith,

Mrs.

Picanco, Mrs. White


finer than

seemed

even

baskets

have

examples
Clark

of

and

and

Mrs.

Woodside

before

that

and

Hingham
a
wide-spread reputation.Some
good
shown
palm leaf baskets were
by Mrs.

Miss

ever

Bates.

The

Hingham Societymakes a specialtyof white


of it adapted from
colonial designs
embroidery, much
and fine work was
exhibited by Mrs. Leighton,
Mrs.
Partridge,Miss Sprague^ Mrs. Curtis, Mrs.
White, Miss Thayer, and others.
Some
in cross
worked
stitch
out
good designswere
linen
hand woven
on
by Miss Susan Willard, some
make
woven
by Mrs. Beatrice Ruyl. The workers
table covers, centre
bed spreads,
wear,
neckpieces,doylies,
baby's caps, sofa cushions, bags, card-cases
and
The
for

other

numerous

articles.

centre
piecesand netted fringes
doylies,
hangings on four poster beds made
by Miss

netted

Bates, Mrs.

White

and

Mrs.

Whiton

were

very

beautiful.
mired,
sought and adin its miniature
reproductionof the best of
well represented
Colonial designs,
was
by Mr. Luce,
Mr.
Hudson, Mr. Cushing and Mr. Whitcomb.
Mr. Hudson
showed
also pi"lureframes and a light-

Hingham

toy furniture,so

much

stand.

Mrs.

Thayer,

Mrs.

Picanco, Mrs. Loud, Mrs. Jones

HANDICRAFT

Miss

and
woven

Fearing had

231

good

some

braided

rugs, also

rugs.

and enamel
work
Jewelry, silver,
copper
large exhibit,all designed and executed

small but

good

Foster, who

Miss

work

whose

Macomber

Eva

exhibiton

had

formed

by

Mrs.

is well known.
of pottery

made

was

by

of
unique garden vases
shows
One
pottery inserted.,

some

with

designsin
the stage back of the metal
in the photograph,on
the making of
Mrs. Bainbridgedemonstrated
case.

cement,

and

lace

exhibited

collection

England, Belgium and France.


The
photographsby Miss Lincoln
side

of attradive

were

of

bobbins

in and

scenes

Miss

and

from

Wood-

around

Hing-

ham.

Miss

Davis

exhibited

carving and
their

Tea

the

Misses

piecesof excellent woodCobb


had a fine displayof

few

bayberrycandles.
served and

was

givenby

were

Mrs.

bridge
Bain-

by Miss Susan Willard on


"Shawls," valuable examples of each being included
which
also included
fine old
in the loan collection,
specimens of snufF boxes, fans and samplers and a set
in Scotland in
of designsfor Paisleyshawls, made
he
1850, by Daniel Urie, for one of which, when
on

but

was

by

the

Mrs.
The
ham
the

"Lace"

talks

nineteen

and

years old, he

British government.

Arthur

Hersey, a

was

These

awarded
were

medal

loaned

by

descendant.

Societymaintains a salesroom justout of HingSquare,where articles are on sale throughout


orders can
be taken. It is planning
year and where
on
a series of talks for the coming winter
subjects

HANDICRAFT

232

hoped

education

and

of interest

that camaraderie

the

to

will

members

and

prevailmore

it is

than

ever

before.

Peterborough
Handicraft

the

The

annual

seventh

Workers

exhibition

of

of

cided
dea
Peterborough was
both financially
and socially.
success,
The
hall was
trimmed
with evergreen
trees
tastefully
effective background for the display
which
made
an
of the various
produces of the society.
Italian cutwork
The
was
arranged on three tables
on

side of the hall. The

one

and

useful

for

pin

many
cushions

work

and

The

several
The

sales

baskets

25

and

amounted

order
the
Two

on

cut-

ever

from

about

were

tables

on

and

in the

center

They

and

found

braided

was

readysales

rugs

in the

shown

the

raffia work

The

tractive
at-

which

$']0.

Several

entrance.

circular table

baskets.

of hooked

from

;^i2

displayof reed and raffia


shown.
all shapes,
They were
little
baskets
to
largewaste

well done.
to

to

the finest

was

sizes

and

Samples

of

taken.

were

bonbon

cent

cloths

tea

these tables amounted

were

have

we

colors

to

filet,
includingfine shirt waists,
hatpins,card cases
jabots,
bags,belts,

at

hall. It

baskets

from

darned

orders

of the

of all sizes

were

They ranged

purposes.
inches square

two

traveling
cases,
etc.

articles

orders
same

at

corner

were

side

and

were

designsto
the

left of

taken.

devoted

to

the

ed
and preserves lookdepartment. The jellies
of orders
very tempting and sold well. A number
sales from
the
taken in this department. The

domestic

were

miscellaneous

table

amounted

to

about

;^20. There

HANDICRAFT

shown

many

department

makes

were

and

woolen

Two

loan

of

These

Mr.

Tea

of

corner

very

gratifyingand

sales

kept

up

the

Our
open

from

sales

to

fine

and

The

in

one

the

been

year

has

sales

of Italian
and

;^I200
The

styles

the

basket

and

quality

standard

p.m.

and

other

of the

and

partment
de-

tic
domesIt includes

infants'

outlook

felt

were

established.

home
The

the

long

wear

for the

suing
en-

pr9mising.

tea

from

sewing.

well

of

branch

for the

fill a

to

jelliessold

just getting well

is very

daily

past

promises

high

articles

and

year

tables

supply.

miscellaneous
is

department
in crochet

and

and

same

The

useful

loaned

before.

preserves

to

tiful
beau-

some

Massachusetts.

over

the

department

The

the

to

than

;^300

ever

domestic

want.

amounted

over

than

Mrs.

from

ware

from

encouraging.

greater

were

for

society

alone
was

better
The

the

of

demand

and

hall.

the

work

work

and
silver

served

were

The

cut

York

interest

beautiful

jewelry

Gardner,

of

the

to

very

wrought

Stone

lemonade

and

in New

hand

of

Arthur

were

hand-made

of

crocheted

dresses.
much

very

This

home.

the

infants'

sheer

added

exhibits

specimens

by

and

garments

Klapp's studio

H.

things for

specialty of

coUeSion

valuable
W.

useful

exhibition.

the

233

room
10

Concord

on

a.m.

to

p.m.

Street
Tea

is

is

now

served

HANDICRAFT

234

EXECUTIVE

COMMITTEE
executive

THE

meeting of

of Handicraft

9 Park

street,

In
presiding.

Societies

Boston,

Mrs.

MEETING

at

10

Conant's

the National

League

held

was

August

at

a.m.,

Mrs.

Garland

absence

Mrs.

Garland

eleSed

Secretarypro tem.
The
ter
letfirst thingbrought before the Board
was
a
from
her resignation
Miss McEwen,
as
offering
It was
accepted in
advisoryeditor of Handicraft.
the spirit
that the comin which
it was
offered,i.e.,
mittee
have a clear
to reorganizeHandicraft
may
was

field.

Although

there

was

Handicraft,

great deal of discussion


no

formal

report

has

to
regardingthe committee
the magazine.
Mrs. Garland
reportedthat owing to illness
exhibition
fund for the traveling
on

been

in

no

handed

in

garding
re-

as

yet

ize
reorgan-

the
had

mittee
com-

sent

report.

agreed
regard to the travelingexhibition it was
that the followingnotice be sent to the different societies.
In

Marie

TRAVELING

T.

Garland,

Secretarypro

tem,

EXHIBITION

ceived
Traveling Exhibition should be reidence,
by the Secretaryat 42 College Street,ProvRhode
Island,by OSober
i, 191 1.
will include:
The
exhibition
this year
basketry,
bookbinding, jewelry,leather work, metal work.

Entries

for the

HANDICRAFT

236

ANNOUNCEMENT

THE

Editors
Handicraft

in
the

decorative

new

craftsmen,

ably
work
of
ed

the
in

as

to

to

able

all

to

use

them.

which

so

article

of

Mr.

by
to

what

is

of

handicraft

offer

fortunately

oa

politan
Metro-

the

interest
has

coUedions

craftsmen

publicaticm

article,

unusual

now

coUeSions

America;

be

of

important

most

inspiration
as

be

Museum

the

This

York.

will

Matter,

wing

arts

New

early

illustrated

fully

Museum,
Milton

for

announce

all

prob*

wealth
situat*

HANBf^AFT
VOL.

OCTOBER

IV

OF

EXHIBITION
AND

I9II

CHINESE
AT

JEWELRY
MUSEUM

fore

IN

there

has

been

of

Denman

Dr.

Harvard

Ross's

Textiles

summer

for the

Arts
an

benefit

students
and

visit the Museum

who

of Fine

during the

school

summer

teachers

Museum

shown

of Chinese

exhibition

ARTS

P.

of the

court

BOSTON

FINE
B.

TEXTILES

THE

OF
M.

the

NO.

in pure
designat
those
students
and

duringtheir

vacation

studyingdecorative art.
has been lent by Dr. Ross
and
while traveling
ear
purchased this last'y

for the

of
purpose
entire coUeSion

The

of itwas

much

in the East.

examples of both embroidery and weaving


and consists of elaborately
figuredrobes in gorgeous
color, great hangings,long lambrequins,and dainty
contains
a
vanitybags. One case
very remarkable
and India.
China
exhibit of jewelry from
The
the first people to cultivate the
Japanese were
silk and damask.
silk worm
and to weave
We
apply
It shows

the

damask

term

decorated

with

being laid
ground and
and
These

woven

in

to
a

silk

woven

in

color but

one

pattern brought out by the threads


from
different direction
the back

which

give a
silks

consequentlytake
different
were

the

ferently
lightdif-

texture.

exported

from

China

and

HANDICRAFT

238
in the

taken

caravans

which

thence

time

and

they

became

scattered

known

retained

been

has

the

was

through Persia and


great tradingcenter
"Damask"

as

this

to

the

over

that

at

world.
and

mascus,
Da-

to

Thus

the

name

day.

with the series


largecrimson
square embroidered
of symbols so
frequentlymet with in Chinese
art,
which
shows
in fading
a beautiful piece of silk damask
has taken on wonderful
tones
shadingfrom orange
to
deep crimson. The embroidery is in satin stitch
in blues and yellows,while gold
and a knot stitch,
A

in the

thread

adds

streamers

great richness

to

the

whole.
If

we

these robes

examine

the

same

in

the

are
figures

used

we
carefully
over

we
illustrated,

gown

and

over.

see

the

shall find that

For instance
pattern

wave

border

of the gown,
diagonalstripesof
colors arrangedwith beautiful harmony, above

forming the
many
this the

crested

foam

mountains

or

rocks

rises and

wave

in the

center.

breaks
The

the

on

waves

are

changes and vicissitudes of life,and


and
the immutability
the rocks of changeless purpose
the waves
the jewel
of time. Among
we
see
often other
of omnipotence and
symbols of good
rises the carp, the symbol
fortune. Out of the waves
of strenuous
of manhood,
endeavor, or of attained
inations
scholarship,as one who has passed certain examis termed
"a
dragon" and it
successfully

symbolicof

becomes
The

carp

the
at

the

first title of rank


the end

of

dragon. The dragon means


in contrast
piritual
power

in China.

thousand

becomes

things,one
earthlypower.

many
to

years

being
It also

HANDICRAFT

240

Another

of

symbols

called

the

eight precious
of the pieces.These
on
are
a
things occurs
many
a
jewel,a cash, a lozenge (symbol of viftory),
pair
of boots, a painting,
of jade,
a hanging musical
stone
artemisia
a
an
pair of rhinoceros-horn
cups, and
set

leaf.
But

the

popular forms are the eight


emblems
Buddhist
of happy augury. These
the
are
Raming wheel, a conch shell,the state umbrella, a
lotus flower, a vase, a pair of fish and an
a
canopy,
perhaps

endless
The
the
of
the

most

knot.

eight Taoist symbols are


gourd,the
magic pilgrim's
flowers,the
lotus

Almost

tube

bamboo

the

fan, the

the basket

castanets,

and

sword,

rods, the

flute and

flower.

all these

be discovered
may
exhibition.

pieces in the
The
long lambrequins

on

the

various

ples
probablyhung in temscriptio
and are
shrines
or
usuallydecorated with insuch as ^^The
imperial age is boundless
like the heaven;" "The
imperialage has no limit,"
"The
and
mist and
the rainbow
into
crystallize
are
gladness."These
very splendidlyembroidered
satin and are finished with
crimson
in gold thread on
gold fringe.
The
displayof color. The
piecesmake a sumptuous

Chinese
in

the

were

most

were

fond

of pure
daring combinations
very

color
with

and
very

used

it

tiful
beau-

results.
in arrangingthe exhibit.
judgment was^hown
All the pieces are
placed under glassand the cases
divide the long room
into small alcoves on
one
side,

Great

HANDICRAFT

so

in

alcove

one

in the

in

the

and

wall

the
At

side

next,
the

on

gold,and

an

an

long crimson

part of the
upper
end of the room
one
China

from

work

and
and

orange

much

with

gowns

and

gown

yellow

hung

space,
the

covers

lambrequinsare

around

room.

is

India.

many

wall

square

blue

rightare

with

gowns

central

red

orange

pieces;

crimson

blue

show

cases

the left

on

The

one.

the

grouped

are

hanging covering the

crimson
and

the

next

241

The

containingjewelry

case

Chinese

delicate

in filigree

excelled

examples

shown.

are

with
ornamented
unique piecesare the ones
in the
the brightblue feathers of the kingfisher
set
times
giltdesign after the fashion of enamel and somecombined
thfe piecesshown
with jade.Among
head dress and many
hair ornaments,
are
a
a
pairof
lay
cpral bracelets with grasshoppersof the feather inand other pieces in enamel.
carved jade pendants show
Some
mens
specibeautifully
of white jade flecked with the brilliant
green
which
is so prized: carved amber
and glassalso make
The

most

beautiful

ornaments.

the

Among

ornamental

Indian

gold

stringsof
many
These
often
a
represent
be
which
the owner
can

specimens
beads.

are

to
portablebank account
bead
one
constantlydrawn
upon
with
innumerable
set
pieces are
rubies and many
pearlsare used in

other

stones.

emeralds

and

beautiful

circular

pearls.Another
Indian jewelryis the clusters of
of gold and silver. The
craftsman

at

time.

Many

bits of cabachon
combination

pin

is

set

characteristic

with
with
of the

tinyballs both
many
will find here much

HANDICRAFT

242

material

suggestive
Oriental

patience
pieces.

few

though
necessary

to

would

complete

have
these

the
orate
elab-

HANDICRAFT

THE

INFLUENCE

243

OF

CRAFTS

UPON

TRAINING

ARTHUR

has

ENOUGH
is

F.

been

PAYNE

said

since

movement

has

been

has

had

said,and

its

And

upon
if it had

that

alone

manual
done

would

arts

and

inception,to run
opinion.But there

very little
influence it
vitalizing

is the

that

the

about

the entire gamut of human


phase of its influence about

one

AND

ARTS

MOVEMENT

MANUAL

crafts

THE

which

trainingin our public schools.


nothing but exert this influence,

be

sufllicient

for its existence.

reason

of the arts
principles
and
crafts are
being spread throughout the land
of manual
ly
rapidthrough the medium
trainingmore
and
be possibleby the
ever
surelythan would
At

the

present time

the

supporters

of the

To

fullythe

influence

has

upon

realize

movement

had

arts

and

crafts

that the

manual

alone.

movement
arts

and

we
training,

little of the type of work


done
in
trainingbefore it felt the influence of the
know

crafts. The

first manual

crafts
must

manual
arts

and

trainingproblems shown
in 1876; they
in this country were
at the Centennial
here from
sent
Russia, and consisted largely
were
of the common
sequently
jointsused in carpentry, and condevoid of any artistic element
were
totally
The
whatever.
adoption of this system into our
schools was
the beginning of real manual
training
in this country. The
problems were
merely exercises
and were
utilitarian value whatever; they were
of no

1
HANDICRAFT

244

of monatony,
and speedily
killed any
interest that the student might have had in nianual

the

essence

Next
training.

decided step in

the Swedish

came

advancebecause

sloyd
-,

this

it took into

was

account

the interests of the

students,by using models that


the problems were
of use in the home. But still
were
T. Harris,the
devoid of any art interest. Dr. W.
well known
educator,said of the Swedish sloyd,

"Sweden

is the leader in the manual


but her educators
of

have

not

developingcorreft

ment,
movetraining

yet

portance
the im-

seen

taste

among

their

workers,as a condition of industrial success; clumsy


the characteristics
are
shapesand incongruousornaments
of Swedish

goods."This

by one
clearly
design,

statement

leadingeducators of that time shows


theyfelt the need of the combination of
and the higherideals that
artistic appreciation,

of the
that
more

the

arts

and crafts

movement

later furnished

It is throughthe direct influence of the


that educators

now

arts

realize the educative

to

them.

and crafts
value there

designthroughthe necessary logical


thinking
in
to produce a designthat has embodied
required
it the requirementsand limitations of use, process
and material. Where
the shopsand the designclass
have no vital connection,a student can design
things
that are
cepted
impossibleof execution,and they are acproviding
theylook well on paper.
But where the arts and crafts principle
is in force,
and the teacher have a working
where the designer
knowledge of the processes and material involved,
made in the shops,there
and the things
are
designed
of designthat is
we
get a diredness and simplicity
is in

HANDICRAFT

245

entirelydifferent from the incongruousobjeftsthat


are
produced in the classes where the teacher is strong
but whose
art
on
knowledge of strufture
(so called),
materials

and

is weak,

or

in the classes of the teacher

knowledge of designis limited to the ornament


that he copies and appliespromiscuously.
Through design we appeal to the interests of the
the student; this develops the much
desired adive
whose

and

attitude

creative

in the

student, instead

of the

nite
receptiveattitude. Through it we get a defireadion
that is a pleasureto the student
and
to the teacher.
an
inspiration
into the schools
Since the adoption ofmanual
training

dormant

of

this country,

values,later

educational

values,but
to

the

arts

its art and

us

have

we

and

informed

been

of its ethical and

crafts

the

its social values. It has

unification

of structure

and

its

industrial

has showed

movement

ual
givento manhigher ideals,

trainingartistic appreciationand
and

upon

decoration

that

find in the

progressivemanual
trainingshop of
said "The
today. John Quincy Adams
purpose
we

of

idealize work"

is to

art

in the manual

of the
The

and

criticism

school
our

arts

system

economic

and

that is what

trainingshops that keep

the

we

find

principles

crafts in view.
that

is

being made

is that it has

no

nowadays

vital connexion

social system, and


the development of

or

of

that it has

our

with
not

and
commerce
kept pace with
industry;also that it has no ethical or social value
to the great majorityof people.The
development of
manual
trainingby the making of objectsof real
sound and artistically
value,constructively
good, de-

HANDICRAFT

246

ethical

velops the
the

value

of

and

Morris.

value, and
school

increases

largely

very

society.
of societyand
The
entire reorganization
industry
the principlesset forth by the founders
of the
upon
and crafts movement,
is impossible.The
tion
educaarts
and elevation of the great publicto an appreciation
that which
is possible,
of even
be done
cannot
of Ruskin
by the few scattered enthusiastic disciples
our

This

education

of the school system, and


its propaganda disseminated
school

system

shows

to

system

and

elevation

is

that it was

started and

entirelyoutside

that the criticisms

of

tion
func-

our

of the
schools

todayare worthy of serious attention


by progressiveeducators.
and the most
the foremost
Even
progressiveof our
learn something from
educators
a
can
study of the
industrial phases of the arts
social and
and
crafts
The
who
are
movement.
so earnestly
men
advocating
education
endeavor
in an
vocational
to
bring the
school
into articulation with our
onomic
social,ecsystem
that

are

current

and

industrial

system

can

learn

that

art,

be separatedbut
drawing,designand industrycannot
The
be developed together.
educator
must
average
when
consideringthe vocations from his somewhat
narrow
point of view engendered by his experiences
rather than the vocations,
thinks
with manual
training
and of forging,foundry
of the machine
shop first,
and pattern making,asadjunctsof the machine
shop;
he thinks of joineryand carpentry, and thinks there
visit
is no need for art or designhere. But he should
of our largestores
where
the products of many
one
vocations
are
presented for sale,and he will find it

HANDICRAFT

248

is

ment

the

for
from
is

the

is

that

educated

an

and

enrichment
the

of
and

arts

manual

that

return

the

crafts

demand

will

that

work

in

ornament

live
result

in.

The
in

the

things

of

of

of

the

public

the
of

development

the

and

and

two

buyers,
consistent

houses

and

to

the

they
will

movements

both

benefit

future

the

make

training

and

buy

they

and

derived

Manual

construdion

combination

been

has

movement.

sound

will

training

educatingandtrainingageneration

who

public,

appreciative

the

state.

enment
enlight-

HANDICRAFT

249

LUCKAHAUKS
LOUIS

WHO

has
sea

pink

to

clam

DEACON

wandered

not

beach

alniost

J.

and

noted

among
numbers

countless

violet tinted

seftions

worn

by

the

ever

of
constant

our

shell

strewn

theRotsam

the

of white

of broken

shells;"Butter-tasters"

smooth

along a

and

"skimmer"

childhood

washing

days,
of

sea

sand, these fragments of shell have attra"led


those childhood
They recall to the memory
many.
made
of in many
use
an
days when they were
alluring
pastime; largepieces in the fashioningof miniature
houses, small thin seftions and narrow
stripsfor
highways and by-ways in the Lilliputianvillageso
panse
planned in hours of play,while a wide excarefully
left bare. But the whole
of beach was
village
and totally
obliterated
was
always ruthlessly
by the
merciless
tidal wave
the return
of high water;
on
with
of
a
catastrophe witnessed
mingled emotions
of gleeat the demolition
regret and a certain amount
and

of

childish handiwork.

our

Few

are

"butter

that in past times

perhapsaware
tasters"

quitean

were

It

can

readilybe

adept in the art


implements of
rude "money"

understood

chipping arrow

hard

flint could
of

the

natives

that Indians

of

out

same

of
important medium
tribes livingalong the

the Indian
among
shore, in their tradingwith other

exchange

these

more

heads

further

land.
in-

sufficiently
and

other

easilymanufacture
attraftive

colored

HANDICRAFT

250

pieces

of

these

giving

to

this

ahauk

somewhat

It

medium

^^stones"

form

of

them

Such

beautiful

found

are

sand

brought

but

to

being
Having

of

by

will

Luckahauks
into

symmetrical
and

ing
show-

that

many

once

beautifully

with

silver

finish

their

beauty

embellishment

with

small

amethysts

Here

is

surely

artistic

ideas

polish

will
The

either

bright

field
love

for
of

the
nature.

are

rich

deed,
in-

almost

wear

colors

heightened
baroque

laps,

sea

"gem."

polished.
in

dull,

the

very

other

harmonizing

the

look

they

small

new

and

and

of

wear

on

any

is

other

or

the

treatment

hardness

C9nsiderable

while

to

unlike

entirely

necessarily

are

course

high

very

when

with

pecially
es-

tiful
beau-

really

what

colorings

beach

proper

indefinitely

or

and

many

thickness,

violet

the

on

due

polish,

no

and

to

polished

sufficient

Luck-

name

possess.
as

with

of

did,

they

wampums.

called

so

and

cut

and

of

know

to

same

pieces

rich

style

surprising

these

from
the

the

this

the

exchange

workers

when

produce

of

after

craft

to

and

shells;

worn

somewhat

be

may

water

or

antique

or

by

blend

treatment

seed

pearls,

stones.

craft

workers

HANDICRAFT

THE
[Under

the

from

time

earns

his

time

livingat

fundamental
the

CRAFTSMAN'S

generalhead
to

251

of "The

TOOLS

Craftman's

will be considered

Tools**

the appurtenances and tools of the hand


his craft under
present day conditions.

considerations will be written

well

by

known

worker
These

who

brief,

workers

in

various

and are publishedin response


to a need
industries,
expressed
for authoritative
The
crafts.
various
the
elementarymonographs on
Editors assume
for the opinionsof contributors,but all
no
responsibility
writers have been encouraged to treat mooted
Aankly
pointsof practise
and
fully.Editors.]

The
carl

purington

craftsman

THE
to

Printer's

who

Tools
rollins

seeks

in the

varied impressionsand
register

of the aftive

life about

ideals of his

him

printedpage
translations

hopes and
appliancesrefined
or

the

brain,has to do with
almost
cal
the last degreeof accuracy
and mechanito
and he must
finish,
always be unconsciouslyon
his guard lest the mere
and
excellence
mechanical
handiness

of his tools lead him

modern
astray. The
excellence
of that uniform

printer'stools partake
without
the
which
is at once
particularsuperiority
and the curse
of modern
blessing
industry;and while
remembering the faft let us consider in this article
in
the tools which
modern
our
printer will use
earning his livingby the pra"liseof his craft,tools
which
in their modern
the
to
perfectionhe owes
machine

age.
TYPE.

The
cast

type of the
in

an

printeris a small piece of metal,


intricate water-jacketed,
multiplexmold.

HANDICRAFT

252

lead, tin, antimony,

of

it looks

etc.;

copper,

like

figureI. On the drawing are the various parts of


the piece of type named
as
they are used in pradise.
sions
Type is made of many sizes,and varies in dimenfollows: the ''heightto paper" (a to b) is
as
always uniform, and is,in America, .918 inch : the
point measurement
(c to d) varies from 4-point
larger
(.0553)to 144-point (1.992 inch)and even
this being the name
by which the type is known,*
and never
varyingbetween
types called by the same
wherever
bought in this country: the width
name,
of characters, or
"set"
(e to f) varies with each
character, as

rule.

the
Type being the most
important tool which
be extemporized,
(sinceevery other device can
printer uses
if need were) it is important that it be
made
and as carefully
selected by the printer.
carefully
Thanks
to the modern
perfedion of manufa"buring,
technical

the

processes

result in

metal

type which

from every point of view.


thoroughlysatisfactory
So much
be said,of course
for the design of
cannot
the modern
the type, inasmuch
as
development of
due to the enormous
mercial
comtype-foundingis largely
requirementsof this country; but the printer
is

is careful

who

and

who

knows

what

he

wants

can

thoroughly satisfadorytype faces from the


his own
By and by, when he wants
type founders.
privatetype face,he can get it designedand cut by
obtain

^he

of type

diamond, pearl, agate, nonpareil,minion,


bourgeois,long-primer,
brevier,
pica,english,Columbian,paragon, canon,
in
The
of the old familiar,
abandonment
etc.
tic
romanno
are
longer use.
is the pricewe
have paidfor accuracy and efficiency not an
names
exorbitant price,either,
in this case.
old

names

"

"

HANDICRAFT

CASLON

STYLE

OLD

this is the lower

253

FACE

TYPE

corresponding with

case

it

tljelotoer caje^eto go Initl)ca)"ttaiiai


tfyi^ijer
"

SCOTCH

scotch

ROMAN
lower

roman

KENNERLEY

case

ROMAN

Group

of

FACE

TYPE

type

TYPE

Type

Faces.

same

font

FACE

HANDICRAFT

254

the

of

some

There

which
in

illustrated

are

his

type faces

seleft the
The

work.

to

253.

on

page
varietyof sizes,and from

printercan
in

of this

makers

excellent

several

are

made

leadingtype

size

be had

day,
to-

These

them

types which

12-point

country.*

the

are

ern
mod-

he will

is shown

need

in

the

samples.
printerwill require many accessory
and these can
be got in
types, borders,and initials,
in all the crafts,drawing is a most
As
two
ways.
and the printerwho
draw
finds
can
faculty,
necessary
aid
himself immediately in possessionof a valuable
have reproduced
his ideas. He can easily
to expressing
zinc
if
or
on
by photography, or on wood
copper
craftsman

The

he

can

initials and various


graver, many
will prove of the utmost
units which
use

handle

decorative

There

value.

and

there
made

be

is

are

times

gatheringthis
them

is

ranging from

of

one

hand

of the

workman

in

question of the superiority


it is always to be preferred;
the ubiquitouscamera
may
cellaneou
printer'scollection of mis-

enriched.

second

is to love old

wealth

vast

The

of

method

specimen

decorative

using that
leadingprinters,
at

every

branch

books

**archi-

type deagner in this country


word

in the restricted

sense

of the trade.

the

definition.
will leave severely
alone the abomination
supposingthat the printer
of desolation know
as half-tone plates.
I

am

material,

utterlyabominable, through
that the foremost

of

reproduced drawing is that the


photographically
a definite mark, like that produced by a cuttingtool,
a serrated line
produced by the action of the acid used in etching:
other words, the mechanicallyproduced platehas edges that lack

fThe objectionto
line is not
resulting
but

the

material

^It is interesting
to record
is also

when

of, and

use

material

In

no

block,t and

of the wood
but

the

HANDICRAFT

HANDICRAFT

257

printersused. Figure 6 are


for pickingout letters

used

tweezers

from

ally
occasion-

the

body of the type


rather than familiarity
should
matter, but reverence
be encouraged with them.
Figure 5 is the "galley"
the stick,
the type is "dumped"
from
into which
and before it is made
up into pages. Figure 4 is the
and "coffin"*
which
on
"imposing stone," "frame"
is placed to be
the type, after being tied with string,
"locked
a part
up" for press. The "chase"
(properly
of
in

which

press)in
figure7.
the

In addition

the

the apparatus

to

type is locked

shown, there

is shown

several

are

which
the printer
expensive machines
will eventuallyhave, such as the lead cutter, (leads
being long.Rat stripsof lead,used to separate lines
rule miterer (for
of type),
of brass
joiningthe corners

valuable

and

rule)etc.
PRESS.

It is

that the

presumed

press, though it is fair


that cannot
varietyof reasons

old hand
to

that

it is demonstrable
on

the

on

the

that

as

presses

power
presses
old hand
machines.
But

printerhas

of the machine

good

work

as

ever

was

days an

surface,and

the

was

old

frame

it has retained.

