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Northern Mindanao

Regional Development Plan


2011-2016

Published by the
National Economic and Development Authority
Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines

Message

MALACAAN PALACE
Message from the President

I commend the Regional Development Councils and all


stakeholders in the 17 regions for coming together to
formulate your respective Regional Development Plans.
May this partnership among regional and local
institutions, the private sector, and civil society ensure the
continued success of the programs and the distribution of
their benefits throughout the country.
Along with the Philippine Development Plan, the RDPs will
guide our development efforts in the next five years, and
will act as a common road map for our countrys
development and for the establishment of the necessary
infrastructure that will help us achieve our goal of
increasing economic and social opportunities for our
people. Guided by our commitment to the UN Millennium
Development Goals, our concerted efforts will not only
help accelerate economic growth, but will also give our
provinces improved access to quality education, health,
and social services.
We came to government with a mandate to eradicate
poverty and create a better future for our nation. As we
carry out key reforms in the bureaucracy, we also strive to
set in place an environment of sustainable and equitable
progress in the coming years. Together, let us fulfill the
potential of our great nation.

BENIGNO S. AQUINO III


MANILA
May 2011

Message

Message from the Socioeconomic Planning Secretary

NATIONAL ECONOMIC
AND DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
Pasig City
The Regional Development Plans (RDPs) represent the aspirations of
Filipinos in different areas of the country. As accompanying documents of
the Philippine Development Plan (PDP) 2011-2016, the RDPs also provide
the spatial dimension to the national plan by identifying the regions'
contributions to our goal of a high, sustained and broad-based growth. This
"inclusive growth" involves rapid economic expansion that must reach
population groups throughout the country through the provision of
productive employment opportunities, thereby reducing poverty.
The attainment of our goals requires massive investments in infrastructure,
social services and other productive activities. The PDP, along with the RDPs
are the key instruments that will guide the proper and equitable allocation of
resources to ensure improvements in the welfare of our people.
Likewise, our plans shall direct our efforts in protecting the environment,
reducing climate and disaster risks, promoting good governance and
ensuring peace and stability.
The RDPs provide the framework for local development. We thus enjoin the
local government units to align their local plans and programs with the
RDPs. We likewise seek the support of regional institutions and the private
institutions in the realization of the plans which many of them have helped
prepare. We need to strengthen multi-stakeholder cooperation particularly
as we promote public-private partnership to improve the provision of
services for our people.
I thank the Regional Development Councils (RDC) for spearheading the
preparation of the RDPs and we count on their continued leadership in
coordinating development efforts in the regions.

CAYETANO W. PADERANGA, JR.


Secretary of Socioeconomic Planning

ii

Message

Message from the RDC Chairperson

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL


Region X, Cagayan de Oro City

The region is proud to craft another six-year development plan that is


supportive and consistent with the national development objective of
attaining inclusive growth. The Regional Development Plan (RDP, 20112016) spells out the regions contributions towards this development
agenda. The goals and strategies are formulated given the regions
competitive advantages, as well as the countrys economic standing in Asia
and the world at large. It aspires for everyone in the region to participate and
benefit from the fruits of development.
The call for mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change
Adaptation (DRR-CCA), and integration of Human Rights Based Approach
(HRBA) into our development plans is of paramount importance. This DRRCCA and human rights-based enhanced RDP is the regions initial step at
increasing its resiliency to disasters aggravated by climate change, and in
recognizing the rights of every person as a primordial consideration in
development planning.
The RDC as the regional machinery in ensuring the link between national and
regional/local development highlights the role of the LGUs in directly serving
the public while highly recognizes the private sector and the business
community as the engines and sources of growth. It likewise promotes
public-private partnership and nurtures the roles of other stakeholders in
building a future anchored on sustainable development, gender equity and
cultural preservation.
As we are all owners of this plan, we are passing this to everyone who has a
stake in development. The RDC-X therefore enjoins all government and
private sectors and the civil society to actively implement and support the
RDP as the roadmap of development in the region. Let this be our dedication
and our collective response to the Presidents call, Together let us work for a
better and corrupt-free Philippines!

