Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 54

Philippine Rural Development Project

Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)


Province of Tarlac

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Table of Contents
DEVELOPMENT BACKGROUND/CONTEXT

GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION
DEMOGRAPHICS
URBANIZATION PATTERN
POVERTY
ENVIRONMENT
CLIMATE
LAND
AGRICULTURE
INVESTMENT

1
1
2
3
4
5
5
10
13

DEVELOPMENT VISION AND FRAMEWORK OF THE PROVINCE

15

PRIORITY COMMODITY CHAINS DEVELOPMENT

16

COMMODITY VALUE CHAIN 1: SWEETPOTATO


A. COMMODITY PROFILE
B. PRODUCTION TRENDS
C. ANALYSIS AND PRIORITIZATION OF TARGET LOCATIONS OF INTERVENTIONS
D. INVESTMENT PLAN
PROVINCIAL COMMODITY INVESTMENT PLAN (PCIP) FOR SWEETPOTATO
PCIP MATRIX FOR SWEETPOTATO

17
17
22
28
30
32
33

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR PRDP-FUNDING

41

IMPLEMENTATION AND SUPERVISION


ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT
MONITORING AND EVALUATION
SAFEGUARDS

41
41
41
42

PDC ENDORSING THE PCIP AND THE PLGU COMMITMENT FOR BUDGET
COUNTERPARTING

42

CONCLUSION

42

RECOMMENDATION

43

ANNEXES

45

List of Tables
TABLE 1 POVERTY INCIDENCE ESTIMATES FOR TARLAC PROVINCE ......................................................................................... 4
TABLE 2 LAND AREAS BY MUNICIPALITY/CITY FOR TARLAC PROVINCE ................................................................................. 6
TABLE 3 MUNICIPALITY/CITY BUILT-UP AREAS OF TARLAC PROVINCE ................................................................................. 7
TABLE 4 PROVINCIAL DISTRIBUTION OF LAND AREA BY LAND USE CLASSIFICATION ........................................................... 8
TABLE 5 AREA PLANTED TO FIELD CROPS BY MUNICIPALITY AND DISTRICT, TARLAC PROVINCE ................................... 10
TABLE 6 CROPS PLANTED, PRODUCTION VOLUME AND PRODUCTION AREA, PROVINCE OF TARLAC ............................... 11
TABLE 7 PERMANENT AND COMMERCIAL CROPS IN TARLAC ................................................................................................... 12
TABLE 8 LIVESTOCK/ANIMAL FARMING IN TARLAC PROVINCE .............................................................................................. 12
TABLE 9 FOUR DEVELOPMENT AREAS FOR TARLAC PROVINCE............................................................................................... 14
TABLE 10 INVESTMENT PROJECTS AND PREFERRED AREAS, PROVINCE OF TARLAC........................................................... 14
TABLE 11 DEVELOPMENTAL GOALS OF TARLAC PROVINCE ..................................................................................................... 16
TABLE 12 SOME VARIETIES PLANTED IN THE REGIONS OF LUZON A CLUSTER.................................................................... 18
TABLE 13 SWEETPOTATO BY-PRODUCTS FOR INDUSTRIAL USE............................................................................................. 21
TABLE 14 WORLD PRODUCTION OF SWEETPOTATO, 2009-2013 ........................................................................................ 22
TABLE 15 NATIONAL PRODUCTION (IN MT) OF SWEETPOTATO, 2008-2012 (BAS, 2014) ......................................... 26
TABLE 16 SWEETPOTATO PRODUCTION VOLUME, HARVESTED AREA AND YIELD PER HECTARE, 2012........................ 28
TABLE 17 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE PROVINCE BY MUNICIPALITY PER THE E-VSA TOOL ...................................... 29

List of Figures
FIGURE 1 EXISTING LAND USE MAP, PROVINCE OF TARLAC ...................................................................................................... 9
FIGURE 2 VARIETIES OF SWEETPOTATO PLANTED IN LUZON A CLUSTER ............................................................................. 19
FIGURE 3 SWEETPOTATO-BASED PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS IN CENTRAL LUZON.......................................................... 19
FIGURE 4 PERCENTAGE BREAKDOWN OF SWEETPOTATO BY REGIONAL GROUP/CONTINENT, 2013 ............................. 23
FIGURE 5 VALUE CHAIN MAP FOR FRESH MARKET ................................................................................................................... 23
FIGURE 6 VALUE CHAIN MAP FOR FEEDS .................................................................................................................................... 24
FIGURE 7 PERCENTAGE SHARE IN AREA OF PRODUCTION BY REGION (2008-2012)........................................................ 26
FIGURE 8 TOP TEN SWEETPOTATO-PRODUCING PROVINCES, 2013 ...................................................................................... 27
FIGURE 9 E-VSA MAP FOR SWEETPOTATO ................................................................................................................................. 28

List of Annexes
Annex 1 Executive Order No. 1 Reconstituting the PRDP and PPMIU
Annex 2 Executive Order No. 1-A Creating the PRDP PPMIU
Annex 3 Special Order No. 1 Creation of the Technical Working Group for the Implementation of
the Philippine Rural Development Program (PRDP) in the Province of Tarlac
Annex 4 PDC Executive Committee Resolution No. 2 Approving and Adopting the Annual
Investment Program (AIP) of the Province of Tarlac for CY 2015
Annex 5 Annual Financial Requirements
Annex 6 List of Cooperatives

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Development Background/Context
Geographical Location
Tarlac, the Melting Pot of Central Luzon, is a province of a highly
multicultural mix of four distinct groups the Kapampangans, the Ilokanos,
the Pangasinenses and the Tagalogs. Geographically, Tarlac is situated in the
Center of the Central Plains of Luzon, lying between 151619 and 154041
north latitude, and 1202026 and 120446 east longitude. Tarlac is
landlocked by Pangasinan in the north, Nueva Ecija in the East, Pampanga in
the south and Zambales in the west. As a first class province, Tarlac has a
total land area of 305,345 hectares. This is 16.75% of Region IIIs total land
area, and 1% of the countrys. 511 barangays constitute 17 municipalities and
the capital city of Tarlac. These municipalities are Anao, Camiling, Mayantoc,
Moncada, Paniqui, Pura, Ramos, San Clemente, San Manuel, and Sta. Ignacia,
Gerona, San Jose, Tarlac and Victoria, Bamban, Capas, Concepcion and La
Paz (UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010).

Demographics
Tarlac has become a more populated province in the past decade. Between
the years 2007 to 2010, the annual population growth rate of Tarlac is at an
average of 1.76%. Given that this growth rate will continue, the provinces
population is expected to double in 40 years. Note that the population growth
is a direct consequence of natural increases and migration. As of the 2010
survey results, the population count of Tarlac province is at 1, 273, 240. The
sex ratio is 103 males for every 100 females. The number of households is
currently at 280,382, with 83,724 households owning land. Tarlac City stands

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

to be the most populous municipality, while Anao is the least populous in the
province (National Statistics Office, 2013).
Due to the population growth experienced, Tarlac is faced with
consequential requirements. The province should be able to meet the
demands for food security and access to potable water, utilities, and waste
disposal, transportation and access; build additional housing and social
infrastructure such as schools and health facilities like hospitals, clinics, rural
health units; and provide economic opportunities to the population in terms
of occupational opportunities, sources of livelihood and business ventures.

Urbanization Pattern
Tarlac is positioned as an agro-industrial growth area. The province is
located in close proximity to major development centers in the region like
Pampanga and Clark. Urbanization in Tarlac has been occurring at a rapid
rate. As an urban and major trade center, the province also serves as an interregional distribution and industrial hub as it lies across two super regions.
The Luzon Urban Beltway, the first super region, considers Region III to be a
major transshipment and logistics hub in the Asia Pacific. Bamban, Capas,
Concepcion, La Paz and Tarlac City lie along this Beltway. The North Luzon
Agribusiness Quadrangle (NLAQ), the second super region, targets the
growth potentials for agricultural activity and food production for Luzon and
North Asia in terms of agricultural exports and eco-tourism. 13 municipalities
of Tarlac form part of the NLAQ region. The Subic-Clark Alliance for
Development (SCAD) positions the region as the logistics hub in Asia Pacific.
Tarlac City, Bamban, Capas, and Concepcion lie along the SCAD Corridor
(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)
Tarlac City has already been classified a Small City (Primary Urban
Center A) with all the new facilities and services available in the locality over

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

the last 13 years. Levels in trading and commercial activities are also
increased within the province through business districts in municipalities,
development of malls and other major establishments, concreting of roads in
identified barangays, and extending loans to small vendors and businesses.
Camiling, Paniqui, Capas, and Concepcion are categorized to be Large
Towns. Moncada, Victoria, Sta. Ignacia, La Paz, Gerona, San Jose, Mayantoc
and Bamban are Medium Towns. San Manuel, Anao, San Clemente, Ramos
and Pura are Small Towns. With the positioning of Tarlac as a strategic hub
with networks of roads providing accessibility to the province, investments
and infrastructure are underway. Along with this progress come traffic
congestions, increased industrial and housing pollution, flooding, growth in
population, and uncontrolled usage of land resources, misuse of natural
resources and destruction of habitats. Implementing traffic transportation,
road and traffic policies and enforcing strict environmental laws and land
policies must address these concerns(UP Planning and Development
Research Foundation, Inc., 2010).