''imposed**on

done

stone.

say that (owing


be gone into here)

was

it is

has been

stone

on

was

in

done

the old hand

as

is that the
explanation

the

sidious
in-

believes

on

power

machines,

used
freqvently
known

done

accomplished
largelybecause

the writer

will be

holdingit became

Another
the

and

can

grave

and

the

use

to

work
as

not

lost his balance

whirr

''^In the old

name

such

no

modern

modern

the

will

craftsman

as

the

an
**

imposing
coffin,"a

''form**

of type

HANDICRAFT

258

craftsman

provided the

is

bedeviled

into

using
the papers, inks and types which
so
are
easilyused
the power
on
appliance.Good
printingis not and
of Speed and
be a pawn
cannot
Cheapness in the
game

of Profit.

There

several

are

book, and
be

well

they

as

to

omit

the

of presses which
market.
Illustrations

are

of

in any type founder's


specimen
all have
their advocates, it may

much

consideration

of the

which
say that the machine
thoroughly,quickly and well the work

here, except
most

on

fouud

be

can

makes

good

machines

standard
them

not

to

matter

will do
of the

ably
printeris the best for the purpose. Probthe Golding press is best adapted for the printer
But in considering
needs we
whose
are
considering.
a
printingpress it should be borne in mind that we
for so-called letterpress
are
seeking a reliable machine
auxiliaries as well as
printing,and that many
design itself which are adapted to specialneeds of
work
in this
modern
commercial
not
a necessity
are
machine
connedlion.
A printing
is an expensive part
of the craftsman's
equipment, and should be secured
only after careful investigation.
craftsman

PAPER.

question of paper is little understood


by the
so
layman, and, it is to be feared,scarcelymore
by
The
the printer.
confusion, I think, is traceable to
per
the lack of understandingof the word
"good." Pahas two
ing
prime qualities composition, meanthe stuff it's made
of, and appearance.
Paper
The

"

may

have

one

of

these

chara"SI;eristics

"

may

be

HANDICRAFT

good in composition
ledger paper; or poor
like

appearance,

rough wrapping
is hand
in the

qualityof
much

and

like
in appearance,
in composition and good in
poor

book

some

and

the

and

papers

drawing

papers.
makes

made

machine

or

259

stuff that goes

some

of the

Whether
no

per
pa-

difference

into it: but it is

made
ever
paper was
say that no
that made
to
equal in appearance
by
by machine
be economicallyprobhand. Obviously it would
not
able
not

too

to

that handmade

pulp, but
machine

it is

paper

true
certainly

made

papers
of the hand made

some

"

"

be made

that

even

from

wood

the finest of

will outwear
papers which
do fall down
when
it comes

and

So much
generalappearance.
by way of attempting to straightenout the tangle
over
"good" paper. For the craftsman there can be
no
question of the paper to use. Hand made
paper
offers every conceivable
advantagefor his work, and
the wide
variety,includingpapers as far apart in
and the luxurious
Chinese Pah Sing Tsze
texture
as
Japanese vellum, is sufficient for every need. The
hand made
imported, and are
papers are exclusively
from Japan, Holland, Italy,
France, Engprincipally
land
and Spain.For many
uses
undoubtedlythe Van
is the most
Gelder
it does a
excellent,offering
as
and pleasingsurface. The
uniform
from Italy
papers
to

surface

would

vary

texture

much

in

illimitable
du"l;ion

of

color, texture

to the
possibilities

and

value, but suggest

craftsman

fine efFe"9:s.Almost

without

in the

pro-

exception
hand
made
papers need to be printedwet, and they
welcome
full of surprises,
and otherwise, from
are
little touches
of Japanese craftsmanship in the way

HANDICRAFT

26o

of choice

parti-colored
paper-tape,
sadlybatter the type.

which

to

lumps

of

pulp

INK.

at the mercy
printeris much
of the ink maker, or I might better say, has at command
the facilities of an experienced ink maker, and
a
knowledge probably greater than that of the old
printer.Ink is bought in small quantitiesas needed,
dust and
from
and
is kept secure
drying by tubes
in. It can
be had in a mulsuch as oil paint comes
titude
of colors,and many
near
blacks,*'but it is

In

the

use

the

of ink

"

well

of

beware

to

craftsman

the

The

them.
with

ink

good

maker

will furnish

stiiF black, and

perience
ex-

that for the craftsman's


the
has proven
use
stiffhand press ink will give best results. The

best

freelyconsulted, and usually


he has a customer
be fullytrusted,for once
he may
and who
what
he wants
knows
who
produces good
work, he will givehim every aid and encouragement,
craftsman
of the size of his orders. The
regardless
color from
who
seeks to mix his own
lampblack,
oils and
varnish, is not likelyto produce as good
ink

should

maker

ink

as

Colored

the

be

ink maker.

inks, like dyes,are

mainly of

coal

tar

deriv-

As a matter
vatives,and are mostly to be shunned.
if ever
have occasion
of faft,the printerwill seldom
blue and red, and good perto
use
manent
any but black,
colors

full bodied
These
and

are
are

the

be obtained.

tools the craftsman


for

sufficient

finest work.

can

It is

the

constant

printerrequires,
produ"9:ionof the very
strugglefor the ambi-

HANDICRAFT

tious

printer
about

zest

his

to

border

all

constantly

another

safe

rule

fonts,
type,

always

make

constantly

effort.

hold

to

one

studying
and

paper

possibly
to

to

ink.

up

for

study

or

lack
old

of

of

it

for

for

is

chosen

equipment

or

"

possibilities

enthusiasm,

examples,

But

carefully

of

amount

type

new

initials.

two

is
which

crafts,

elusive

the
No

the

secure

set

"

there

for

equipment,
about

as

craftsman

more

one

limit

to

printing

the

urges

261

of

can

failure

constant

HANDICRAFT

Boston.

Diiignidby

Hartford:

Arts

G.

Birlram

and

Gsedkue.

Pelerboro
,

Crafts

Club.

socEnrop,

DBKOTnXB
Detroit.
Marks

of

the

Differenl

Arts

and

Crafts

Societies.

HANDICRAFT

26+

WITH

THE

The
BOSTON:
the Societyof

followingschedule

SOCIETIES

Committee
Arts

and

Exhibitions

on

Crafts

the

announces

SpecialExhibitions

of

of

for

191

1-

to

1912:
1.

Woodworking,
December

2.

5, 191

4.

etc., November

1.

Copper, Brass, Pewter, Iron,January


6,

3.

Frames,

19

to

ruary
Feb-

1 2.

Pottery,February 9 to March
5,
Textiles
and Embroidery, March

191
8 to

2.

April

9,

1912.

Basketry,April 12 to May 7, 1912,


6. Jewelry,rear room.
Silverware,front room. May
9 to June 25, 191 2.
The
has this year arranged for a small
Committee
number
of exhibits,in order to allow a longertime
5.

for each; but

it is the intention

to

alternate

exhibits

in the schedule
that every craft will be represented
least every other year.
at
The
remind
members
wishes
Committee
of the
to

so

well
as
importance of these exhibits to contributors
the Society.The
to
as
heartycooperation of all is
urged that the present series of exhibits may be of
will
unusual
merit. It is hoped that members
prepare
specialarticles of importance for the exhibits.
intended

Work
on

the

for these

regular form
and

5 0^clock on
Exhibition.

should

the

but

should

exhibits
marked

be delivered

at

*'

tion,"
Special Exhibi-

9 Park

Monday previousto

be entered

the

Street

hefore
openingof the

HANDICRAFT

265

Old

Colony Union, Bourne, Mass.,


after organizasix months
opened its Club House
tion.
The
House
consists of a large reading
Club
for members, running the full lengthof the east
room
Bourne:

The

side of the

house,

and
building,

room

is finished

room

it is

overhead;
with

tea

salesroom

window

gold.The

in dark

curtains

wood,

in

of

stained

furniture

in the

the west

on

hung

of

town

in the

of the

center

side. The
the beams

ing
show-

golden brown
Japanese texture

burlap,

dull brown

Bourne.

At

ing
read-

of

old

made
is all hand-

each

of the

six

chair.
writing table and cane-seated
In the center
table for magazines,
of the room
a large
with
six Morris
chairs
surrounding it, suggests
hours of readingto the members.
comfortable
many
The
is the room
salesroom
through which all enter
It is lightedfrom the south end,
the club building.
the walls are hung with grey burlap of an open weave,
the wood-work
is a dark tone
harmonizing with the
color of the walls. Cherry colored curtains givejust

windows

is

the

touch

salesroom

of color needed
on

and

it was

examples
one

the

In the

room.

an

unusual

one

ing
interest-

thing
Every-

for the work

high order. It consisted mostly of


baskets
rugs, althoughthere were

of leather
The

the

opening day there was an


done
of work
by members.

considered
of

warm

the

exhibition

was

to

work
needleand

amples
ex-

work.
of Swedish

shown
done

on

brown

weaving
hand-woven

were

terestin
intable
vege-

in brilliant brown
dyed linen was worked
along
Indian
basket in its coloring
borders suggesting
an
in dull blues on
and composition. Another
a

HANDICRAFT

266

crash also

Russia

and white

another
proved interesting;
plainblock designon hand-woven

in

made

runners

with

bands

was

in

band

of crochet

one

worked
with a green
green
in linen thread
representinglittle

in

There

was

luncheon

beautiful

group
of a center
set, consisting

doilies in the
Miss

which

much

One

in

artistic

four

moss

attitudes.
interesting
in color and design.One
conventional
design was

chickens

bureau

vegetabledyed linens
in the same
in daintypattone
terns
design; noteworthy among

of crochet

these

other

were

hand-woven,

in

conventional

of

in

of all. There

the admiration

won

in green
crash

blue

of

was

with

mauve

chet
cro-

very dainty.
of needlework
in

pieceand twentyCape Cod work,

white

and

Garel

in

in brown

Sandwich

has

shown

so

interest.
luncheon

Another
with

were

border

green

it was
flyingacross
attraffcive in its novelty of

in efFe"9:and

linen

with

of swallows

flock

The

in white

set

quaint linen
a
delightto

and
squirrels

chickens

cross-stitch

bird,Maeterlinck's

biles made
all. There

worked

with

ment.
treat-

woven

and
geese
in old ioned
fash-

these

on

*blue bird for

hand

were

One

patterns.

on

anese
Jap-

little blue

happiness,was

very

popular.
There

was

an

and doilies. In the

mats
collars,
was
was

braided

much

Orders
many
these

coUedion
interesting

rug in
admired

this

for five of these

will
fingers
orders.

be

Another

bands

of red which

eleven

was

laces in

of the salesroom

center

burlap with
"

of bobbin

feet

across.

given so that
occupied braidingburlap to fill
were

braided

at

rug

once

in

beads

border

HANDICRAFT

novel

was

267
A

in its treatment.

crochet

rug in

green

unique. A large
ground with panelsof ducks was
bed spread of Russia crash worked
der
with a wide borof reticelli hemstitchingand a center
panel was
all being
in its simplicity
and freshness
interesting
"

worked
A

in the

homespun
peacock was

bands

embroidered

with

same

So

lightblue.

orders

many

brown

woven

of brown

also
admired, as was
simple design worked

much

of the

and

shirt in hand

"middie"
girl's

young

dress

tone.

same

and
child's

in

green

received

were

for

that
workers
artistic little gowns
are
many
tryingto fillthe orders for the school dresses.

these

busy

artistic
undoubtedly the most
in the Club House.
room
head,
Showing the timbers overthe walls hung with green burlap,
the window
curtains of a pale green of the same
ture
Japanese texthe room
used in the other rooms,
as
givesone
The

Tea

is

of freshness

sense

The

Room

china

in

is the

use

the curtains
The

Tea

the

room

in its green

of interest

proves
in

all,and

with the
style,
by the boys under

mission

Union

JapaneseSedgiware*

ing
match-

tone.

of the children's
represents so much
in the Industrial School this year, that

tables,twelve
made

comfort.

Room

done

work,

and

Industrial

the

to

all. The

chairs
thirty-six

sideboard

match,

to

fifteen in The

School. A

little round

settee

Old

were

made
all

Colony

in the salesroom

plant stands.
hemmed
The
table linen,all of the finest quality,
was
ing
by the girlsin the Industrial School,and the letterthe white ground was
O. C. U. in green upon
of it worked
much
by the girls.
was

also made

by them,

and

several

HANDICRAFT

268

the

on

vases

ware

of clematis

strands

Lovely

bits of the

of the

corners

twined

same

hanging

the

On

the

of the Old
hundred

three

about

Overlooking Bourne
pines is very pretty
tables
breezes
An

under

the

for the

summer

out

of

exhibition

Union

pond
and

mantle

Union

Colony

persons
the outlook

very

were

through
picturesque.The

works

were

taken
the

cool

Colony
County Fair,

rain.

made

tea

Old

The

Barnstable

the

to

of

was

and

and

the

months.

poorly attended this year on


During the day orders amounting

which

Club

present.

suggest comfort

trees

the

taken

was

Sedgi
piece,and

the green vases


upon
pictureof the Tea Room.

tables

House

the

about

the

complete
opening day

from

in addition

an

award

of

account
to

$93"ys

of ^20.00

Vas

for its handiwork.

Union

ference
Agricultural
Collegehad a conin Amherst
in
workers
for community
asked
to
hibit
exwas
August. The Old Colony Union
their works
there, and the exhibition proved
in every way.
successful
During the Conference

The

Massachusetts

Mrs.

Garland

work

and

As

there

number

in

of states, and
The

and

Hartford:
Hartford

minutes'

ten

talk

outlined

organizationof The Old Colony


were
representativesthere from

certainlydone
its works

Old

purpose

and

twenty-fifthand

Crafts

nations,an

Colony

made

sale of

A
Arts

several

Union

the

Union.
a

large

honor
in

was

having

known.

articles

seleffced

Shop was
twenty-sixth at

held
the

from
on

the

August

studio

in

HANDICRAFT

"Bramble

English,
Fine

printed

much

interest
also

August.
of

The

Society

palm

baskets,
of

assortment

cotton

woven

rugs

but

exceedingly

and

colors;

miscellaneous

these

blue

well
and
crafts.

and

shown

were

in

Montague

annual

its

jewelry

work

It

colle"Eiion.

the

financially.

successful

The

L.

J.

leather

silver,

manifested

was

very

held

hand-made
and

Mrs.

of

I.

R.

textiles

Montague:

sizes

of

specimens

home

summer

Weekapaug,

at

block

was

the

Brae"

269

exhibition

the

makes

now

after

woven,

white

the

old
and

latter

ciety
Soof

part

shapes

many

constituting
inexpensive

Crafts

and

Arts

and

attra"live

most

articles

and

useful

rag

carpet

method,

many

patterns

of

embroidery;

and

several

HANDICRAFT

270

LETTERS
PUBLIC

TH"

EDUCATING

To the Editor:
conneiftion

IN

with

report of the

the

Rockford,

Arts and Crafts Societyit seems


Illinois,
while to bring forward
several points

In the firstplace,I agree


that the benevolent

with

worth
for

cussion.
dis-

the

tary
discouragedsecreundertakingof educating
a
public againstits will,is an expensive enterprise
be confused
with condudlinga craft shop
and not
to
The
financial success.
ucation
artistic and
to
an
only ed-

any of us ever
is that which
and
arts

I know
there

without

our

own

operation
co-

through experience;

comes

possiblethat, in this instance, it is the


the education?
crafts society
that is acquiring

is it
and

get

not

Rockford
does

and

differ

not

feel

sure

that the

materiallyfrom

situation

that of

other

places of its size. It is a beautiful and homelike


little citywith the same
kinds of people one
meets
in most
ly
places people charming or otherwise,mostand peoplewith monthe former in my experience,
ey
and without.
As is the case
in other places,the
are
people of small means
vastlyin the majority,
their purchasing power
ever
being in no relation what"

to

Now

their education

it appears

to

me

or

culture.

that handicraft

sales

are

not

empt
ex-

principlesof any salesmanship.One


run
a
shop with only the thingfor
certainlycannot
is heroically creatinga demand."
which
One
one
not
must
only get the people into the shop, but
from

the

**

HANDICRAFT

272

titude

of

superior

and

caste

certain

summary

we
classingof the average person as a philistine,
more
might be surprisedto find how much
progress
be made
in tryingto learn with him, than
can
by
standingaloof and tryingto drag him up by the hairs

Craftsworker.

of his head.
"

"

"

To the Editor:

1DO
letter
my
the

idea of

the

with

writing,but
pen

eager

can

provoking its readers


though I have so far
no
longerdo so. The
the editors

provocation be upon
fray.
In the September issue
editorial signed"M.
an
an

have

supposed

for protest. It is
does not
the times

system
if

has

carved

that

true

much

turn

the

to
;

and

such

to

as

the

spiritof
as

the
that

those

as

call

of education

matter

shown

windows

Indian

an

what

remember

should

we

is

to

system

that

with

workmen

out

wonderful

do

the

is presented

but

produce craftsmen,

as

to

there

ideals

present

and

cause

contrary

so

our

restrained

magazine
wherein

now

excited

to

now

so

"

western

our

were

of education
cannot

we

of your
T. G."

ideal of education

apparent

we

is being edited

if Handicraft

know

not

who
in

magazine,that those workmen


ciety.
were
never
supposed to take their place in a free soof Suez.
born west
EgalitePhillipewas
Fortunatelyor otherwise we have the utterlynovel
problem of producing good handicraft and turning
former

out

number

competent

of the

craftsmen

confrontinga great
dehiocracy where every

under
race
man

conditions
that

"

is

as

is,in

good

never
a
as

fore
be-

political
another

HANDICRAFT

273

little better.

and

sometimes

write

this letter is the greater


criticisms of the German
of which

burden

the
while

it does

temptation
of several

in view

of

system
be

to

seems

efficient

out

turn

My

to

'

cent
re-

education,

that that

system,
is

workmen,

tially
essen-

Apparently a system of education


the boys and girls
for the strenuous,
ill-paid,
fitting
feverish, and withal pleasurable life of craftsmen
be exclusive,narrow
and tend
be eflFe"ftive,
to
must,
aristocratic*

to

class distinction.

It is well
but

shall

rank

realize

to

doom

we

that
those

society?The

in

all
who

far advanced

alreadytoo
sure

that

health

our

caste

as

craftsmen;

particular
call for agricultural
choly
schools,is a melan-

present

institute

to

be

can

schools, trade schools,vocational


attempt

be

cannot

tion,
in educa-

system

by

nation

to

I am
colleges.
(and,as producers
our

dodors
of
beauty)does not lie with the German
will
science and philosophy.
to me,
Rather, it seems
of boys and girls
it come
from
trained in the
race
a
ideals of
and
educational
sensuousness
simplicity,

of

^^

passion." Under
and

natural

reared

quipped
an

out-of-doors

such

on

idea that

we

the

factorythat

and

I have
of

the

*Sce

"Atlantic

Democratic

we

afuther
kiddies
class

craftsman

are

industrial

living,would

three-fold

become

to

of

conditions

foundation

be

child

better

craftsman?
I
proficient
befuddled
so
inextricably
don't really
what
know
art
a

idea that
to

make

reallysavors

skilful Germanic
future

members

less of education

Monthly** for September, 191

Education.**

not

freedom,

1,

e-

have
with
is

"

ing
trainthe

of

than

"Aristocratic

and

HANDICRAFT

274

of manufafture.The
as

well

mixed
to

lead

as

up
us

titude,but
our

to

the
in

fadoryhas "got"

craftsmen:

it,and

it 's

our

we

business

all
to

educaton

pretty
iind the

wdl
cha"

I suppose
it 's a horribly
benighted at*
shall succeed
I have an idea that we
ia

out.

by tryingto
freedom
with justiceand
the fadory siren.
quest

are

the

better

leaven
than

industrial

ety
soci-

by succumbing
Artificer.

HANDICRAFT
MMi

VOL.

NOVEMBER

IV

I9II

NO.

"l*w^pfc

GROUP

OF

JAPANESE

CANDLESTICKS
FREDERICK

the

Japanese have been savingdaylight

BECAUSE
for many

to

Franklin's

axiom

of farmer

and

ye

centuries

ornate
finer,more
The
Nipponese

made.

before

Until

COBURN

W.

coUecftion

candlesticks
have

; the

many
fisher folk

kerosene

oil

was

characteristic.

introduced

among
lightingof the ordinarydwellinghouse

by

rude

form

easily

not

always been obedient


picturesin their Ukiyobeginning their labors

illustrate that national

dawn

is

of their

of candlestick

them
was

the

plished
accom-

known

as

te-

affair of iron

supported on three legs,with


of the projecting
one
arms
considerablylonger than
the other by which
it might be easily
picked up from
the floor,on
which
it emitted
its sputteringlight.
In wealthier houses a common
ispherical
type had a largehembase,twelve or fifteen inches in diameter,
from
which
feet or
a
more
arose
singleshaft two
in heightand surmounted
by the usual cup and spur.
Only in templesand shrines,during the greater part
of Japanese history,
the candlestick
accorded
was
such workmanship as went
of sword
to the fashioning
guards and kozuka^ of the narimono or ancient bells

shoku^an

and
A

Koro

or

small but

bronze

incense

burners.

comprehensive
fairly

collection

of

tem-

HANDICRAFT

276

or shokudai^
mostly from the remote
piecandlesticks,
and Tango, was
provinces of Tamba
latelyshown
resident in Boston.
by a Japanese connoisseur
They
students
teach no especiallesson with which
of Japanese
not
art
are
alreadyfamiliar. Considered, that
is to say, as objedlsof varying beautythey illustrate
all the decorative
the course
arts
through which
of the
passed in Japan from the archaic simplicity
Nara
period through the nobly adaptive designs of
and Ashikaga periodsreaching a culmination
the Kamakura

works

in the

of

Kubei

and

other

master

earlyTokugawa, beyond whom


upward one usuallydiscovers only deterioration and
of the artistic imagination.
increasingdebasement
This story is familiar to readers of Mr. Ralph Adams
admirable
book
Cram's
on
Japanese architedure;
it might be reof ex pede Herculem
the principle
told
on
metal

workers

in

of the

of candlesticks.

terms

Japanese candlesticks,it should be explained


before attemptingto describe individual types or examples,

The

burn
paper.

candle

wax

with

hollow

wick

candle, being hollow, is fitted

Each

to

of rice
a

sharp

bronze, a device employed in the


obsolete.
candlestick,now
practically
English^r/V"f^/

spur

of

iron

or

requireda good deal of snuffing;


the snufferswere
usuallyin the form of a blunt pair
like our
The
much
of tweezers,
candy tweezers.
of the old time
projeftinghook to be seen on many
The

wick

paper

candlesticks

oldest of the

The
in

for accommodation

was

Boston

type

were

recorded

to

of the snuffers.

pieces in the colle""lion exhibited


pair of tall iron candlesticks of a
have

been

used

in the

Buddhist

HANDICRAFT

277

temple of Daianji,one of the seven


great temples
of the earlyempire. Whatever
in Nara, the capital
lector
the colthe provenience of these specimens, which
secured
in the province of
is said to have
archYamato,
they follow what is known
among
vertical rod is
eologistsas the Daianji style.The
and
holding peradjustable,
pushing up and down
fe6llyat any desired pointalthoughthere is no visible
clasp.The lower rod is riveted to a broad and heavy
base. The
shape, accordingto a Japanese tradition,
derived from two
was
corrupted Sanskrit characters
divinities.
signifyingFudo and Aizen, Hindoo
Nara
and ninth centuries,A.D.)
The
period (eighth
to

the

which

these

formation

candlesticks
of the

later

are

referred

earliest school

witnessed

of

Japanese iron
brilliant guildof

develop into the


the
Myo-chin. Although no candlestick maker's
is preserved from
this remote
name
antiquitythe
workmanship
suggests that the Daianji craftsmen
were
primarilysword smiths, who perhaps pra"):ised
sticks
the more
peacefulart as an avocation. The candlebronze
of cast
which
began to appear about
the design
the twelfth century show
very frequently
of a stork standing on
tortoise's back
a
eman
dlem
of longevity.
The
motive
was
accepted at first
and primarily
as properly
decorative,the bird's straight
legs admirably servingtheir purpose as standards.
little gold inlay from
A
the first gave a touch
of
vied with each other
elegance.Later on the designers
workers,

to

"

in the efFort
of

kugawa

to

realistic tation
represenof the Toand tortoise shell. Some

secure

plumage

candlesticks

adion

are

and

therefore

as
delightful

re-

HANDICRAFT

zyS

ever,
gards surpriseand quaintness of 6ancy.Often, howthey departtoo far from the naturally
upright
of the candlestick

charader

that is meted

criticism

and

out

become

liable to the

all over-realistic decorative

to

The

between
arcitedural
happy mean
and piduresque grace is held by the Japanese
seventy
themselves
of
been attained by Kubei
to have
art.

lived and

Sakai,who

worked

in the

province of

Setsu

in the latter part of the seventeenth


century. To Kubei
is attributed the originof a type of which
ample
a good exin

shown

was

Boston,

of

candlestick,with

of a conventionalized
tripodbase, each legconsisting
elephant'shead with upturned trunk.

Prettyfancies

displayedby individual candle


stick makers.
A piece from the earlyAshikaga period
island"
shows
in the upright standard
in the
an
losophe
phiopening of which is seen a figureof a Chinese
A stork and
peeringas through a window.
were

^^

work

tortoise
leaf cup

of the

master

reception of

century, with

lotus

candle, is said to
resemble
Japanese candlestick
closelya famous
influenced
which
the sculptorBary elate in his
greatly
A very old candlestick,
with hexagonal base,
career.
of swelling
chrysanthemum plinth and a column
entasis reveals the fkieness of proportion of which
the

for the

fourteenth

workers

opulence and
Private shrines

national
at

in size and

colle6lor who
from

Kamakura

self

noblemen's

candlesticks

work

of the

that
charm.

found
the

the

era,

assertion,were

an

age

of

capable.

tained
conpalacessometimes
vied with
sticks
temple candle-

Of

such

sort, the

ese
Japan-

lightful
explains,is a rather deMiddle
Tokugawa age, in
it

HANDICRAFT

lotus

ivhich

motives

domestic

Where

for

intended

candlestick

not

is

w^hich

might

flora

and

applied

motives

to

indeed

this
if

to

this

of

the

and

freedom

the

have

not

objeft

such

day

and

metal
which

inspiration*

of

is

generation
of

ordinarily

of

and

the

metal

be

may
not

intelligible

more

than

and

and

questioned

Americans

as

Japanese
fauna

national

Medieval
serves

One

suggestiveness
which

It

the

belongs

century.

their

utility.

high
of

It

head.

considerable

from

bronze

inches

designer

with

rich

rendering

seventeenth

grace

those

tiny

half

lion's

find

were

some

exquisite

workmanship

work

From

and

occidental

an

they

came

two

the

early

whether

worker

Europe

for

the

to

wonders

than

simple

the

than

temples.

conventionalized

probably

and

more

notable

each

described

undoubtedly,

house,

daimyo's

feet,

shrines

of

monumental

less

and

veining.

not

were

previously

sort

smaller

usually

still

realistic

and

candlesticks

utilitarian

and

in

tendrils

with

throughout,

executed

are

twisted

delicately

279

much

Renaissance
basis

for

study

HANDICRAFT

28o

OUT

WAY

FOR
MIRA

THE

titleof Mrs.
Handicraft

CRAFTSMEN
EDSON

Dennett's
must

article in the
interest

tember
Sep-

all craftsmen

tryingeither wholly or in part


of their craft. What
themselves
to support
by means
is all too plain,that
few
is there called attention
to
thus and that there
able to make
few
a living
are
are
beingtrained to becomea"ftive workers. The question
of a craft
of being able to earn
a
livingby means
for the movement
is no
matter
extraneous
rtierely
the
whole
of arts and craft. It concerns
very vitally
influence
It must
the quality
idea of the movement.
both
the work
and the respeftin which
of the work
in which
is held; beside,too, the spirit
and the worker
At present these last
it istaken up byyoungcraftsmen.
do study do it as amserious and those who
not
are
ateurs.
be an
be unless it can
This
must
earning
icine
medprofessionand they can enter it as they would
law. If also,those who
are
or
working in it
a
cannot
earn
livingthereby this (z" stands in the
of their doing the best they might in it, both
way
of its not being taken
because
so
seriously
by themselvesand others and by an a6lual hampering in doing
who

are

it.

The
some

work

years

of the societies has


and

has

reached,

in

been
some

going
cases,

on
a

for
fair

for the amateur


time
The
degree of organization.
is everywhere looked
is passingand the professional
that there is not
a
for. It is found
supply of excel-

HANDICRAFT

282

personalone

of the whole
solved

but

movement

and

those

dreamed
does

This

who

the

this is in

never

be what

have

crax

veiy

Unless
can

some

way

its

struggledthus

nators
origifar

in

for it.

not

therefore

are

becoming

now

movement.

the

it,have

is

in the

mean

become

to

least that

craftsmen

socialists;
they cannot

out
with-

their post work


for that,though
directly
deserting
other progressive
reforms.
some
do,indire"ftly,andfor
the craftsman
reach a reasonable
How, then, can
degree of independence so that his work shall be

"neither

wearisome

over

or

anxious"

over

and

so

and to make
the dreams
true?
to dream
liberty
of cooperation and
It can be brought about by means
of the movement
keeping well within the principles
of workers, whether
itself: that is by forming groups
be

at

in

town

it has

or

been,

successful.

country.
to

the

But

degree in

this

this has

Wherever

should

which
be

it is

more

been

tried,

cooperative,

intimate

and

aside petty jealousy


set
must
complete. Craftsmen
and
suspicion and work for each others' interests.
one
they may hope, when advertising
By this means
the group,
the group, and in advertising
to advertise
then
include the welfare of all within it. They may
nished
degree to have a place to live in furhope in some
and companions' work, and so
with their own
useful and at the same
containingnothingnot really

^^

time

beautiful."