LAWRENCE Ll. CRUZ


Chairperson, RDC-X
Mayor, Iligan City

iii

Foreword
The period 2004-2010 proved the regions resiliency amidst the global economic
slowdown. Anchored on its resource-rich endowments, dynamic human capital and
enabling governance, the region remains the biggest economy in Mindanao and one of
the fastest growing in the country in the past six years.
The formulation of the RDP is anchored on the Presidents development agenda as
contained in his Social Contract with the Filipino People which envisions a country
with an organized and widely shared rapid expansion of our economy through a
government dedicated to honing and mobilizing the peoples skills and energies, as
well as the responsible harnessing of our natural resources.
The plan outlines the major strategic thrusts and priorities which Region X shall
pursue in the next six years (2011-2016) in its bid to become the leading industrial
core and trade center in southern Philippines with dynamic men and women enjoying
equal opportunities in harnessing and sustaining its agriculture and natural resources
in building a decent, harmonious, and safe environment.

NATIONAL
ECONOMIC and
DEVELOPMENT
AUTHORITY
Region X
Cagayan de Oro City
Foreword

The region presents itself as the most competitive, efficient and attractive
transshipment hub and venue for industrial ventures in southern Philippines. In
asserting its role as the major GATEWAY, and industrial core and trade center in the
South, strategic actions shall be pursued along the following areas: Good Governance
and Peace and Order; Access, Logistics and Other Infrastructure Services; Trade,
Industry and Tourism; Environment and Sustainable Development; Well-being and
Improved Welfare; Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry; and Education and Youth
Empowerment.
The plan covers nine major chapters following the GATEWAY (Chapters 2-8).
Chapter 1 presents the Macroeconomic Development Framework which sets the
overall development agenda of the region including the major targets to be attained
during the plan period. Meanwhile, Science and Technology (Chapter 9), as a crosscutting concern, is critical in attaining productivity and competitiveness of the regional
economy.
Our sincerest appreciation and gratitude to those who gave their significant
contributions in coming up with this plan: the regional line agencies, the local
government units, the academe, the private sector and non-government organizations.
Likewise, to the Regional Development Office (RDO) of the NEDA Central Office for
their comments and suggestions, and more importantly, to the men and women of
NEDA Regional Office X for their wits and enthusiasm to produce this plan in a creative
and timely passion.
The challenge remains strong for us to achieve inclusive growth where everyone
participates, contributes and benefits from the fruits of development. It is only
through our collective action in carrying out and monitoring the progress of the plan
can we bequeath a better future to the next generation.

LEON M. DACANAY, JR., CESO III


Regional Director, NEDA-X
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X

iv

Republic of the Philippines

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL


Region 10 (Northern Mindanao)
National Economic and Development Authority
Regional Office 10, corner Capistrano-Echem Streets
9000 Cagayan de Oro City
Tel. No. (8822) 723436, 722168, (088) 8561920

Telefax (8822) 728072

e-mail: nedardc10@norminet.org.ph

Website: www.norminet.org.ph

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL-X


Resolution No. 37 (s. 2010)
APPROVING THE MEDIUM-TERM REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PLAN (MTRDP), 2011-2016 OF NORTHERN MINDANAO
WHEREAS, Memorandum Circular No. 3, signed by the authority of the President directs the formulation
of the Medium Term Philippine Development Plan and Public Investment Program and
accompanying regional development plans;
WHEREAS, for this planning cycle, Sentro ang Tao sa Ating Plano, is the slogan or battlecry that will be
popularized;
WHEREAS, the formulation of the MTRDP is anchored on the Presidents development agenda as
contained in his Social Contract with the Filipino People which envisions a country with an
organized and widely shared rapid expansion of our economy through a government dedicated to
honing and mobilizing the peoples skills and energies, as well as the responsible harnessing of
our natural resources.
WHEREAS, the national development agenda has twin goals of achieving inclusive growth and reducing
poverty with the following objectives during the plan period: 1) attain a sustained and high
economic growth that provides productive employment; 2) equalize access to development
opportunities; and 3) implement effective social safety nets;
WHEREAS, at the regional level, RDC Resolution No. 32, s. 2010 Approving the guidelines and
timelines for the formulation of the Northern Mindanao Medium-Term Regional Development Plan
(MTRDP), 2010-2016 was passed during its August 19, 2010 meeting;
WHEREAS, with the issuance of the said RDC resolution, series of planning consultations were
conducted as follows: a) RDC-X SeCom meetings to validate MTRDP 2004-2009 assessment
and generate inputs for the MTRDP (September 2010); b) RDC X SeCom and TWG MTRDP
planning consultations/workshops (OctoberNovember 2010); c) MTRDP Regional Public
Consultation (November 26, 2010) participated in by more than 100 stakeholders both from the
public and private sector;
WHEREAS, the newly crafted MTRDP outlines the major strategic thrusts and priorities which Region X
shall pursue in the next six years in its bid to become the leading industrial core and trade
center in southern Philippines with dynamic men and women enjoying equal opportunities
in harnessing and sustaining its agriculture and natural resources in building a decent,
harmonious, and safe environment.