Poverty
Poverty stands to be a major social development issue in Tarlac. There is a
high prevalence of poverty and hunger and a very wide economic divide
between the very rich and the very poor (UP Planning and Development
Research Foundation, Inc., 2010). According to the City and Municipal-level
Small Area Poverty Estimates by the National Statistical Coordination Board,
the highest poverty incidence is in the municipality of San Jose at 32.1%. This
is followed by Mayantoc (28.3%), Sta. Ignacia (21.8%), Victoria (20.2%) and
San Clemente (18.2%). These municipalities are largely agricultural. The
lowest poverty incidences occur in Tarlac City (8.7%), Bamban (10.6%),
Paniqui (12.8%), Capas (13.2%) and Concepcion (13.5%). These municipalities

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

have a lot of economic activities and are rather more urbanized (National
Statistical Coordination Board, 2009). The table below details the poverty
incidence in the province.
Table 1 Poverty Incidence Estimates for Tarlac Province
(National Statistical Coordination Board, 2009)

City/Municipality
Anao
Bamban
Camiling
Capas
Concepcion
Gerona
La Paz
Mayantoc
Moncada
Paniqui
Pura
Ramos
San Clemente
San Jose
San Manuel
Sta. Ignacia
Tarlac City
Victoria

Poverty
Incidence
(Percentage)
18.0
10.6
15.8
13.2
13.5
17.6
17.0
28.3
15.9
12.8
14.7
16.7
18.2
32.1
17.0
21.8
8.7
20.2

Environment
Tarlac is endowed with physical and natural resources. The western
portion of Tarlac is hilly to mountainous, while the eastern portion consists
of flatlands. Natural resources and forest products are abundant in the
province. Resources like coal, iron, vegetables, fruits, log fires, sand, rocks,
livestock and forest animals are found here. The province has a major thrust
in the provision of adequate and accessible space for sustainable food
production, forest and mineral resources.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

There are a number of areas that are constrained environmentally. These


land areasare naturally prone to hazards, causing negative effects to man and
the environment. Severe erosion must be addressed in the municipalities of
Capas, Sta. Ignacia, Mayantoc, Tarlac City, Bamban and San Jose. There are
also areas that are subject to the volcanic hazards of Mt. Pinatubo.
Concepcion, Capas, Bamban, Tarlac City, Gerona and Paniqui still have lahar
deposits in their agricultural lands and riverbanks. During rains, floods are
prone in the areas of La Paz, Victoria, Concepcion, Gerona, Paniqui,
Camiling, San Clemente and Tarlac City. San Manuel, Pura, Ramos, Anao,
Gerona, Paniqui, Concepcion, Moncada and Tarlac City are areas that are
prone to liquefaction.
Climate
The Coronas Classification of Philippine Climate categorizes the province
of Tarlac under Type 1 climate, which has two pronounced seasons: Dry from
December to April, and Wet from May to November. The main atmospheric
systems controlling rainfall in the area are the southwest monsoon from June
to September and northeast monsoon from December to February. The
Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and Local Thermal Convection also
contribute significantly to the total annual rainfall especially during summer
(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010).
Land
Dominantly an agricultural economy, Tarlac boasts of a total land area of
305, 345 hectares, comprising 16.75% of the total land area of Region III and
1.0% the nations land area (UP Planning and Development Research
Foundation, Inc., 2010). Table 2 below lists the provincial land area per
municipality.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Table 2 Land Areas by Municipality/City for Tarlac Province

(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)

District

City/Municipality

Land Area
(Hectares)

Percentage of
Provincial Land
Area

District I

Anao
Camiling
Mayantoc
Moncada
Paniqui
Pura
Ramos
San Clemente
San Manuel
Sta. Ignacia
Sub-total

1,961
15,150
27,178
7,899
10,639
3,146
2,488
5,696
5,366
13,600
93,123

0.64%
4.96%
8.90%
2.59%
3.48%
1.03%
0.81%
1.87%
1.76%
4.45%
30.50%

District II

Gerona
San Jose
Victoria
Tarlac City
Sub-total

12,480
61,966
11,270
26,270
111,986

4.09%
20.29%
3.69%
8.60%
36.68%

Bamban
Capas
Concepcion
La Paz
Sub-total
Total

25,208
42,438
21,120
11,470
100,236
305,345

8.26%
13.90%
6.92%
3.76%
32.83%
100.00%

District III

As of 2004, built-up areas in the province consist of 10,434.3 hectares.


These areas include 3,336 hectares of open space allotted for future expansion.
Table 3 provides a listing of the built-up areas in the province (UP Planning
and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010). On the one hand, Tarlac
City owns 26.60% of the total built-up areas, the largest of all. San Manuel, on
the other hand, owns 0.41% built-up area, the smallest percentage. Table 3
details these built-up areas in the province.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Table 3 Municipality/City Built-Up Areas of Tarlac Province


(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)

City/Municipality

Built-Up
Areas
(Hectares)

Percentage
from
Total
Built-Up
Areas

Percentage
of
Built-Up
Area
per Total Land
Area

Anao
Bamban
Camiling
Capas
Concepcion
Gerona
La Paz
Mayantoc
Moncada
Paniqui
Pura
Ramos
San Clemente
San Jose
San Manuel
Sta. Ignacia
Tarlac City
Victoria
Total Built-Up Area

64.06
332.41
679.33
727.60
703.00
529.55
387.70
168.90
116.40
362.00
121.20
54.84
93.33
177.70
28.89
233.50
1,863.00
361.50
7,004.91

0.91%
4.75%
9.70%
10.39%
10.04%
7.56%
5.53%
2.41%
1.66%
5.17%
1.73%
0.78%
1.33%
2.54%
0.41%
3.33%
26.60%
5.16%
100.00%

0.02%
0.11%
0.22%
0.24%
0.23%
0.17%
0.13%
0.06%
0.04%
0.12%
0.04%
0.02%
0.03%
0.06%
0.01%
0.08%
0.61%
0.12%
2.29%

Lands in the province are categorized into several land use classifications.
The majority of the land in Tarlac is devoted to rice paddies and then woodlands.
The smallest amounts of land are devoted to the usage of cemeteries and parks.
Table 4 shows the land use classifications in the province.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Table 4 Provincial Distribution of Land Area by Land Use Classification


(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)

Land Use Classification

Percentage
Land
Area from
Total
(Hectares)
Land Area

Tropical Grass
Swamp
Scattered Trees
Rice Paddy
Major River
Park
Orchard
Open Space, Other Lot Land
Ponds, Lakes, Other Water Bodies
Woodland
Cultivated Land
Built-Up Area
Clearing
Cemetery
Bush
All Land Use Classification

9,781.00
1,043.00
16,510.00
144,300.00
1,193.00
11.70
3,680.00
3,336.00
1,110.00
81,730.00
15,890.00
7,010.00
2,192.00
88.30
17,470.00
305,345.00

Provincial Government of Tarlac

3.203%
0.342%
5.407%
47.258%
0.391%
0.004%
1.205%
1.093%
0.364%
26.766%
5.204%
2.296%
0.718%
0.029%
5.721%
100.000%

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Below is the existing land use map of the Province of Tarlac.


