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6623 Legters Dr.

Dallas, TX 75236 October 8, 1988

Dear Friends,

Greetings in the wonderful name of Jesus.

For those of you who are wondering if we've fallen off the end of

the

Earth or been diverted to a cannibal's feast—the answer is "no".

you have not heard, we are on furlough. We returned

to

the

In case

States on

Feb. 26, and have been seeing supporters, visiting family, helping at

camps and Vacation Bible Schools, etc. We have represented our work in 7 states and saw supporters in 2 others. We also traveled through 7 other states in the process. The kids—no, all of us—are tired of traveling.

It is nice to be more or less staying in one spot for a while.

We are all experiencing homesickness for our village home. It isn't

that we do not like it here so much as we belong

there.

Beth frequently

cries to

if we are to sucessfully return. A little understanding dulls the pain.

This does not mean that we have not enjoyed seeing you—it just means that

here at this point in time

go home.

We know that we need to be

this is not where we belong.

Pray for us.

The kid's adjustment to the

United States has

been really, well,

interesting.

The first shock was D-III's first sighting of an escalator.

We were in Hawaii going through the airport and

the

line

stopped.

Our

little

boy, near the front of the line, wasn't certain

what to do about a

moving staircase. He wasn't about to put a foot on it without permission (and assurance) from Mommy. Now, whenever we go to a place with escalators they want to spend all their time going up and down the silly things.

Other new experiences include toasters that pop up (in PNG they

town, but

none that pop up when done).

saw

That was the day's

toasters in

major source of entertainment. The kids watched the toaster and we watched

the kids. We were also asked about the lights hanging above the streets,

and why we stop for the red one and went when it

turned green. (They have

become proficient back-seat drivers, too.)

their systems came when we gave them

could spend it as they wished. They were

Probably the biggest shock to

each a few dollars and said they

soon in tears due to the

decisions they had to make. The store had more toys than they remembered

ever seeing before.

Speaking of spending money, we notice that Beth and D-III are very

much influenced by the PNG culture. When they buy something it is usually

a joint decision.

D-III had

the way they think. When in a store they saw some

The other day they gave us a typical illustration of

Tic Tacs.

some

When

leaving she said, "Don't eat all the Tic Tacs while I'm gone." Rosalind

said, "Beth, D-III bought them with his own money." "Yes, but we agreed to share them."

his birthday, so they discussed the item and he bought

them. Later Beth went into a store while

money from

he stayed

in

the

car.

Then Beth replied,

This

is typical

of

them. They even discuss buying gum from the 25

cent gum machines in stores. It is rare, when they are together, to

make

a totally independent decision. They can do it, but they prefer to behave

as brother and sister might in PNG.

DALLAS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR

to

school. Rosalind is studying at the International Linguistic Center. She

As I write this we have moved to Dallas, Texas, where we are going

is taking literacy and anthropology

courses so

she

can

work

on

the

development of a literacy program for our people in PNG.

During this time I am studying Hebrew at Dallas Christian College in preparation for Old Testament translation. In the remaining time I will

be working

to

increase our support

to

more a

more acceptable level.

Language work will fill out any remaining time available. (I also plan to

woi^ on reviewing my Greek in an effort to get ready to translate the New

Testament.) I have hopes of taking in

a few other benefits of

being in

the area, too. One such benefit was a three week "course" introducing us

a

with making our program more

can help

to the benefits of a MS-DOS computer.

few other such

successful.

Perhaps I'll be able to pick

up

events that

The house we are renting

is

Rosalind

is taking her classes.

just

a

five

minute walk from

where

It is a nice three bedroom duplex with

other missionaries all around us for neighbors. Rosalind is excited about

having a dishwasher and garbage disposal for the first time since we were

married.

It is also the

first

time

we

have

lived

in

a

house with

air-conditioning. We have experimented and find that if we set it about 85

the house is quite comfortable. While in PNG we were most comfortable in

the 80—85 range. The time we spent on the Oregon coast lowered our heat

tolerance—but not enough that we were comfortable there!