RDC-X Resolution No.37 s. 2010

Page 1 of 2

BE IT RESOLVED, AS IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED, on motion duly seconded to approve the


MTRDP, 2011-2016;
RESOLVED FURTHER, that the RDC-X enjoins all development stakeholders, including the
government and private sectors, and the civil society to implement and support the MTRDP as
the roadmap of development in the region;
RESOLVED FINALLY, that copies of this resolution and the MTRDP (final form) be furnished to
the NEDA Central Office, the RDC-X members and other concerned parties for their adoption,
appropriate action and guidance.
Approved, 9 December 2010
87th RDC-X Full Council Meeting
Marco Hotel, Cugman, Cagayan de Oro City
-o0oCertified correct:

ALAN L. OLAVIDES
Secretary, RDC-X
OIC-Assistant Regional Director, NEDA-X

Approved:

LEON M. DACANAY, JR., CESO III


Vice-Chairperson, Regional Development Council (RDC-X)
Regional Director, NEDA-X
(Presiding Officer)

RDC-X Resolution No.37 s. 2010

vi

Page 1 of 2

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Acronyms and Abbreviations

4Ps

Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino


Program

BOMB

Budget Operations Manual for


Barangays

ACT

Action for Conflict Transformation

CAC

A&E

Accreditation and Equivalency

Competency Assessment and


Certification

AAGR

Annual Average Growth Rate

CADT

ADB

Asian Development Bank

Certificates of Ancestral Domain


Title

ADSDPP

Ancestral Domains Sustainable


Development and Protection Plan

CALT

Certificates of Ancestral Land


Title

AEPEP

Annual Environment Protection


and Enhancement Program

CARP

Comprehensive Agrarian Reform


Program

AFP

Armed Forces of the Philippines

CBFM

Community Based Forest


Management

AFTA

ASEAN Free Trade Area

CBMS

ALS

Alternative Learning System

Community Based Management


System

ARBs

Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries

CDA

ARCs

Agrarian Reform Communities

Cooperative Development
Authority

AROGA

Association of Resident
Ombudsman in Government
Agencies

CDO

Cagayan de Oro City

CDP

Comprehensive Development
Plan

ARTA

Anti-Red Tape Act

CDS

Corridor Development Strategy

ASEAN

Association of Southeast Asian


Nation

CENRO

Community Environment and


Natural Resource Officer

ASM

Advocacy and Social Mobilization

CEO

Career Executive Officer

ASTI

Advance Science and Technology


Institute

CFC-GK

Couples for ChristGawad


Kalinga

AusAID

Australian Agency for


International Development

CHDNM

Center for Health Development in


Northern Mindanao

BDCC

Barangay Disaster Coordinating


Council

CHEd

Commission on Higher Education

CHR

Commission on Human Rights

BFAR

Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic


Resources

CIC

Cagayan de Oro-Iligan Corridor

BFAD

Bureau of Food and Drugs

CIDSS

Comprehensive and Integrated


Delivery of Social Services

BFP

Bureau of Fire Protection

CIPs

Communal Irrigation Projects

BLGF

Bureau of Local Government


Finance

CIS

Communal Irrigation System

BLP

Basic Literacy Program

CLASP

Community Land Acquisition


Support Program

BnB

Botika ng Barangay

CLOA

BNR

Business Name Registration

Certificate of Land Ownership


Award

vii

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

viii

CLUP

Comprehensive Land Use Plan

DOTS

Directly Observed Treatment


Short Courses

CMP

Community Mortgage Program

CMTS

Cellular Mobile
Telecommunication Service

DPWH

Department of Public Works and


Highways

CNC

Certificate of Non-Coverage

DRR/CCA

COA

Commission on Audit

Disaster Risk Reduction/ Climate


Change Adaptation

COD

Center of Development

DRRM

Disaster Risk Reduction and


Management

CODI

Committee on Decorum and


Investigation

DSWD

Department of Social Welfare and


Development

COE

Center of Excellence

DTI

Department of Trade and Industry

CPR

Contraceptive Prevalence Rate

EAB

Equitable Access and Benefits

CRM

Coastal Resource Management

ECA

Environmental Critical Area

CSC

Civil Service Commission

ECC

CSCAAP

Civil Service Commission Agency


Accreditation Program

Environmental Compliance
Certificate

EDCF

CSE

Crime Solution Efficiency

Economic Development
Corporation Fund

CSNs

Children with Special Needs

EFA

Education for All

CSO

Civil Society Organization

EHLP

Expanded Housing Loan Program

CSR

Cohort Survival Rate

EIA

CTNI

Claveria Tree Nursery


Improvement

Environmental Impact
Assessment

ELA

Executive Legislative Agenda

DA

Department of Agriculture

EMB

DAR

Department of Agrarian Reform

Environmental Management
Bureau

DBM

Department of Budget and


Management

E-NGAS

Electronic New Government


Accounting System

DBP

Development Bank of the


Philippines

EPEP

Environmental Protection and