Figure 1 Existing Land Use Map, Province of Tarlac
(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Agriculture
Of the 305,345 hectares of land in the province, 54.37% of these lands are
utilized for agricultural activity. 166,023 hectares are allocated for rice paddies,
orchards, ponds, lakes, swamps and other bodies of water and cultivated lands.
Agricultural crops and fisheries are allocated with 141,252 hectares of land. The
areas planted to field crops are detailed below (UP Planning and Development
Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)
Table 5 Area Planted to Field Crops by Municipality and District, Tarlac Province
(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)

District

Fruits and
City/Municipality Legumes Vegetables Root Crops
(Hectares) (Hectares) (Hectares)

Total
Land Area
(Hectares)

District I

Anao
Camiling
Mayantoc
Moncada
Paniqui
Pura
Ramos
San Clemente
San Manuel
Sta. Ignacia
Sub-total

11
25
80
65
39
100
102
15
24
148
609

15
82
30
220
94
35
111
25
9
176
797

7
15
37
1,850
1,280
374
120
7
47
3,737

33
122
147
2,135
1,413
509
333
47
33
371
5,143

District II

Gerona
San Jose
Victoria
Tarlac City
Sub-total

48
29
71
148

143
50
653
117
963

540
70
22
50
682

683
168
704
238
1,793

District
III

Bamban
Capas
Concepcion
La Paz
Sub-total
Total

53
27
56
337
473
1,230

112
20
157
76
365
2,125

60
524
135
1
720
5,139

225
571
348
414
1,558
8,494

Note that Moncada, Paniqui, Gerona, and Concepcion have the greatest
land areas dedicated to root crops in the province. La Paz, Sta. Ignacia, Ramos
Provincial Government of Tarlac

10

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

and Pura have the largest areas dedicated to legumes. Victoria, Moncada and Sta.
Ignacia have the largest areas for fruits and vegetable production. Table 6
provides a listing of the different crops that are planted in the province,
including the production volume and areas planted.
Table 6 Crops Planted, Production Volume and Production Area, Province of Tarlac
(Office of the Provincal Agriculturist, 2014)

Crops
1. Rice (effective)
-Irrigated
-Rainfed
-Upland
2. Corn
-Yellow
-Green/White
3. Root Crops
-Sweetpotato
-Cassava
-Ube
-Gabi
-Singakamas
-Radish
4. Legumes
-Mungo
-Peanut
-Bush Sitao
-Pole Sitao
5. Leafy Vegetables
-Cabbage
-Pechay
Mustard
-Lettuce
6. Fruit Vegetables
-Ampalaya
-Eggplant
-Squash
-Tomato
- Potato
-Upo
-Okra
7. Spices
-Spices/bellpepper
-Hot Pepper
-Onions
-Garlic
-Ginger
8. Tobacco

Area Planted (Has.)

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Production Volume (MT)

85,238.69
26,991.38
767.50

306,913.13
103,900.59
2,066.50

13,903.90
683.80
92.65
5,356.42
131.32
258.81
251.72
338.50
11.10
469.02
1,397.97
239.37
83.32
181.85
33.72
0.00
58.64
43.45
5.50

103,674.10
6,054.95
247.30
86,257.68
1,615.25
2,503.56
1,277.64
9,473.18
162.03
3,184.00
9,895.35
694.09
384.31
1,439.24
0.00
0.00
1,489.80
311.00
2.25

416.99
482.15
147.61
236.03
12.00
59.45
113.52
3.50
4.70
27.42
76.40
15.00
54.45
113.00

4,264.53
4,587.85
811,462.52
4,482.47
30,060.00
629.53
2,292.00
26.50
24.30
220.17
1,042.00
173.45
369.20
128.00

11

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

There are also bearing and non-bearing trees in the province. Table 7
shows the composition for these crops:
Table 7 Permanent and Commercial Crops in Tarlac
(Office of the Provincal Agriculturist, 2014)

BEARING
235,854.00
8,207.00
26,074.00
11,652.00
110,790.00
29,755.00

a. Mango
b. Coconut
c. Guyabano
d. Cashew
e. Banana
f. Guava/Guapple

NON-BEARING
90,604.00
2,704.00
14,253.00
725.00
28,216.00
8,346.00

Livestock/animal farming is also practiced in Tarlac. Table 8 below shows


the number of raisers/farmers and number of heads per animal in the province.
Table 8 Livestock/Animal Farming in Tarlac Province
(Office of the Provincal Agriculturist, 2014)

Kind of Animal
1. Carabao
2. Cattle
3. Swine
4. Goat
5. Sheep
6. Broiler Chicken
7. Layer Chicken
8. Native Chicken
9. Ducks
10. Pigeon

No. of Farmers/Raisers
10,895.00
14,332.00
13,692.00
19,666.00
2,491.00
200,899.00
15,584.00
56,571.00
49,087.00
1,115.00

No. of Heads
33,066.00
38,171.00
83,922.00
44,423.00
3,173.00
572,245.00
169,422.00
301,668.00
155,094.00
4,562.00

The Provincial Development Framework Plan for the Province states that
Tarlac (UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010) farmers
are faced with constraints in their industry, as follows:

Low income of farmers from agricultural activities


(crops/livestock/poultry)

High cost of agricultural production inputs

Resistance of farmers in adoption of technological changes


Provincial Government of Tarlac

12

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Need for consideration of the supply chain for agricultural crops

Low productivity of agricultural crops


o Unsustainable agriculture production growth
o Need for crop zonification

Differing values and perceptions of farmers

Inadequate farm-to-market roads


o Difficulty of marketing agricultural products
o Lack of access to market within and outside the locality

Lack of irrigation of potential or irrigable agricultural areas

Need for postharvest facilities

Need to promote entrepreneurship among farmers

Some interior barangays lack good, all-weather roads

Lack of capital for farm development resulting in idle and abandoned


lands

Non-complementation of crop and animal production, resulting in a waste


of resources

Lack of agri-processing activities to increase value-add from agriculture

Inadequate extension personnel for agricultural activities other than those


that are into rice or corn production

Lack of accurate farm information on agricultural activities

Investment
Tarlacs large tracts of lands devoted to agriculture and farming equate to
further development in infrastructure that support agricultural production and
the marketing of farm produce. There is a thrust towards agriculture and agriprocessing and fishery productivity. This includes the enhancement of
production methods, thereby linking such to food processing and marketing
support facilities. These activities will be spread throughout the province via

Provincial Government of Tarlac

13

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

clustering of the activities and facility location, relative to a particular


agricultural produce (UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc.,
2010). The following gives a more detailed description of Tarlacs provincial four
development areas:
Table 9 Four Development Areas for Tarlac Province
(Tarlac Investment Promotion Plan, 2013)

AgricultureAgri-processing
San Manuel
Anao
Ramos
Pura
Moncada
Paniqui
Gerona
Camiling
Mayantoc
Santa Ignacia

Eco-tourism Circuit
San Clemente
Camiling
Mayantoc
San Jose
Capas
Bamban
Tarlac City

Distribution and
Logistics hub/
Agri-processing
Tarlac City
Capas
Bamban
Concepcion
La Paz
Victoria

Urban Services
Tarlac City
Camiling
Paniqui
Capas
Concepcion

The following table draws a more concrete picture of the targeted projects
for Tarlac Province along with the preferred areas for investment:
Table 10 Investment Projects and Preferred Areas, Province of Tarlac
(Tarlac Investment Promotion Plan, 2013)

Priority Sector
A. Agriculture /
Agribusiness

Investment Projects
1. Malunggay SeedOil for Biodiesel
Processing
2. Ethanol from Sugarcane for
Biodiesel Processing
3. Cassava/Camote
Processing for
animal feeds
4. Muscovado Production
5. Fruit and Vegetable
Processing
6. Upland Rice
Production
7. Coconut
Production

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Preferred Areas
San Manuel,
Anao, Ramos,
Pura, Moncada,
Paniqui,
Gerona,
Camiling,
Mayantoc and
Santa Ignacia

14

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

B.
Information
and
Communications
Technology
(ICT)

Tarlac City

C. Tourism

San Clemente,
Camiling,
Mayantoc, San
Jose, Capas,
Bamban and
Tarlac City

D. Light
Medium
Industries

1. Contact Center
2. Business/Knowledge
Process Outsourcing
3. Software Development
4. Animation
5. Data Transcription,
Engineering Design
6. ICT Ancillary Services
1. Tourist Accommodation
Facilities
2. Resorts
3. Retirement Villages
4. Medical Tourism
(healthcare and
wellness products
and services)
and 1.Production/manufacture of
exports products and services

E. Infrastructure

1. Power and water facilities


2. Highways, railways, roads and
bridges
F. Logistics
1. Cold storage
2. Blast freezing
3. Ice plants
4. Pesticide Analytical Laboratory
5. Mango Packing House and
Processing Facility
G. Natural and 1. Production of Fragrances and
Organic
Essential Oils
Industries
2. Organic Rice Production
3. Organic Banana Production

All
municipalities

All
municipalities
Capas, Bamban,
Concepcion, La
Paz and
Victoria

All
municipalities

Development Vision and Framework of the Province


Tarlac is envisioned as:
A progressive, peaceful and environment-conscious province with
sustainable and globally competitive agriculture: a major logistics,
investment and tourism destination; with well-planned communities that
are home to healthy, productive, and principled citizenry.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

15

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

The province vision statement spells out the desired role that the
province can play or the best contribution it can make to the development
of the nation, and the region of which it is an integral part. It also states
the desired state of the Province as an environment for the Tarlaquenos to
live in and where they can make a living.
The provincial development goals of the province are detailed in the
following table:
Table 11 Developmental Goals of Tarlac Province
(UP Planning and Development Research Foundation, Inc., 2010)

Sector

Developmental Goal
To ensure that families live peaceful, orderly community with
decent homes, and to enable residents to be responsible for their
personal, health and social responsibilities through proper
education and basic life skills.