But
in the

group

of craftsmen

city,an

but

little

as

allied

this would

workshops
be

over

the

can
only meeting in the societies,
efFeftive compared with such a group

isolated craftsman
be

advance

with

HANDICRAFT

rural conditions.

amid
cities
but

be

cared

by

orders

to

the

made
for

by
as

group
a

towns

or

and

advantages;
citylife,will be

studies

would

soon

such.

The

place

and

shop

could

distance
with

well

of

well

winter

occupy
could
be

have,
ities
local-

most

mer
sum-

some

gardening,with
with

craftsmen, and

young

the

of sales

matter

tea-room;

automobile

might

months, while

the

and
citysalesrooms
direftly
begin to come

distri"^s. This

teaching of

the

near

of the

means

local

being within

them

to

up

which

in summer,

the

groups must
of educational

advantages,so called,of

than

be

Such

present, because

at

other

more

283

the

sonal
per-

summer

filled with

the

worthy examples of the craft of each.


The
such, might stand for a particular
as
group,
craft,the output varied by the individualities of the
workers
might have a different craft. There
; or each
would
probably result enough orders to keep most
rural workers
fairlybusy; as the industries among
have, as a rule,had enough orders to keep pace with
creation

of

the output.

By

this

there

means

for workers

qualityof
touch

and

of which

their

would

be achieved

would

which

work, and

confidence

in one's

sense

read
of

an

upon
true

pendence
indethe
social

neither
fellow-artists,

under
enjoyed now
by craftsmen
city
conditions
and livingcasuallyin rented chambers.
who
By this means
only can the craftsman
essays
to live by his work
hope to realize the ideal of the
is

that

movement;

handmade
therefore

is,that each
so

tiful
beau-

and
the greatest simplicity
raise design to the standard

things,in

taste, and

shall live amid

HANDICRAFT

284

of

which

art,

requires
of

happiness
all

With

talent

which

endowed,
these

in

things

not

are

we

is

yet

the

of

means

It

and

carried

field

of

equal

of

if the

in

life
the

to

this

their

need
the
out

the

wait

propitiation

along

craftsmanship.

one's

duce
pro-

which

past,

craftsman
is

goose

earnest

killed

second,of

lives;

own

for
of

own

the

of

first,

craftsmen;

the

as

as

few

convincing

rulers,
lines

but
and

rades,
com-

of

maybe
in

produc-

movement

mattermerelyofconvincinga
not

to

therefore,

idea,

andthird,offurtheringthe
is

youth

laid.

is

all

nation

qur

the

of

the

ablci

be

independent,
egg

of

some

best

with

as

should
the

to

But

doing.

enlarging

whole.

able
reason-

ourselves

we

commend

ingtheirbest;

or

beauty,

golden

group-workers

and

invention

pleasure

and

would

We

ly

of

beautiful

not

before

the

least

at

art

an

and

believe

we

with

dream

condition.
science

our

with

and

study

jorities
ma-

diredthe

proper

HANDICRAFT

TWO

285

SAMPLERS

MADALINE

YALE

to! I will make

WYNNE

sampler,"
with
to"
sounded
"Go
very sympathetic
the sampler idea,it seemed
an
orderlyintrodu(^ion
to the work;
immediately*
everythingin

GO

land

the

of North

Africa

set

itself

to

for the

pose

needle.

generalway I should have said that the hot sun,


the dome
the
of the mosque,
the sea, the villas,
and the slender
donkeys, the white draped Moors
would
have
colors as a
minarets
suggested water
medium
of expression;but an idea is so much
more
sampler the
potent than a fa"^ that at the word
In

whole

visible universe

cross-stitched

itself before

be simple minded
sampler one must
be taken
yet supremely arrogant. Objefts must
To

out

Ark

make

their
and

en

vironment
be

stitched

like toy animals


in the canvas

from

me.

and
from

Noah's

definitely,
yes

defiantly,
exa"fUyas fancy dictates.
Donkeys and cathedrals have no rights,they must
take on the hue of any silk that one
happens to have
selves
hand
and
their proportions must
on
adapt themmesh
of the groundwork.
to the square
silks themselves
be Arab-dyed for Arab
The
must
de
and they must
have been bought in the Rue
use
robed
the gentlejostlings
la Lyre amid
of white
Arab
women
who, veiled and trousered,look like

even

great, white, awkward


than
gracefulin flight

birds
on

that

foot.

would

be

more

HANDICRAFT

2%6
The

cloth

must

be

Was

it

done

in

not

to

in

it

was

the earth

stitchery

terrace

looking
over-

Sea.

that

sampler

should

be

the land

from

for this that

not

has

baked

been

made

as

forth in

Genesis,

for thousands

of

years
while

in Africa's

hot sun,
desert sand
dunes?

unmade

and

set

Turks, Greeks, Jews, Arabs and


have passed over
the land throughtime
Slaves have groaned and Bedouins
have

Romans,

their meagre
flocks. Beads have been told
and the heavy, ebony Nubian
of Allah

white, full garment


tom-tom's
But
from

on

proud
and

with

square

whoever

will

posing for
is a joy.

of

True

and

gay

glory

has,

in his
the

to

snatch

can

TO

is stillwarm

macaw,

THE

tell him
that the

era

with

cathedral

her

and

go and
the world

speak

doing of

the

is

to

ever

deed

SAMPLERS

of Our Journeyfrom America to


sampler-wiseand otherwise in Arab

Account

Algiers.Done

the

perpetuated her

monkey,

unseen

and
listen,
sampler and

KEYS

I. A

nity.
eter-

tended

tee-totum

being

one

her needle

Jts pageantry

spirit.
Go, little donkey
empty

to

centuries.

Matilda

canvas

like

to

tians
Chris-

iteration.
is all that

moment

the

Queen

turned

monotonous

the

so

the year nineteen


hundred
and
was
created,and that the waters

world

have

winds

the end

on

the

Algiersin

divided

and

and

woven

blindingsun,

Mediterranean

that the

were

Arab

the

worked
ten

be

must

Silks. 1909.
Send-off letters

to

gladden us.

HANDICRAFT

288

Wrought

iron

gate with

Old

the

on

roses,

Roman

road.
Hand

of Fatma.

The

Crescent.

Arab

trunk,

of wood

made

ors,
painted in primitivecolwith decorations
of birds,fishes or flowers.
The
whip and the
Eup eu," the sharp cry of the
drivers of the wine-vans
that pass in the night to
and fro from
vineyard to town.
The
donkey that brought our
dailydinner vegetables.
"

the

Tananarrivo,

villa

belonging to

the

ex-Queen

the Island
for the town
on
Madagascar. It is named
of Madagascar where
she formerly ruled; it
the town
of a thousand
who
signifies
represent
men,

of

thousand

Malala

tribes.

the
(darling);

word

taught

was

us

by

the

Queen.
The

Queen's

The

empty

we

did

the monkeys that


signifies
Valley of the Monkeys at

square which
in the
see

not

Malala.

called

macaw,

Blida.
The

Desert, a

tomb

of Saint

stunted
or

ada, a desert town


The
settingsun
Names

II.

Approach
in

The

Wise-man
in
and

of Villas where

by

residents

an
a

on

Canal.

Marabout

the way

to

Bou

or

Sa-

camel.

laden
we

were

of the

Venice^ Apriland

to

the

Oasis.

Venice, trees
long festoons.

Grand

and

palm

tertained
hospitablyenEnglish Colony.
May^ 19 lO.

with

most

vines

trained

tween
be-

Handicraft

The

two

The

Lion

The

full

The

Comet.

bay

trees

of

289

terrace.

our

on

Mark's.

St.

moon.

Forget-me-nots.
The

nuptial

The

doves

of

The

yoke

and

little

The
A
An

of

and

Venice

the

Adriatic.

Marco.

Sail

setchi

of

the

water-carrying

women.

Giorgio.

San
A

ring

bridge.

Shrine

On

Lagoon.

the

gondola.
where

urn

The

dolphin.

The

gold
of

San

the

birds

background
Mirco

which

to

came

to

meant

is

like

drink.

the

suggest
"dim

beaten

or
interi-

gold."

HANDICRAFT

a9o

EXPERIENCES
EDMUND

HE

writer

of

of

de|"thof
be

color

made

screen

the
in

him

eiFe"^s of such

while

schools.

color

The

the

method.

fillcavities

in

and

in

metal

altar

could
emulate
about

cast

had

to

fuse

not

the
for
to

access

allowed
and

and

old

an

to

to

He
was

painting in

eSeAs

him

beauties

richness

desire

caused

largemanufa"luringfirm
enameler

of

series of enamels

paint,and

the

to

student

realize that such

teach

to

someone

firstattra"^ed

art

oil

given with

ROLF

B.

was

enameling

one

ENAMEL

IN

see

them

the
in

Beyond the cardinal colors,nothing


was
attempted. The jewelry supply houses carried
nothing in stock but white and black,blue,yellow,
red and green, sometimes
both
purple.These were
muffle

furnace.

and transparent.
opaque
The
problem of making enamels
altar

remained

screen

loaned

him

book

of enamels

and

who
relative,
and

another
the

enamel

in the

At

body

was

chemist

them.
and

With

the aid of

suppliedthe oxides,

the

and

emptied

Three

the
all

into

crucibles

powdered materials and


covered to
fire,
carefully
fire urged to the utmost

of the

and

stove.

the

evening when

the enamel

use

fused in the kitchen

was

reduction

artist friend

friend,a potter, who told where to purchase


lead, and soda, the first batch of
silica,

filled with

were

to

was

an

in the

the making
French, describing

in

how

as
figures

until

such

as

of

was
a

last bubble

clear
bucket

had

placed
prevent
limit.

risen

through

as

water

each

crucible

of

water

and

drained.

HANDICRAFT

The

result

It

would

the

of

was

much

if it

as

clear

bled
resem-

trouble

when
had

one

used

then

was

the oxides
clear

heating was
on

to

go

knows

knowledge

no

was

that

worth
time

diamonds.

were

enamel

with

mixed

were

this

and the pound


enamel
procure
valued at
trouble and in fa"^ was

much

Xhe

that

to

all the
as

of enamel

pound of enamel
enamel, but the writer

for

cost

where

that

seem

through

pound

of diamonds.

mass

about

was

291

and

enough

taken, ground up and


after a couple of hours'

to

pour.
diiFerent metals and

These

firstcolors

when

it was

seen

adiual pieces
they would fuse and mix together,
made
of them. The
of jewelrywere
paletteof colors
colors discovered
and new
was
enlarged,many new
invented.
of using them
found
Later, it was
ways
and a supply secured.
where
to
purchase enamels
used as the firsthad been but some
were
They were
almost
found
impossible to fuse on silver,others
while a large proportion would
melted
not
easily,
but chipped or cracked
remain
for almost no
inta"5^,

that

accountable
Pieces

reason.

of work

that

had

been

finished

with

much

chip and had


expenditureof time and care, would
fire again,to be again finished;
to go through the
but twice, or thrice.
and not only once,
It was alwaysunaccountable
to the writer why enamel
and jewelers.
used more
not
was
by the metalworkers
the craftsmen
showed
that
An investigation
among
of the chief objedlions
the tendencyto crack was
one
that it required a special
others claimed
to its use;
knowledgeto use it properlyand which they had

HANDICRAFT

192
not

the

and

study to

time

color and

needed

batch

study to

make

your

to

each

we

making

them.

are

of

hours

of

will teach

the

time

in

used

has

work
to
spend hours refinishing
many
returned
been
cracked, while such time

that

making

to

enamel

would

to

one

cause

of the

and
of his work
permanency
the metal
generaluse of enamel among
To
those who
forced to
are
jewelers.
enamels
color

of

enamels

on

caused

in

"

more

materials

make

is

knowledge

experiments

ignorantof

lack

view,

enamels

apparent

has

new

is enamel

intimate

batch

of each

it,than

use

of which

The

but
it*,

the craftsman's

enan^el.The

own

of the constituents
how

time

individual

seldom

it,as

use

all this from

pointto

to

of

the worst

not

was

of each

behavior

the

require

in behavior.

uniform
The

learn

that

it did

acquire.Truly

to

and

have

time

not

it is possibleto
by itself,

that the part that is enameled


accident
in place and if an

sure

more

cause

workers
the

use

more

and
mercial
com-

study each
design the work

so

be

can

be

spent

should

to

set

fastened

or

happen

to

it it

might be repairedwithout putting the whole


piece
through the fire and consequent
refinishing.
A silver lovingcup, presented to a former
university
exhibition
of craft's work
in an
with
president,was
The
the shield cracked.
the enamel
on
piece was
hammered
and delicately
chased.
To
pair
rebeautifully
the

enamel

through the
skin

that
the

fire

would

it would

be

againand

cover

take

chasing.It would

hours
have

to

all with

remove

if

been

pass it
heavy fire

to

necessary

not

ing
ruin-

possibleto enamel

HANDrCRAFT
the

shield
the

done

other

or

It

is

and
independently
chasingcould have
convenient

lose

to

whatever

hand

same

it in

set

that had

paved setting,

imagine

that

enthusiasm

workers

many

they

had

for the

returned
largepiece of work was
them
for repairs.
to
Many craftsmen carry out their
own
designsand to those it will not be difficult to
be done
the work
that the enameling can
so
arrange
ing,
discolorseparatelyand any mistake as over-firing,
casion
cracking or inharmony of color need not ocuse

of enamel

the

means.

difficult

not

ivould

293

the

It is

and

from

the
the

the

using

learned

whole.

cracking of
it but

their trade

of

some

their

enamel

some

of the

under

the

that
workers

keeps
that

faftorysystem,

students, believe

that

chaser

We
enameler.
an
chaser,an enameler
learning,
though,that the best work is done when
and executed
whole by
a
as
piece is conceived

should
are

loss of the
alone

not

many
have

if a

one

be

worker.

not

so, the

craftsmen

not
can-

headway againstcommercial
systems, under which good designers
may be secured
and good workmen
employed.
who
have
It is true that many
developed a strong
when
of form, are
it comes
at
to
sea
sense
color,
when
it comes
where the ground
to enamel
especially
work
has such
the
of metal
on
a
peculiarcScA
overlyingenamel*, but surelythose studying metal
work
bining
ought to give part of their time to the comhope

to

make

If this is

of stones

much

and

the

use

of enamel.

Perhaps, later,there will be some


the figurein design;but
use
can

at

craftsmen

who

present

when

HANDICRAFT

294

viewing

the

had

dearth

of

the

English

Some

of

using

the

hoped

that

among

exhibit,

do"lrine

Arabian

see

crafts

our

figure
there

own

one

stolen

designs
and

among

be

workers.

an

the

using

think

that

the

workers,

in

awakening

some

human

continental

eiFe"liveIy

very
will

would

to

figure.

workers
enamel
in

are

and
this

it

resped

is

HANDICRAFT

296

and

established

have

within

the

border
Here

remarkable

the

are

varietyof

shady main
found

household

colonial

weather-beaten

be

successfully

now

industries

dwellings

of that famous

street

taining
main-

old

that

town.

bayberry dips, rugs,


reed and willow
icately
baskets, fabrics delnetting,raffia,
dyed, artistic photographs,blue and white
needlework, products of the painting and etching
house
in each
is given
room
arts.
Ordinarilyone
modest
these
manufadures;
to
over
beypnd that
may

the

room

household

pottery,

pursues

its usual

domestic

way

requiresnaturally
though the pottery industry
enough,
back
kiln in the proprietor's
a
yard.
"In many
New
England villages in most, it might
"

be

said

"

the drift

to

cities has

the

taken

away

the

and left behind


of women
men
great numbers
young
and girls,
selves
of whom
a
largeproportion find them-

dependent on
scanty financial resources.
restless
Others, better circumstanced, become
of their lives. With
through the seeming inutility
uneventful
them
the days and weeks
an
are
round;
if they had some
such industrial stimulus as has been
provided in Deerfield they would be happier as a
of course.
A writer in Handicraft
matter
speaks
and happiness which
of the "general air of comfort
pervadesthe town;" and visitors to Deerfield testify
of the description.For
the accuracy
to
a
country
Rather
community like this winter has no terrors.
it is

with

it is filled
of the year, because
congenial tasks. In winter the bulk of the
cheerful

season

productive work
marketing the wares

is done;
thus

summer

is the

time

produced,though the

for

fame

HANDICRAFT

the

of
such

If

other

Deerfield
**

Deerfield

of

the

to

pursue

his

task

but

only

invites

individual

variety

that

is

of

work

play
the
It

out

primitive
has

town,

indeed,
work."

he

of

spice
and

work

labor

Deerfield
of

its

past,

community,
but

revitalized

play.

union

of

from
into

It

makes

retaining
by joyous

to

beauty.

lethargic

alert

the

appeals

and

use

an

It

It

along.

fancy,

life.

of

as

less
changecreative

it
of

mere

his

play

of

carry

the

the

over

not

to

out

and

than

puts

thought

worker

the

more

the

feature

environment

hopelessly

divergence,

transformed

modern

charm,

enough

the

essential

him

which

for

enables

it

makes

instinSfor

dreaming

The

that

slaving
into

occupation

manufaSure

of

of

would

experience

so,

of

produds

the

congenial

It

employe,

talent

is

in

way.

even

follow.

to

order

example

the

with

lines

plan

congenial

routine

flooded

new

producer

household

follow

to

But,

profitable

mail

to

year.

were

be

might

spread

now

considerable

the

industries."

suggest

it does

village

we

cottage

in

that

throughout

every

has

its craftswomen

extent

an

business
*^

and

town

297

and
its
and

old
perous
pros-

ancient
ligent
intel-

HANDICRAFT

HANDICRAFT

300

WITH

SOCIETIES

THE

The
Societyof
BOSTONsuccessful
:

summer

sales for the first nine

the

showing
months

gain

of

than

more

Arts

and

Crafts

months

^7,000

room,
its sales-

at

season

ports
re-

of

the
the

over

year
same

of
quite satisfadoryincrease
of business. A number
of impor20
^
tant
under
commissions
are
includinga large
way,
trophy for one of the polo clubs in the vicinityof
Boston
which
promises to be a unique piece of worL
and making other
The
cases
new
Societyis installing
improvements to meet the requirements of the growing

for 19 10
in the volume

"

business.

first

specialexhibition of the season,


woodcarving and frames, opens on November
the rear
gallery.The individual exhibition
fullyengaged until after the holidays.
The

At

the
the

invitation

of

the

American

that

of

3, in
case

Federation

is

of

small

representativeexhibit
State Fair in September.
to the Wisconsin
Cincinnati
are
: We
pleasedto report that the prospects
excellent
for the organizationof a new
seem
Societyin Cincinnati to take up the general work
A very successful
of an arts and crafts society.
ing
meetheld in the springat which committees
were
was
mer
appointed which have been at work during the sumand are to report at a meeting to be held before
the new
shall hope to welcome
wc
go to press. We
societyinto the League before the year is passed.
The
Norwell:
Arts and Crafts Societyhas moved
Arts

Societysent

into temporary

quarters

on

Central

street

while

al-

HANDICRAFT

terations

Norwell

street,
Melrose
is

Melrose

for

preparing

and

to

in

the

have

and

class

new

for

and

with

of

It

shop.
Fair

Crafts

on

wood-

metal

changes

ketry,
bas-

in

and

and

some

the

classes
work

jewelry

Crafts

work.

being

are

is also

planned

November

15

16.

Minneapolis:

The
direction

the

and

arts

about

Society
Miss

of

the
classes

and

Crafts,

Bartholomew,
will

throughout

der
un-

is
the

to

go
the

paring
pre-

state,

ferent
dif-

ing
start-

i.

The
in

Arts

which

clubs

crafts

of

Ethel

exhibit

November

Haverhill:

starting

of

traveling

number

in

floor

Arts

an

Main

on

and

Arts

leather

classes

the

second

of

season

embroidery,

preparation

made

building

own

Society

a"iive

an

weaving,

In

its

in

Centre.
The

carving

made

being

are

301

and

Arts

Crafts

enthusiastically

season

and

an

interesting

Association
and
series

is

plans
of

ings.
meet-

HANDICRAFT

30"

LETTERS
To thi Editor:

1DOof
be

if the

know

not

enough

unwearied

nor

artistic value

pure

work"

by the term "craft


helpfulto some,

who

frame

I shall describe

work

yet it may
have

for

too

in

more

in

demand

rugs, but

corre"ft
on

these

your

make

stretched
upon
my eyes, and when
strain the muscles
of the back.

frame

So I have

articles

demand

severe
a

ly
sufficient-

prove

eyesight
patienteffort,
though

the "hooked"

admired

dignified

the strong

not

desiringto produce household


to make
at
taste
slight
expense,
page.
I have

be

to

may

evolved

a not

bad

"

I conclude

substitute.

"

I take

burlapor denim for a foundation and in place


of drawing the rags through,stitch them
the
on
outside of the foundation,upon
the sewing machine.
For
I

instance

rug

27x54

the

inches.
.

rags one-half
righthand corner.

inch

in width.

Begin
the upper
at
Lay the stripsclose
the edge, four inches
in length,or any multiple
to
of four as desired ; four will work
up tiny scraps.
Longer than these will make loops which may later
Push
be cut
each stripup close against the
open.
tear

others

or

cut

to

make

solid mass,

and

stitch

two

or

three

of the row
the
on
through the centre
The
machine.
inches
pile will then stand up two
When
the loops are
each side of the stitching.
cut
if the rags are
pushed close enough to each
open,
oi stitching
will be quite hidden.
other, the rows

times

down

HANDICRAFT

304

Voted

that

The

articles

Voted

that

be

to

for

the
the

planniif

societies

had

exhibition.

the

forward

each

to

exhibition

traveling
with

sent

in

fifteen

that

secretary

in

represented

assistance

exhibition.

reported

secretary

promised

have

secretary

traveling

of

route

the

of

set

these

exhibits,

their

society
tions
ques-

questions
.

to

be:

date

facilities

city,

include

the

The
191

be

rural

which

interesting

may
or

ful
help-

secretary

providing

in

expense

authorized

be

to

packing

incur

boxes

for

exhibition.
Elliott

Mr.
his

remarks,

and

might

that

the

that

necessary

manufa"fcuring,

town,

study

a"3:iveand

societies.

other

Voted

of

for

anything

to

membership,

organization,

population

sustaining,
or

of

duties
board

beginning
of

assistant

treasurer

1.

Meeting

reported

of

Editor

elefted

was

with
editors

Handicraft,

December

the
to

^^108.76

be

on

number.

announced
hand

later.

Odober

4,

adjourned.
Nellie

F.

Conant,

Secretary.

HANDICRAFT

3o6

would
of

to

be

of

failures

your

struggling
the

suggest
learned

portfolio
he

who

take

to

to

In

be

your

our

and

one

workers.

Again,

unwisdom

of

will

for

the
flavors

It

the

to

to

so

readers

to

us

help

that

the

destiny

secrets

feel

"we

w^ill

sure

keep

our

and

craftsman

that

"

lies

the

does

Therefore

help

may

commercialism;

of

watchword.

his

value

great

selfishness

that

of

title

of

But

motive

account

an

public

making

experience.

be

not

empty.

hands

be

fellow

hard

yet

"

may

readers

our

no

successes

aspires

gain

to

and

through
this

that

interest

they
they
of

we

Handicraft.

appeal
continue

may
may

not

be

helped.

HANDICRAFT

THE

307

WE

WAYS

IT

DO
Leander

and

CLYTEMNESTRA,
have

founded

each

that

is

to

say,

title,though
little

resemblance

holds

theories

the

to

about

each

one

"Village
employs

established
another.

Hannah

Industries:'*
the

bracing
all-em-

facSts have

Clytemnestra

the country communities,


uplifting'*
for Clytemnestrabelongs to a club and
she there has heard a speaker refer in largeand brilliant
ity
phrase to the use a club should be to the localin which
it has its being: "You
each do
can
something to elevate,to encourage, to bringhope to
the poor,
starvingfarmer's wife," said this fluent,
of the farming
clear-voiced lefturer;"The
women
hamlets
ha ve plentyto eat and to drink I know,but they
are
starvingnevertheless for the mental stimulus,the
of their faculties,
the wakening, it may
nourishment
be, of their sleepingtalents,which the club women
could bring to them.
Let the club give of its larger
life to the meager
existence; let its members
village
at least try
to solve the problem of helping
try
"

our

to

"

sisters

to

It

wider

but

most,

message.

"The

difficult to

was

Arts

spent the
saw

her go

by hopes. The

vision!" These

Clytemnestra they

to

but the very next


first,
"the rightway." This
was:

"

and

put them

were

but words

were

into

meeting of the club


under
time the subject
Crafts

nightin

Movement."

estatic

forth armed

efFecStat
showed
review

nestra
Clytem-

vision,and the

ing
morn-

plans and fortified


chosen
in the village

with

firstthingto do

golden

HANDICRAFT

3o8

^^aits
to establish
an
obviously,
To call a meeting of her fricDds,
and crafts society."
tution
to
organize,to ele6l officers and draw up a constiwith
particularattention to by-laws, was
studied in a class
about
easy, for Clytemnestra had
rash
when
a
parliamentaryusage; difficulties arose
member
of ^^the village women"
proposed having some

for her mission

the

among

officers. "Let

the management
It's the way they do in the

hands.

own

and

fridlion." That

it saves

having, and
eleded
jury was

worth
the

us*' said

president,"keep

chosen
our

was,

its

was

weight was

as

separate

an

the

stridlyin
cieties,
largesoargument

felt later

board

newhr

over

wheo
the

industries.
with

conscious

pride Clytemnestra
the choice
looked upon
of
a complete organization,
mooted. Ever willingto learn, Clytemcrafts was
nestra,
who
dressed
was
society,adsecretary to the new
letters seekingadvice to other secretaries
of
older societies. She gathered cataloguesand
wrote
this is the letter she wrote
also to individuals^iifld
to
Iaminstru6led
Hannah.
"Dear
Madam:
ident
bythe PresArts and Crafts Societyto beg
of the Busyville

Finally,when

you

will bestow

us

upon

some

of your

valuable

perience
ex-

founding and managing villagecrafts.


plentyof enthusiam, a little talent,but
do for Busyville
to
capital,and we want

in
We
not

what

have
much
you
how

done

have

for Smalltown.

We

want

to

carved bowls, and


starting
other form of
rugs and baskets and jewelry and any
work
art
suggest, and knowing your great
you may
ask how
to
success
along these lines,I venture
you
know

to

set

about

HANDICRAFT
teach

the

309

find

workers, and

market, and

all other

will

help us. We know nothing


of
these
different branches
of handicraft,but we
have
of Busyville
hope and courage, and the women
have half a loom,
are
already quite interested. We
but
do not
know
how
it ought to look when
all
we
completed. Do you ever send out teachers to give

information

lessons?

you think

Or

helpful? Any
vf^e

most

are

be
you any literature that would
will be gratefully
advice
received, as

have

anxious

to

aid

the

upliftmovement.

Thankingyou in advance for your kindness,I remain.


Yours
ClytemnestraBlinker, Sec'y
very cordially,
BusyvilleA. " C. Society."
To
find the missing parts of her "grandmother's
loom," to take lessons in weaving and to teach the
had leisure to learn,
few
in Busyvillewho
women
be climbed. Rugs
to Clytemnestrabut hills to
were
The
obstacles in
are, at last,produced in Busyville.
the
way of basket making and bead work and various
other

handicrafts

These
struggles.
tra's
to
are

will; and

make
a

bowls

but

were

too

were

though

repetitionsof the same


overcome
by Clytemnes-

she

has

like Hannah's

fixed fa6l. Exhibitions

sold and

the

never

her
are

found

anyone

villageindustries
held, the work

is

speak of Busyvilleas ^^a


of bustlingadivity." Of
the burdens
scene
cast
pleted
by flaggingofficers,of uncomupon her shoulders
tasks left her to finish,
of explanations,
reconcilations,
suggestionsand advice that she has dealt
allsides,
and of endless "fricStion" encountered
out on
and borne, Clytemnestradoes not speak.She prefers
Millionaire who
to talk of the Benevolent
buys their
newspapers

HANDICRAFT

3IO

travels about

the agent who


guests with their wares,
she now
Clubs before whom

products,of

bout

founded

nestra's.

He

the

charmingly athe ''joy of msk-

earlier than

Clytemjust as it

golden opportunity

five years after Hannah


gleam some
had begun to work.
found
Leander
sort
two
for joiningthe "movement"
toward
the

began

arts

with

his industries

saw

more

ledlares

villagelife enriched

the

"ng.
Leander

her

and

hotel
among
than
all of the

he considered

by him,
himself
with

and

to

while

these

the esthetic world

and

he

he

in the

was

woke

in

him

to

to

minor

be

formed
re-

maintain

reformatoryadt. Along

recognitionsof

there

he needed

sure

was

needed

sons
rea-

the

of

nature

the

tion,
situa-

the

advertisinginstind.
Without
much
talent,and that wholly of the second
direction a giftof first
rank, he had in this one
quality.Fostered by the chances
presented to that
Leander
to a genius,and
instinct,the giftamounted
and his industries throve.
He
felt the public's need
of a watchword
and
supplied it by proclaiminghis
of Purpose; he divined
the public's desire
Integrity
be reminded
of what
it has alreadyheard
and
to
it by becoming a Teaching Disciple of
gratified
and
Ruskin
mand
Morris; he replied to the public's defor entertainment
by furnishingto it the spectacle
of

who

have
the

made

Practical Theorist.
become

thingshe

shine.

open

He

hearted

likes

too

has

part of his success,

followers
who

have

has

called themselves
been

Leander

fore
advertised,and have therethe Makers; for Leander
has

in his

well

to

willingnessto
warm

himself

let others
in the blaze

HANDICRAFT

311

his waving
bigger fires to haggle if sometimes
torch
igniteshis neighbor'sfagots.
ennunciates
Leander
Maxims, Statements, Opin
of

ions.
''AH

work

be work:

must

if it is

work,

not

it is

not

work, I say."
take
working place a shop. Let me
will be taken
into our
in, taken to
shop. You
midst of work, Happily Evolved, Happily Pursued,
Happily Sold. You will not be Sold, but our
call

''We
you
the

our

will be."