Enhancement Program

DENR

Department of Environment and


Natural Resources

EPIRA

Electric Power Industry Reform


Act

DILG

Department of Interior and Local


Government

EPP

Export Pathways Program

EI

Emotional Intelligence

DOH

Department of Health

ERDS

DOJ

Department of Justice

Economic Rural Development


Society

DOLE

Department of Labor and


Employment

ERPAT

Empowerment and Reaffirmation


of Paternal Abilities

DOST

Department of Science and


Technology

E-SRE

Electronic Statement of Receipts


and Expenditures

DOT

Department of Tourism

Acronyms and Abbreviations

ETEEAP

Expanded Tertiary Education


Equivalency and Accreditation
Program

HDMF

Home Development Mutual Fund

HE

Higher Education

HEIs

Higher Education Institutions

HLURB

Housing and Land Use Regulatory


Board

HRBA

Human Rights Based Approach

HRH

Human Resources for Health

HUDCC

Housing and Urban Development


Coordinating Council

HVCC

High Value Commercial Crops

HWG

Hazardous Waste Generators

IACPSP

Integrated Area Community


Public Safety Plan

ICCs

Indigenous Cultural Communities

ICM

Integrated Coastal Management

ICSG

Industry Cluster Support Group

ICT

Information Communication
Technology

EWP

Environmental Waste Program

FIDA

Fiber Industry Development


Authority

FLW

Fuel, Light and Water

FMR

Financial Management
Regulation

FMR

Farm-to-Market Roads

FMRDP

Final Mine Rehabilitation and


Development Plan

FPA

Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority

FPP

Family Planning Program

FSP

Food for School Program

FTE

Full-time Equivalent

GAD

Gender and Development

GAP

Good Agricultural Practices

GHG

Greenhouse Gas

IDP

Internally Displaced Persons

GIS

Geographic Information System

IEC

GMAC

Gabay sa Mamamayan Action


Center

Information Education and


Communication

IHKP

GOCCs

Government Owned and


Controlled Corporation

Indigenous Health Knowledge


Practice

IIS

Integrated Information System

GPRA

Government Procurement Reform


Act

IKSP

Indigenous Knowledge System


and Practice

GRDP

Gross Regional Domestic Product

InfRES

GREET

Grassroots Enterprises and


Employment in Tourism

Infrastructure for Rural


Enhancement Sector

IPCC

Government of the Republic of


the Philippines-Rebolusyonaryong
Partido ng Manggagawa ng
Mindanao

Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change

IPs

Indigenous Peoples

IQuAME

GSIS

Government Service Insurance


System

Institutional Monitoring and


Evaluation for Quality Assurance

IRA

Internal Revenue Allotment

GVA

Gross Value Added

ISO

HCP

Health Care Providers

International Standard
Organization

HDI

Human Development Index

IVAS

Investigation Verification and


Approval of Survey

HDM

Highway Development
Management

GRP-RPMM

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

JBIC

Japan Bank for International


Cooperation

MDG

Millennium Development Goals

MES

Modularized Education System

JMC

Joint Memorandum Circular

MGB

Mines and Geosciences Bureau

KALAHI

Kapit Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan

MHC

Municipal Health Center

KBP

Kalayaan Barangays Program

MICE

LBP

Land Bank of the Philippines

Meetings Incentives Convention


and Exhibition

LBW

Low Birth Weight

MILF

Moro Islamic Liberation Front

LCE

Local Chief Executive

MinDA

Mindanao Development Authority

LDN

Lanao del Norte

MISS

LDRRMC

Local Disaster Risk Reduction &


Management Council

Malaybalay Integrated Survey


System

MLE

Multi-lingual Education

MMR

Maternal Mortality Rate

MNCIADP

Mindanao North Coast Integrated


Area Development Program

LEAD

Livelihood Enhancement and


Agricultural Development

LEP

Ladderized Education Program

LGA

Local Government Academy

MOA

Memorandum of Agreement

LGC

Local Government Code

MOEP

Mineral Ore Export Permit

LGPMS

Local Government Performance


Management System

MPS

Mean Percentage Scores

MRDP

Mindanao Rural Development


Program

LGU

Local Government Unit

LHB

Local Housing Board

MRF

Materials Recovery Facilities

LMIS

Labor Market Information System

MSME

LPMC

Local Project Monitoring


Committee

Micro, Small and Medium


Enterprise

MSP

Merit Selection Plan

LRA

Land Registration Authority

MSU-IIT

LSB

Local School Board

Mindanao State University


Iligan Institute of Technology

LTAP

Land Tenurial Assistance


Program

MUST

Mindanao University of Science


and Technology

LTI

Land Tenure Improvement

NAPC

National Anti-Poverty Commission

LTIA

Lupong Tagapamayapa Incentive


Award

NAPOLCOM

National Police Commission

NAT

National Achievement Test

Land Tenure ImprovementProject Beneficiaries


Development

NBI

National Bureau of Investigation

NCAA

National Collegiate Athletic


Association