Society

Economy

Infrastructure,
Transportation
and Access

Environment

Institution

To enhance local economic growth;


The objectives of local economic development plan include:
increased and sustained employment rate in all the sectors of the
economy; enhanced investment level; and increased value added
from agriculture, fishery and forestry
To improve peoples access to physical services and utilities,
including transportation and access.
This aims for modernization and re-engineering for efficiency and
enhancing the sectors competitiveness to be at par with the rest of
the progressive areas, nationally and globally.
To sustain the use of natural resources for wealth creation while
maintaining the integrity and resilience of ecosystems, both natural
and man-made, for a better quality of life of the people of Tarlac
Province.
To sustain good governance through a provincial government
bureaucracy that is efficient, productive and responsive to the
development needs of the local constituency.

Priority Commodity Chains Development

Provincial Government of Tarlac

16

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

The PRDP prioritizes commodities in each region and province. This is to


ensure that the project is aligned with both provincial and national goals. The
priority commodities of Tarlac are listed below:

Sweetpotato

Goat

Onion

Okra

Aromatic/Pigmented Rice

Mango

Mungbeans

Commodity Value Chain 1: Sweetpotato


A. Commodity Profile
Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.), a bio-efficient crop grown for its edible
roots, belongs to the family Convolvulacea (Morning Glory). It originated in or
near northwestern South America around 8000-6000 B.C. Guatemala, Colombia,
Ecuador, and northern Peru have the greatest diversity in sweetpotato
germplasm. Secondary centers of genetic variability are in Papua New Guinea,
the Philippines, and parts of Africa. Sweetpotato is locally known as kamote.
Sweetpotato roots come in various shades and colors--- from white, cream,
yellow, golden orange to purple. The flesh color of the sweetpotato is said to be
directly related to its beta-carotene content. Beta-carotene in orange-fleshed
sweetpotato is something that the human body can use to produce vitamin A,
thus, calling it, Provitamin A. The purple-fleshed sweetpotatoes have the
highest antioxidant activity (activity protecting cells against the effects of free
radicals damage due to oxygen such as heart disease and cancer) among any
other sweetpotatoes. Also, the skin is found to have the highest antioxidant

Provincial Government of Tarlac

17

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

activity in any other part of the plant. The more common varieties in Luzon A
Cluster are the cream to yellow fleshed and those with reddish to purple skin.

Table 12 Some Varieties Planted in the Regions of Luzon A Cluster


(Limon and Sampaga/Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University, 2013)

Variety
Super Bureau
Bengueta
Tocano
Inubi

Root Skin Color


Red
Light Pink
Light Pink
Red violet

Japanese Ubi
SP Native
PSBSp 22

Purple
Light orange
Purple

Root Flesh Color


white
Light Yellow
Light Yellow
White with violet
tinge
Purple
Light Yellow
Light Yellow

Shape
round to oblong
Elongated
Round
Elongated
Oblong to Elongated
Elongated
Round to Oblong

According to the International Potato Center (CIP), there are 6,500


varieties of sweetpotato being cultivated around the world as of 2013. In the
Philippines, there are thirty-two sweetpotato varieties developed by the National
Seed Industry Council (NSIC) and Philippine Seed Board (PSB) that are
recommended for local production. The variety widely planted in the Luzon A
Cluster is the Super Bureau (VSP6).

Super Bureau is high yielding with a

technical yield of 20 to 25 MT per hectare. It has a high dry matter content of


32.90%. Sweetpotato roots with high dry matter content are highly suitable for
cooking. They do not easily break when boiled or when made into sweetpotato
skewers or kamote cue. Farmers also plant the Taiwan variety, which is used for
Kamote Fries (substitute of the Potato French Fries).
The leaves, tops, and roots of the sweetpotato are largely utilized as either
food or feed. The heart shaped leaves are used as vegetables and supplemental
Provincial Government of Tarlac

18

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

feed to hogs, cattle, and other ruminants. More products, however, can be made
from the roots than the leaves and, as such, would be the focus of the value chain
analysis. Products from the sweetpotato storage roots have greater value as
these require more complex value-added activities. Sweetpotato roots are
utilized as food, feed, and raw materials for industrial products.

Figure 2 Varieties of Sweetpotato Planted in Luzon A Cluster

Figure 3 Sweetpotato-based Processed Food Products in Central Luzon

Provincial Government of Tarlac

19

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

The crop is most often consumed boiled, fried, or roasted in fresh form. It is
consumed both as a snack food and as a supplemental or alternative staple food
in lieu of rice. To date, the most dominant users of sweetpotato are the snack
food subsector and households for the preparation of various traditional Filipino
desserts and dishes such as the pinakbet. The most popular snack made of
sweetpotato is the kamote cue (sliced camote dipped in brown sugar, fried in
oil, and sold in bamboo skewers). The camote cue is usually consumed as midafternoon snacks. It is sold via street vendors, school canteens, and restaurants.
It is also being offered as an alternative to potato French fries in some fastfood
establishments and restaurants such as BonChon Chicken and Maxs Fried
Chicken. BonChon Chicken is said to be using imported sweetpotato.
Sweetpotato is acquiring an increased role in rural development as raw
material for many industrial applications. The most important industrial uses of
sweetpotato are as source of energy in animal diets in the feed industry, for the
starch industry, and for the production of ethanol.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

20

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Table 13 Sweetpotato By-Products for Industrial Use


Product
Chips and Granules

Starch

Ethanol

Description
Undersize and oversize sweetpotatoes are chipped into thin
slices not exceeding 1.5 cm thick and 10 cm long. The chips are
then further processed into granules. The chips and granules are
used by feed mills as alternative or substitute to corn.
Production of dried chips and granules is undertaken by
cooperatives in Pampanga and Tarlac. Comment: only chips for
Tarlac, nit granulated.
Carbohydrates generally make up between 80 to 90 % of the dry
weight of sweetpotato roots. The sweetpotato yields an
important starch, which is used as a food starch in noodles and
technically for sizing textiles and papers, for the manufacture of
adhesives and in laundries.
In the mid-1990s, Central Luzon had three starch plants with a
combined capacity of 130 tons of sweetpotato roots per days. The
factories required roots with high starch content, and only
accepted two cultivars meeting this requirement Bureau and
Super Bureau. By 1998, it was estimated that at least 80% of total
area for sweetpotato production was devoted to these two
varieties. Soon after the sweetpotato starch industry in Central
Luzon took off, a major disease, locally known as kulot and
caused by a virus complex, occurred and caused crop loss of as
high as 100%. Unfortunately, the high starch varieties were
highly susceptible to the disease, forcing farmers to abandon
their sweetpotato fields as early as two weeks after planting
when the symptoms appear. By the late 1990s, the starch
factories could no longer sustain operations due to the
inadequate supply of sweetpotato roots. Key factors that
plagued the short-lived starch industry in Central Luzon were: i)
the high disease incidence; ii) lack of alternative high-starch
varieties with low susceptibility; and iii) problems in the
marketing agreement between farmers and the factories
(Campilan, UPWARD Program). Comment: there were two
starch plants operating in the 90s NOT in Central Luzon but in
Pangasinan
Ethanol is produced by fermenting and distilling sweetpotato.
Ethanol has various industrial uses: It can be mixed with petrol
or used on its own as a transport fuel. It can also be used as a
base for alcoholic beverages. Lastly, ethanol can be utilized as
industrial alcohol which is important in the pharmaceutical and
cosmetic industry.
There are no existing initiatives in ethanol production in Luzon
A Cluster. China uses both cassava and sweetpotato in its
ethanol production.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

21

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

B. Production Trends
World Production
All around the world, sweetpotato is being produced in many
countries as supported by production data in Table 14. World production of
sweetpotato increased from 104,146,000 MT in 2009 to 110,746,000 MT in 2013.
The areas cultivated to sweetpotato decreased slightly from 8,365,230 hectares in
2009 to 8,240,970 hectares in 2013. The increase in production volume between
2009 and 2013 was primarily due to increase in farm productivity, from 12.45 MT
in 2009 to 13.44 MT in 2013.
Sweetpotato is produced in about 116 countries. Asia accounts for about
78.38% of the world production in 2013. With 78,875,000 MT of production in
2013, China remained the largest producer of sweetpotato, accounting for 71% of
world production and 91% of the output from Asian countries.