It

has taken

less

than

a

week

here in Texas and we are once again happy to be warm.

Now as fall is starting we must once again get used to cooler temperatures. When we wake up in the morning I am told how cold it is, but when I look at

the thermometer it has been

freezing that we feel.

reading around 75

degrees—not quite the

HIGH TEC FOR JUNGLE USE

Other

developments include

the

purchase of

a

printer

for

computers. This was made possible by the donations of a high school

and a VBS.

our

camp

We have also purchased a new computer (a Toshiba 1200 FB) that will

be able to do things that our smaller ones are too small to

do.

I

have

been transfering the files over to our new machine and storing them on disc

(but still keeping the old files—never TRUST a computer.) In fact, this newsletter was started on the TRS80-Model 102 (our smaller computer) and is

being completed on our Toshiba.

The purchase of the new computer does not mean that we will phase out

the smaller ones—they

will continue

to

be

used

due to their "user

friendly" nature. We plan to train our language helpers to use them when

we return to PNG, and Rosalind says she will continue to use hers instead

of the new one.

Oh, yes. The computer was purchased with funds from the

offerings received from several camps and a VBS.

It appears that the rate of development in computer technology is so

great that next furlough will see another purchase. What we have is about

can now purchase when we consider our needs and what is

as

good

as

we

available. But there will be equipment and software out then that will be

able to improve our performance enough to justify another change. By that

time our needs will once again have grown (hopefully) to the point that the

improved machine and software will be worthwhile.

PRAYER AND PRAISE

Praise God for:

1. A safe trip to the US.

2. Safty in travel in the US.

3. Our new computer and printer.

4. Gifts of clothing and supplies

needed here in U.S.

5. Seeing so many of our friends

and family since our return.

6. All of you who support us

7.

through finances and prayer.

The care that the PBT team and

the Kianele people are giving

for our house and airstrip

while we are away.

Grace and Peace.

Pray for:

1. Beth and D-III's adjustment to their first time in public

school.

2. Rosalind's course load. She's

taking more hours than planned.

3. Dan's Hebrew class and driving

4.

5.

across Dallas. This is quite

an adjustment from the jungle.

We need to increase our

support by $2500 per month. (If you need an explanation

about this or want to

participate, please let us

know.)

The Kianele people. We have

been very involved in their

lives and it is quite important

to us that they are constantly

in His care.

Yours in Him,

Dan Wilcox

' OUR SCHOOL YEAR ADDRESS

Dan and Rosalind Wilcox

6623 Legters Dr.

Dallas, Texas 75236

(214) 709 0754

TERM RECAP

OUR NEW FORWARDING AGENIT

ADDRESS

Paul and Leatha Weaver

406 Thornton Or. Rd.

Toledo, Oregon 97391

(503) 875 4022

Some of you have heard a recap of of our term.

For those who haven't, and

for those who want it again, here is a brief description of what we feel are the

more notable accomplishments of our 1983 to 1988 term. These are not

necessarily in order of accomplishment or importance.

We built our "permanent" house. Our first term we lived in a temporary house

made mostly of village materials. This term we built again using materials that

should last longer and with better design and techniques. We do plan a few

modifications when we return for better mosquito proofing and a bit more room

when we need a break.

The Anangalo airstrip was built. This takes care of the difficulties we were having with travel. Although this will involve regular maintainence, it should

not ever have to be totally rebuilt. The people do want it to be extended

another 200 to 400 feet.

We may help with this, but probably more in terms of

knowledge and equiptment rather than labor.

On our first trip to town using the new airstrip the plane lifted off

beautifully and turned toward Madang. Before five minutes were up Beth and D-

III started the age-old custom of "are we almost there?" and "How much farther?" We began thinking about how much faster we were getting to town and found

ourselves appreciating the normally irksome routine. By the time we were in

town we would normally have only completed about one-sixteenth of the river

travel time—not counting delays caused by darkness, engine trouble, etc. When

we got off the plane in Madang we were told that we not only looked better, we

smelled better!

in Kianing Balang.

always express myself in the local language and say what I want to.