LTO

Land Transportation Office

NCC

National Computer Center

LWUA

Local Water Utilities


Administration

NCIP

National Commission on
Indigenous Peoples

M&E

Monitoring and Evaluation

NCMF

MCP

Maternity Care Package

National Commission on Muslim


Filipinos

MCT

Mindanao Container Terminal

NCR

National Capital Region

LTI-PBD

Acronyms and Abbreviations

NDA

National Dairy Authority

OPIF

NDHS

National Demographic Health


Survey

Organizational Performance
Indicator Framework

OPT

Operation Timbang

OSCA

Office for Senior Citizens Affairs

OSHC

Occupational Safety and Health


Center

OSY

Out of School Youth

OSYDP

Out-of-School Youth Development


Program

NEDA

National Economic and


Development Authority

NFP

Natural Family Planning

NGO/PO

Non-government Organization/
Peoples Organization

NHA

National Housing Authority

NHTS-PR

National Household Targeting


System for Poverty Reduction

OTOP

One Town One Product

OTP

Ore Transport Permit

NIPAS

National Integrated Protected


Areas System

OWWA

Overseas Workers Welfare


Administration

NIS

National Irrigation System

PACD

NISGP

National Integration Study Grant


Program

Public Assistance and Complaints


Desk

PAGASA

NMIS

National Meat Inspection Service

NNC

National Nutrition Council

Philippine Atmospheric
Geophysical and Astronomical
Services Administration

NorMinCoHRD

Northern Mindanao Consortium


for Health Research and
Development

PAMANA

Payapa at Masaganang
Pamayanan

PAWCZMS

Protected Areas, Wildlife and


Coastal Zone Management
Service

NOVs

Notice of Violations

NSCB

National Statistical Coordination


Board

PBD

NSLE

National Summit on Labor and


Employment

Program Beneficiaries
Development

PCC

Philippine Carabao Center

NSO

National Statistics Office

PCUP

NSSP

National Sustainable Sanitation


Program

Presidential Commission for the


Urban Poor

PDAO

NTP

National Tuberculosis Program

Persons with Disability Affairs


Office

NYC

National Youth Commission

PDC

Peace and Development


Communities

NZAID

New Zealand Agency For


International Development

PDCC

Provincial Disaster Coordinating


Council

OBO

Overseas Buildings Operations

PDEA

OCD

Office of Civil Defense

Philippine Drug Enforcement


Agency

ODA

Official Development Assistance

PDS

Polycentric Development Strategy

OFWs

Overseas Filipino Workers

PENRO

OPDES

Office of Public Defense Services

Provincial Environment and


Natural Resource Officer

OPES

Office Performance Evaluation


System

PES

Payments for Environmental


Services

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

PESFA

Private Education Student


Financial Assistance

PPMD

Public-Private Mixed DOTS

PPP

Public and Private Partnership

PESO

Public Employment Service Office

PR

Participation Rate

PETCs

Private Emission Testing Centers

PRC

PEZA

Philippine Economic Zone


Authority

Professional Regulation
Commission

PRMF

Pangulong Gloria Scholarships/


President Gloria Macapagal
Arroyo

Provincial Road and Management


Facility

PSAE

Poverty Small Area Estimates

PHDR

Philippine Human Development


Report

PWDs

Persons with Disabilities

PYA

Pag-Asa Youth Association

PhilCAT

Philippine Coalition Against


Tuberculosis

RA

Republic Act

RDC

Regional Development Council

PGS/PGMA

xii

PhilHealth

Philippine Health Insurance


Corporation

RDCC

Regional Disaster and


Coordinating Council

PHIVIDEC

Philippine Veterans Industrial


Development Corporation

RDP

Regional Development Plan

RDRRMC

PHIVOLCS

Philippine Institute of Volcanology


and Seismology

Regional Disaster Risk Reduction


Management Council

REB

Reaching Every Barangay

RECs

Regional Ecology Centers

REMM

Results, Evaluation, and


Monitoring Matrix

RHU

Rural Health Unit

RLGRC

Regional Local Governance


Resource Center

RLUC

Regional Land Use Committee

RP

Responsible Parenting

RPFP

Regional Physical Framework


Plan

RPMES

Regional Project Monitoring and


Evaluation System

RPOC

Recruit Petty Officer In Charge

RRCY

Regional Rehabilitation Center for


Youth

RSCC

Reception and Study Center for


Children

RSET

Regional Social Economic Trends

RSTL

Regional Standard and Testing


Laboratories

RTC

Regional Tourism Council

PICE

Philippine Institute of Civil


Engineers

PLPEM

Provincial and Local Planning and


Expenditure Management

PMS-OPES

Performance Management
System-Office Performance
Evaluation System

PMT

Proxy Means Test

PNP

Philippine National Police

PNQF

Philippine National Qualification


Framework

PNVSCA

Philippine National Volunteer


Service Coordinating Agency

PO

Peoples Organization

POC

Peace and Order Council

POPCOM

Population Commission

PopDev

Population & Development


Program

PPA