Table 14 World Production of Sweetpotato, 2009-2013


Country
WORLD
China,
mainland
Nigeria
Tanzania
Uganda
Indonesia
Viet Nam
Ethiopia
Angola
Kenya
India
United States
Rwanda
Madagascar
Japan
Mozambique

2009
104,146,000
76,543,500

Production Volume (in MT)


2010
2011
2012
103,282,000
105,173,000
108,004,000
74,172,500
75,362,000
77,375,000

2013
110,746,000
78,875,000

3,300,000
1,417,390
2,766,000
2,057,910
1,211,300
450,763
982,588
1,034,200
1,119,700
883,100
803,228
910,857
1,026,000
900,000

3,300,000
2,424,200
2,838,000
2,051,050
1,318,500
736,349
986,563
820,971
1,094,700
1,081,590
840,072
919,127
863,600
920,000

3,400,000
3,100,000
2,587,000
2,386,730
1,364,000
1,354,910
1,199,750
1,150,360
1,132,400
1,124,230
1,081,220
984,000
942,300
890,000

Provincial Government of Tarlac

3,300,000
3,573,300
2,554,000
2,192,240
1,362,190
390,135
1,045,100
759,471
1,046,600
1,223,070
845,099
1,102,950
885,900
860,000

3,400,000
3,018,180
2,645,700
2,483,470
1,422,500
1,185,050
644,854
859,549
1,072,800
1,201,200
1,005,310
1,144,000
875,900
900,000

22

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Burundi
926,319
Papua New
595,000
Guinea
Haiti
271,346
Philippines
560,516
Brazil
477,472
Other
5,908,811
Countries
Source: FAOSTAT

966,343
615,000

955,103
620,000

659,593
580,000

839,715
600,000

414,518
541,525
495,182
5,882,210

240,000
516,338
544,820
5,794,684

543,169
516,366
479,425
5,991,934

599,683
527,687
479,000
6,128,015

Figure 4 Percentage Breakdown of Sweetpotato by Regional Group/Continent, 2013

Figure 5 Value Chain Map for Fresh Market

Provincial Government of Tarlac

23

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Sweetpotato roots are utilized as food, feed, and raw materials for
industrial products. The crop is most often consumed boiled, fried, or roasted in
the fresh form.

It is consumed both as snack food and as a supplemental or

alternative staple food in lieu of rice. To date, the most dominant users of
sweetpotato are the snack food subsector and households for the preparation of
various traditional Filipino desserts and dishes such as the pinakbet.

The

most popular snack made of sweetpotato is the kamote cue (sliced camote
dipped in brown sugar and sold in bamboo skewers). The camote cue is usually
consumed as mid-afternoon snacks. It is sold via street vendors, school canteens,
and restaurants. It is also being offered as an alternative to potato French fries in
some fastfood establishments and restaurants such as BonChon Chicken and
Maxs Fried Chicken. BonChon Chicken is said to be using imported
sweetpotato. Majority of the farmer growers past through the traders and only
few farmers/growers directly deliver their products to the wholesaler and
retailer.
Figure 6 Value Chain Map for Feeds

Provincial Government of Tarlac

24

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Sweetpotato is acquiring an increased role in rural development as raw


material for many industrial applications. The most important industrial use of
sweetpotato is as a source of energy in animal diets in the feed industry. With the
increasing price of yellow corn as main source of raw materials in the feed
formulation, the feed millers find alternative raw materials for feeds production.
One commodity identified by feed millers is the sweetpotato. To date, only two
cooperatives in Central Luzon have existing marketing contracts or purchase
orders with San Miguel Foods Incorporated and CP group of Companies These
cooperatives are Sapang PMPC of Moncada, Tarlac & Lambac MPC of Guagua,
Pampanga.
Domestic Production
Under the Philippine Food Staples Self-sufficiency Roadmap (FSSR) 2011
2016 that aims to achieve rice self-sufficiency by 2013 in the country, sweetpotato
plays a major role in realizing this goal. Strategies to solve the food scarcity issue
in the country by managing rice consumption include increasing food staple
supply by 3.5 percent annually and making these crops affordable and available
to everyone (Official Gazette, 2011).

Provincial Government of Tarlac

25

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

In terms of production volume, Eastern Visayas occupies the top spot,


followed by Bicol Region & Western Visayas. Region 3 Central Luzon ranks 7th
in terms of production area, contributing 6% of the total volume of sweetpotato
produced in the country in 2012, as shown in Table 15. In terms of area, however,
Eastern Visayas has the widest area while Central Luzon ranks 5th, accounting
for about 7% in the total area for sweetpotato in the Philippines.

Table 15 National Production (in MT) of Sweetpotato, 2008-2012 (BAS, 2014)


VOLUME
PHILIPPINES
EASTERN VISAYAS
BICOL REGION
WESTERN VISAYAS
CENTRAL VISAYAS
NORTHERN MINDANAO
CALABARZON
CENTRAL LUZON
CARAGA
DAVAO REGION
CAR
ILOCOS REGION
MIMAROPA
SOCCSKSARGEN
CAGAYAN VALLEY
ZAMBOANGA
PENINSULA
ARMM

2008
572,654.79
118,067.30
95,766.89
44,599.81
47,557.22
28,550.68
37,190.30
31,554.72
62,382.77
19,620.17
17,353.32
15,320.38
12,552.75
9,734.61
15,886.28
10,205.00

2009
560,516.40
118,185.30
95,860.60
46,447.25
47,021.78
29,436.69
33,683.92
31,685.01
53,655.66
19,813.88
17,186.86
15,168.80
12,661.93
10,154.89
13,573.56
9,854.03

2010
541,265.03
118,039.70
94,700.84
44,454.74
40,846.91
29,724.53
32,312.03
31,543.57
48,475.03
19,900.83
16,519.68
15,516.04
12,850.82
10,457.04
11,068.32
8,773.83

2011
516,338.02
118,982.60
92,120.58
45,345.23
38,718.32
31,529.59
31,389.62
30,004.38
27,907.78
19,013.89
15,976.12
15,255.97
13,318.80
10,783.23
11,063.03
8,951.84

2012
516,365.52
123,349.90
91,942.91
45,641.58
32,555.15
32,473.99
32,471.81
31,196.02
27,939.08
18,417.31
15,710.64
14,976.87
13,881.97
10,782.01
10,358.79
8,546.78

6,312.59

6,126.24

6,081.12

5,977.04

6,120.71

Figure 7 Percentage Share in Area of Production by Region (2008-2012)

Provincial Government of Tarlac

26

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Figure 8 Top Ten Sweetpotato-producing Provinces, 2013

Regional Production
Central Luzon is the main commercial growing area of sweetpotato in the
country, supplying the Metro Manila market and other provinces in Luzon.
Provincial Government of Tarlac

27

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Alongside commercial production are semi-commercial and subsistence systems


similar to most of the other sweetpotato-growing areas of the country. There are
at least 5,600 sweetpotato producers in the region. Sweetpotato is grown after
rice in a season that also grows corn and other vegetables in sandy loam soils.
Per BAS data, Tarlac province is number one in terms of volume of
production and area planted. Although the trend in area production declines
from 2008 to 2012, it appears that Tarlac Province maintains its rank in years both
in area and volume of production, contributing 68% of the Regions sweetpotato
production in 2012 and accounting for at least 74% of the production area in the
Region, for the same year.
Table 16 Sweetpotato Production Volume, Harvested Area and Yield per Hectare, 2012.

PROVINCE

Production (MT)

Area (Ha)

Yield/Ha (MT)

CENTRAL LUZON

31,196

6,942

4.5

AURORA

2,262

396

5.7

BATAAN

1,515

465

3.3

718

60

12.0

NUEVA ECIJA

1,106

216

5.1

PAMPANGA
TARLAC
ZAMBALES

2,500
21,361
1,735

533
5,100
172

4.7
4.2
10.1

BULACAN

C. Analysis and Prioritization of Target Locations of Interventions


The Expanded- Vulnerability and Suitability Assessment (E-VSA) is a
science-based tool developed by the Bureau of Soils and Water Management to
identify the suitability of commodity in a certain location/municipality. The
results of EVSA will guide the planner in allocating the governments investment
to support and to uplift the income of the farmers and players in the value chain.