Occasionally I will be unable to keep up with a more complicated discussion, but

that is fairly rare.

I have become fairly fluent

By that I mean I can almost

As the term ended I found myself being able to preach and

pray in the language, often expressing myself more easily than I could in the

trade languange.

Due to Rosalind's teaching the kids she has not progressed as far We hope to arrange more time for her to do language work next term-

that expectation that we are proceeding with our schooling.

as

It

I have,

is with

Our phonology statement is almost through its third revision. There are no major changes—Just filling out gaps in the data presented, checking spelling, etc. The phonology statement is the analysis of the sound system that the

alphabet is based on.

The initial description of the grammar is almost complete. I estimate that it has 400 to 600 hours of work left before completion. (Actually my guess is

200 hours—but I have learned that I always guess at getting things done faster than I actually do.) This is a major essential step for beginning full scale translation work. Both the grammar and the phonology work involved many man-

hours (and woman-hours) of work. We do not talk about the results too much

because they are hard to understand unless you have a background in linguistics.

That does not mean that the work was insignificant—on the contrary—it is the

basis for our future translation work.

Based on the work we had done in the phonology and grammar, and because we

^

have some of the people who are semi-literate in the trade language, we held our first vernacular (native language) writers workshop. For this we flew twelve

men and women to Likan where another PBT team, William and Robin Butler, work. This is also the home of the traditional enemies of our people. (They are now

best friends.) During the week the participants produced two small booklets of

stories that they wrote in their own language and illustrated with their own

drawings. These are the first booklets produced in Kianing Balang.

Then we had a review course and a second writers workshop. From this we

have three more booklets produced in Kianing Balang. We also discovered that it

is more productive to hold the workshops away from the village. When at the

village the people are too transient—if they want to go hunting they go. It is

not easy to hold a course when the participants don't come.

Leadership development has really progressed in the last term. Although some classes were held, the majority of the accomplishments were through more casual

times of answering questions, conversations, etc. This is the type of progress made more by being there and available (and the leaders knowing that you are

available) rather than by classes or lectures.

Connected to the leadership development is the growth of the Kianele Church.

This last term the Church at Giling planted two new churches within our language

group, one at Sivisivi and one at Janing. Just before leaving our area the

Australian Church of Christ Mission asked us for a count of the Christians in

the three villages. We sent a message to each Church and were told that the

total number is 440. Now many of those are nominal "church-goers", but it is

also about half of the language group! Do note that the effort has included

both Australian missionaries and ourselves, but the major evangelistic effort

has involved mostly the local Church leaders. But isn't that what we are after?

Some of you may be (should be?) asking why a translation is necessary if the

church is growing without it.

The fact is the longer we are in PNG the more

convinced that it is necessary for the Kianele people to have their own

translation. There are many areas that the trade language translation is not understood due to the nature of the trade language. And there are many of the people who do not now know the trade language, or who do not know it well enough

to use it for spiritual growth. Among the Kianele all really important issues

are still discussed in their heart language, Kianing Balang. Since this is the case, Kianing Balang is the language in which the Kianele need God's word.

Matthew's version of the Christmas Story and the Resurrection have been

translated.

Also a few verses from 1 John.

The little we did on this late in

the term convinced us that as soon as we complete the grammar statement we are ready to really get into translation in a major way.

After completing a revision of the Christmas story I read it for the 1987

Christmas worship service. Afterwards Ambisang, my wife's village papa, came up

to me and said, "My insides really fell down when I heard that." Experiences

like that really make us want to get on with the translation. And knowing that

many, or most, of the older people cannot really understand about following

Christ until they have God's Word in their language makes it all the more

critical.

Dear Friends,

Greetings in the name of our Lord.