Philippine Ports Authority

PPAN

Philippine Plan of Action for


Nutrition

Acronyms and Abbreviations

RTESD

Regional Technical Education and


Skills Development Committee

SUCs

State Universities and Colleges

TBDOTS

Tuberculosis Directly Observed


Treatment Short Courses

RTIPC

Regional Tripartite Industrial


Peace Council

TBI

Technology Business Incubation

SDC

Spatial Development Cluster

TESDA

SDMP

Social Development and


Management Program

Technical Education and Skills


Development Authority

THQ

Teens Healthquarters

SEA-K

Self-Employment Assistance
Kaunlaran

TR

Training Regulation

SEF

Special Education Fund

TVET

Technical Vocational Education


and Training

SET-UP

Small Enterprise Technology


Upgrading

TVIs

Technical-Vocational Institutions

SHFC

Social Housing Finance


Corporation

TWSP

Training for Work Scholarship


Program

SK

Sangguniang Kabataan

UBOM

Updated Budget Operations


Manual

SLF

Sanitary Land Fill

UDHA

SLGPR

State of Local Governance


Performance Report

Urban Development and Housing


Act

UNDP

United Nations Development


Programme

UNGPID

United Nation Guiding Principles


on Internal Displacement

SNAP

Strategic National Action Plan

SP

Special Program

SPED

Special Education Program

SRES

Special Report on Emission


Scenarios

WCCD

Women and Children Concern


Desk

SEGEAP

Selected Ethnic Group


Educational Assistance Program

WQMA

Water Quality Management Area

YAFSS

Young Adult Fertility and Sexuality


Study

Y4SC

Youth Profiling for Starring Career

SSP-IEP
SSS

State Scholarship Program for


Indigenous People
Social Security System

xiii

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

xiv

Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Message from the President .................................................................................................................................... i
Message from the Socioeconomic Planning Secretary ........................................................................................... ii
Message from the RDC Chairperson ...................................................................................................................... iii
Foreword ................................................................................................................................................................. iv
RDC Resolution Approving the RDP 2011-2016.................................................................................................... v
Acronyms and Abbreviations ..................................................................................................................................vii
Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................................... xv
List of Tables .......................................................................................................................................................... xx
List of Figures ........................................................................................................................................................ xxi
List of Maps ........................................................................................................................................................... xxi

Chapter 1: Macroeconomic Development Framework

I.
II.
III.

ADMINISTRATIVE JURISDICTION ............................................................................................................. 1


POPULATION ......................................................................................................................................... 1
REGIONAL ECONOMY ............................................................................................................................ 1
Economic Performance ................................................................................................................................... 1
Poverty Incidence, Family Income and Income Inequity ................................................................................ 5
Labor Force and Employment ......................................................................................................................... 9
Progress towards the MDGs ........................................................................................................................ 10
Vulnerability of Region X to Disasters .......................................................................................................... 12
Number of Natural Disasters .................................................................................................................. 12
Affected Families/Persons ..................................................................................................................... 13