Figure 9 E-VSA Map for Sweetpotato

Provincial Government of Tarlac

28

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Table 17 Statistical Analysis of the Province by Municipality per the E-VSA Tool

Provincial Government of Tarlac

29

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Municipality

Poverty
Incidence

Moncada
Paniqui
Gerona
Concepcion
Camiling
La Paz
Santa Ignacia
Ramos
Victoria
San Manuel
Anao
Pura
Tarlac City
Capas
San Clemente
San Jose
Mayantoc1
Bamban

16
13
18
14
16
17
22
17
20
17
18
15
9
13
18
32
28
11

Production
Area
(Hectares)
1350
1428
387
350
151
36
8
128
12
2
1
20
20
134
3
5
28
25

Production
Volume
(Metric
Tons)
24300
23811
2965
4550
3020
280
53
2278
98
16
8
80
239
2670
38
38
410
275

Old
Composite
Index

Old
Rank

New
Composite
Index

New
Rank

Geocode

0.6032
0.5338
0.5367
0.5453
0.5835
0.6134
0.587
0.52
0.5549
0.5618
0.5451
0.5385
0.5377
0.4338
0.4699
0.3712
0.3594
0.4009

2
12
11
7
4
1
3
13
6
5
8
9
10
15
14
17
18
16

0.74068
0.70351
0.4032
0.40287
0.38776
0.36717
0.36381
0.34981
0.34244
0.33444
0.32901
0.31959
0.30175
0.29828
0.29193
0.28661
0.27449
0.24059

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18

36909000
36910000
36906000
36905000
36903000
36907000
36915000
36912000
36917000
36914000
36901000
36911000
36916000
36904000
36913000
36918000
36908000
36902000

D. Investment Plan
The sweetpotato value chain helps identify the segments that require
intervention or assistance. The value chain analysis will guide the PLGU/LGU
planner and the National Government in prioritizing the constraints and
interventions in the value chain. This is to increase the competitiveness of the
industry and promote inclusiveness to the players of the value chain. The
Provincial Government of Tarlac then prioritizes the gaps/constraints and
strategizes on where to establish the projects. Such strategies will address the

1The

municipality of Mayantoc is the sole producer of clean planting materials in the


province. One of the enterprises identified is the establishment of a nursery and net houses for
clean planting materials. Hence, it is positioned as a municipality essential for inclusion in the
development of interventions for sweetpotato. Other neighboring municipalities that do not
commercially produce sweetpotatoes but serve as very good locations as sources of clean
planting materials are San Jose and Santa Ignacia.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

30

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

gaps and contribute to inclusive growth, making the province more competitive
in the sweetpotato industry.

The province prioritizes the following interventions:

The establishment of postharvest processing facilities with mobile


chipping machine to address the problems of lack of postharvest
processing facilities with storage, packing house and limited mobile
chipping machines in the remote production areas;

The limited supply of quality clean planting materials (CPM) all


year round;

The improvement of farm-to-market road access in the production


areas to minimize transaction cost and reduce travel time and to
provide greater road accessibility all year round;

The upgrading and establishment of tissue culture laboratory to


support the expansion areas and minimize the incidence of pest
and diseases of sweetpotato.

Such interventions and aid are geared towards boosting agricultural


development and income-increase for the rural poor. The enumerated
interventions are aligned with the developmental goals and priority programs of
the Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Plan (AFMP) of Region III, as well
as that of the provincial goals of Tarlac.
The Investment Plan for Tarlac Province is supported by the Value Chain
Analysis segmentation and key gaps/constraints. The annual financial
requirements for each proposed intervention are shown in Annex 5.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

31

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP) for Sweetpotato


The Sweetpotato Value Chain Matrix identifies the different constraints
that Tarlac faces in the sourcing, producing, processing and marketing of the
commodity.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

32

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

PCIP Matrix for Sweetpotato


Key Gap/ Constraint in
VC Development in the
Province

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Target Result

Target Areas

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

Estimated
Project Cost

Proposed
sources of
Funds

Remarks

Rank

INPUT PROVISION
Limited supply of
tissue cultured planting
materials

Upgrading of existing tissue


culture laboratory that will
produce clean planting
materials (CPM)

Upgrade existing
Tissue culture lab.

Camiling

TCA
PLGU

PhP
6,500,000.00

DA-HVCDP

No. of farmers: 2,794


Capacity of the
proposed tissue culture
lab: 1,500 plantlets per
month

Area of CPM
production: 100 has.

Lack of supply of tissue


cultured planting
materials

Establishment and/or
scaling up of existing
nurseries/multiplication
farms

Existing capacity of lab:


1,000 plantlets
Establish 3 nurseries
Output: 520,847,360
stem cuttings
No. of farmers
reached/served: 2,794
No. of net houses: 20
Area of each nursery:
10m x 11 m
Area ha., dimensions
of net houses: 5m x 22m

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Mayantoc***
(the only one in
Tarlac producing
CPM),
Sta. Ignacia & San
Jose (these are the
immediate areas
surrounding
Mayantoc and are
also the potential
CPM producers as
they do not
commercially
produce
sweetpotato)
San Jose, Santa

Mayantoc Sweet
Potato CPM
Producers Coop,
Ambalingit
Farmers PMPC,
Grains MultiPurpose Coop,
Mamonit PMPC,
Maniniog MPC,
Mountainside
PMPC, St. Joseph
PMPC.
Davids Farmers
Marketing Coop,
Mabulod Green

33

PHP
6,000,000.00

PRDP
PLGU/
MLGU
PG

2016

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Key Gap/ Constraint in


VC Development in the
Province

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Target Result

Target Areas

Ignacia
Mayantoc Brgys:
Pob. Norte
Pob. Sur
Cubcub
San Bartolome
Mapandan
Maniniog
Ambalingit
Calabtangan
Carabaoan
Mamonit

Accreditation of CPM
producers

Provincial Government of Tarlac

50 CPM producers
(existing number of
cooperatives for
Mayantoc

2,000 hectares
(1 hectare =
45-50,000 cuttings)
San Jose;
Santa Ignacia;

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

Estimated
Project Cost

Proposed
sources of
Funds

Remarks

Rank

Farm Producers
Coop
Bagong Ugnayan
ng Santa Ignacia
Layunin Angat
Kabuhayan,
Caduldulaoan
PMPC, Calipayan
MPC, Macaguing
PMPC, Maserpat
MPC, Pugo
Cecilio Farmers
Producers Coop,
San Sotero PMPC,
Sta Ignacia
Furniture,
Antique &
Bamboo
Producers Coop,
Sta. Ines East
PMPC, Sta. Ines
Golden Grains
PMPC,
Timmaguab II
PMPC, UMC
Saranay MPC
DA-OPAG, TCA
Mayantoc CPM
Producers
Cooperative,DA,
DAOPAG,TCA,BPI

34

PHP 500
accreditation
fee per
producer

DA HVCDP,
PLGU/
MLGU

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Key Gap/ Constraint in


VC Development in the
Province

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Target Result

Beneficiaries include:
farmers of Mayantoc,
San Jose, Santa Ignacia,
Moncada, Paniqui,
Gerona, Camiling,
Concepcion
30 farmers per
municipality, 2 batches

Increasing cost of
chemical fertilizer

Establishment of organic
fertilizer production plant

One Organic Fertilizer


Production Plant

Target Areas

Mayantoc Brgys:
Pob. Norte
Pob. Sur
Cubcub
San Bartolome
Mapandan
Maniniog
Ambalingit
Calabtangan
Carabaoan
Mamonit
Gerona

Target
municipalities:
Moncada,
Paniqui, Gerona,
Camiling,
Concepcion
No. of pax per
batches: 50
Moncada,
Paniqui,

PLGU/
MLGU

To make fertilizers
more affordable and
readily available for
sweetpotato farmers

Conduct participatory
technology demonstration

Provincial Government of Tarlac

No. of batches of
Training: 10
No. of farmers trained:
500

No. of technology
demonstration: 3

Estimated
Project Cost

Proposed
sources of
Funds

Remarks

Rank

Training cost
PhP 50,000
per batch =
PhP 100,000
for 2 batches

Lead player:
Sapang PMPCI,
Ablang-Sapang
Producers
Cooperative,
Other players:
PLGU/
MLGU
DA
BSWM
DA-OPAG,
PCEDO, TCA
PLGU/MLGU
DA
BSWM
DA-OA
BSWM
TCA

25,000 farmers to serve

Continue to capacitate and


educate farmers on the
benefits and importance of
using organic fertilizer

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

PhP 1,667.00
per head, to
include mass
graduation
& field day
PHP
5,000,000

PhP 30,000
per batch

PLGU/
MLGU

Supp
ort

PhP
1,500,000.00

PhP
200,000.00

35

PRDP
PLGU/MLG
U
PG

PRDP
PLGU/

Supp
ort

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Key Gap/ Constraint in


VC Development in the
Province

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Target Result

on the use of organic


fertilizer

Low use of fertilizer


among smallholders
due to limited
purchasing capacity.