Work
"We

use

the

Sweat

of Honest

Sayingslike
colored

these

he

and

inks

public paid for


And

instead

Sweat

glue in

shop: it is
Toil. Better than glue."
printedon black leaflets in pale

tied

them

with

our

thrums.

And

the

them.
has

Leander

of

been

Where

success.

Hannah

Clytemnestra has picked up


has swept
nickels,Leander
together quarters, and
of his coins
the noise of his sweeping and the glitter
these agreeable
has pleased the dear public,even
as
results have contributed
to his self-support.
has

earned

The

dimes

record

began

of

good

to

ago
modest

buy things that


for
to pay
willing

and

are

is

shrewd

as

much

money
is good, her

air of

She

creature.
as

she

can

business

has

but

and

has

the

sold

by
For
privilege.

wants
earn.
sense

flavor. She

erable
built up a considwith the people who

sort
are

mild

not

to

earn

Her

the

bulk,

Hannah

money,

and

earuingcapacity

she
sufficient,

is industriou

possesedof enough artistic talent to give


has
to her products. Hannah
individuality
and

an

Hannah

while

traffic of
want

and

HA

312

NH"I"]:

F"t

R'A

theories,but she has views, an"l

no

expressed in her

were

Clytemriestra's let-

to

answer

ter:

dear

sorts

of

it

under

which

trade would

owti

my

or

be classed.

though riot an addressed


yourselfwith politenessI
these"

of both

began

to

because
and

"

take

to

me

"

thoughtof

it occured

to

any

claim

you

enclose

useful

me

-stamp

commodities.

about

dozen

to
way
that the market
a

my

upon

envelope-*-^andexpress
am
making y6u a present

bowls

make

and

busy woman

am

that you have


experience,but because

"

*^I

"which

all

arc

into'nianufa"5hire

venture

discover

cannot

time

villagecrafts'

there

course

merely individual or associated irfFortsito sell


made by harid" That, at least,is the description

articles

and

Of

Blinker:

so-called

are

"

Miss

..

"My

tliem

of

some

years

decorate

new

ago
them

might ncfed my
attempt! found

Imade
the
improved b6wls. When
I
increased
I was
right.Therefore^ as the'demaftd
invited others who, 'like myself,had heed of earning
after my
in producing bowls
to join me
money
fashion',they did so, sharing the risks and profitson
a carefully
planned business basis. As'the bowls have
the firiahcial success
of the
been favorablyreceived
venture

have
two

Both the
has grown.
rested from the first on

essential necessities
:

my

bowls

have

where

and

success

ideals has been

and

favor

of
recbgriition

our
a

handicraft

always bfceri to

stillremains

the

lis concerned

of chief

me

importance as an art," to fashion them


most
pleasingdesign and of the best and
material,and to spare no effort
these

the

after the
most
to

propriate
apattain

of paramount

^
HANDICRAFT
314

HOMESPUN

THREAD

THE

THE

thread

Is

known

sometimes

And

oft

When

that
to

the

gains

one

just

evil

an

is

in,

Fear
For

ev'ry

Brings

spin

one

soul
a

great

do

can

few.

very

good

greatest
withstood.

out,

weave

to

not

and

WEAVER

THE

Weave

small

one

the

one

spool

round

weave

thread

gathers
with

far

about.

out.

in

which

Marie

out

about^

PATTERN

thing

kindest

round

and

hesitate.

to

THE

The

in

goes

all

both

in

gathers
known

never

thought

itself

winds

And

It
Is

of

to

T.

spin.
Garland.

"

HANDICRAFT

315

POTTERY
p.

W.

OF

all the

creative

is

destruction.

to

is considerable

the necessary
successful issue.
formidable

most

be

not

to

deduftive

the

stepping

undertaken
lightly
be incurred

to

item

in the

fore
be-

satisfaction

your

that
work

to bringyour
qualities

posses

The

and

purpose
made
are

expense

demonstrate

can

you

failures

It should

success.

for there

the

that lures many


mechanical
certain

of
tenacity

where-by

acumen

to

is from

pottery

ignisfatuus

an

It demands

skill,perseverance,

you

arts

varietyof results to be obtained, the


The
fascinating.
simplicity
apparent

of its manufacture

stones

JJIRVIS

infinite
most

to

HOME

AT

account

expense

is the kiln. A

portablekiln accordingto its size and


being fired to a sufficient heat, costs from

capable of
;$75.oo to ;$500.oo.
market

made

There

are

several makes

either with
firing
of their own,
having good qualities

oil

for

on

or

the
all

gas,

but none,

far

as

kilns are
know, perfeft.These
very much
like children,
make
those of the same
even
(we mean
than a little,
and like children
kilns)
varying more
as

we

requirecontinual watching and individual


construction
to produce good results. The
kilns should
chamber

by

known

muffie

is

flues. Underneath

box where
and

or

be

the

the
striking

flame

and

understood.

box

of fire

of these
The

firing

clay surrounded

fire
space called the
the burner
is introduced

this is
from

treatment

floor of the muffie

is

spread out

and

HANDICRAFT

3i6
the

forced

up

muffle

where

flues

box

another

to

it escapes

the

of

top

on

pipe leading to the


these kilns can
be placed in
chimney. In most towns
the insurance, but it
without
the house
invalidating
this point.
is best to make
on
sure
It may
seem
strange to speak about the last process
about the clay,but it is really
before saying a word
Natural
red
the first thing to consider.
clays both
and can
and buff are plentiful
easilybe procured at
If such clayas you purpose
cost.
a very trifling
using
is procured from
it will
a
pottery the heat at which
be ascertained,but if not a kiln test
mature
can
must
made.

be

your
a

The

Cone

primary condition
heat

to

this

ensure

(seebelow) is

one

To

is desirable.
as
firing
of the clay and dry

consider

to

should

finished

pottery when

sufficient

up

low

as

make

hold

heat

attained.

for

the

take

tests

your

and

water

be

must

is that

first
some

thoroughly,then pound with


until it is powdered at the same
hammer
time
a
moving
reand
other refuse. In a pail or
bowl
stones
add the powdered clay and
stir
containing water
be passed through a lawn,
vigorously.This must
about

to

100

for sixteen

to

it

mesh,

120

into another

twenty-fourhours

bricks
to

that

does

of this
any

until such
leave

clayand
or

as

knead

to

the

it well

bubbles.

and

On

the

should
on

be

clay
surplus
poured

hearthstone

has orated
evapand
easilyworkable

sufficient

plasticmass

adhere

not

air holes

time

left

and

settle. The

to

will sink to the bottom


particles
residuum
is poured off. The
water
that
in a plasterbasin or failing
or

vessel

hand.

water

Take

togetherso as
a
damp board

portion
to

expel

with

an

HANDICRAFT

317

orbinary roilingpin make a cake of this clay and


from
it cut out accurately
measured
piecesand these
^vhen
thoroughlydry will form your tests. If you
break
of these pieces and examine
it through a
one
microscope you will find it has much the appearance
of honeycomb. This
is caused by the clayparticles
which
has not yet all been
being separatedby water
expelled. This the fire alone can accomplish,and as
closer togeththis progresses
the clayparticles
come
er
and cause
what
is known
as the shrinkage.
When
the firing
is completed measure
your trialpiece
and

difference in size between

the

unfired

the

and

the fired

tial
piece will establish the shrinkage,an essenfaft to guideyou in future productions.To
certain
asthe heat in the kiln has been rendered
simple
formed
of certain materials
by Segar'sinvention of cones
melt at given heats. These
which
be procan
cured
from Professor E. Orton, Columbus, Ohio, or
Mayer Bros.,Beaver Falls,Iowa, for one cent each.

If

trial has been

your

it is

made

for

the

improbablethat
and, anticipating
this,that some
not

put in the kiln

portion
cent,

of

of

the

natural

clay and

per

and

cent,

flint,
marking

recognized.
When
clay has
tongue when
the moisture

be

to

them

To

igrade,
150" Cent-

clayhas
do

melted

trials

were

this take

it add

fifteen per
be
that they can

another
so

dense

mass

applied should come


caused by contact

five per
portionof the same
to

fired it is called

been

this biscuit should

another

further

time.

same

to
ground flint,

weightten
of the

the

at

i,

cone

from

easily

biscuit

and

which

freelyaway
remain

cent,

for

the
and

some-

HANDICRAFT

3i8

If

time.

is

clay

available

not

at

mature

to

j^

28

Flint,

"

Cornish

"

Felspar,

This

cost.

Barclay

Co.,

"

pale

it is

made

is

which

The

are

in

with

at

Drakcn-

Reusche

L.

or

inconsiderable

an

fire

ivill

glaze

lead

has

to

return

to

archaic

It

later,
desire,

but

has

is suitable

energy
which

or

we

its

only
skill
shall

as

uses

to

for

those

with

of

late,

not

be

have

who

of

one

in

throwing.
but
here

domonstrated

be

will

employ
deal

will

and

methods,

principal

and

taught

much

been

the

ways,

casting

coiling, pressing,

named

encouraged.

of

variety

first
a

methods

York,

used

when

York,

New

New

from

ivory.

Pottery
of

St.,

Stone,

procured

be

can

Place,

Park

Co.,

"

field

"

Clay,

"

which

for

materials

pounded
com-

Clay

14

19^

be

can

follows

as

one

China

parts

clay

cone

Ball

parts

10

the

has

enough.

natural

fire

the

quickly,

disappears

moisture

hard

been

not

If

the

our

not

the
next

the
other

paper.

HANDICRAFT

TOOLS

319

IN

USED

GRISCOM

ELIZABETH
at
of Bookbinding

Instru3or

BOOKBINDING

THERE

was

School

MARAT

of

that tried the

time

Museum.

Art

Worcester

soul

of him

who, through his love of books, sought


them

enshrine
his
been

born

the

of

outlet

his

for

conditions

to

United

in the

memory

not

bindingswith

in permanent

if he chanced
hands; particularly,

own

of

get the

present
pent

of

America

writer.

He

could

industry.Try

proper

tools

of the oldest

ply one

States

enthusiasm

up

as

and
and

materials

all the

crafts of the old world.

Haifa

century

march

of

to

have
in the

find

no

pitted against
might he could

he

which

with

time-honored

most

to

of

foreignbinders
But graduallyconin this country doing fine work.
ditions
became
so
impossiblethrough competition,
that they were
obligedto fall in line with the dead
death

to

the

Ruskin

or

be

in the

were

many

("dead," because it dealt


came
creative ability).
They bewheel
of a modern
naut.
Jugger-

crushed, there

said of conditions
manufactured

In the midst
was

individual's

spokes

Submit

was

there

industrialism

mere

As

ago

of this chaos

but
a

in

was

no

alternative.

England,

"

thing
Every-

men."
voice

in the wilderness

those things
in your houses
be useful or belie ve to be beautiful."

heard,*'Only have

which

you know

to

death of the plethoraof ugliness


sick unto
Disciples,
which might be expressed in England by the one,
word "Victorian," took heart.

320

HANDICRAFT

The

heard in America
far off cry was
crossed
the Atlantic
to become

ones

in

Conditions

England

and

the

thirsty

initiated.

quite so hopeless
for tradition,at
all
in this country,
as
least, w^as
Morris
about them. And
through it William
brought
which
but surely,
is slowly,
about a renaissance
ing
provthan the destroying
itselfmightier
sword
of cheapness.
There

is

now

demand

not

were

in

new

our

for tools

country

it
And
making beautiful books.
the will to learn, through
is but a questionof bringing
infinite
of time, patience and
the exercise
pains,
of mind
which
is necessary. These
the
are
qualities
is in too
only stumbling blocks to a nation which
to
accomplish anything thoroughly.
great haste

and

materials

Precious

volumes

from

have

libraries

there

is

found
take

their way

into

immortality,
view, without being sent

can

bibliophile's
point of
European heaven.
a

As

on

space in a limited article to discuss


of bookbinding, the tools
used
in

not

all the
*^

which

transatlantic

our

to

for

aspects
forwarding"and ^'finishing"
onlywill bedescribed.
should

These

be

well

and

chosen

the outfit

be

can

Even
of the tools here
some
simple one.
very
mentioned
could
be dispensed with. For
instance,

lying press

be

made

do

duty as a standing
is lacking.A simple litde
press if space or
money
be rigged up with
iron
an
can
50 cent
gas stove
tools. And
the
supportingring for heatingfinishing

rungs
when
resort

of
a

can

chair

have

sewing frame
is not
worthy

been
was

of

to

used
not

to

sew

avilable.

emulation

book

on,

This

last

however,

as

HANDICRAFT

322

the

hold

of the

ends

vening
intersignaturestogether.The
five marks, seen
in the illustration,
in lead
are
the
pencil only and not to be sawed. They represent
which
the signatures
positionof the cords around
are

sewed

for "rounding**
i6, number
24, hammers
and
old
the
backing," the book; for beating out
jointsin books to be rebound. Also used to flatten
Number

*'

the

ends

of

cords

the

when

laced

in and

cut

off

short.
Number

17,
which

of five brass

one

keystotightenthe

cords

sewing bench is strung up; around


of the book are
these the signatures
sewed.
or sedions
often necessary to pull the
Number
18, little pliers,
of a book
while
needle through the back
working

with

the

the head-bands

at

head

tail.

used
for
plow knives
fitthe book; numto
ber
cuttingmill-boards accurately
and number
1 9 is sharpened for mill-boards
20,
for paper cutting.
the upper
Number
side
on
21, a steel point,beveled
for paringedges of paper for guardingand inlaying
plates,mending, etc.
Number

rg,

Number

22,
pastingbroad
brushes
Number

are

number

and

rubber

surfaces

advisable

23, sponges,

20,

cemented
of leather

paste brush
and

paper.

for

Smaller

guards,plates,etc.
and fine,for cleaning
coarse

for

26, number
dampening leather,etc. Number
implements, whittled out of
27, home-made
cigar-boxwood, for cleaningoff glue from the backs
of books after rounding and backing and for knocking
of cords before covering.
up unevennesses

and

for

Tools

used

in

Book-binding.

HANDICRAFT

323

28, ordinaryshears.
edge shears, for cutting
29, large square

Number
Number
mill-board.

number

Number

30,

Number

32, number

points,made of old
tooth-brush
bone
handles, ground into shape on
draw
in the
to
grindstone and sandpaper. Used
of the leather covers
and for modeling the
corners
the head-band.
head-cap over
32a,

folders of assorted

bone
to

31, bone

certain

to

rub

dowii

be

used

33, number

shapes,some

better

34,

adapted

others.

35, box- wood

Number

of the

than

uses

number

leather

stick,beveled
between

bands.

side,

one

on

should

This

sparinglyas it can easilydestroythe grain


leaher. A stripof levant is safer and generally

better.

Number

used
36, trindles,

of the back

of the book

to

before

knock

the

round

out

cuttingthe fore-edge.

the cords at the head and


placed between
the back
is
tail,and inside the boards; and when
made
and the book
removed
flat,
they are carefully
into the press, firmly
is lowered
held,and the fore-edge
When
released the back springsback into shape
cut.
and its parallelsurface, which
has just been
cut,

They

arc

becomes

concave.

Number

37, leaded

Number
Number

stick used

to

knock

closelywhen sewing.
38, cuttingblock.
39 planefor keepingwooden
,

down

nature
sig-

backingboards

in order.
oil-stone

Number

40,

Arkansas

Number

41,

large steel

for

honing
tri-square.

knives.

HANDICRAFT

324

Number

42,

for

stone
lithographers*

leather

paring

on.

43,knocking-down iron,with dressed upper


lower
surface, to hammer
surface,and flange on
Number

upon.
Number

44,

glue-pot.

Number

45,

sandstone

46,

little lamp

for

keeping ordinary knives

sharp.
Number

tools,to

make

to

blacken

impressions

ends

when

of

finishing
working out a

pattern.
for heatingbrass finishing
stove
finishing
tools for decoratingleather either with gold-leafor
in "blind"
(withoutgold.)
B, Sewing bench on which the book is sewed.
C, French standingpress, for pressingthe book and
its parts in the different stages of forwarding and
finishing.

A,

French

D, Grindstone.
for cutting edges
", Plow

of

books

and

boards.

F, Lying press, for forwarding and gilding.


firmly
G, Finishing press, for holding the book
back with titleand decorated panels.
while toolingthe
in brass,and
tools cut
Plate IX., different finishing
Wheels
handles.
in wooden
or
roulettes,used
set
lines in a pattern. Pallets or short
long straight
straightlines of varying lengths.Gages or curves
for followingany
of varying degrees of curvature
letters and numerals
curved line in a design.The
for

for titles and

dates. The

for elements

in pattern

The

old bindershad

flowers, leaves

and

figures

making.

their

own

distinftive tools.

They

HANDICRAFT

326

The

SUCCESSFUL

Industrial

EXPERIMENT

School

of The

Old

Colony Uniony

Bourne^ Massachusetts.
MARIE

y4 N

TUDOR

GARLAND

has

experiment
interesting

been

made

with

LJL an Industrial School in Bourne, MassachujL jL. setts, by The


Old
Colony U nion.
The
of Bourne
consists of eightvillages
widely
town
with no
scattered over
a largearea,
regularcontrains.
or
neftinglink in the way of trolleys
The
children beyond the third grade are
all brought
the high school
the central village,
where
ing
buildto
Bourne
is situated. The
school, like all country
schools,is excellent,though lackingperhaps, in the
modern
most
thought regardingeducation.
Aside

from

offered

the

Lessons

are

is

so

the

regularschool

children

lost in
attempts

sea

of book

to

introduce

in

music,

work.
but there

subjeds,and so little
for applying it,that it is really
lore. Up to the present time

given to

opportunityafforded

of manual

in the

way
given in drawing and

little time

little is

curriculum

these

manual

work

have

been

successful.
un-

During the winter of 19 10-19 1 1, as an experiment,


the girlsin this school
asked
to
were
gather on
the school opened
Saturdaysand learn to sew. When
the first Saturday,only a small
proportion of the
girlsreported for work, and these all lived in the
all satnot
at
villageabout the school. This was

HANDICRAFT

and
isfa"tory,
be

must

work,
the

put

it was

soon

the

on

same

327

basis

else all the children

or

desire

reach

to

was

therefore, they

that

seen

as

the

could

them

Saturdayclass
regularschool

not

attend, and

all. The

week

next

told

again invited, and were


would be paid,as they are on

were

that their carfares

each

regularschool day. This gave them all a fair and


and the numbers
equal opportunityto attend the classes,
soon
began to increase. Startingwith about
seventeen,

maximum

number

of

seventy-seven

dustria
possibleeighty.That the Inbe
School
thus started might in no
sense
termed
a
"charity" school, and wishing to put it
decided that the
a
on
basis,it was
self-respe"^ing
be paid such
children should
prices for their work
for
would
a good experienced worker
as
receive,i.e.,
and
a
paid two
hemming a dish towel they were
half cents
in order
a towel. Then
a hem, or five cents
that they might feel they were
doing their share in
paying for instruction and helpingthe school,it was
ings
arranged that they should pay one-half their earnwas

reached

out

the

into

of

fund

of the

Industrial School.

this year confined


to
girlswas
household
were
linen,and, as many
beginners,the
found
simplestkind was first given out. It was soon
that many
were
experienced with the needle, and
finer work
was
given them. As a result their productions
roller towels
kitchen
ranged from coarse
to
towels, with bands of hand
finelyhemstitched
The

work

crochet

for the

linen

lace inserted,and

in old
was

fashioned

cross

initial letters
stitch. The

confined,however, entirelyto

house

broidered
em-

work

linen,as

HANDICRAFT

328

important that
always marketable, and it was
be quickly disposed of. In other
the things made
worked
words, the market was
figured
on, the girls
to
supply the demand, and the summer
colony on
the Cape found these necessities ready at hand
at a
needed.
reasonable price when
The
met
questionof capitalto start this work was
by an interested person who made a loan of a few
hundred
that the experiment might be tried.
dollars,
With
this fund all the material was
sale,
bought at wholeof the
on
account
specialprices being made
it is

of the

nature

work.

materials

The

and

neatlyfolded in
lots of a dozen
or
a
half-dozen, and carefullytied
without
in packages that they might be handled
ing
fallapart, then taggedand numbered, a record being
kept of each lot,the record being a duplicateof the
of material,amount
allowed
cost
tag, givingoriginal
of profitand
for the work, amount
sellingprice.
the work
When
was
given out, the child put her
in the record
to the- tag and
name
signed her name
of the lot taken, with date;
book againstthe number
in this way
account
an
was
kept of each lot that
went

out,

as

bought were

cut

follows:

Lot number

22

Cost

$2.50

Profit

1.

Work
Sell

Taken
When
indexed

the

work

record

was

returned

book, each

$4.25

January

by Mary Jones.

15
.60

it

worker

was

10,

entered

191
in

1.
an

being assigneda

HANDICRAFT

for the

allowed

lot

the

which

on

page,

work

329

was

and the

entered

amount

credited.

requiredto launder their finished


and return
work
it, each piece neatly folded and
it
tied with the orginalstringand tag. In this way
was
ready for sale when received.
difference in the buying and selling
The
pricenetted
considerable
that on the lots of highergrade
a
profit,
lots in all were
being greatest; two hundred and fifty
given out.
had just organized in
the Old
As
Colony Union
and social asBourne
sociation,
an
as
industrial,agricultural
with a salesroom
for work, a public tea
for members,
and a readingand writingroom
room,
the money
decided
the girls
it was
earn
to
to allow
children

The

were

become

to

necessary

dollar. This

one
members, i.e.,

paid, and charged up to the


ing
worker, that the child might feel the joy of enterher own
the association
on
responsibity.
fee

membership

At

the

end

of the school

had

children

was

term

it

was

for themselves

earned

found
and

that the

and

rangingfrom a few cents to eleven


etc.
sixty-five
cents, accordingto skill,

The

interest in the work

fund

dollars

sums

of the children

school

the

was

so

keen,

experiment so well repaid the


time and thought expended, that the sum
loaned,
turned over
a
as
representedas "Outlay," was
gift
to the school
fund, and so may be added to the profit,
therebyenablingthe school to start in on the second

and

the

year
At

result of the

with

the

credit

to

close of the

following:

its

account

first year,

of
the

$525.33.
books

show

the

HANDICRAFT

330
o

sO
"

"

N
00

I
bo

.*"

cs

fO

fO

Th

NO
NO

"

"

o
oo

-ft
*"v

^-

--^

'^

H "

o
M

N
,

"5
fO

"o

HANDICRAFT
and

Another

331

of the Industria

branch
equallyinteresting

School

carried

was

for the benefit of the

on

boys. This was a class in wood working, and had


to be an
lay
necessarily
expensiveexperiment, the outfor material,
tuition and tools beingconsiderable.
A sufficient sum,
however, was provided by the same
interested

who
person
branch, and the
girls'

loaned

which, being well lighted


on

proved an

fund

the

for the

school gave the use


of a part
of the school buildingfor a room,
work-

basement

of the

had

the north

side,

ideal

place for the purpose.


The
services
of a graduate of the State Normal
School at Hyannis were
secured, instruction being
to twelve-thirty.
given on Saturdays from eight-thirty
then bought to equip fifteen boys, the
Tools
were
classes being limited to that number, the work-room
not
more.
beinglargeenough to accommodate
the boys first reported for work
When
they started
ofF that portion of the basement
lotted
alin to partition
them, and on the partition
were
placedhooks
and hats. This
for their coats
took
a
good many
careful not
hours, but the instructor in charge was
of work, lest they
form
to keep the boys long at one
their enthusiasm

tire and

The

next

this work

step

the

was

being done

by

and
expense,
articles for themselves
to

third step

every
About
an

was

this time

order

for the

the

Old

the

should

the

boy doing his

construction

boys

enable

to

save

The

wane.

of

for

them
the

two
to

reasons:

make

such

necessityarise.

makingof lockers

and

share in the work.


wood

benches,

working
Colony Union

drawers,

class

was

Club

given
House,

HANblCRAFir

332

in process
all to be

then

Nine

inch

30

butWmg,for

of

niture,
fbllowing furin mission
made
r
style
tea
tables,six 36* inch tea tables,

sideboard,on"

chairs,one
thirty-six
tables,three

the

settee,

tabourettes.

boys were to be paid a fair pricefor


to giveas the girls
were
did,one-half

The
and

The

work

trout

when

the

bridge,or
prideand the

ball game
was
on,
of the school were

honor

furniture

The

work,

their

interest waning
iperrily
on,
lay temptinglyin the pools

went

the

when

their

ready before

was

ings
earn-

fund^

benefit of the school

for the

brary
li-

two

the

only
below

where
at

the

stake.

Cliib

House

setts
opened,andwas sent,at the request of the MassachuAgricultural
College(where it represented,with
OW C9lony
of The
the work
the sewing of the girls,
Industrial School)for exhibition at a conUnion
ference

held

for the betterment

in Amherst

Theire

workers.
furniture similar

orders

In this

over

another

as

year

by the boys;It
kept busy another'

work

at

to
gift

is

benches
one

boys

interested

work

than

of the

amount

there

equippedwith
may

the

for

is hoped
year

on

the School
on

hand

time. There
and

able

Fund,
work

toolsr where

and

to

was

so

sat-

original
outlaywas

also

are

do

so

that for

room

fifteen
a

fully
boys

number

higher grade

of
of

last year.

this work
figures
regarding
they are given here:
interesting,
As

received

also, the result of the work

case

munity
com-

these.

as

that the
isf^ftory,.

turned

were

that piade

to

that the classes will be


iust such

orders

of

may

be

equally

HANDICRAFT

334

It

evident

is therefore

carried

that

such

school

volunteer

successfully, especially if

on

struftion

given. There

is

should

points

which

article

is written

others

to

borne

along

start

the

important

very

(nind,

in

and

this

as

of

purpose

similar

in-

lines,

helping
attention

them.

to

The

locality

there

is

should

studied

be

for, and

market

be

solely for

make

is called

certain

are

be

can

the

ascertain

to

what

outlined

work

to

meet

existing demand.

the

EfForts
able

made

be

should

volunteer

to

to

instruction,

necessarily be

otherwise

teachers

secure

large

the

as

who

are

tuition

item

must

the

on

debit

account.

school

building

is

from

It is

always possible

the

experiments
such

hand

as

It is
very

important

will

child
are

and

able

the

to

of

the

the

grasp

encourage
work

of

the
on

keenest

value

child
hand.

there

the

secure

parents
the

show

to

kind.

As

well
is

the

and

scope

tions
dona-

at

its value.

whose
of

be

to

sure

by sympathetic

rule,

organized

sympathy
children,

interest

has

and

appreciate

to

who

one

nature,
for

here,

enough

keen

of

but

slow,

is outlined

brain

this

locality

this.

some

uncertain

an

therefore

are

plan

of

are

of

work

in any

as

interest

to

give, in

to

means

work

such

for

free

expense

available

always

and
for

operation
co-

that

parents
the

classes

ing
understand-

HANDICRAFT

WITH

THE

335

SOCIETIES

The
Old
BOURNE:
Massachusetts, held

Colony Union, Bourne^


Columbus
on
Day its first
exhibition
for which
of the children's work
prizes
had
been
offered. This, the children's
day at the
well attended
Club House, was
by the children,but
the

little interest.
parents showed
needlework
few
contests
were

The

girlsevidentlyfindingit hard
their
The

little of the

Faunce

The

were

judgedby

Demonstration

Farm

Mr.

of

first and

Doo-

in Sandwich.

were
pumpkins shown
result of the first year'swork.
second
prizes for poultrywere

as

by

originatework

potatoes, and

corn,

The

number, the

own.

contests
agricultural

The

to

in

isfactory
sat-

won

girl.

Old

Colony

Union

has done

to interest the children


power
it to be the foundation
upon

will

movement

eventuallybe

everythingin its
in agriculture,
believing
which

the

Handicraft

based.

Societyat its November


its usual
from
monthly meeting departedsomewhat
and evening
in making it both an afternoon
custom
session, the meeting taking the form of a special
exhibition of old laces and jewelryloaned
by the
The

Melrose:

meipbers
The

Melrose

themselves
both

response

surpriseeven

to

the

quantityand qualitywas
and there were
committee
itself,
in

HANDICRAFT

336
heirlooms

many

which

shown

of the lacemakers'

examples
and

art.

of old thread

beautiful

were

them

Among

lace and

choice

were

fine

some

mens
speci-

pieces of

Irish

point and duchesse. A largescarf from


India embroidered
with the palm leaf pattern
and a
kerchief of exquisitely
fine work
which
was
ally
originowned
by one of the royalfamily of Spain attradled
There
much
attention.
were
some
baby
clothes of a century
ing
showetc.
caps, dresses,
ago
rose

"

"

the delicate needlework

great

our

and

grandmothers were

for which

insertion

noted.

fine pieces of
crowded
with some
largecase was
the jeweler's
and stone
art. Fine old mosaic
brooches,
carved tortoise-shell combs, gold and silver
delicately
watches
and some
buckles, bulls-eye
extremely fine
brooches. A Venetian
cameo
gold neck chain, with
a
peculiarsecret link which jewelers say if broken
could never
attached to a goldmountbe repairedwas
ed
miniature
on
ivory.
But the most
talk by Mrs.
a
entertainingpart was
Munroe
returned
whohas
to this country from
lately
A

stay of several

with

her

years in South
largeand very valuable

laces coUefted

in various

she
for
of

collection

ofnative
which

she described

them.

passedaround for inspedlionas


Of specialbeauty of design and
laces

She

parts of that country

she

cobweb

had

America.

texture

were

several specimens
ofParaguay,

the

of which

piece,a lace handkerchief, which


fineness,design and weaving rivalled any piece
the French
Italian lacemakers, made
or
by a
had;

native

and

woman

all present.

one

of

Mrs.