Here is our revised 1988 financial report and furlough budget.

bunches all

The

individuals together so as to protect the

report simply

anominity of those who do not wish their names published.

1987 Giving

Individuals

$ 9,794.35

Churches:

Bay Area Church of Christ, North Bend,

Or.

Central Kitsap Christian Church, Silverdale,

Cy-Fair Christian Church, Houston, Tx.

Eastside Christian Church, Albany, Or.

First Christian Church, Mill City, Or.

First Christian Church, Newport, Or.

600.00

Wa. 2,145.83

1,950.00

1,725.36

766.38

6,364.21

First Christian Church, Rifle, Co.

21.01

Haltom City Christian Church, Fort Worth, Tx

50.00

Hope Christian Church, Hope, Alaska Ladies Friendship Circle,

500.00

Sisters Church of Christ, Sisters, Or.

135.00

Nezperce Christian Church, Nezperce, Id.

200.00

Valley View Christian Church, Dallas, Tx.

5,175.00

Willing Workers, Buffington Road Christian

Church, College Park, Ga. total of Church giving in 1987 Total of all giving in 1987

120.00

$19,752.79

$29,547.14

As occurred in 1986, there were several thousand dollars that

went

through our hands (and were legally accounted for by PBT) but did not go

through our own forwarding agent.

Elkanah

These

funds, $3000 from

Foundation, were totally concerned with the construction of the Anangalo

airstrip and were given directly through Pioneer Bible

office in Duncanville, Tx.

1987 Expenses

Translators

mam

Office

255.31

Telephone

0.00

Postage

96.20

Printing

254,10

Publicity

180.32

Salary

10,500.00

Overseas Operating Expenses

11,275.53

Travel

0.00

Furlough

600.00

Insurance (Life)

617.76

Retirement Savings

600.00

Team Ministry

2,862.00

Equiptment

0.00

Medical (eyeglasses)

183.00

Miscellaneous

3,544.00

Airstrip

$1,000.00

FICA

2,241.00

Gifts

295.00

Safty Deposit Box Total Expenses

8.00

$30,967.46

1988 Budget

United States Operations;

Personal:

Salary

$ 1 150

(per month)

Medical

150

Retirement

200

Taxes

380

Children's College Fund

100

Life Insurance sub-total

110

$2,090

Mission:

Office Supplies

10

Professional Expenses

120

Promotional Materials

20

Printing Newsletters

50

Postage

15

Phone

50

Banking Expenses

2

Insurance (Health)

200 (estimate)

Overseas Travel (Savings)

200

Emergency Travel (Savings)

100

Transportation

225

Equiptment and Supplies

20

Furlough Housing

500

Children's Education

(Correspondence)

0

Miscellaneous

10

sub-total

$ 1,522

Papua New Guinea

Mission

200

Personal

5

Team Ministry

424

sub-total

$629

Total

$ 4,446 per month

X 12

$53,352 per year

It should be noted that "dependable monthly giving" was approximately

$1,740, or $20,880 annually. This is important for our

and plans concerning raising our support for returning to Papua New Guinea.

budget planning

Other giving during the year is not scheduled

cannot be

relied on

in our budget plans.

appreciated—it has often come in at just the

and rather uncertain so

That is not to say it is not

right

time and

is always

very much appreciated. You will notice that if we compare the amount we

need monthly with

the

amount we

receive

we

will need

to raise

our

dependable support level by approximately $2650 per month. Currently our ability to raise the funds leaves the bollom line figure rather academic.

The Emergency Travel fund will be built to have an amount

family to

the States from PNG in an

The

sufficient

emergency. That Overseas Travel

to transport the

amount will then be left in savings until needed.

fund can

be

met

by a large gift, unexpected gifts, or left to grow as a

budget item. Once this item is sufficient for round trip fares it will be

considered met until we return to the field. When fares rise or funds are

used money will need to be added

to

this account again.

Those months

where we do not receive enough for the Overseas Travel Fund will need to

be made up in order for us

to be able to return to PNG.