Strengthen existing
cooperatives as input
providers and link them to
financial institutions that
provides credit services with
friendly terms and
conditions

Credit facilitation for farmers


and cooperatives

Concepcion

Linkages to financial
institutions: 2
No. of farmers trained
150
To increase accessibility
of production loans
from financial
institutions
No. of farmers assisted:
381
No. of coops assisted: 5

Establish market linkages/


marketing agreement with
institutional buyers

No. of market
linkages/
agreement: 5
No. of coops assisted:
10

Find an existing cooperative


that will provide an added
service of supporting price
stabilization for farmers

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Target Areas

No. of technical
briefings conducted: 2
trainings, 50
participants from 5

Camiling
Concepcion
Gerona
Ramos
Paniqui

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

Estimated
Project Cost

DA
BSWM
DA-OA
BSWM, TCA
PLGU/
MLGU
CDA
DA-AMAD
Financial
institutions
PCEDO

Proposed
sources of
Funds

Remarks

MLGU

DA

Rank

6
Credit
Support

Moncada,
Paniqui, Gerona,
Camiling,
Concepcion

PCEDO,
Landbank, DBP,
Cooperatives

PhP
20,000.00

PCEDO
PLGU
DA

Credit
Support

Sapang PMPC
Ablang Sapang
Producers
Cooperative
Raniag MPC
Barang PMPC
Aduas PMPC

Sapang PMPC,
Ablang Sapang
Producers
Cooperative,
Raniag MPC,
Barang PMPC,
Aduas PMPC

PhP
20,000.00

DA AMAD
PLGU
MLGU

This is
addresse
d by
projects
rank 2
and 3

PhP
300,000.00

PCEDO

Support

2 technical
briefings per
municipality
Moncada,Paniqui,

Dizon Farms,
Global Foods,
UBM
Sapang PMPC
PLGU
MLGU

36

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Key Gap/ Constraint in


VC Development in the
Province

Limited access to and


availability of steady
supply of clean
planting materials all
year round

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Strengthen research and


development and establish
techno-demo about the
production of clean planting
materials and prevention
and control of sweetpotato
virus disease complex
(SPVD), benchmarking,
socio-economic studies,
impact assessment

Target Result

trainees from 10
municipalities
Establish: 5 PTD on
CPM
No. of participatory
technology
demonstration: 1
No. of farmers trained:
25

Target Areas

Gerona, Camiling,
Concepcion
Mayantoc
San Jose
Santa Ignacia
Camiling
Concepcion
For PTD:
Moncada
Paniqui
Gerona
Concepcion
Camiling
Ramos

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

Estimated
Project Cost

Proposed
sources of
Funds

Remarks

Rank

CDA
Mayantoc CPM
Producers
Cooperative

PhP
1,000,000.00

DA-HVCDP
PLGU
TCA
PG

Supp
ort

TCA,
DA-OPAG, LGUs,
PCEDO

For 2017
FARMING
Limited outreach of
existing providers /
existing extension
services
Low adoption/ uptake
of improved sciencebased sweetpotato
farming and Good
Agricultural Practices

Set-up or capacitate group of


farmers as providers of
improved technology or
services to co-farmers
through conduct of FFS,
techno-demo, and trainings
and to support the set-up of
research and demonstration
plots to showcase good
agronomic practices and
climate-smart farming
technologies

No. of FFS: 5

Conduct of skills training


and education on sweet
potato farming and

No. of trainings
conducted: 2 trainings,
50 participants from 5

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Total No. of farmers


pax: 250

Moncada
Paniqui
Gerona
Concepcion
Camiling

PG
TCA
PLGU
MLGU
DA

PhP
500,000.00

PRDP
PLGU
MLGU
TCA
DA HVCDP

Support

Sapang PMPC
Ablang Sapang
Producers

PLGU
MLGU
DA

PhP
100,000.00

PLGU/
MLGU
Sapang

Support

37

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Key Gap/ Constraint in


VC Development in the
Province

Limited access to
efficient technology/
Farmers cannot afford
and/ or pay upfront for
equipment and
technology

Lack of organized
groups

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Target Result

Target Areas

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

agricultural management
training to facilitate
promotion and adoption of
GAP and climate-smart
agriculture

trainees from 10
municipalities

Cooperative
Raniag MPC
Barang PMPC
Aduas PMPC

DTI
ATI
PCEDO

Set-up of common service


facilities for mechanized
farming with a focus on land
preparation and harvesting
technologies

Two 4WD tractor with


accessories per coop

Moncada,
Paniqui, Gerona,
Camiling,
Concepcion

Sapang PMPC,
Ablang-Sapang
Farmers
Producers Coop,
Me-We Producers
Coop, Moncada
Tarlac Farmers
MPC, The Tillers
Multi-Purpose
Coop.

Organize farmers into


cooperatives/
associations

2 Harvesters
2 Cultivator
2 Dryers

Coop/association to be
organized: 6
No. of farmers trained
150

Camiling
Concepcion
Gerona
Ramos
Paniqui

Refer to Annex 6
for list of other
cooperatives per
municipality
PLGU/
MLGU
CDA
DA-AMAD
Financial
institutions
PCEDO

TRANSFORMATION/ PROCESSING

Provincial Government of Tarlac

38

Estimated
Project Cost

PhP
48,000,000.00

Proposed
sources of
Funds

Remarks

PMPC
Ablang
Sapang
Producers
Cooperative
Raniag MPC
Barang
PMPC
Aduas
PMPC
PRDP
PLGU/
MLGU
PG

DA

Rank

Credit
Support

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Key Gap/ Constraint in


VC Development in the
Province

Limited access to
common service
facilities (dryer,
chipper, granulator,
storage, and
transportation) for the
production and
marketing of
sweetpotato granules

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Provision of Custom Service


and Establishment of
Processing Center and
Storage Facility for
Sweetpotato in the Province
of Tarlac

Low recovery due to


inadequate facilities

Limited range of
commercially viable
products
Low level of value
addition

Product and market


development support with a
focus on intermediated and
processed food products
geared for the following
markets:
i.) feeding and nutrition
programs/disaster relief
assistance/hospitals (e.g.,
instant noodles);
ii.) restaurants (ready-tocook fries and chips);
iii.) supermarkets and health
shops (e.g., 500 grams and 1
kilo pack of ready-to-cook
high quality sweetpotatoes)

Target Result

No. of post-harvest
processing center and
storage facilities: 3

Target Areas

Moncada (2015)
Camiling
Concepcion
Paniqui

Building with chipping


area: 3

Moncada (2015)
Concepcion
Paniqui

No. of trainings
conducted: 2 trainings,
50 participants from 5
trainees from 10
municipalities

Sapang PMPC
Ablang Sapang
Producers
Cooperative
Raniag MPC
Barang PMPC
Aduas PMPC

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

Sapang PMPC,
Concepcion
Sweetpotato
Producers
Cooperative,
Raniag MPC,
Aduas PMPC
PHILMECH, DA,
DOST, DTI, BAPS
Sapang PMPC,
Concepcion
Sweetpotato
Producers
Cooperative,
Raniag MPC,
Aduas PMPC
PLGU
MLGU
DA
DTI
ATI
PCEDO

MARKETING

Provincial Government of Tarlac

39

Estimated
Project Cost

Proposed
sources of
Funds

PhP
38,815,548.43

PRDP
PLGU
PG

PhP
2,880,000.00

PRDP
PLGU

PhP
100,000.00

PLGU/
MLGU
Sapang
PMPC
Ablang
Sapang
Producers
Cooperative
Raniag MPC
Barang
PMPC
Aduas
PMPC

Remarks

Rank

1
Support

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Key Gap/ Constraint in


VC Development in the
Province

High cost of transaction


due to poor farm-tomarket road

Low bargaining power

Brief Description of Potential


Intervention

Cost contribution to
rehabilitation of farm-tomarket roads

Development of capacity of
farmers to incrementally
associate, collaborate, and
coordinate to achieve
economies of scale in their
transactions and to become
attractive partners to large
buyers and establishment of
common trading center for
sweetpotatoes (fresh and
chips for feeds) and other
commodities

Target Result

14.689 kilometers
Moncada

No. of trading centers:


3

Target Areas

Brgys.
Capaoayan,
Banaoang West,
Banaoang East,
Ablang Sapang
Camiling,
Concepcion,
Gerona,
Paniqui,
Moncada
Concepcion
Paniqui

Proposed Lead &


Other Players

Estimated
Project Cost

PLGU
MLGU
DA

PhP
145,131,687.1
0

PRDP
PLGU

Sapang PMPC,
Concepcion
Sweetpotato
Producers
Cooperative,
Raniag MPC,
Aduas PMPC
PHILMECH,
BAPS, DA, DOST,
DTI