Paraguay,won
Munroe

very

the

admiration

of

kindly repeated her

HANDICRAFT

talk

the

in

such

efforts

value

alone

the

of

of

much

the

exhibit,
well

run

the

at

assembling

in

have

must

there

pleased

committee

interesting

which

which

of

present,

were

and

instructive

an

those

number,

the

of

success

and

evening,

goodly

were

337

money

into

four

figures.
This

is

Society

sale

and

enlarged

The

photograph,

articles
and

societies
will

work
this
be
The
work

year
sold

be

proceeds
the

is

be

the

appealing,

will

as

basket,

of

have

merit

been

out-of-town

collection

artistic

broideries,
em-

jewelry,

as

especially

all

eclipse

to

the

well

of

improved

its

tables

other
this

articles

various

of

expected

modest

fair

hibition
ex-

evenings

wood-carving,

from

very

will
for

of

it

bids

and

weaving

assembling

in

chairmen

leather-work,

annual

its
and

sixteenth
which

and

efforts.

previous

afternoons

and

shop

for

preparing

the

on

fifteenth

November
and

busily

of

as

artistic

specialty

which

can

sum.

be

devoted

classes

to

this

carrying

winter.

on

the

HANDICRAFT

338

OF

ITINERARY

TRAVELING

EXHIBITION
1911-1912

Providence
LEAVE
ember
16.

for

Amesbury, Mass.,

Nov-

Leave

Amesbury

Leave

Boston

for

Portland,Me., November
27.
Portland for Peterboro, N. H., December
Leave
7.
for Haverhill,Mass., December
Leave Peterboro
18.
Leave Haverhill for Deerfield,Mass., December
28.
Deerfield for Melrose, Mass., January 8.
Leave
Melrose
for East Orange, N. J.,January 18.
Leave
East Orange for Philadelphia,
Leave
Pa.,January 29.
Leave
Philadelphiafor Baltimore, Md., February 8.
LeaveBaltimore
for Greensboro, N.C., February 19.
for Charleston, S. C, February 29.
LeaveGreensboro
for Memphis, Tenn., March
Leave
Charleston
11.
Leave
Memphis for Evansville, Ind., March
21.
for St. Louis, Mo., April i.
Leave
Evansville
for Denver, Col., April 11.
Leave
St. Louis
Denver
Leave
for Deer
Lodge, Mont., April 22.
Leave
Deer
Lodge for Helena, Mont., May 2.
Leave
Helena
for Minneapolis, Minn., May
13.
Leave
Minneapolis for Rockford, 111.,
May 23.
Rockford
for Peoria, 111.,
Leave
June 3.
Peoria for Chicago, 111.,
Leave
June 13.
Leave
Chicago for Buffalo,N. Y., June 24.
Buffalo for Wayland, Mass., July 4.
Leave
Leave
Wayland for Bourne, Mass., July 15.
Leave
Bourne
for Hingham, Mass., July 25.
Leave
Hingham for Boston, August i.
for Providence.

HANDICRAFT

339

COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE

8, 191

NOVEMBER
meeting

MEETING

1, the

of the executive

School

Handicraft

of

League

of

Design,

Garland, Mr.

board

Societies

Providence.

Rollins

postponed monthly

and

Mrs.

of the National

held

was

at

the

Mr.

Elliott,Mrs.
Conant, present.

1 7,
specialmeeting held Oftober
read and approved.
Voted, that Mr. Rollins have positionof Business
Manager of Handicraft.
of securing Miss
Edson's
Voted, that the matter

The

report of the

assistance

Voted,

be

left in the hands

that the

Secretaryinsure

of Mr.
the

Rollins.

hibition
TravelingEx-

Voted, that the Secretarywrite the Chicago Society


of the
regarding that Society'sdelay in payment
guarantee
Mr.

pledgedHandicraft.
suggestedchanging the

fund

Rollins

form

icraft,
of Hand-

approval a largerand
attradlive form
for the magazine.
more
of three. Miss
Mauran,
Report of the committee
ed
J.Templeman Coolidgeand Mrs. Garland, appointfund to
and means
for raising
devise ways
to
a
purchase a Traveling Exhibition.
committee
"Your
owing to a lack
reports: i. That
in the League by the individual
of interest taken
of the League
craft workers, the financial condition
of a fund
does not
the raising
at this time
warrant
and

sufficient

That

to

presented

Traveling Exhibition. 2.
lies in the fa"l that crafts
difficulty

establish

the present

for

HANDICRAFT

340

find

men

monies

the
"

it

Your

towards
that
the

five

Old

the

best

fund

for

towards

Society
the

Mrs.
will

fund

T.

best

for

that

of

offer

die

Arts

speciiiien
dollars

Garland

and

needlework,

cadi

craft.

twenty-five

gave

M.

Meeting

for

Union

of

year

for

prize

Boston

purpose.

Colony

specimen

dollars

this

that

specific

some

the

and

ofFer

to

prize

silver,

in

that

offer

will

work

in

stated

Coolidge
Crafts

work

of

tor

up

recommends,

asked

he

society

tie

to

handiwork.

their

therefore

specimen

and

hardship
in

committee

"Mr.

of

financial

invested

constituent
best

gave

stated

prize

for

twenty-

purpose.

Garland,

Chairman*

adjourned,
Nelly

F.

Conant,

Secretary

"^

jm

23

1912

Jdm^^AFT
VOL.

IV

DECORATIVE

THE

craftmen

not

Elgin

stimulated

the

marbles

for the

museum

had

movement

directors

London, England

to

found

to

and crafts until this

by

MATTER.

the firstrevival among


English
is said to date from the importation

LTHOUGH

was

THE

YORK

MILTON

of the

lO

MUSEUM

NEW

ZJk
J. \.

AT

ARTS

METROPOLITAN

NO.

I912

JANUARY

alreadybeen

French

of the

arts
ognized
rec-

museums.

learned that the MetropolSeveral years ago it was


itan
of Art was
follow the example of
Mueeum
to

foreigninstitutions
to

the decorative

arts.

of the best methods

been

this

to

educated

to

opening.New
the value of
of the

through the

agency
Manufacturers
not

were

the

slow

our

best,and

was

use

the great

colonial furniture

Hudson-Fulton

not

of

in many
journals.
York
dealers had

uncommon

beautiful detail in articles of furniture


the

and

tion.
exhibi-

cheaper gradesof
grasp the advantageof

it

voted
de-

consideration
cai'e^""l

of the
to

wing

new

of construction

chronicled

that has been

Previous

After

inauguratedwith

exhibition,the wing was


success

build

would

and

ture
furniducing
reproto

find

intended

for

of the poor.

new
wing, which was
MetropolitanMuseum's
firstmade possible
by Mr. J. P. Morgan'spurchase

The

HANDICRAFT

342

in Paris of the wonderful


now

been

too

short

upon

opened to

the

enough

time

and

arts

to

to

indicate

the

Hbentschel

has
colle"");ion,

publicsomewhat

judge

over

of its ultimate

ayear:
influence

crafts of this country, but


long
the possibilities
of such influence.

designersthe advantages of such


threefold. In the first place they are
coUedtion
a
are
of plates and
made
independent of the inaccuracies
designs,and are able to reproduce from the objed
itself. In the, second
place obje"h are not isolated,
but are so broughttogetheras to producethe ensemble
of a room.
Lastly there is the revelation for every
of his own
craft by thus
designerof the possibilities
of many
crafts but of the
seeing associated works
same
style.
collections have thus far proved of
Perhaps the new
To

and

craftmen

greatest service
Not
western

to

the

manufacturers

of

furniture.

houses, but many


largeeastern
send
their designersto study in the
Tapestries are also the subjectof

only

the

of the

ropolitan.
Metmuch

interior decorators
likewise
study,while innumerable
frequent the new
wing. An encouraging sign is the
tendency among schools to send their classes to the
Museum,
generallyunder expert guidance. Great
has alreadyproven
in the short time in
its utility
as
the new
which
wing has been opened, the unique
for
of the collection is sufficient justification
worth
would
the belief that a greater publicity
bring a
of students, a result
correspondingly
largernumber
which
the mere
passing of time is certain to efFed.
The
of the new
wing is a peculiarly
arrangement

successful

one

for the

exhibition

of its

treasures.

HANDICRAFT

343

largecentral hall,the gracefulproportionsofwhich


tribute the skill of the late Charles F. McKim,
a
are
of the larger
has been utilized for the display
sculptural
pieces,and of sufficient of the decorative works to
the first
In side galleries
lend a pleasingvariety.
on
and second
floors are
grouped exhibits illustrative
the
from
of the development of the decorative
arts
A

twelfth

to

the

nineteenth

the

century. Where

vision
di-

sculptureand decorative arts is not


together.
clearlydefined,these objeftsare shown
the introduftion
art
to this intimate
Quite fittingly
of by-gone peoples is effefted through the Italian
between

Renaissance.
the hall

High
hand.

monumental

two

are

Renaissance
No

first strikes the eye upon

What

better

choir

arranged along the


illustration

could

be

ing
enter-

stalls of the

wall

on

either
of the

found

period.The gorgeous
color and brilliant lustre of the adjoiningmajolicas,
reveal
tapestries,
togetherwith the rich Renaissance
the fondness
of the Italians for brightcolors. The
also finds representation
of the bronze
workers
art
of statuettes
and
in a small but worthy collection
plaquettes.
is tempted to lingerlong over
the largersculpOne
tures
of the Renaissance.
There
are
piecesfrom the
Pisano School, which
time threatened
at one
tistic
aran
revival before Italywas
readyfor it. The style
decorative

tendencies

of this

of the great Donatello


is illustrated in the
his pupil,Agostino di Duccio.
A terra-cotta
and

Child

and

of his Florentine
chio. What

may

bronze

Putto

represent

contemporary,
well be considered

Andrea

work

of

Virgin
the

work

del Verroc-

the most

captiva-

HANDICRAFT

344

tingmarble

labelled

child
it would

to

seem

of that

The

in the colle"^ion isthe small bust of


^^

laughing
Rossellino,"although

Antonio

show

of the

many

characteristics

fascinatingartist,Desiderio

Museum

is also fortunate

da

Settignano.

in the loan

of

panion
com-

might readilybe ascribed to flossellino. Recent


purchases have been made in this
of thf^ngc}
department, including
a terra-cottafigure
Gabriel by Civitale,
and a Nativitygroup
by %o^sellino.In marked
of thelt^j^n
to the charm
contrast
pieces is the ascetic note of the Spanish sculptures.
of the most
One
lection
important piecesin the entire colis a largeSpanishaltar piecein alabaster which
bust

shows

of Netherlandish

traces

the

At

that

far end

German

and
in

of the

hall

influence.

grouped the French,


ferences
difCertain
Netherlandish sculptures.
are

material,purpose

and

sentiment

serve

to

them.
distinguish
The
stone,
French
employed sandstone or painted limeand used their sculptureto adorn
church
cades,
fainterior walls and pillars.
On the contrary,
or
the German
and Netherlandish
carvingswere
chiefly
made

for

altars,and

Likewise

of wood.

the German

generallyharder in
This
end of the hall
sentiment, but full of sincerity.
is reminiscent
of the nave
of a church, a plan that
in the Kaiser
has been
so
successfullyexecuted
and

Netherlandish

Friedrich

Museum

works

at

In the
BerlirXj^

earlyItalian Romanesque

tabernacle

center

in marble.

is

an

This

ofby Gothic choir stalls,fering


excellent opportunityfor the comparison
an
their picturesque
stylewith the architectural treat-

is flanked

of

are

on

either

side

HANDICRAFT

34^

also be followed
late may
in the altered
schemes
of the majolica.
Several reliefs in stucco

color

to

terra

the

cotta

who

masses,

marble

monuments

are

and

used

bronze

the excellent

to

works

and
of

taste

reproductionsof the
for the beautifying
of

best
their

homes.
The

heavy proportionsof
show

room

that

Renaissance

of the

the

furniture

have

we

for the

left the

sixteenth

in the

joining
ad-

birth-place

century

home

tothecurious
itsadoptionin theNorth. In contrast
German
cabinets, imitative of house
facades,are
the smaller French
classic in design.
cabinets,more
The
chief attraction of this room,
however, and one
of the collection,
of the greatest treasures
sels
is a Brusfor the Spanish Court
made
tapestry which was
later passed into the possessionof Cardinal
and
Mazarin.
it is depictedwith threads of fine silk,
On
silver and gold,the glorification
of the Church.
In
the tapestry is
composition and in color scheme
of the art of the great Flemish
stronglyreminiscent
the cornext
ridor
cross
painter,Quentin Matsys. We
of

and
of

enter

Dutch

which

the charader
propuces
interior of the Baroque, seventeenth

room

Flemish

or

of its interesting
exhibits

century period.One

inserted

lustrat
plateswhich ilthe transition to the eighteenth
century when
used as household
pieces of Chinese porcelainwere

is

cabinet

decorated

with

ornaments.

French

decorative
centuries

of

seven

in the

rooms.

styleof

art

finds
In

of the seventeenth

worthy

illustration in

the first of these

furniture

and

and

we

wood-work

see

eenth
eighta

series

refleded
the

mag-

HANDICRAFT

nificence
Louis

of that

347
named

period

after

its

sovereign,

XIV

(1643-1715).The extravagance "f the


Regency (1715- 172 3) and the greater charm of the
periodof Louis XV (i723-1 774) are revealed in the
The
four rooms.
small grey and gold alcove
next
with
with
the trophiesof the
panels ornamented
the
typifies

seasons

of the boudoir.

exercised

care

Before

ascendingto

the seventeenth century Swiss


of Flims, Switzerland,should

complete

most

room

in the

decoration

the second
from

the

floor,

village

be visited. This

exhibit in the collection with

is the

its richly

wall and

carved

windows,
panels,stained glass
ceiling
The
tile stove, pewter and other objects.
eighteenth
library
century pra"liceof simulatingan extensive
of false bindings finds its illustration on
by means
floor in a series of panels taken
from
the second
a
libraryof the period.
Typical of the period of Louis XVI
(1774-1793)
carved
a
door, wall panel and mouldings from
are
the Tuilleries that failed of destruction
of the

the

palacein

Turkish

studyof

from

the

comes

an

A. C.

Two
.

paintedpanels from

of the

the many chairs will show the development


earlier stylesto the classic design.
Finally

unusallyrich
which

ornaments

87 1

lustrat
ilat Versailles
queen
popularityof such fanciful decoration.
boudoir

the
A

ing
in the burn-

BouUef,

the

colle"lion

applied metal

by such craftsmen
Caffieri,
Riesener,Gouthiere

were

used

of

as

and

Thomire.
In the

shown
are
furniture,potsubsequent room
tery
and porcelain
exhibits,coveringthe Elizabethan,
Jacobean and Queen Anne periods.This is followed

HANDICRAFT

348

Heppel

and

Bolles

coUedion

portion,

the
With

the

it will

soon

on

this

side

of

American

be

of

possible
the
the

the
has

been

has

to

round

decorative

Atlantic,

out

arts,
and

by

the

only

yet

furnishings

put

gallery

new

the

acquired
As

earliest

the

in

generosity

furniture.

of

of

Chippendale

mantel-piece

Museum

the

acquisition

of

Through

colonists,

of

collection

Adam.

illustrative

American

marble

Sage

style

the

in

and

Robert

Russell

Mrs.

of

furniture

white,

of

manner

of

examples

by

exhibition.

on

however,

space

this

remarkable

rivaled
few

of

by
on

the

none

other

HANDICRAFT

DESIGN

349

IN

JEWELRY.

GUSTAVE

for

jewelry or objectsof personal a-

DESIGN
dornment

ROGERS

is

of the

one

design,
justas

divisions

applied

other divisionsare furniture design,

pottery, iron, silverware,etc.


meddle

cannot

of

with

The

signer
jewelryde-

furniture,nor

the

can

iron-worker

hope to use his experience


successfuly
gainedthrough labor at the forgeand anvil to express
himself
in gold and silver. These
are
altogetheron
different and widely separatedlines of thought and
the laws governing good design
practice,altogether
of course
apply to each one. Our art is preeminently
of delicacy;it employs the rarest
of the metals
one
and

the

finest of gems;
who

of

Four

or

is carried

whose

heads

divided
I.

paints with

ivory;it

minute

it is like the

are

as

out

edge

under

tiny brush

which

is

with
most

of the miniaturist

art
on

tools whose

thin

sheet

ends

are

keen.

design for jewelrymay

be

follows:

Proportion.

II. Accents.
III. Texture.
IV.

Color.

And

these

be

subdivided

again:
I. Proportion: growth, rhythm, balance.
II. Accents:
relief,modeling.
III. Color:
alloysof the precious metals, color
the

may

enamels, tone-relations.

of

HANDICRAFT

350

We

divide proportion into three


may
The
size of the piece of ornament

A.

The

C. The
To

A.

of

size

the

size of the
determine

parts
stone,

which

on

or

be

each

other.

of the enamel.

shall be the size of the

what

it is to

in its entireB.

to
relatively

jewelrythe only consideration

of

se"");ions:

worn.

is the

piece
background

It is somewhat

like

an

painting;on wall paper of large,sweeping design


a
paintingdone in photographicminuteness
appears
totallylost. So is a very small pendant on a very
stout
lady.A bracelet,vulgarenough in proportion
the thin
is sometimes
on
to suit a Congo native
seen
debutante
in pink. These
wrist of a blue veined
are
I am
of us are voluntary
extremes.
quite sure none
sin in the art of design,
these sins
we
criminals; when
We
know
knew
sins of omission.
we
better,but
are
oil

didn't

we

B. Size

stop

of the

to

think.

units

making up
naturallyconsists

whole.

the
of

large number
be flowers,buds, leaves,
of small parts. These
may
connected
togetherby stems, and they in turn may
be supportedby the largerbough and trunk; or, design
An

ornament

case

units

conventionalized

there

must

parts and
receive

the

from

but there
continuity,
relative proportionsof these
be

In either

nature.
are

always

parts

must

consideration.

part of smaller

area, if

whelm
highlypolished,may overanother
or
matt
largerunpolishedsemi-matt
The
area.
highly polished area attracts the eye and
large,while matt surfaces look small and of
appears

less

importance.

HANDICRJIFT

352

the brilliant translucent

than

the latter. The

relation

stones,

between

look

largerthan

the size of the

stone

is necessarily
surroundingmetal (goldor silver)
important.If correct,the stone will not appear
ing
surroundlargeit may be. The
unwieldy however
will appear
wider
than
metal, if highlypolished,

and

if

the

matt

or

semi-matt,

will make

and

the

er.
small-

stone

Being probablyweary of the effort to transmit


the eye
to the unending brain-questions,
all the restfulness it
minute

examine
surface

very

of the

small

and

find. It therefore

can

detail and
stone.

And

full detail

passes

this is the

round

II. The
the

less

stone,

the

the

wider

may

minutelyornamented,

largerand

to

even

why

reason

of ornamentation

margin near a stone makes the stone


important.
The
followingrules may be found
I. The
more
minutely ornamented

seeks

refuses

to

on

swers
an-

the

on

more

serviceable.
the
the

the

margin
margin

narrower

tail
debe.
may

margin be.
the most
suitable
It is not always easy to determine
On
of surrounding metal.
breadth
by the
paper,
signer
color,the dehelp of pencilsand brushes and water
ecution
imagine very fine results,but on exmay
in the metal, he is often disappointed.To
be had to modeling
the difficulty
recourse
overcome
may
bronze
mixed
with
in wax
powder. (Bronze
powder is imitation gold or silver dust.)Modeling
in place,
the piece in this,full size, with the stone
effeft. Even
will give the corredt ultimate
if the
piece is not to be cast but "built up," the hour spent

HANDICRAFT

in

modelingis not

smaller

353

lost;the

details of the

work,

the

the

the appearance
reliefs,
of the carving or chasing are
easilyforgotten.For
silversmiths
take plasterof Paris
that reason
many
impressions of parts of important pieces;therefore
in wax
the model
made
is valuable if only as a reference
measurements,

in the

In this

future.
real

question of proportion,the

whether

feature

to

the

stone,

to

or

problem

make

the

is

rounding
sur-

its
to
warrant
as
interesting
being featured. Probablythe pieceof jewelry should
attain to the heightof meritingthe appellation, a
ornament

so

^^

whole."

harmonious
of

But

this is

to

some

ficult
dif-

extent

attainment.

In

regard to enamel, the rightproportion of width


of metal
easilyfound. A
showing round it is more
be considered
of enamel
not
must
as
a
large area
precious stone, but rather as a metal surface such
as

silver

copper
the lid of

one-half

efFedl of
would

largearea
leave only a
a

with

the

same

are

in the

be

or

or

iron. You

silver box

of smooth
narrow

enamels.

No

would
with

not

cover

If the
copper.
is desired,you

copper
rim of silver. It is

matter

how

many

just

colors

enamel
In

narrow.

rim
must
surface, the {enclosing
other words, you
feature the
must

enclosingrim is 2l frame and should


follow the rules I have given.If it is highlypolished,
/V polished,
and theenclosing
rim of metal usually
be narrow.
If the enclosing area
it must
then
is
minutely ornamented, the enamel area must be small.
enamels
Sometimes
used in lieu of preciousstones,
are
in which
case
they are small in area,^ and of course.
enamel.

The

HANDICRAFT

354

make

we

no

diiFerence

between

them

and

precious

stones.

lies at the
subjeS is growth. Growth
very
of the obje(Sts
of design. One
foundation
of the
the
jewelry designer is to translate in miniature
The

next

efFefts
tree

he

real

tree

offers

nature

has

is

by

size,the trunk, if

upper
of a tree

taper to
branches!
not

be thirtyfeet high,
it may
the ground, and
its tip
near

twig only an eighth of


gradationof i to 600.

should

If it is

eye.

it appear
alive,growing. The
is largeat the bottom
and
nature

very small at the top;


three feet in diameter

top

human

make

to

built

the

to

one

least four

at

one-thousands

Instead, we

much

often

smaller than

kills all illusion of

growth.

inch

through. That
In a pendant of ordinary
eighth of an inch wide

an

see

the trunk

But

if the

the

at

the

branch

itself. This

designer is

the tree or the branch


the
or
clever, he will show
flower with an
upward' rush of life. The representation
illusion of

growth

be made

preeminent^
receive the best attention; something must
it must
be
be pushed to its
sacrificed to attain it;it must
even
limit,for in it are movement,
variety,adion; and
for brilliancy.
these three make
Not
very distincSl;from growth
very far distant nor
dation
and as important is rhythm; it also lies at the founof jewelrydesign,givingas it does, delicacy
and elegance,while growth gives brilliancy.
tells us that rhythm is in "the hoofA certain book
horse and in the swirls of smoke
beats of a galloping
risingfrom a chimney;" another finds rhythm in
"the
throbbing throat of a warbling nightingale;'*
or

must

HANDICRAFT

and
a

Dr.

Ross

mode

in

describes

which

order

through designin
of

art.

either

movement

It

355

it

follows:

"Rhythm is
and
is revealed by nature
is change inducingthe idea
as

in duration

of time

or

in

tension
ex-

provided the change takes place


of time or at regularand marked
at
intervals of measures
of space
at lawfully
varying
intervals and
all find this precise,
measures."
We
but some
of us find it also persuasive.
I examine
When
executed
a well
example of rhythm
I realize I zvn feelingsomething inside of me.
The
I watch
number
of dancers
a
same
happens when
of space,
regularintervals

"

and

listen

to

well defined

of lines

music.

There

are

certain

following each other in


decreasingor increasingsizes or lengthsand repeating
themselves
certain
at
intervals,that produces
It is called rhythm.
the feeling
of motion
inside of me.
The
objeft of all art is to induce sensation in us,
and probably the greatest of all art-induced
feeling
is rhythm produced by colors in color-and-shaperhythm.
Sometimes
wenotice
the mistake of confusingsimple
repetitionwith rhythm. The former does not give
the feelingof motion.
Harmony is also sometimes
taken for rhythm.
The
orders of harmony and balance
are
quiescent;
they are the opposite of action. So is simple repetition.
Rhythm on the other hand is not quiescent,
because
it contains
is made
or
currence
by well defined reof groups of shapes or lines that increase
diminish
in repetitions;
it is action.
or
admirable
Truly the most
thing in the world is regroups

or

masses

HANDICRAFT

356

but it gets awfullywearisome


except under
phase; then it may be called the M"$k of A"lion
pose,

when
interesting

it is most

being torn
mind

The

the

m"iisk is nearest

one

and
to

off.
thinks

and

in contrast

opposites,when
led strongly
look at rhythm we
are
to
we
imagine
harmony and balance. It is a test of fine rhythm
discover in it these two, althoughin them
is perto
feO. rest and in the latter,
stress.
Far easier as a problem is balance. It is not difficult
whether
the twQ
sides of a pendant
at once
to
see
alike in shape and
are
size; if however, the design
is not
to be bilaterally
symmetrical,the eye can be
taughtto determine balance after some littlepracSlice.
In treatingof the second
heading,"accent," its
time.
sub-headingswill be discussed at the same
On
this subjediwe
the voare
cabulary
obligedto use more
of the sculptorthan that of the designer
whose
pencil deals only with the flat.
is either a high light
An accent
of brilliant polish or
a

shadow

in which

jewelrywe

no

man"
detail U visible. In ^^crafts-

find

ty;
singularcrudinoveinings,nor any

sometimes

instance,the leaves have


the relief from
modeling,the stems no details,
for

the

the

highestplaneis inadequateand improper;


in fa"l,there is no
thought put on it.
of elaborate modeling that the
It is only by means
highestform of jewelry can be attained. This may
be done with chasingtools or engravingtools,or by
the modeled
orately
built up work
art and as elabimitating
lowest

to

worked
In

over.

modeling, the

accent

is

cavityby

means

of

HANDICRAFT

developed.Its strengthor value


in diredl proportion to the abruptness
necessarily
the walls of the cavityor of its depth. Its shape
immaterial,it may begin to slopedown gradually
shadow
side and be abrupt on the other. The
one

which
is
of
is
on

357

shadow

will be

on

is

the latter side. If the work

in

is executed

"built-up" method, we stillshall have what awill be under


and the shadow
to the cavity,
mounts
has
its abrupt wall. The
positionof these shadows
of the finished
everythingto do with the appearance
piecesthey are the soul of the pendant, brooch, ring,
whatever
of proportion,
it is. Tests
belt buckle
or
of growth, of rhythm and of balance must
be made
these accents
with the utmost
to
rigor.
Let us take for example one
half of a belt buckle; it
has a number
of leaves on
stem
a
curving round a
located stone. I n executingit,
man
the craftslargecentrally
the

saws

stone,

out

between

the spaces
the stone

the

leaves

and

solder them.

and

the leaves and

between

and

the stems;

the

the stems;

thus

ing
form-

he

cut

them

or

may

alongthe stem
between
the accents, deep cavities
the leaves are
forming the shadows. They have been spaced so as
its
of growth in the stem
from
to produce a sense
beginning all the way round the stone; they are "at
of space
regularand marked intervals of measures
at lawfully
varyingintervals,"and therefore produce
of movement;
a
sense
they are in balance because
the eye does not find
any preponderance of weight
side or on the other,or at
or
greater interest on one
less,
faulttechnique being of course
top or bottom. The
the whole
is considered
good.
out

The

vacant

areas

"

HANDICRAFT

358
Let

for the half shadows.

look

now

us

If the

accents

are
iipportance,the half shadows
hardly less
so.
They are not devoid of detail and are not like
the strong, sharp, clamorous-for-attention
accents;
in human
ings,
bethey interest like the finer emotions
in distindlion to the elenlental passions; they
made
sometimes
are
by fine ahd sm^ll detail in masses
and by gentlycurving planes of modeling, as in our
buckle, on the leaves and stems.
Being half-tones,
had no half-tones,
they of course
possess detail. If we
should unavoidablyfind "spottiness,"caused
we
by
with
no
polished high-lightsand heavy shadows
introduftion
of half shadows
The
bridge between.
and
shadows
as
a
high-lights
bridgebetween
gives
the efFeft of tying the latter together.
are

of

Texture

seems

be

to

vexed

in

craftsmanshipand

in

jewelryis

some
subjeft;
designwill have

mistake

and

to

of
and
cut

me

that in

tree's trunk

fruit suggests a
and worked
over

and

surface

by

the

it that

unwarranted,

high levels of work


but
the sin of common
removes
placeness,
found
in textureless pieces.
not
Nothing in Nature is devoid of texture;
seems

ities
author-

branch,
marked

it
adds

not
a

ture
tex-

but it

only
ty
beau-

the ance
appearleaf and
flower
and

Master-hand;

pittedand
even

the

how
to
polished,seem
precious stones, no matter
look into depths of
have a skin through which
we
for instance
color, the skin giving"atmosphere." Take
a

zircon; its color is

magnificent
orange;

it is

color
of orange
from
another
stone
distinguishable
fine
shows
by seeminglybeing"greasy."A diamond
innumerable
points of colors; the different colors

Reed

Baskets.

Fig.

3.

HANDICRAFT

impress

one

Leaves

in

The

unmistakable;

the

not

and

curves

the

carries

that

to

apt

the

crude

appear

produced by

texture

is

same

leaves, or

be

to

said

into

ing
chasof the

if the

even

conventionalized

design
and

squares

parallelograms,to the surface


certain roughness,
microscopic if

narrow

be

given a
piece is of small

the

from

texture.

piece of jewelry are

thoroughly

must

certain

chased.

branch
is

form

so

if they are
is

different distances

being at

as

and

observer

359

"

dimensions,

if it had

been

so

that

it may

sess
pos-

by use.
Texture
smooth
is produced by carving tools, or
be used
faced
chasing tools. Matting tools cannot
anywhere on a piece of jewelry except in the accents
and
then
increase
the depth of the shadow
to
as
so
the detail as far
oxydization or blackening removes
All the required texture
be
the eye can
can
see.
as
tools. The
obtained
very readilyby the smooth-faced
size of the face of the particulartool necessarilyhas
charm

much

do with

to

the
With

as

to

of

extent

some

that

jewelry.To

prove

day
stone

cases

the

of small

areas

seldom

those

the

large-facedtool

of flat

obtained;

the appearance

face, the rougher


a

worn

where

texture;

and

er
the small-

vice

becomes

texture

the

flat surfaces
the

value

it is absent.

It is

curvature.

in

appear
of texture,
Even

the

tremely
ex-

piece

consider

present

pendant with a
face
or
two, its design simply pierced and the surpolished and textureless;itis quite uninteresting.

we

sometimes

find

quite

flat

at

ries
se-

pends
size de-

proportions whose
on

versa.

HANDICRAFT

360

POSSIBILITIES

THE

IN

DESIGN
LUTHER

REED

BASKETS.
TURNER

WESTON

which

WORK

INHERENT

OF

we

and

copy

work

which

we

tal
compared for meneducational
value; hence
suggestive
of the teaching which
teaching is far in advance
leaves nothing to be thought out.
Therefore, it is
are
originate

the

not

not

to

be

of this article

intention

exhaust

to

baskets; rather to
je"lof design in woven
mind.
an
investigative
enough to arouse
The
triple
usingcolored and natural
weave,
of different

weavers

or

the three

between

colors; and

sub-

say

only

weavers,

certain

the number

and

weavers

the

ratio

of stakes

of the basic
the causes
are
upon,
(a) shows the result obtained where the

woven

designs.

number

of stakes is

equallydivisible by

of

ers;
weav-

21, 24, 27 and 30 stakes. The


in vertical bands
up the sides of the

i.e.: 12, 15,


color

the number

comes

18,

basket.
I

of stakes
a

3
I

is divisible

by

of one;

remainder

(c)results
of two,

the

from
as

in

where

number

i.e.: 13,
colored weaver

stakes. The

result obtained

the

(b)shows

16,

the

of
19,

number
with

weavers

25, 28 or
spottedeffect.
22,

givesa
with
a division by three
14, 17, 20, 23, 26, 29

der
remain-

and

32.

of units of design
readilysee that the number
will be the quotient
around
any given basket
of stakes and the
obtained by division of the number
of weavers,
number
not
consideringthe remaining

One

can

one-third

or

two-thirds*

HANDICRAFT

361

/
I

!Fi" 2.
XXX '^fo-fi'
'irtmut
Stuafei
X\Xf^'^
^

"'
.

on

T tactile

paa^r.

HANDICRAFT

362

The

sedlion

cross

in

determining

II

(a

and

of,

drawn

(r)

shows

gives

unit

(c)

is

few

four

and
This

rows.

five

or

spoken

the

right,

rows

to

may

modified

of

(a)

and

of

(a)

ing
revers-

left.

the

woven

going

be

by

then

unit

again

then

obtained

unit

Lightning

of

woven

to

rows

Stroke

the

units

simple

arrowhead

five

or

weaving

(d)

design.

of

the

useful

very

paper.

Indian

four

found

be
unit

of

two

this

the

and

for

show

on

weaving

desired

any

b)

will

paper

the

to

to

the

as

any

right

tion
propor-

desired.

(^)

shows

bout

by

out

is

an

weaving
upright

change

number

one

change

the

ratio

cut

out.

and

h)
of

rows

pair
is

are

of

again

few

rows

the

change

to

After

woven.

(/", g^

combination

ratio

(^), brought
and

then

to

weave

the

desired

number

of

to

(a) by

inserting

the

all

based

is

on

change

woven

stakes
desired.

(a).

to

the

right

rows

the
and

colored

weave

cutting
as

{b)

of

(b)

spoke

the

When

a-

viously
pre-

desired
er
weav-

until

HANDICRAFT

SOME

363

ASPECTS

OF

IRELAND'S

INDUSTRIES
MRS.

HARRY

BOTTOMLEY

of Ireland
resources
present economic
divide themselves
almost automatically
into

THE

classes,much
more
than they appear
to

two

be. There

to

industries

are

distinct in their
the

mere

in Ireland

ordination
co-

economist
which

are

the

pivot of her industrial existence, but which


stock of the world's generspring from the common
al
commercial
and are
without
aftivity
any national
very

charaderistics

whatever.

rootedin
and

And

the Paradise Lost

there

are

Irish industries,

of Ireland's" Ardri"

hand in
raths,"where labor and learningwent
hand forsuch longhappy centuries and "theirschools
al
throughoutthe country handed on a great traditionand
transitoryor local,but permanent
art, not
national."*
The
chief industries of Ireland, like
those of all other competitivecountries,stand in the
market
and take their saliences,
like the rest,
open
from
the actual operationsof capital
and labor,supply
and demand, tariffs,
fadory ads, trades unions,
shirt
strikes,etc. Ship building,
brewing, distilling,
making, horse and cattle breeding,bacon curing,
farm and fishing
all go under
creameries
industries,
"

"

this head.

dustrial
originand of an inpedigreelaysno responsibility
anywhere, on
activities. The
market
is their inspiration

such
and

The

arbiter

and

sentiment

of

dividends

and

balance

and

in all

sheets

their

ulterior aim.
In
*

Irish

Irish

industries

By
Nationality.

proper
Anna

StopfordGreen.

hedistinctly

HANDICRAFT

364

this is

reditaryhandicrafts however,
force
be the perpetuating
not
submission
to

of the

its bread

earn

and

could

The
principle.

stinctiv
in-

Divine

the

to

race

in

and

not

dailytoil,has

junctio
inin

even

mechanical
of our
degradation
age its transports
and the tendency to enhance
of supererogation
the
indispensablelabor of maintaining the body with
which
inates
work
feelingand soul still domexpresses
the

the
So

pockets and
and

looms

our

our

the great fadors


always be and nations

machines
needles

and

civilization.

our

our

tools

cohesion

in human
whose

of

individuals

still remain

they
may

shall

never

exchange "dear words of human


speech"
of their
through the thought-laden work
come,
and fascinate
know
each
to
thought-drivenfingers,
meet

other
The

to

and lives.
each others' characters
sway
cottage industries of Ireland like every other
and

questionin

that

studied

from

homes.

Three

land

of

livelycontroversy,

very familiar

of

can

be

misrepresentatio
The
optimisticofficial,parading his
The
of them.
impressivefigures,
givesus oneaccount
annual output of Irish lace,he tells us, is ;^ 100,000,
and ;^95,ooo of this is wages.
Derry alone, he says,
has thirty-eight
one
splendidshirt factories whose
and thirteen rural branches
hundred
;^300,
pay over
cufF and fronts,made
in the
a
000
year for collars,
two

thousand

sources

"

cottagers get work

from

Congested Districts Board and the Post Office


show
increase
in depositssince
an
Savings Banks
lions
1890, from three and three-quarterto twelve milin the Trustees
and
of ;^500,000
Savings
This
Banks.
when
and cirquoted in Parliament

the

HANDICRAFT

366
of

veto

its

competition
boards

the

on

alike

measures

of

and

for
voluntary associations
Irish home
industries. In 1906, Japan imported 4,
riage
yards of linen from Belfast,paid the car500,000

government

and

it,embroidered

returned

undersell

Irish

the

peasant

ton,

between

the

official's complacency and


Nationalist's
and
real and

the

despondency

lover

whole

of

about

the

understatements
that the

handicrafts

truth

45s a
fast
Bel-

of

overstatements

the

to

home

own

The

It is somewhere

the

in its

work

drawn,

freightfrom Belfast to Japan is


than from
only two and threepence more
in Ireland.
to a neighboringcounty

market.

the

and

the

rural

must

of
omist
econ-

look

for

Irish industries

as
today.And they will find,as I did,that whererealized in wages," covers
in
the largeamount
instances suchdishonest
as^^ truck
too
juggling
many
ers
payments" in food and drink to the poor hovel workby the receivingagent, who is usuallythe public
market
house and generalstorekeeperof the nearest
earned
the great bulk of it is really
pleasantly
town,
in peaceful,sanitary,convent
schools; or in the
the little cabins
where
of the green hillside,
sunshine
stand. They will see, too, that it is the very cheapening
and multiplying
by the machine, which enhances
and maintains the value of the handwrought article
the top
to
everywhereand that it rises automatically
of

"

of the

industrial pan

the

Irish

be skimmed

for the

use

and

classes, German
petition,
comdiscriminating
which since the displayin the Irish pavilion
Glasgow exhibition has been manufaduring
with
crochet
trulyshameful success, is after

benefit of the

at

to

HANDICRAFT

all but

supplyinga

lovers

of

Clones

367

demand

and

will

lace

Ardara

the very cleverest imitations


real menace
The
in the market.

shudder

at

appear
industries

in Ireland

is the

foreignpeasant to
loaf and our
cottagers'

in Ireland
oneroom

lion's

the

of it that may
to all the

share

and

boards

have to defend
the
may
hovels againstJapan and

Irish

channels

vites
in-

of the

associations

cupboards
TenerifFe

cottage industries into still

our

and

always only

which
railwaytariff,

the

Irish

itself created

it has

of the

by

verting
di-

acteristic
char-

more

lace

making and
linen embroidery.Iron-work, wood-carving,stained
and marble
stone
glass,
carving,metal repousse work,
cabinet
making, porcelain,silver and goldsmiths'
ameling
work, ecclesiastical embroidery,leather work, enin colors,illuminating,
basket
work, spinall native
ning,carpetmaking,andtabinetweaving,are
less dormant
or
or
hereditaryIrish crafts lyingmore
in the untrained

hands

of Irish peasants.

of thousands

report of the

The

Technical
on
Royal Commission
publishedin 1884, said very significantly;
is a general consensus
of opinion on
the

Education
"There

of all

part of persons
views
poorer

by

than

other

on

instru"lion.

generaland
in

our

whatever

that
subjefts,

districts of Ireland

technical

less

ranks,

it is one

be

may
There

which

mind, that

the

may

be their

prosperityof the
greatlypromoted

is

conviction

visits have

the children

and

not

firmed
fullyconyoung people

of Ireland^of the laboringclass^possessgreat manual


veloped
and aptitude^
which
only requiresto be dedexterity
in order
those

amongst

to

whom

be

useful

to

they live."

themselves

and

to

HANDICRAFT

368
The

Christian

and

Brothers*

famous

classes all

school

at

Artane

Ireland,recruited
the very poorest cabins, have been a"^ing upfrom
on
this con viftion for years and anticipating
Sir Horace
doctrine that the real problem in IrePlunkett's
land
is a human
ucation
problem and the solution of it edand self-help.
Wherever
this is applied success
the

convent

is almost

in Ireland and

instantaneous

applaudsthe results. Things "made


are
a
beauty and a dignitywhich

world
have
of the

machine.

German

and

"great traditional

in Ireland"

the

her

refinement

of her

which

art"

infused into the

Tara"

Wherever

the whole

despair

linens

and

Donegal carpets, her poplins and porcelains


homespuns go they carry their evidence of

laces and

the

over

and

race

cultured

the

"Hearth

of

of the historic

some

land's
clingsto all of Irenative industries,
givingthem a singulardistindiion today in a market
sadlyvulgarizedby the
competing fadlories of the world.
which
the Countess
In the preface of a littlebook*
in 1897 and on the flyleaf of
of Aberdeen
gave me
she

which

of my

inscribed

hopes

her

past

best wishes

for Irish

for the realization

industries.Sir C. Gavan

Duffy quotes Mrs. Power Lalor's estimate of "70,000


waiting for discipline
girlsand young women,
and employment" in Ireland and goes on
to
say
truth only those who
have
much
studied
with how
"

in

human,

the

in Ireland

can

preference to

judge:
"

"He

the

will be

more

than

the Providence
Providence, he may become
limits this
nation, who will enlargeto its utmost

Parish
of

politicalproblem

Parish

Fro'vidence^By E. M.

Lynch.

HANDICRAFT

fieldof safe and

experiment."The
Education

Technical

on

that "funds
but

useful

and

369

teachers"
alone

teachers

were

have

been

had

mission
Royal Comdecided in 1884

all that

ed,
need-

was

working

miracles

regenerationin Ireland since then. At the Dalkey Cooperative School of Embroidery the Loreto
have
in making a parish become
suceeded
its
nuns
of

own

Providence

and

in the

littlestory of the Fox-

Mills, recentlytold in a fascinating


pamphlet by Rev. T. A. Finlay,S.J.,*we have a
of womanly courage
and patriotinstance
thrilling
ism
all the world should applaud. In 1891 a
which
the
Sister of Charityacquireda ruined corn
store
on
bank
of the Moy in the heart of a squaliddistridt in
the County Mayo and from
"poverty, hunger and
ly
dirt,"one hundred and twenty homes have been steadiand permanently wrested
by her venture.
Today
the "ruined
store" is a busy littlemill,the fame
corn
of whose
flannels,friezes,tweeds, clerical cloths,
shawls and blankets,exhibitions and prizeshave carried
far and wide. It circulates i^5,ooo a year in wages
and has wholly repaid a loan of iJ^7,ooo
which
ford

Woolen

it received
moderate
was

loom
These

from
rate

given for
was

set

of
the
in

Congested Distrifts

Board

at

free grant of ^^1,500


trainingof workers and the first

interest. A

motion

by

Sir Horace

Foxf^rd and

of

Plunkett.

trial
in the induspathos and romance
resurre"lion
of a people whose
trade was
killed
by a"ts of Parliament and laws admittedlydesigned
to
"degrade,impoverish and destroy in them the

touches

the

its Faifory.DoUard, Dublin.

HA.NDICRAFT

370

of

spirit

enterprise"*

give

Ireland

civilized

nations

and

among
to

expedl
in

Leckey's

her

Ireland

in

the

XVIII

now

for

Century,

unique

entitles

assistance

encouragement,

struggle

her

industrial

her
and

tion
posily
sure-

ence
preferment.
reinstate-

HANDICRAFT

RELATION

THE

TO

CONGER
y

IT

very

WORKER

of Arts
Society

architedi

an

F.A.I.A.

and

that

ideas about

vague

ARCHITECT

BALDWIN

fad
regretable

that
and

CRAFT

THE

President
a

THE

OF

FRANK

is

371

CraftSyDetroit,

laymen

most

architedts.
is

formulae; a very pradticalman,

greatlyconcerned
problem that the
Another

with

mere

will believe

rules

perhaps,but

construftive

so

side of his

esthetic

will hold

that most

the

One
of

man

entertain

architedts

to

side escapes his attention.


the oppositeview and contend

idealists,
visionaries,
always
the sacrifice of
at
efFeft,even

are

strivingfor artistic
practicalneeds and never
yieldingto the idea that
a
buildingmay be convenientlyplanned and stillbe
pleasingto the eye.
Both
of these conceptions are wrong
and there are
who
recognize that the successful architedi
many
must

be

man

istics of both
of the

who

the better charadterpossesses


of the above
types and the really
great
of broad

culture,who
have
than
more
a
knowledge of
merely superficial
the sister arts of painting,
sculpture,literature and
music.
universities of today recognizethis and
Our
of the
are
working upon this theory and in most
in achite"lure much
is
attention
courses
collegiate
for a broad generalculture and
given to the necessity
the student
does not, as a rule,take up the more
until he
professionalstudies of the course
stri"^ly
his sophomore year.
enters
We
need
not
go deeply into the historyof archimen

professionare

men

HANDICRAFT

372

in search

te"ture

testimonyin

of

support

examples

but

cite a few
may
historyduring the periodof

from

VIII

Henry

of this

to

gument,
ar-

English
George

II.

John of Padua,
Henry, received
as

^^

who
a

and

Architect

the

was

in which

royalgrant
Musician

archite"t

court

and

he

Devisor

was

under
named

of his Majesty's

Buildings."
In the time

of Charles

find

we

InigoJones, whose

Palladian

ing
designsgave much to the serious and lastof England. Being the son
architecture
of a cloth
worker, his youthfuldays were
spent in the study
of the processes
of manufacturing fabrics. He
was
later bound
apprentice to a joiner,and biography
he was
led
for us the various
traces
steps by which

paths of architecture.

into the

During the prosperous state of King Charles' afiairs,


carried on with much
the pleasures
of the Court were
and magnificence.
and
music
taste
Poetry,painting,
all called into play.Ben
architecture
were
Johnson
the designerand
the laureate. Inigo Jones was
was
learn

from

Walpole

Horace

efFeCts,
costumes,

scenic
of

the

given at
Under

for festal occasions.

of the decorations

inventor

famous

Jones

that

etc., for
or

masques

no

We

created

less than

plays which

the
teen
fourwere

Court.

Charles

II flourished

Grinling Gibbons,

ar-

While
rant
perhaps there is littleto warchiteft-sculptor.
pacity,
carecognitionof Gibbons in the first named
the many
a sculpas
examples of his ability
tor
and

Charles

carver

gave

mark
him

him

as

free hand

master

in the

craftsman.
decoration

of

HANDICRAFT

374

urallyfollows
sympathy with
crafts

the

The

Before

make

to

the

could

occured

then

to

do

without

arts

and

of

this

and

spiritinto
resulted

there

of his

which
personality
duplicatedand it had not

or

world

the civilized

to

the

hearty

processes

breathed

fashioned

he

imitated

be

not

mechanical

of

visible manifestation

some

underlies

in

spiritof craftsmanship
beautiful
thingsfor everyday

workman

article which

be

must

true

advent

manufa"Eure, the
every

architedi

the

which
spirit

movement.

is the desire
use.

that

the

beauty in

that it

was

sible
pos-

thingswhich

one

handled

daily.
of obNowadays, when we consider the multiplicity
chanically
jeftswhich are mechanicallyduplicated,if not methat the public
designed,is it small wonder
has come
ly
utterare
to believe that art and
utility
? It would

divorced
are

intent

more

character

chiteft

to

does

manufacture

objedlto be
prefer to have

principles rather,that
"

the

and

encourage

To

illustrate;when

his artistic

venture

he

serious

under

the

than

upon

chinery
ma-

the

manufactured.
it believed

is

that the

ever

from

ready to

efforts of the

William

brains

our

of

this defeftion

condone

not

that

appear

development

of the

I should

But

the

upon

which

with

almost

Morris

the corporate

true

ar-

true

further
man.
crafts-

first organized
name

of Morris

encouraged and
Ford
men.
strangelyassortedgroupof

supported by a
Madox
Brown,
Burne
Dante
Gabriel Rosetti,Edward
ers
Jones,paintand PhilipWebb,
architeft,were
actuallymemfirm. The
of the arbers of the original
then dean
"

Co.,

he

was

"

HANDICRAFT

375

professionin England,Mr. Bodley,promised


the firm certain orders for stained
to place with
glassand other decorations, providedthe organization
able to undertake
them.
Later, the firm did
was
Mr. Bodley for the glassfor St.
receive orders from
church
Michael's,Brighton,and also for another new
Mr. J. P. Seddon,
built in 1862, All Saints',Selsley.
Morris
also commissioned
the archite"^,
" Co. to
cabiiiet made
from
his design.
decorate
a
The
chief point upon
which
particular
emphasis
of slight
should be laid is that it is a matter
ance,
importthe architedt
whether
is or is not
a^ually a
His sympathiesand interest are with the
craftsman.
and the more
ly
craft workers
closelyand harmoniousand
the craftsman
the archite"l
are
allied,the
demands
to make
more
surelywill the public come
chiteftural

the latter.
upon
At present the publicis

greatlyaddi"led to the reprehensibl


habit of purchasingby catalogue.
Commercial
and manufadturers
have prospered
purveyors
else to supplythe lack
because
there has been no one
occasioned
man.
by the disappearanceof the artist craftsand crafts societies throughIf,therefore,thearts
out
the

beautiful the
the

to

We

as

the

which

ing
mak-

enter

of
furnishing,

to
inour

will be the first to seize upon


of the results. While
we
are
willing

the archite^s

make

use

concede

world

should

exquisitebit of filigree
jewelry
de]ightsthe eye, we should insist that

that

satisfies and
the

everyday elements

construdtion,as well

homes,
and

their efforts toward

shall bend

county

needs

an

workers

encourage

in
the

coarser

formation

materials.
of

groups

of

HANDICRAFT

376
artist ctaftsmen

that

so

specialdesign which
at

turn

to

once

only expe"l

the

but

executed

will be

he
arts

when
wishes
and

archited

an

any
he will

to

carry out,
crafts societies and

feel assured

that

in

manner.

capable

has

the

not

commission

r
WITH

THE
The

SOCIETIES
Detroit

Societyof Arts and


its doors to the public on
cember
Deopening to members
taking
7 : the formal
place the previousevening,with the annual meeting
and a banquet.

DETROIT:
Crafts opened

The

new

work,

are

source

the direftion

Under

both

result of five weeks'

the

rooms,

of

great pride

of the

the

Society.

vice-presidentand

architedis,a substantial

converted

to

strenuous

brick

urer,
treas-

barn

has

admirablyarrangedbuilding:
with open
stairs:
downwith a largeshow-room
fire-place
and packing rooms.
also wrapping, store
stairs,
Uppart of the floor has been cut away, forming
with the down
conne"led
six foot gallery,
stairs
a
room
by a stair-case at one end. In this galleryare
the
the secretary's
on
desk, and long show-cases
ofF this
sides. A small and very well lightedroom
for specialexhibitions. The
ofFers opportunity
gallery
been

into

an

entire interior is ceiled and

stained

beautiful

shade

ning
greyishbrown, dark downstairs and runThe
the ceiling.
principalfeature
lightertowards
in reddish brown
is the largePewabic
unfire-place
glazed title. The buildinghas been treated as a uni-

of

warm

HANDICRAFT

377

ground
backdesignedto form a harmonious
for exhibitions;nothing has been allowed to
intrude which, though beautiful in itself,
dewould
the perfe"ladaptation of the rooms
tra(% from
to
for which
the purpose
ney
they are intended. Mrs. Sidhas had charge of the interior work,
Corbett
and is to be warmly congratulated
the result.
on
iied whole

and

Extended

notice

the

opening

The

second

of the

will be

exhibitions

various

given next

and

of

month.

bulletin of the Detroit

Societyhas been
notes
issued,containingdetails of the new
building,
current
exhibitions, and other Society news.
on
Copies will be sent free,on applicationto the secretary.

r
EXECUTIVE

COMMITTEE

monthly meeting

THE

held

was

at

The

December

on

Mrs.

Garland, Mr.
Conant, present.
Report of the November

MEETING
of the

School

of

6, 191 1, Mr.
Hoyt, Mr.

executive

board

dence,
Design, ProviElliott presiding.

Rollins

meeting read

and

and

Mrs.

approved.

In

from the American


to a communication
response
Institute of Archlteds, the board voted to advocate
the

site recommended

the Lincoln

Memorial

Voted

that the

eleven

to

hour

twelve

by the Park Commission


in Washington.
of meeting be changed

o'clock

when

the

board

meets

Providence.
Voted

to

hold

the

January meeting

in Boston.

for

from
in

HANDICRAFT

378

Annual

At

the

of

meeting

cided

the

for
This

upon.

Garland

Mrs.

Voted

copies

of

societies

notice

Meeting

the

of

all

Boston,

Conference
matter

that

retaries

in

of

was

presented

for

by-laws

the

Conference

191
19

12

discussed

revised

1,

the
not

was

boaiC^

the

by

-aai.

constitution

League.
made

be

with

this

of

and

instriiftions

sent

to

to

bring

secr

it

tti

members.

adjourned.

Nelly

F.

Conant,

Secretary,

HANDICRAFT

38o

ing

proceeded to

what

called

in

those

days
work."
This
"crewel
was
better, but the designs
worked
terrible and the material we
on
were
ly
rapidshowed
signs of its lack of quality.Accidentally
with friends who
I came
into touch
brought some
handspun linen home from Russia. I am talkingnow
looked
of years ago, when
on
homespun linen was
cleverer
it was
much
rather stupid:
and up to
so
as
the productions of the wonderful
date to use
chines
manow
sults.
floodingthe country with their great reWhen

wide,
The
wanted

to

open

an

obstinate

long before you can


now
standingwide

it is not

door

can

you

was

was

do

much

more

work

door

it quite wide.

open
open.

than

inch

an

And

I could

now

bly
possi-

en,
accomplish. I was
discoveringhow to find linof designin books
and
silk,threads and treasures
and scraps of old despised work, often
museums;
full of lessons in design and
cution.
exekindly lent, were
But no
one
pair of hands could accomplish
all I wanted

More

than

to

do.

twenty

years ago
crippledgirlof about sixteen

I found
with

poor

clever

and

very
and
fingers

I
immediately taught her and employed her. Then
little girlof fourteen
in very delicate health
found
a
I taught her. Gradually it began that people
and
little
if I could get some
staying with me wondered
thing done for them. My two girlswould do it and
when
paid for it. It was
they were
proud we were
done
on
handspun linen and was a careful copy of
lent me
linen work
old bits of Mediterranean
by a
I took another girl
with hip disease and
friend. Then
then

man

with

broken

back; these

were,

and

HANDICRAFT

wonderful
fa"St,

in

are

of

disabled

more

fresh

one.

We

the

to

crafts exhibition

successes,

but

''It shows

that

day

when

and

my

to

enough

Albert

in touch

me

done.

Hall.

must

go

now

my

with

the broken

more

go to the
took the

and

on

to

broken
work

back

took

and
of

some

astonished

at

back

our

said:

very much
enquire for more

orders

do

and

Home

last

at

for the

gold cross

whole
of

were

exhibition

Arts

embroidery of its kind in the


It was
given to my first worker
now
crippledgirl,
quitea woman.
the

And

arts

sent

we

were

began

we

take

We

We
with

man

we

to

first local

our

of

with

others

two

taughtthem.

organizedand

still." Then

workers
brave

they put

was

had

thingswe

better

and

two

cases,

found

have

that

two

came

the

workers

themselves

than

happens

it often

In

successes.

disabled

most

my

381

at

best bit

exhibition.

long

ago,

the

Last

year my man
said: "I suppose
Duchess
of Somerset

it. He

is really
good." The

pleased with the clever fingersof the


Wiltshire
Cottagersthat she suggested,to our great
Her charming
pride,hername beingused as god-parent.
recognitionof our efforts is justlike the medal
was

soldier

so

obtains

for brave

services:

these

workers

and
very brave in the face of their disablements
their pride in their awards
ary
of merit and their honor-

are

distin"^ion is

It
delightful.

is

that
recognition
that they "take
a
a

they have found the true ideal


delightand pride in their work."
A lady ordered
altarcloth for her church, a fair
an
linen cloth. It was
exhibited,received a high award
and we
have done several since and are doing more.
"

HANDICRAFT

382
Last year

one

it to

labor, sent
shall miss
do

which

on

one

had

she

I said

with

her: "And

to

weeks

spent

almost
finished,

me

it so."

justfinished

had

girlwho

tiful
very beauof devoted
tears

what

"

*'I

will you

with

the money
I can
you get for it?" "Oh,
pay
doftor
myself! Her health is terrible. Another
"

my

nearlypays the rent, another one who has


"wanted"
not
at home,
a
now
step-mother and was
lodgesin a different villageand pays her own
way.
have
We
begun with a little girlof seven, with a
and with a ploughman of
brick layerof forty-five
forty.
whatever
This
is not 3. "charity."No
is given
money
done.
The
charityconsists in
except for work
the voluntarytime
given to the conducing of the
class. The
teachingwas in the earlydays very easy,
of workers
the number
being so few and so close
that a little occasional
to
me
personal instrudlion
and
As time went
on
rapidlydeveloped their ability.
one

very

and

numbers

distance

increased

this

was

not

so,

but

kind
lady
everywhere I found, and still find, some
will willinglyundertake
who
a
cripplein her own
der
neighborhood.An educated lady quicklylearns unbooks
and examples,or perdire6l:ion from
haps
my
selves
two
or
one
personallessons. The workers themin a school,
be coUeded
cannot
beingcripples
also of

course

that ends
the

whole

and

is

You

for

room

in fixed

scheme

school

costs

money;

ten
of-

paid teachers, and


a
"business,"
rapidlybecomes

quicklyout of
will gatherthat

hours

touch

and

with

the

true

ideal.

are
my belief is that we
ducing
reprothe old condition as well as obtainingthe old

HANDICRAFT

materials

I believe

them.

^'condition"

is

believe

that

not

is better

than

and

connexion

modern

our

the

with

produced

have

of the

that

old art, the

Our

real flower

results. Do

or

our

modern

be

course

that

are

unfavorable
of

art.

work

It is not,

old work.

knowledge

of

condition

designs,or adap"
produce the old

in the

art

the centuries
a

to

great element

appreciablyworse.
machinery cannot

it is

old

reproducingthe

and
of

tations

383

of science

discussed
gone,
to

but

in

they

ishing
the flour-

By carefullyhand

little
watering and tending, we can still raise some
blossoms, but only by hand watering and tending.
I had almost
As
said,by sittingup all night with
It need
them.
hardly be suggestedthat it need not
be a crippleclass of workers, but I do
necessarily
red tape, a cultivation
of individuality,
no
urge
of very honest
aims, money
being the secondary
and a very earnest
consideration
studyof old models.
To
obtain the old designswe
have recourse
to
must
remember
old books, drawing, examples. We
must
sance
that the best of them
were
produced in the Renaisartist." The
an
was
period "when
every man
Renaissance
but spread
confined to Italy,
not
was
to
Germany, Austria, Holland, England, Spain,
France.
In those days English workers
nically
techwere
eries
so
good that many of the splendidembroidsent
to
worn
land
Engby the great Italians were
be worked
and
to
English peasant fingers
have not
must
member
reyet lost their cunning. Also we
that in Englishagricultural
distri"^s cunning
has not
been
destroyedby machinery as it has been
We
have
in towns.
no
labor-savingapparatus of
"

"

HANDICRAFT

384
the minor

The

sorts.