PhP
3,000,000.00

PRDP
PLGU/
MLGU
PG

Support Services:
Financing
Research and Development
Extension
Laboratory
Enabling
Environment:
Total Estimated Project Cost

Provincial Government of Tarlac

Proposed
sources of
Funds

268,035,265.53

40

Remarks

Rank

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Institutional Arrangements for PRDP-Funding


Implementation and Supervision
The Provincial Program Management and Implementing Unit (PPMIU) is
headed by the Provincial Administrator. There is also a PPMIU Focal Person who
serves as the overall coordinator for the Philippine Rural Development Program
(PRDP) for the province of Tarlac. A Technical Working Group has also been
created for the following components of the PRPD IPLAN, IBUILD and IREAP,
and other support functions. With the full cooperation and assistance of the
concerned LGUs, it is the PPMIUs responsibility to implement all sub-projects,
including but not limited to the preparation of pertinent documents and studies
that would be required by the projects.
Organization and Management
The PPMIU organizes and manages the PRDP subprojects through its
component units and sub-units as the IPLAN Unit, the IBUILD Unit, the IREAP
Unit, the M&E Sub-Unit, the SES Sub-Unit, the Finance Sub-Unit, the
Procurement Sub-Unit, the IEAC Sub-Unit and the Grievance Redress
Mechanism Point Person.
Please refer to Annexes 1, 2 and 3 for the copy of the Executive Order and
Special Order creating the provinces PPMIU and Technical Working Group,
respectively.

Monitoring and Evaluation


The Operations Manual specifies a monitoring and evaluation tool that
will be utilized by the different PRDP units in tracking the progress of the
subprojects. The Monitoring and Evaluation Sub-Unit of the PPMIU will handle
this task.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

41

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Safeguards
The province of Tarlac ensure to abide by the safeguard policies set by the
World Bank and the Philippine Government as described in the Social and
Environmental Safeguards (SES) Framework of the PRDP.
Social Safeguards will be governed by the Indigenous Peoples
Development Framework, Land /Right-of-Way (ROW) Acquisition and
Resettlement Policy Framework. The Philippine Environmental Impact System
will govern environmental safeguards and will adopt the Environmental
Framework and Guidelines set for by the program.
The SES Sub-unit of the PPMIU will carry out the environmental
guidelines, prepare and implement the environmental management plan,
resettlement action plan and indigenous people development framework in a
manner that is satisfactory to the World Bank.

PDC Endorsing the PCIP and the PLGU Commitment for Budget
Counterparting
The Provincial Development Council has endorsed the budget
counterparting for the Provincial Commodity Investment Plan through
Executive Committee Resolution No. 01 dated March 17, 2015. This budgeting
also warrants the PLGUs commitment to the PRDP and its goals. Refer to
Annex 4 for the copy of the resolution.

Conclusion
Serving as a basis for both the IBUILD and IREAP components of the
PRDP initiatives for Tarlac province, the Provincial Commodity Investment
Plan (PCIP) substantiates the proposed interventions detailed for each
priority commodity. The PCIP also functions as the stimulus in the

Provincial Government of Tarlac

42

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

mobilization of resources from other National Government Agencies and


private sectors.

Recommendation
The Provincial Government of Tarlac, along with the support and assistance
of the National Government Agencies, Local Government Units and the
private sector, must work on increasing the growth and productivity of the
agricultural sector, continuously seeking new approaches to fulfill the PCIP.

Provincial Government of Tarlac

43

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Provincial Government of Tarlac

44

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Annexes
Annex 1 Executive Order No. 1 (Creation of PPMIU)

Annex 2 Executive Order No. 1-A (Creation of PPMIU and Addition of GRM)
Annex 3 Special Order No. 1 (Creation of TWG)
Annex 4 PDC Executive Committee Resolution No. 1 (PCIP endorsement for sweet potato inclusion in the
PRDP)

Annex 5 Annual Financial Requirements

Annex 6 List of Cooperatives

PANIQUI
Aduas PMPC, Barang PMPC, Cayanga PMPC, Hacienda Macabaga Agrarian Ref. Beneficiaries MPC,
Mabuhay Tablang Marketing Coop, New Dapdap Farmers Marketing Coop, New Paniqui Golden Harvest
PMPC, Paniqui Buklod Diwa MPC, Paniqui Trifed MPC, Raniag MPC, Samahan ng Magsasaka ng Tarlac
Producers Coop, Western Paniqui Farmers & Livestock Raisers Marketing Coop, Western Community
Primary MPC
GERONA
Abagon Compact Farm & Seed Growers MPC, Mushroom Growers Producers Coop, New Matayuncab
MPC, Oloybuaya Farmers Producers Coop, Poultry Farm Management Service Coop, Prosperity MPC, San
Agustin Busilak MPC, Villa Paz PMPC
CAMILING
Bilad PMPC, Bobon Caarosipan MPC, Cabanabaan MPC, Camiling FACOMA MPC, Camiling Grains
PMPC, Pindangan 2nd MPC
CONCEPCION
Asucal PMPC, Binhin ni Abraham Producers Coop, Bountiful Harvest Producers Coop, Calius Gueco
Farmers Producers Coop, Christian Era Producers Coop, Concepcion Calamansi Growers & Rice Producers
Coop, Concepcion Farmers Producers Coop, Concepcion Seed Growers Producers Coop, Concepcion Sweet
Potato Growers Producers Coop, Golden Grain Farmers MPC of Concepcion, Jefmin Farmers MPC (JEFFAMPC), Kabutihan Mushroom & Organic Vegetables Producers Coop, Lilibangan-Magao-Castillo (LIMACA)
Producers Coop, Macangcong MPC, Inc., New Parulung Kapit Bisig MPC, Original 1989 Sugarcane
Beneficiaries Producers Coop, Pagtatagumpay Producers Coop, Pando Agri-Inputs Producers Coop,
Samahang Magsasaka ng Pao Producers Coop, Sta. Monica Farmers Producers Coop, SAMACO-Malupa
Farmers MPC, Sanvic Raisers MPC, Sta. Cruz Farmers Producers Coop, Sta. Monica Farmers Producers
Coop, Talimundoc Marimla MPC, TG-32 Irrigation Service Coop, Tinang SN MPC, Inc, KASAKA Farmers
Producers Coop

Provincial Government of Tarlac

45

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Annex 5 Annual Financial Requirements


Annual Financial Requirements (PhP)
Value Chain Segments
& Services
INPUT SUPPLY

Proposed
Intervention

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Total

Upgrading of existing
Tissue culture and
disease indexing
laboratory that will
produce Clean Planting
Materials (CPM)

1,250,000.00

1,250,000.00

1,250,000.00

1,250,000.00

6,500,000.00

Establishment of nursery,
and net houses for the
propagation/ production
of clean planting
materials (CPM)

1,500,000.00

1,500,000.00

1,500,000.00

1,500,000.00

6,000,000.00

Accreditation of CPM
growers
Establishment of organic
fertilizer production
plant
Continuing education of
farmers and technology
training
Participatory technology
demonstration on the use
of organic fertilizer

243,015.00

225,015.00

650,000.00

2,450,000.00

1,250,000.00

650,000.00

5,000,000.00

450,000.00

450,000.00

450,000.00

450,000.00

1,800,000.00

67,000.00

67,000.00

67,000.00

Sub Total

468,030.00

200,000.00

19,968,030.00

Provincial Government of Tarlac

46

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Annual Financial Requirements (PhP)


Value Chain Segments
& Services

PRODUCTION

Proposed
Intervention

2015

Improvement of technical
knowledge
Extension of Credit
Facilities
Infrastructure
Farm Production
Machineries

2016

2017

2018

2019

Total

450,000.00

450,000.00

900,000.00

170,000.00

170,000.00

340,000.00

2,000,000.00

2,000,000.00

2,000,000.00

2,000,000.00

11,000,000.00

8,000,000.00
11,000,000.00

Sub Total

20,220,000.00

TRANSFORMATION/
PROCESSING

MARKETING

SUPPORT SERVICES

Provision of Custom
Service and
Establishment of
Processing Center and
Storage Facility for
Sweetpotato in the
Province of Tarlac
Improvement of Existing
Farm to Market Road
Areas
Establishment of trading
Centers
Research and
Development

38,815,548.43

38,815,548.43

145,131,687.10

145,131,687.10

1,500,000.00

1,500,000.00

250,000.000

250,000.000

3,000,000.00
250,000.000

250,000.000

1,000,000.00

Sub Total

167,538,687.10

GRANDTOTAL

268,035,265.53

Provincial Government of Tarlac

47

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

Provincial Government of Tarlac

48

Philippine Rural Development Project


Provincial Commodity Investment Plan (PCIP)

22

Provincial Government of Tarlac

June

49