I could

than

more

stuiFto

some

gave
could

do

not

^^

so

the

to

Every man
days, because

*'

It

was

door

now

make

skirt

girlto whom
regrettedthat

to

artist"

an

was

all his

from

the

is '*a

born

made

she

no

chine."
ma-

Renaissance

in those

house

designa

beautiful.

surroundingswere

their sickness

modern

is

there

"

beautifu

beautiful; an

were

is

ugly ones

no

lovely visions,it will


To
ugly ones.
say that a
artist,"is

not

to

jerry-built
town,

utensils

and

filled

are
we

can

old.

study the beauty of

to

Fill it with

I have

because, ma'am,

fillhis eye with base imaginings.


Our eyes
with base imaginingsand the only way

temper

er
rath-

make
to
easy for the blacksmith
key, because all door keys were

architeft
to

and

wish

flourishes

exceptionaland rather a waking


which
machines
reduce
to
us.
inability

this
Still,
as

sewing machine

man

say that
serve

surround

to

him

him

turn

soon

or

away
woman

place him
with

with

in

machine

every

labor

quisite
saving appliance,he will,in spiteof all,evolve exdrawings for houses, silver,carpets and what
and displayan
complishes
not
industryand a genius that acmarvels of beauty.He will not, and when
the terrors
he has tried,it has been pitiful witness
Buttake
"the born artist,"
Nouveau."
labelled "Art
bid him steep himself in the lovelyrelics yet left of
a lovely
world, and his drawings,designsand adaptations
"

"

will

givesome

gone.
Begin with

with

your worker

First of allexplainthat
anathema.

She

that all is

assurance

the

not

utmost

machine-hemmed

will then

hemstitch

ably
irrevoc-

simplicity.
teaclothis

them

and

soon

HANDICRAFT

386
settled it all

fingersare

well

as

live

the

today

ones

Machine

hands.

as

And

to

work

long

dead

think

and

reads

us

brokenday I was telling


my
I imagined a particularstitch was
how
old piece we
an
were
studying.He took
me
ma'am, this is
very gently:"Excuse

fesson like that. One

no

backed

man

worked

on

it from

me

it will

how
I

as

As

think!"

course

you
it I should know

it is natural:

see

and

had

you

only

that asserts
rejoicein the individuality
becomes
itself and the piece of work
a treasure.
"Please
me:
ma'am,
urgent postcardsummons
to

an

cannot

out

of

go;

always at

am

time

their satisfa"bion.

tellingthe

head

use

to

get

till you

on

come."

Then

think

we

it

together.
tell

little anecdote

of what

happened
avillageman about
only last week, William
thirtyyears old, crippled,is doing a very beautiful
for a lady.The
lady wishes to receive
counter-pane
it is nearly comand
it the end of this month
as
pleted,
William
I asked
to jiurry.He
repliedon a
post card, for he is in a distant Wiltshire village
work
fore
beI can't promise it. The
must
please me
and I cannot
it pleases any
one
hurry, for I
I must

here

"

"

should

do it well. If /am

not

satisfiedwith

the stitches,

the lady." This


best to satisfy
my
is the firstlesson I instill; the firstthing that matters

I have

is that
has
The
your

the

done
craze

best
and

and

to

done

an

worker

should

be

quite

certain

that

he

his best.

cooperationis fatal,and will destroy


efforts. I had a big order for casement
tains,
curI gave them
to
a
beginner to hemstitch,
for

advanced

worker

to

embroider.

HANDICRAFT

"I

don't

*'it's

not

And

the

rivets

into

but

can

you

I told

fond

of

far

machine

thing;

it

takes.

Now

is

too

not

take

identical

by Fanny
should

work

have

it should
all this

comes,

be

can

that

has

of the
been

worth

the

worker

let

worth

you

are

the

secrets

of

my

writing,
hand-

all this
the

priceless
something

purchasing,

class.

to

William."

it possess

have

and

"That

say:

the

it

able

be

by

three
head

style.And

keeping.
These

such

of

and

designer,
and

doing,

threads."

and

achieved;

of

four

his

is

the

do,

individualityas
and

he

wont

use

done

material

card,

post

should

is

much

soul

have

priceless inspiration
achievement

that
as

up

of work

pieces

tomorrow,

the

threads

You

so.

and

to

nexion
con-

another.

thought

ever

made

do

of

taking

was

to

the

counter-pane.

on

three

up

like

thing

threads

have

take

proud

me

Three

William

two

up

is done
The

to

to

fine, lam

too

would

was

made

threads

"

looks

and

thing

three

but

end, completing

wrote

if I

as

nothing

life and

William's

up

cards

post

does

replace
He

stitch.

materialis
No

take

to

not

them!"

all his

machine

never

him

for every

the

It's

''

who

soulless

one

replace

can

rivetter

in the

between
You

said

boilers

iron

himself

rivet

mere

of the

said,

work,"

own

my

she

curtains,"

them, just hemming


me

these

little hemmer

poor

It reminded

put

about

care

like

just
finish

to

was

to

seem

387

worth

HANDICRAFT

388

INDUSTRIES

GROUP

AND

ARTS

THE

AS

PEIRCE

relation

craftworker

as

the world

to

group

industry to

individual,to

an

of which

community
part and

WHITE

the

of

TO

MOVEMENT

CRAFTS

SARA

THE

RELATED

outside

to

the

it is

whom

the

diate
imme-

conscious

it is also importantl

coming
connected, though less intimately,is beand

mors

more

for consideration

matter

constantlyto our notice that the village


industries are
increasingin numbers
yearly and in
the handicraft
definite way
are
a
ment.
moveaiFed^ing
for better or
Whether
is a question
worse
which
is being asked,and quitenaturally
bringsforth
for whom
?
another,namely, better or worse
like to use
and
Cooperation is a word which many
believe that they believe until it comes
to puttingit
when
fear of losingtheir personality
into pradice
them
and they do not
dare to run
the
overcomes
in a work
for the general
risk of losingtheir identity
good.
as

it

comes

"

That
met
meet

ask

the

and

more

even

those

crafts

are

dire"^ion

America.

educational

faced

and

were

of the group

which

has

movement

important, and is ready to


to
greater ones, gives me
courage
who
in dire"^ sympathy with
not
are

problems that

the work

able

and

arts

industries

to

consider

being accomplished by
and

Perhaps

management

in various

sults
re-

under

parts of

important point is the


trainingthe children and young

the

value of

them

the

most

I89

HANDICRAFT^
people

in technical

skill and

through industrial applicatio


in producingbeautiful things,
teachingthem
It is a common
discrimination.
icans,
reproach that Amerwith an exceptional
few,have no artistic sense
and
are
generallywasteful. It seems
quite possible
that both an appreciationof beauty and a better understanding
will be felt quitedefiniteof economics
ly
later on
result of our
industries.
a
as
village
is every opportunity
There
and
to produce designers
craftsworkers

leaders

will grow

who

in their

into useful and

valuable

in the
community and finally,
of outgrowing their environment, to broaden
case
their plane,giving others the chance
to
come
up
and
take their places.
the social conditions
Only those who have known
before and after the establishing
of an art industry
own

in isolated distri"^s or

the

on

surface

to

where

even

little need

be but

of one,
people who

effect upon
the
find the benefits which

the
and

seek

and

off from

there would

become

seem

can

derstand
un-

earnestly
ing
broaden-

influence,in lives naturallycut


cultivating
the generaladvantagesfound
in our
larger

cities.
There

is

always a
wrought obje"^s.In
demand

than

demand
certain

in others

for

beautiful,hand-

localities there

for the

is

more

work

produced, but
with the aid of judicious
ing
shopsand traveladvertising,
sales,there is every opportunityfor bringingthe
work

to

from

the

the notice

From

the home

homespuns

of the way sed^ions of the country


of interested
purchasers.
out

industries

in wool

and

of Canada

linens,woven

beautiful

come

and

dyed by

HANDICRAFT

390

hand, which are charming in color andtexture; these


States industries
are
being used by two of our United
in making children's frocks and dressing
gowns,
which
from
the Liberty
come
quite as artistic as those
The
Old
at
Shop in London.
Colony Union
Bourne, Massachusetts, and the Aquidneck Cottage
Industries of Newport, Rhode
Island,find difficulty
in

the
filling

demand

for these

handmade

garments,

designand show an application


of needlecraft
lifts it
to wearing apparel which
quiteout of the positionit usuallyoccupies.
Basket
The
Shop in Belfonette,Pennsylvania,
produces
baskets
made
by the townspeople under the
dire"^ion and from the designsof able craftsworkers
aided by an
have been in their town,
who
expert in
gettingthe best results in dyeing.The settlements in
of the largecities are
gettinggood results in
many
needle-craft
and in making pottery. The
Bohemian
which

are

distin"^ive

Needlework

Guild

in

in New

York

and

The

Paul

Pottery in Boston are notable examples.


The
Keene
Valley tapestriesmade in the Adirondacks
by the guides'wives in their homes, from
Smith and under
special
designsby Pamela Coleman
the able direction of Mrs.
markable
George Notman, are reexamples of weaving and are good from
signs
to order, from
specialdeevery standpoint.Made
and with the colors dyed to harmonize
with
fill a need
terior
long felt by inany surroundings,they
Revere

decorators.

losingtheir opportunitiesand sacrificing


individual,the organized group industryoffers
of trainingcraftworkers,
most
practicalmethod

Rather
the
he

than

HANDICRAFT

teaching
of

time

as

and

it

does

money,

391

design
and

and

the

technique,

loyalty

to

common

value
terest.
in-

HANDICRAFT

39"

GLASS

STAINED

IN

CHARTRES

to

explore,as if one

CATHEDRAL.*
de Chartres ! It isa world

Notre-Dame

entire Middle

explored the

Wai.tka

Ages.

THERE
are

in the Cathedral

one

hundred

Patu

and

storied windows
stained-glass
lights,'*
seventy-five
richlydight,"and of these almost all
the
date from
the thirteenth century. Remembering
glassof the followingcentury in S. Pere and the
shall not
later windows
of S. Aignan, we
to
care
claim

disputethe
of mediaeval
The
as

three
have

we

that

of Chartres

to

be

of

limpid blue belong,

the locus classicus

glass.

western

said,to

windows
thetwelfth

century. And

we

know

all the great legendarylights


the year 1220
of the choir, with
and all the windows
nave

by

of the

exceptionof those givenbyS. Piedmont of Castile


had been placed in the
and Jeanne de Dammartin,
glazingremains. There
bays. Almost all the original
is of course, fine thirteenth-century
glassin England,
at
at Canterbury for instance, and
Lincoln, whilst
and York
are
scarcelyto be surpassed for
Salisbury
It is at
the pale beauty o( their silverygrisailles.
and Bourges, and most
of all at
Reims, Le Mans
Chartres,that are to be found the largestand most
galleries
complete and therefore the most
gorgeous
tres,
of the deep, rich mosaic
glassof that date. At Charthroughoutthe whole vast expanse of jewelled
that is not
lightsthere is scarcelyone
early,and
the

From

The

Storyof Chartres by

CxaL

Hxadlam.

HANDICRAFT

394

It is as

throughthem.
unceasinglyas

marvellous,and it changes as
the ever-changinghues
of a sunset
shores of Scotland,or on
the western
the iridescent
on
of the Venetian
waters
lagoons.And it is even
the noonday sun
brilliant than these. When
more
the aisles,or
is dartinghis angry
soft
rays across
streak the spaces with
rain-laden beams
stripesof
bloom; when the shades of evening have begun to
is gatheringstrength,and is
the dawn
when
or
fall,
the dim distances of the vast
now
lighting
nave,
you
round

sit and gaze

may
the

those windows.

on

You

watch

wine-red,theblood-red,the yellowand the brown


and the lancet lightsbeneath,
of the Rose of France
of all other beauty upon
earth fades,
tillthe memory
of that stupendous coloring.
You
in the intoxication
however
at last,
turn
vivid,
and, since no memory,
retain to the full the impression of the beauty
can
startled into another ecstasy. For
of that glass,you
are
be other windows
that there can
you have forgotten
as

beautiful. You

colors
blues

until
exquisite,

as

and

greens,

azures,

the

astonished
and

lightsof
ever

sightfrom

azure

sapphires and rubies


The
reds,like those
the
brown

and

beautiful of all

of the
at

emerald
are

peacock

which

other
those
blues

shine

in upon
of the south

stillthere

remain

the

the apse, and stillthe old glories


of the western
lancets,the

the

western

Reims,

saffron also and


the

are

more

the windows

the aisles. And

of the

once

and

reds
fiery

the choir and

new,

see

you
ultramarines

those

and

and

transept

believe that there

cannot

rose.
derful;
everywhere won-

are

the citron

green;

but

blues,the

yellows,the
most
superbly

lucid

transparent

HANDICRAFT

twelfth-centurylancets,and the deep


fillsthe lower
blue of Poitiers,
which

of the

azure

sapphire,the
windows

395

of the

nave.

The

secret

of its manufa"ture

lost,but you can understand,when you behold it,


how
said that
believed which
easilythat story was
in order to secure
this depth of blue the monkish
glaziersused to grind sapphiresto powder and mix
them
with their glass.
There
is only one
thing that
be compared with the stained glassof the North,
can
and that is the mosaics
of the South, of Ravenna,
Palermo, San Sofia.
The
offers to the student of glassa perCathedral
fect
the path
model, not indeed of detail,for upon
which
of detail the thirteenthleads to the perfeftion
steps to take, but of
century glazierhad stillmany
efFe"ls in decorative coloring.
In the rose
you have
there is not any
confused eScQ. of color,in which
a
definite form
of the broken
too
to spoilthe charm
bits of color upon
The
the senses.
meaning is there,
borate,
shall see, many
too, as we
meanings,simple and eladire"l and mystical.But it is in the lancet,
is

windows

of the

that

nave

the

of otherwise

row

(let

it be

suppliesus at once,
ungainlyfigures
confessed)
of the drapery,cloaks and borders, with
by means
that

mixture

of

and
beautiful,
with
which
are

The

crowded

lesson

with

and

those

shade

broad

that

masses

makes
of stain

color
bined
com-

absolute

should

not

color

be

and severity
of design
simplicity
And
the ideal of the glazier.
they

with

too

much

story.

of the army of saints and martyrs which


they represent is printedin largetype, so that it may
be easilyread and understood
the distant level
from

HANDICRAFT

396
of the

Each

lightexhibits one enormous


clad
marked
of a saint,
with features strongly
hopes of blazing color,set off by a border
nave.

more

sober

of these

in

broad

tone

and

The
opaque.
of limpid blue

in

figure
bright
that

fire dies

is

out

and
emerald
patches
green, of flaming red and saffron yellow, as they
and black,
approach the deep, cool borders of brown
violet and
of red
grey, mingled with lower tones
and green. You
the successful
see, then, the objeftand
result of these bold designsof huge saints.
The
the position
mediaeval
glaziershad considered
which
their glasswas
in the Cathedral.
to
occupy
They did not merely designit with a view to its being
effeftive in the studio. There
is another
point to be
noted. Working, as they did,with small fragments
of the preciousglassas it came
of the meltingout
pot, and binding each fragment in lines of lead till
the whole
formed
a
pattern or drawing in a leaden
and test
able to watch
their
framework, they were
work
in its progress.
Thus, watching and testing,
able also to arrange
for the proper
ling
mingthey were
of the rays diffused on
all sides by each piece
of the mosaic. They did not
aim so much
at painting
a
good preliminarydesignupon paper as at producing
When
in sucin glass.
ceeding
a fine effeft of color
centuries paintersinvaded the realms of glass
quirements
they would appear to have ignoredthe obvious remedium
of the new
in which they were
the medieval
to work.
Experimentallyand intuitively
studied
have
glazier,on the other hand, must
the whole
questionof radiation as it affe"led his task.
And
the result is,that for the most
superb effeds

^HANDICRAFT

397

of stained
burnt

glasswe have to go, not to the pi"lures


the largesheets of glassby famous
ers,
paintthe designs of the thirteenth-century
to

on

but

anonymous

monkish

craftsmen.

In

the

matter

of

glassthe latter had this advantagealso in their


favor. They had tovi^ork with a material which, being
less scientifically
mensely
imcompounded, was
artistically
stained

of the old potsuperior.In the manufacture


metal
something was left to Nature, much, that is
to
color,in other words, was
say, to accident. The
modern
not
so
evenly and exactlyspread as by more
itwould
unevenly distributed,
processes. Being more

ofFat the

edges,and the rays diffused


from it would
mingle in a softer harmony with those
of the neighboringcolored
fragments.And greater
obtained, because a chemicallyimpervarietywas
feft process
never
givestwo batches of glassfrom
the pot quite alike. In earlywork, again,the fa"t
that largepiecesof glasscould not be made
also
was
tone
frequently

on

the

side of the

craftsmen.

Perfeft

color

is the

of small
product of varied colors; the multiplicity
pieces of glassset in deep black lines of lead yielded
which
is in the nature
a result of rich,deep coloring,
from
of things not
be obtained
to
one
largesheet,
however
But

fine.

so
though the.paletteof the earlyglazierwas
with those splendidreds and ineffable
rich in quality
has long been
of which
lost,and
blues,the secret
To
other primary colors,it was
this
poor in extent.
be ascribed the curious coloringof
poverty must
many
details.Beards are often paintedblue,and faces usually
shade of a rich purplishbrown
brown.
Some
was

HANDICRAFT

398

fa6l

in
The

ordinary

sunburnt

efFeft

figures.

of

the

those
the

tones

the
in

and

the
rich

are

and

patterns

brought

deliberately

used

I have
at

brown

aspe"l

of

so

here,

not

only

their

this

very

home

manufactured

visages
of

the
in

in

as

the

in

type

of

Paris.

Persian

related
Nor

when

it is
of

but

framed.

are

enamels.

Crusaders

the

the

borders

clearly

imitations

time

of

mosaic

those

inept

seem

glass

hieratic

the

centuates
ac-

apparel,

are

and

only

these

beneath

soft

glazier.

influence

sumptuous

devices

by

early

many

medallions

and

the

of

their

ivories

Byzantine

simile

tint

undoubtedly

more

they

that

rugs

and

still

which

rug;

visible,

personages

and

The

Bourges,

at

plainly

is

also

by

As

of

Oriental

the

East

flesh

the

the

were

to

will

bered
remem-

Persian

being

HANDICRAFT

WITH

399

THE

SOCIETIES

It has been

BALTIMORE:
report
to

the result of

Handicraft,

events

in Baltimore

of the work

to

months

some

too

since

has been

many,

not

too

sent

few,

chronicle!

''The

Magic Ballads,"the firstpublicentertainment


givenby the club,put our energiesat a high pressure,
and, resultingin a produ"^ion of rare beauty and
charm, quickened our
vitality.
energiesto a new
i and
Occurring December
2, the "Ballads"
ceded
pretl\pChristmas sales by a short,perhapstoo short
margin. They served,however, to place the clnb
in the publiceye. During the fall and early
very much
winter there were
held an interesting
exhibit of handand the third
basket sale,
a Christmas
wrought silver,
annual

exhibition

jewelry,which
Evening Sun.
"

One

ofthe

of

thus

was

most

Mr.

Frank

described

exhibitions
striking

Gardner

Hale's

in the Baltimore

ofhandwrought

jewelry,the work of Frank Gardner Hale, of Boston,


craft
is being shown
week
at the Handiduringthe current
value
Club, on Charles street. It is of particular
not
merely because of the extreme
beauty of the
with which
these delightful
'trifles' are proartistry
duced,
but because
ofthe
educational qualityit has
in bringingthe uninitiated to a better appreciationof
the extraordinary
ious
beauty of the so-called semi-precstones.

Maine

and

Such

colle"^ion

of tourmalines

from

peridotsfrom far-awayEgypt,
California,
like
aquamarines and alexandrites with their chameleonhues, black and Australian opals,reconstru"ted

HANDICRAFT

400

and baroque pearls is not


often to
rubies,lapislazuli
be seen
at one
time, and the strikingshades of these
stones
are
wonderfully illuminating.
There
is a bikck opal stickpinthat scarcely shows
in the brightestlight,and
its peacock colors even
there is a black opal ring that might have come
from
Rosetti painting,so brilliant are
its blue-greens.
a
Tourmaline
of such
sleeve links are
a
deep green
emerals.
that they seem
like pure
There
almost
is
in
a
set
wonderfully wrought filet of moonstones;
**

silver that takes


Most

on

beautiful

the

shade

of its wearer's

hair.

pendants.One

has
especially
almost
Oriental
an
suggestion.It consists of pink
East Indian, tri-colored sapphires,
tourmalines,some
and a peridotset in pale gold.There
is one
a zircon
called
magnificentdark peridot,a stone sometimes
the emerald
of the night,set with pearlsin pale gold.
The
settingsare for the most
part entirelyformal,
there
art'
being little or no
suggestion of 'new
in their makeup, but they are
designedand
carefully
wonderfully wrought, an artist's work and a joy to
chased
behold.
Pearls in rings are set in beautifully
in place.
vines, the tendrils of which hold the stones
There
is one
pendant suggestingmistletoe and some
silver chain is made
of
beautiful brooches.
A striking
of individually
assembled
hundreds
pieces of silver
*'^

and
work

make

The

sales

over

19

10

and

the

like lace. It took

looks
to

are

for
and

two

weeks

J.O.L."

it.
1

1 1

the

growth.

of constant

have
outlook

shown
is for

marked

a
a

new

increase
year

of interest

HANDICRAFT

402

failure of the

the

and

Societyas

other

matters

while

deal of attention

the

at

that

given

time

same

ucation
ed-

great

the

mercial
com-

something

was

to

desired.

be

report of the council


of the President

The

of the Societyand
hereafter

that

the

at
arts

the

Wisconsin,

as

ever

seen

who

the

the

at

gestions
sug-

the

pose
pur-

announced

meeting,

excellence

probably the

best

in this country,
it will readily

saw

state

in

exhibition

recent

request

report of the salesroom

business

Arts

those

Society at
sent

the

the exhibition
fair
of

at

the

of

Madison,
American

of Arts.

Federation
The

of the

report also mentioned

The

Boston

regard to

spoke

Fine

which

statement

with

further

for unusual

crafts exhibition

and

believe.

and
of

Museum

up

in this connexion

medals

three

work:

handicraft

took

council, at the annual

the

award

would

be

must

salesroom

of the

success

whole; but

for the

year

look

of

committe
over

showed

jt7 0,5

00

and

gross
it will

of this business
disposition
the Society'smembership. Three
hundred
among
members
and thirty-one
were
representedby the sales
and the average
the salesroom
made
at
receipt by
each member
so
counts
representedwas ^27.00. Five ac-

be ofinterestto

average

at

over
average
from ^1000

to

the

^2000

each; nine

^2000;

twelve

accounts

accounts

from

from ^100 to
accounts
$S00 to ^1000; fifty-nine
from
$^0 to |lioo and
$SOO'y sixty-sevenaccounts
one

hundred

^50.00 The
the

and

seventy-nineaccounts

salesroom

pressingneed

for

committee
more

room

also
in the

were

under

mentioned
salesroom

HANDICRAFT

403

decided to remain
practically
in the present quarters but to enlargethem.
The
Jury reported that the generalaverage of work
is good and gradually
but that the greatest need
rising,
of
is a complete appreciationand study of the work

and

stated

that it had

past craftsmen.

included

Walker,

in the

work

exhibitions

on

the

for

at

tailed
de-

opportunities

reported on

specialexhibitions in the
have
that the Society
recommended
plan

written

the part of the exhibitors.

on

committee

in

Jury's report,

and

of the salesroom

the needs

The

C. Howard

Mr.

communication

for better

been

also

and

rooms

ition
exhib-

summer

new

resorts.

summer

bership
reported a total memmembership committee
of 865, a gain of 31 for the past year. The
membership now
being made up of 212 associates,

The

and

masters

134

craftsmen.

519

raised

been

graduallyhave

that the

recommendation

requirements for

that the

important statement

also made

They
and

it

requirements be

the

bership
mem-

their

was

still

made

striker.
of the council

members

The

for the

expiring

term

CoolJ. Templeman
fellow,
idge,Jr.,Francis Steward Kershaw, A. W. LongS. Williams.
Frederick
P. Cabot, Arthur
Following the business meeting Mr. Joseph Lindon
Smith, the popular auftionecr,succeeded in working
1915

off

on

of work
work

elefted

were

convulsed

follows:

audience

considerable

amount

the juryand some


rejefledby
it is quitesurethe jurywould not havere-

which

which

as

had been

jeftedif it could
treasures

have

among

seen.

There

were

several

the articles sold,of which

cided
demay

HANDICRAFT

404

be

mentioned

illuminated

manuscript of great
with the reignof King Theodore
1st,
rarety, dealing
of undoubted
two
genuineness,etc., etc.
d'oily-cloths
One
ly
prominent officer of the Societywas very soundberated by the auctioneer
for biddingfive cents
for
a
jewel which belongedto Catharine de Medeci.
valuable article offered for sale
Probably the most
known
that famous
the
was
as
pi"lureof Leonardo's
Won't
Lisa."
"Smile That
Come
Off," alias "Mona
Great secrecy was
this picture
necessary in selling
of course
there was
as
great danger that the French
authorities

would

put

of fa"l after the

matter

of

an

Mr.

to

detectives

was

hustled
to

picture had
it

Morgan's agent

two

in the

were

down

this

to

stop

the hall and

and
out

been

to

Cambodia

of the

and

that

the auctioneer

It isexpedtedthat
languishin jail.

will be banishment

as

disposed

discovered

was

room

sale: and

door, probably
his

great

expressed by those present for the poor


probable fate.
of the
one
Altogetherthe meeting was
that the Boston
Societyhas ever

sentence

pitywas

man's

most

fortunate
un-

cessful
suc-

held.

Societyof Arts and Crafts will open


its new
building,
street, formallyto
37 Witherell
members, with a Hearth- Warming' and Banquet
6, at 7 o'clock, when
on
Wednesday, December
the Annual
Meeting and elediion of officers will
take place.
ford
of the 'Hearth"The
Warming' will afceremony
their first opportunityto inspe"t the
members
Detroit:

"The

'

HANDICRAFT

405

premises,which, through the generous assistance of


number
of friends,have
been
a
modeled
appropriatelyreand it will also be a
for the Society's
uses;
'Private

View'

in honor

of

the

'Gala

of the fifth

Exhibitions'

anniversaryof

bled
assem-

ing
the found-

of the

It

Society.
is hoped that there

will be

largeattendance, and
in order that none
be obligedto remain
for
away
lack of escort, the committee
in charge will be glad
for a few memto
bers,
privileges'
arrange for 'escort
But as accomodaif earlyapplication
is made.
tions
are
limited,it is imperativethat the
necessarily
know
Committee
ber
as
soon
as
possiblefor what numto
bers
provide.It is urgentlyrequestedthat memreplyat once
by the enclosed postalcard, signifyin
their intention
to^be
stating
present and
whether
the 'escort
is desired.
privilege'
Helen
^
Plumb, Secretary
I had dinner
"I thought the 'Banquet' was
a joke,so
before I came!"
The
gazed
unhappy member
with good things
at the tables loaded
disconsolately
which
his more
friends were
believing
enjoying. I
passed by this place at noon
to-day,and concluded
from
the looks of thingsthat the opening had been
indefinitely
postponed," said another; "will some
No
one
pleasetell me how it has been done?"
one,
so
far,has been able to say how it was
done, those
behind
least of all. The
the scenes
most
day of the
and
opening found carpenters, painters,electricians,
about the gas" in full and apparentlyperma"men
nent
pied
occupossession;the middle of the floor was
by a largepile of lumber, and a carpenter's
''

"

HANDICRAFT

4o6

bench; articles of furniture

they would

where

corners

way

tucked

in

of

out

least in the workmen's

be

and the new


heater was
gettinginto
way;
and emittingthe usual preliminarysmells.
The

Banquet

At

for 7 o'clock

set

was

in the

men

their heels.

on

in from

the

the

scrubbed.

At

the

5.30

at

80,

and

and

rooms,

in numbers

they sat down,

licited from

the

at

nearby till thingswere


6.30 the members
began

partook

of

arrive,

to

between

70 and

repast, which

the

quoted

remark

parted
delittle

sumptuous

member

one

lowed
fol-

carried

were

wait

settled. At

and

look

one

again, to

ber
lum-

dumped, and
"banquet" arrivingin a large

alleywhere

automobile, took
more

5, the tables
they had been

At

tion
ac-

evening.
began to

stopped work, and


their impediments, beginningwith the
remove
with pailsand mops
pile;cleaningwomen
4 o'clock

the

e-

above.

brightfire burned in the grate, and beside it stood


a
Royale;" a few
largebowl of steaming "Punch
drops were
solemnlysprinkled on the hearth, and
the "hearth- warming" was
a
was
begun. Never
successful evening;the spirit
of goodmore
entirely
A

fellowshippossessed all;and
the

apparent
there

is

lamentable

or

the

even

of the
and

the

main,

new

in

that

attention
to

the work

the

feature
was

which

more

undeniable
food

to

Banquet

made

was

fa"t,that

bring about

meeting. Let

annual

rooms

reports testified
taken

but

nothing like good

reallyenthusiastic
thought,however,

once

was

it

not

the

be

only,

of the

evening;the opening
something much greater;
was
given to the various

was
very real interest which
of the Society.It was
matter
a

the

HANDICRAFT
for great regret that

407

retiringPresident,Mr. F.
C. Baldwin, was
unavoidablyabsent from the city;
in his place,the Vice-President,Mr. H. J. MaxwellThe
Grylls,presidedwith his usual ta"l and felicity.
Societyshowed its appreciationof Mr. Grylls's
great
office of
services, by eleftinghim to the vacant
President by acclamation.
Mr. Gustavus
Pope was
elefted first Vice-President,and the remaining officers
were

all

and
as

the

reelefted;all the elections

enthusiastic.

Annual

evening was

From

were

imous
unan-

point of view,
Meeting, Opening, and Banquet, the
cess.
sucpronounced by all an unqualified
every

a
Secretary'sreport showed
healthygrowth
in the Society,
in spiteof the summer
which
closing,
with the members.
proved to be an unpopular measure
closed for six months,
were
Though the rooms
business
never
entirelyceased, and several rather
in hand
taken
important undertakingswere
during
the summer,
summer,"
others, the '*Masque of Midamong
and the costuming of the
Midsummer
appeared in
Night's Dream," notices of which
Handicraft.
The
Lefture
Committee
arranged
for a course
of five le"tures by Professor
Walter
the generaltopics
on
Sargent,of Chicago University,
of Design in Industrial Art. These
were
given in
the Museum
of Art, and were
free to the public,and
without
ture
exception very well attended. A speciallecing
by Mr. Joseph Linden Smith, on the "Openof a Royal Tomb
in Egypt" was
a
cess,
great suc-

The

'*

and
work

netted

of the Lefture

sum

sufficient

Committee

to

carry

for the current

on

the

year.

HANDICRAFT

4o8

held during
specialexhibitions were
hibition
Exthe year, most
important being the Book-Plate
three
in February and March, when
over
In May, a specialexshown.
thousand
hibition
plateswere
Workers
of
of work
by the Handicraft
Peterborough proved a great attraction,as did also
exhibition of jewelry
an
by Josephine Hartwell Shaw.
exhibitions
that were
Other
celled
planned had to be can-

number

of

when
for the

Now

Board

decided

the

Societyis

exhibitions

be

for

the

made

rooms

atmosphere
than

this annual
their

exhibitions

of

future

the

rooms

the

rooms

are

something
at
appeared strongly
suggests

shop. This
meeting,proving that

and

ments
entertain-

of specialexhibitions,
purpose
and back-grounds,
lighting

mere

purpose

and

new

for the

for,besides good

serve

the

last settled in its

for

admirably adapted

other

at

arrangement
can

the

close

to

summer.

that

home,

the

as

club

the

room,

rooms

as

well

could
as

for

sales.

revelries
spiritprevailedas at former
held by the Society,
and in even
greater degree;for
of
the time being,all those present were
members
spired
one
interest,and inSociety,held togetherby one
fail to be
ideal; the Society cannot
by one
efficient for such meetings.
stronger and more
Coming Exhibitions:
Exhibition
of Textiles, loaned
1.
by the Boston
of Fine
Museum
ary
Arts, January 1 2 to Febru-

The

same

14.

Samplers, February and March.


3. Small Bronzes, April.
2.

HANDICRAFT

4IO

Miss

Annah

excellent

and

china

design
The

Corey

by

society
its

Helen

Miss

feels

constitution

Mrs.

and

vase

Near

greatly
in

order

Edward

Stephens

beautiful

of

attrafted

much
and

encouraged
to

do

and

larger

sent

original
attention.
is

ing
chang-

work.

HANDICRAFT

411

LETTERS

Editor:

the

To

article
the

such
but

piece
is

just

the
Rolf

*Bo8ton

the

on

what

position
from

was

of

seeing

Rolf

was

cup

should

decoration

applied

and

after
done
the

the

case

closely.

and

be

worked

the

may

the

cracked,

piece

cup

have
Arthur

loving

in

enamelled

suggested
the

into

This

finished.

was

in

coUeftion

crafts

found

not

with

to

an

Rolf,

B.

drawn

is

arts

Mr.

ago.

decoration
that

the

contains

1,

Edmund

attention

with

months

191

Mr.

by

which

of

exhibited

some

November,

enamels

on

course

cup

of

issue

YOUR

but

question,

prevented

J.

Mr.
Stone.

HANDICRAFT

412

EXECUTIVE

regular

THE
board

monthly
held

was

Museum

the

at

MEETING

COMMITTEE

Wednesday

of

Mr.

presiding.

of

meeting

Fine

executivi

January

Arts,

3,
Mr.

Boston,

Rollins

Mr.

Hoyt,

the

Hoft
land,
Gar-

Mrs.

and

rQia^'J

present.
Voted

the

that

immediately
Voted

that

three,

and
and

Voted

that
for

CRAFT

Voted
ton

that
be

Meeting

Conference

after
the
that

the

American

the

last

exaft

date

the

admitted

be

year
Arts
to

and

Philadelplua

in

of

left

be

of

instead

days,

two

Arts*

for

the

ident
Pres-

decide.

to

complimentary

one

held

Federation

Conference

Secretary
a

be

subscription
sent

Crafts

membership

to

to

Hand^

contributors.

School
in

of
the

Washing-

League.

adjourned.
Marie

T.

Garland,

Secretary

pro

tern.

who

HANDICRAFT

414

arc

earnesdy searchinga

of the

out

way

trial
indus-

maelstrom.
Guild

Without

doubt

Ashbee's

guidancehas

the

of Handicraft

been

station in all the arts and

under

the foremost

crafts

Mr.

experiment
The
lems
probfailed only

movement.

bravely,and
insofar as "it is only possibleto answer
for the final
for the diredl success
truth of principles,
of
not
ment
plans,"have been the problems of the whole movethey have

since

attacked

Morris

and

so

his fellows

it direction.

cheerful

Their

and their
assumption of responsibilities
simple way of meeting the recurrent

honest

and

attacks

of hostile

social

forces

must

of all. From
hearty admiration
the past twenty-five
years much
of us,
those who, like so many

satisfied with
Mr.

gave

Ashbee
both

the
may
are

the present condition


several
has written

London

and

with

meet

the
of

experiences
be

learned

by

profoundly disof the lesser


books

on

arts.

his

periences
ex-

Campden, the most


thorough and searching being "Craftsmanship in
Competitive Industry."*This book should be read
by all craftsmen interested in the social and economic
phases of their life work. It treats fullyof the Guild,
and has much
to
say of craftsmanship in general.
It is profuselyillustrated with picturesof the work
done
by the Guild and with various social activities
of text
in which
it has engaged.It shows
by means
the production
and diagram the forces againstwhich
have to contend, and the losing
of artistic craft work
at

at

Craftsmanshipin Competitive
by C. R. Ashbee, M.
Industry,
[published1908].The Essex House
Press,Campden, Glos. To

through

Handicraft

Book

Service.

A.

n.

be had

HANDICRAFT

England. At

the

industrial

face of continued

battle in the
in

415

the

same

time

it

have

been

of the Guild

purposes

depression
to

seems

in

that

me

measure

complished.
ac-

It had

that it was
by a good fight
in a country village,
even
possibleto do
in spiteof the most
discouragingconditions,i.e.,a
system of societyfundamentallyinimical to craft
proven
good work

Success

work.

to

seems

in this case,

me,

to

mean

holding on so long and so bravely.What


might not
decent
industrial system? By
be possibleunder
a
industrial depressionhad
1908 the long continued
of the Guild of Handicraft
compelled the abandonment
in the

The

London.

from

which

form

adopted at

was

step is what

next

and it is proposedhere
interest,
of Mr.

book

Ashbee's

of the book

the

purpose
of this book

is to
with

is of

to

prefaceMr.

Ashbee

follows: '^The

as

of the

provide members

rules
copy of the new
after the dissolution of the Limited

Handicraft
them

Company

in

1908,

and

also with

to

be
were

we

on

"^Mr.

of

made

by
Liability

in that
year.

told.
purchase may be briefly
found
years, working in the country it was
do

impossibleto
able

to

do in

in

JosephFels

is a

country

district what

London,

that is to say,
work
of arts and

remunerativelyour

Philadelphia
soap

study of economic

He

Guild

of this

account

six

purpose

for the management


purchasedfor them by Mr. Joseph Fels*

After

states

copy of the Deed


of the landed Estate

of Trust

"The

most

copy from a recent


givingthe latest details of the

In his
life history.

Guild's

the removal

manufadlurer

who

circumstances

of modern

industrialism.

ry
car-

crafts,

has made

both in this country and


colonies and has shown
is greatlyinterested in single-tax

of the
appreciation

conditions

to

in
a

siderable
con-

Europe.

striking

HANDICRAFT

4i6

found coincidentoccupation were


ly for at least a certain proportion of the craftsmen
man,
engaged. The crux
lay in the feedingof the workand the breaking up of the home
during periods
of trade depression.It was
argued that if some
could
economic
condition
be arrived
other
at
by

unless

some

which

the

and

the

for those

other

of

means

sustenance

secured, it would

rent

forms
of

the great town.


Fels whose

could
serve

as

be
a

controlled
stable

basis

of

dependen
higher craftsmanship that are inmachinery and therefore do not need
The
to Mr. Joseph
argument appealied

name

has

become

associated

with

the

bringingof people back to the land; and rather than


allow the community at Chipping Campden
be
to
dispersed,he purchased the estate referred to in the
below
of Trust
this was
then
Deed
given. With
pooled,by arrangement with the shareholders,the
workshops, tools,plant and other effects of the old
and the whole
then vested in a body
was
company,
of Trustees, with provisionfor its repurchase from
Fels by the guildsmen.
Mr.
"At the same
time the guildsmen set to work
to restrufi: their rules and adapt them
to the changed
con
economic
were
conditions, as they now
no
longer
holders and owners
of
employees, but small tenant
rules however
which
are
privatebusinesses. These
given below, follow pretty closelythe rules drawn
printed for private circulation in the year
up and
have
made
them
men
1898, and many of the same
both. Of the past historyof the Guild
ther
nothing furneed here be said beyond referring
the two
to
it has been
set
publicationsin which
forth, ^The

HANDICRAFT

Endeavour

in

William

the

Morris'

417

of

Teachings

John
and

issued in 1901,

my

Ruskin

and

later book

^Craftsmanship in Competitive Industry'1908, in


which
the whole
the
problem, and more
particularly
Guild's

tail.
into in full de-

in the country is gone


this book
is given the
too

work

In

complete roll of
1887 to the date

all the

guildsmen from the year


of issue. According to the new
rules many
of the
this roll though they no
men
on
longer work with
stillremain, and we
at Campden
us
hope will long
continue
of the ,guild.
The
to
tual
acremain, members
of the

government

Guild

however

is vested

in

the

working guildsmen only. This is a necessary


of home
measure
rule,but its obje6lalso is to keep
those links of kindliness and good fellowshipwhich
from
of

time

its

and

members,

the Guild

endeared

have

time

to

shown

it

to

mean

to

many

something

else in life than


of

in

men

is the

merely the hap-hazard association


'tradingconcern' where the only link

cash

"Deed

of

OF

Guild

the

Trust

Confirmed
"I.

The

of the

nexus

by

of

Handicraft.

the

Trustees

is 'The

"2.

The
of
with
to

Incorporating

under

name

capitalist."
Trustees

Drawn
in

which

Trustees

the

Up

October,

the Trust
of the Guild

and

1909.

minister
shall be adof Handicraft.'

objeftof the Trust shall be the encouragement


ry,
craftsmanshipin conjun6lionwith husbandand their families
a view
to enablingcraftsmen
live

the country,

healthier
and

thus

and

by

more

means

reasonable
of the land

life in
to

give

HANDICRAFT

4i8
them

such

economic

for them

in the

continue

to

shall make

as
security

exercise

it possible

of their

the purpose
the term
of this Trust
shall be taken
craftand craftsmanship

crafts.

*'3. For
"a.

all such

occupations with

the assistance

of

the

machinery as

largefadories

in

include

in towns,

all such

and

more
are

of thie Art

on

den,

shall

occupations as

by those who arc members


Guild, the Arts and Crafts
the Guild
more
particularly

cover

hand, with or without


not
are
usuallycarried

on

to

cifically
spe-

carried

Workers'

Exhibition

Society,and
Handicraft
at Camp-

of

in Gloucestershire.

*'t).The

husbandry shall be taken to cover


carried on
the land whether
on
ill those occupations
by small holding,or
or
co-operatively
individually,
term

culture^which shall best dovetail in with the


petite
-occupationsof craftsmanshipjustdefined,and which
for the craftsmen
singlyor col"hall primarily
serve
ledively as sustenance.
are
empowered to hold real or
trustees
*'4. The
personalproperty of all sorts that may conduce to
this

end,
and

they
"5.
not

to

The

trustees

than

more

Miller

In

the

of

any

to

time

shall

not

C.

R.

be

and

Ashbee,

(LaborDiredor
of the

of the

three,

less than

Coates, Mr.

Walter

event

fit.

see

five in number,

Mr.

Bishop, Mr.

"6.

time

from

may

shall be:"

Alec

craft,
of the Guild of Handipurposes
as
deal with all or any part thereof

for the

the

first trustees
Gerald

Mr.

craft).
of Handi-

or
death, disability
a

M.

Joseph Fels, Mr.

of the Guild

Trustees,

and

new

ment
retire-

appointment

HANDICRAFT

shall be made
at
*'

of Handicraft

quarterlymeetings.

property which

for the purposes


freehold
*'a. The

of the Guild

members

of their

one

7. The

by the

419

the

stated

above

(i)of

shall administer

trustees

shall consist

seventy

some

of

:"

of land

acres

Broad

and cottages
Campden togetherwith buildings,
the same
and (ii)
and threeof some
one
upon
of land, workshops, cottage and other
quarter acres
Essex
as
buildingsat Chipping Campden known
tools and
House
togetherwith the fixtures,
fettings,
implements used in conne6iion therewith. Both the
above
propertiesare subjeftto a mortgage to Mr.
Joseph Fels.
craft
*'b. Any other property that the Guild
of Handifrom time to time at their quarterly
ings
meetmay

at

entrust
"

8. The

in

to

them.

above mentioned
set forth
are
properties
made
between
Joseph Fels of the
conveyance
two

part and of the trustees


other, and dated November,

property

named

above

one

of

the

The
moveable
1909.
appertainingto (a)is set forth in a detailed

scheduleentitled

'Plant,Furnitureand

now
Fittings,'

and
keeping of the trustees at Essex House
bearingthe signatureof G. E. Horwood, in whose
charge the property has been placed.A copy of the
in the

said schedule

is a}so attached

to

the above

mentioned

mortgage.

"9. With

the

view

to

trustees

having regard to

the

the

shall
terms

of craftsmanship

encouragement
as

far

upon

the property, grant agreements


those agreements
shall contain

to

they are able,


which
they hold

as

the

craftsmen, but

clauses

by

which

the

HANDICRAFT

420

shall be free

trustees

in their

be

opinion

to

(a)if the land


properlykept, or (b) if the
tenure

resume

not

przSticehis craft.
**
The
of the properties(i)
and
10.
accounts
be kept separately.
craftsman

The

^^11.
as

think

to

best for the sale

they

as

The

^^12.

shall be free

trustees

they may

property

to

ceases

or

such

terms

leasingof

such

hold.

at

present
shall meet

trustees

make

shall
(ii)

not

less than

four

times

year, and it shall be the duty of the Labor


Direftor of the Guild of Handicraft, himself a member

in the

of their

body,

shall form

meetings three
of the

event

In

"13.

call them

to

the month

of March

inventory shall
vested

property
checked

be
two

of the

be

conclusive

the

date

of the

in the

and

be

trustees, and

evidence

two

Such

first monies

only.

the

of the

same

shall

trustees

and

signed inventoryshall

of the moveable

inventory,and

in the

two

or

in every year a complete


of all the moveable

made

signed by

craftsmen.

of the

quorum,
numbering three

trustees

such

together.At

property

the trustees

available reinstate

and

shall
restore

on

out

all

articles which

and restoringon
requirereinstating
the taking of such inventory.
shall have the rightto let any
trustees
14. The
land or premises which
they may acquire by purchase
otherwise
such terms
or
as
they in their
upon
think fit,
discretion
subje6ito any restridion
may
which
under
they may acquire the same.

*'

of the Trust
for the purposes
all such
be necessary
borrow
for
as
money
may
and may pay interest
carryingits obje6isinto efFe6i,

*'

15. The

trustees

may

HANDICRAFT

422

of the Guild

shall,if and when called upon


to
bers
do, eledl additional five memso
by the trustees
the trustees
shall
of the Guild, and on
failure,
the same
in the preceeding clause
have
as
power
provided."
members

rules

The
Trust
"

adopted

Rules

Guidance

the

for

'*

IN

The

trades,crafts
such

on

basis

at

of Handicraft

Guild

Guildsmen

of

Confirmed

1908 AND
March,
1909.

UP

Deed

the

of

follow:

as

are

with

in connection

Guild

Meeting,

of different
body of men
occupations,united together

and

is

shall better

as

Drawn

both

promote

the

goodness of the work produced, and the standard of


life of the producer. To
this end it seeks
to
apply
to

the

wisest
trade

work

collective
and

best

unionism

craft,and

in the
or

apply these

to

"The

Guild

was

modern

revival

in such

manner

permit, or

its individual

whatever

is

of cooperation, of
principles

of the

circumstances
to

of its members

as

shall be

of
as

most

art

and

changing
ful
help-

members.

founded

in the

year

1888

and

duced
con-

privateindustrial partnership,
all the members
who
were
duly elected into
the guildbeing from the time of their election jointly
in
for all they had. But
liable with the founder
the business
was
1898 in order to limit the liability
re-constru6led,andtheGuild of Handicraft, Limited
formed.
With
view
to
a
was
safe-guardingthe old
the former
spirit,the old rights,and the old privileges,
retained
but
governing body of the Guild was
for

ten

years

as

HANDICRAFT

definite

42J

In

1908 after three years of


commercial
acute
depression and heavy losses,the
Guild
the winding
was
again re-construdted
upon
fore
Its objeftsthereup of the limited liability
company.
the same
remain
as of old,viz.: to do good work^
given a

and
the

to

do

status.

it in such

welfare

way
of the workman.

as

shall best conduce


And

as

there

are

to'

many
labor'

help to this end besides the mere


in the workshop, so the Guild also seeks to aid it"
members
in such ways
the following.
To
afford
as
the workman
such
facilities for improving hi^
to
shall from time to time
as
positionand his powers
tions
seem
best, seeing that good work and good condiconnected.
To promote
are
inextricably
among
old or young
of
the study
good craftsmanship by
classes or
of technical
otherwise.
To
means
help
with a provident fund in sickness
death. To
at
or
form
of such works
be most
a
as
ful
helplibrary
may
its members, and to promote
that other side
to
in time of holidayor work,
of life which, whether
in sports, by music, by drama, or
whether
any form
of art, bringsmen
togetherand helpsthem to live in
fellowship.
Hereunder
follow, for the guidance of present
of such as shall yet
guildsmen,and more
especially
be ele6ied,the rules that,with such changes as the
Guild may
from time to time see
fit to make, shall
be bindingupon
every guildsmen,and to which
every
subscribe his name.
guildsman must
that

means

'*

"I.

The

'^

Guildsman

2.

hereinafter

Guild

is 'The

name

shall

mean

mentioned,*and

of Handicraft.'
member

the

Guild

of the

Guild

shall consist

HANDICRAFT

424

of such
of the

as
are, for the time being, members
persons
Guild under
the followingregulations:
"

''(a)A working guildsman using and having


of the workshops.
privileges
of the old Guild of Handicraft
"(b) Any member

the

as

have
shall not
March, 1908, who
in his resignation.
sent
"(c) An Honorary Guildsman.
guildman must in any case have worked
"3. A new
a journeyman in the
as
shops for a period of at least
of his
be proposed by a member
six months, must
be eledled at a guild meeting by
own
shop, must
of the whole
the ballot votingof two-thirds
body of
guildsmen and subscribe to such rules as the body of
working guildsmen may from time to time in Guild
meeting determine.
time voluntarily
at any
or
retire,
"4. Members
may
two-thirds
majorityof the Guildsmay be expelledby a
it existed

up

to

men.

"5. So far

as

these
such

be

subjedlto

its

constitution,or

from

time

to

time

rules do
rules
as

not

have

as

the

apply,the

body

Guild

shall

hitherto
of

governed
guildsmen may

determine.

by
meetings,other than those convened
time
the working guildsmen shall be held at such
be prescribedby the whole
and place as may
body
time or
of guildsmen in generalmeeting,and if no
place be so prescribed,a generalmeeting shall be

*'6. General

held

in the Guild workshops


in every year in March
Essex
House, Campden, Gloucestershire.

once

at

"7. Seven
of

clusiv
days'notice of any generalmeeting (exthe notice is served,or
which
the day on

HANDICRAFT

deemed

to

be

425

served, and

of the

meeting)^
meeting, and

day of

the

specifyingthe place,day and hour of


of special
in case
business,the generalnature
in
business, shall be given to the members
hereinafter

mentioned,

or

in such

other

of such
manner

manner

as

be

ing,
prescribedby the guildsmen in generalmeetbut the non-receiptof such notice by any member
shall not invalidate the proceedingsat any general
meeting.
"8. Notice of generalmeeting shall be given to all
members
of the Guild by post.
personallypresent shall be a
"9. Five members
at a generalmeeting.
quorum
^^
The guildsmenshall at theannual
ing
10.
generalmeet-

may

in March

Direftor

ele^their Labor

as

heretofore

majorityof guildsmen present and voting.In this


ele"tion each guildsman shall have
vote
one
only.
shall be not
There
less than four guildmeet"II.
ings
to
are
annuallyfor working guildsmen.These
of quarter day,and only
be held within three weeks
workingguildsmenshall have the rightto attend them,
attend by inand others may
vitatio
but honorary members
by

"

1 2.

All

have

three

guildmeetings shall

of the

instance

the

at

further

in

request

"

convened

provided he
less than

not

guildsmen.
the time

for the

meeting

14. Motions

has
to

all guildmeetings,
of the

commencement

been
be

at

quorum

shall notexceedhalf-an-hour
the

Direftor

writing signed by

^^13. Five shall form


and

Labor

be

after the time

meeting

for which

summoned.

brought up

at

the

quarterly
guild

426

HANDICRAFT

meetings must

be

and
on

written

handed

the notice

board, where

posted fprnot less than


'*'I5. Meetings may
a

Labor

the

to

out,

the

signed by
Dired^or

such

for

motions

poser,
pro-

ing
plac-

shall be

daysbefore the meeting.


adjournednot longer than

seven

be

fortnight.
The

^'i6.

shall be

chair
taken

at

by

all

the

general and

Founder

guildmeetings

of the

Guild

ever
when-

it may
depute the Labor
present, in his absence
Diredor
the Labor
the chairman
to do so, and
or

Dire6ior

shall in each

case

be

responsiblefor keeping

the minutes.
'*'

7.

ed at

Specialor temporary committees


any meeting and shall report

''18. The

Direftor

Labor
and

shall ad

may
as

be eled-

appointed.
all
ex
on
officio

body of trustees.
lot
''19. The Labor Director shall be appointed by balat the annual
generalmeeting in March.
In the event
His ele6lion shall be by majority.
20.
tion
"of there being more
than two
candidates,the elecshall be determined
by a second ballot of those
of votes.
receivingthe highestnumber
It shall be the duty of the Labor
Dire""lor to
*'2i.
committees,

serve

on

the

"

post up notices of all Guild or trustees'


inations
meetings,and also,to receive anid coUeft the nom-

convene

and

for his

the close of his year


for re-eleftion.
being eligible

successor

office,he himself

at

of

It shall be the

to
duty of the Labor Diredor
examine
and investigate,
and if necessary
to
bring
from
before the Guild any shop grievancethat may
time to time
arise,but not so as to interfere with
the private business of
any shop.

"22.

HANDICRAFT

Provided

"23.

the

shop,
in

there

for

shop

anyone

Elections

^^24.

only

at

The

apply

to

guild

last

the

*'26.

four

quarterly
rule

the

general

of

shall
of

any

given

which

at

take

place

meetings.
be

not

taken

shall

they
of

of

be

to

eligible

indentures,

their
be

considered

those

requisite

above

special

years.

as

time.

be

the

held

be

not

shall

shall

majority

meeting

alteration

but

other

any

successive

shall

expiration
of

two-thirds

been

guildsmen

journeyman's

to

shall

new

months

equivalent

from

three

than

apprentices,

upon

six

nomination

Director

months

six

eled^ion

for

the

of

more

of

one

*'25.

is

Labor

of

office

427

for

the

rules,due

repeal

notice

or

having
the

for

convened

meeting

at

present

purpose.

**27.

These

rules
third

every

shall
year,

be

brought
the

at

forward

general

for

vision
re-

in

meeting

March.
**28.

shall

the

attended

have

not

to

cease

to

guildsman

Any

be

guildsman

contrary."

who

for
any

unless

peripd

meetings
the

of

five

shall

Guild

years

ipsofaSio
see

reason

HANDICRAFT

428

WITH
The
BOSTON:
salesroom

jury as

lends

It is

men.

the

and

to

Society

the

report

practicesof

of

crafts*

that all may


not
agree with
at in the
following,which

quite evident
arrived

conclusions

interest

methods

the

to

Boston

of the

success

in its

its

SOCIETIES

THE

to the
Society
jury report submitted
it is at least worthy of careat its last meeting,but
ful
reading.
There
has as usual been
steady improvement on
the work
presentedto the Jury for approval and the
its acceptance
is being
standard requiredto warrant
advanced.
gradually

is part of the

The

artist and

craftsman

the

the fact that

times

at

pieceof work

no

offered
justifiably

fail

done

by

to

appreciate
hand
can

public for sale which


made
could
been
have
equallywell or better by a
and that it is absurd
machine
to
charge a price
unless
work
of that charge for machine
in excess
distin"tive artistic or skilful charadier
some
pertains
be

the

to

"

to

the

article which

is

that imitation

work.

Also

crude

craftsmanship in
as

not

is likewise

have

been

be found

of the

the

worked

happy

in machine
accidents

of

tation,
is pure affecexaggerationof elementary

modern

designand workmanship.
glazeswhich do not cover
should

to

This
and
out.

work

to
appliesespecially
to

tool marks

Because

which

peasant

glazingan inexpensive utensil puts on his glaze so


roughly and unevenly that it runs and perhaps gives
rich efFed, there is no
a
reason
why the craftsman
who

expe"ts a unique pricefor

his work

should

im-

HANDICRAFT

430

of

their

of

which

setting.
is in

pleves

these
is

lack

of

The

especially
card

scale,
in

delicate

of

good

and

ware

and

mode^

in

carving,

and

canes

the

drawing.

embroideries,

Venetian
"

in

desired:

are

design

arranged

glass

glazes.

ideas

"

etc.,

well

china,

heads

ivory

cases,

"

work

of

There

drawing

has

and

etc.,

interest.

figure

devoid

is

demand

races,

and

which

work

types

in

in

none

Cham-

rare.

increasing

an

importance

good

carving

are

awards

as

technique

following

painting

of

often

good

proper

clubs

is

tolerably

even

and

designs,
rately

There

for

good

enamels

Limoges

ivory.

pieces

are

little

is but

unknown.

are

trophies

for

There

las
umbrel-

well

rated
deco-

leatherwork

type,

lacquers,

of

HANDICRAFT

EXECUTIVE

COMMITTEE

monthly
Museum

of
and

Minutes
Mr.

meeting

Towle

by

the

This

the

the
member

of

that

the
hold

to

that

be

will

that

secretary

brought

League

Meeting

of

society
shown

before

secretary

official

an

in
the

the
the

May
the

by

the

cerning
con-

to

11.

ed
instructloan

conference.

the

circulars

sent

Handicraft.

February
that

conference

sent

small

for

the

full in

ecutive
Ex-

in Philadelphia,

be

League

secretaries

April

Europe.

and

10

request

before

of

held

be

to

tour

societies.

League

concerning
of

with

University

possible, be

as

during

appear

report

of

information

conference

president

be

of

with

soon

meetings

report

him

by

Voted
each

to

Elliott's

out

annual

with

arrange

approved.

Bureau

National

the

its

the

exhibitions

Mr.

will, as

tour

and

handicrafts

Circulars

the

Elliott, Mr.

heartily endorsed

was

at

12,

present.

proposition
the

postponed

19

read

meeting

study

to

Committee.

Voted

being

representing jthe

League

Voted

Mr.

Conant

proposition

each

Boston.

Mrs.

Travel, presented

its

14,

Arts,

January

held

February

Fine

of the

MEETING

Committee

Executive

THE
Rollins,

431

meeting
all
be

be

matters

sent

sent
to

to

the

2.

adjourned.
Nelly

F.

Conant,

Secretary,

HANDICRAFT

432

EXHIBITION

HANDICRAFT

OF
INDUSTRIAL

annual

The

Duluth.

its

Societyannounces

exhibition

to

be held

from

April

and
Anoka
Paul, Stillwater,
governing board is anxious for entries

16

June

to

29,

ART

State Art

Minnesota
THEeighth

AND

St.

at

full information

be had
may
Mrs.
bert
Herthe correspondingSecretary,

work

of handicraft

by writingto

and

Davis, St. Paul, Minnesota.


A

of interest

MEETING

Normal

all concerned

crafts will be held

and

in the arts

to

Art

School,

Boston

at
on

with

tion
educa-

the

chusetts
Massa-

April

12.

phia
speakers include Leslie W. Miller of Philadeland James Frederick
Hopkins of the Maryland
Institute,Baltimore.

The

...

Mr.

Frederic

Allen

of the
Whiting, Secretary

Boston

Societyof Arts and Crafts for the past fifteen years,


of the Museum
has resignedto accept the directorship
apolis.
Art Institute of Indianof the John Herron
with the arts and
Probably no one connefted
crafts

in this

movement

country

knows

work

the

thoroughlyas does Mr. Whiting,


and under
his secretaryshipthe Boston
societyhas
service and sales.
gained tremendously in prestige,
of the advisory
Mr.
Whiting will remain a member
and in his new
board
of Handicraft
positionwill
The
be able to help the movement
very efFedively.

and

the workers

craftsmen

many
as

and

friend

wider

so

and

will wish

patrons
him

who

count

every success
opportunitybefore him.

Mr.

ing
Whit-

in the

new