Economic Damage .................................................................................................................................. 14
IV. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES ................................................................................................................ 15
V. DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES ............................................................................................................. 15
VI. GUIDING PRINCIPLES ......................................................................................................................... 16
VII. DEVELOPMENT AGENDA..................................................................................................................... 16
National Development Agenda .................................................................................................................... 16
Regional Development Vision and Agenda.................................................................................................. 16
VIII. SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT DIRECTIONS.................................................................................................. 17
Spatial Development Clusters (SDCs) ......................................................................................................... 17
SDC 1: Realizing the Cagayan-Iligan Industrial and Trade Corridor ....................................................... 17
SDC2: Capitalizing on the Agri-Fishery and Eco-Cultural Tourism Endowments of Lanao del Norte and
Misamis Occidental................................................................................................................... 17
SDC3: Boosting Agri-business Ventures and Eco-Tourism in Bukidnon................................................. 17
SDC4: Harnessing the Gingoog-Camiguin Tourism Adventure Loop ...................................................... 21
IX. DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK ............................................................................................................. 21
X. MACROECONOMIC TARGETS .............................................................................................................. 22
Economic Growth ......................................................................................................................................... 22
Poverty Reduction ........................................................................................................................................ 22
Family Income and Savings ......................................................................................................................... 23
Employment ................................................................................................................................................. 23
Managing Population Growth ...................................................................................................................... 23

xv

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Chapter 2: Good Governance and Peace and Order


I.

II.

III.

ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES ........................................................................................................ 25


Good Governance .........................................................................................................................................25
Functionality and Effectiveness of Government Structures, Procedures, and Frontline Services .........25
Professionalizing the Civil Service ...........................................................................................................26
Improving Government Discipline, Efficiency and Equity in Managing Resources ................................. 26
Development Finance.............................................................................................................................. 27
Gender and Development Mainstreaming .............................................................................................. 31
Disaster Preparedness and Response ....................................................................................................32
Peace and Order and Public Safety ..............................................................................................................33
Crime Management ................................................................................................................................. 34
Pursuit for Lasting Peace ........................................................................................................................35
Disposition of Justice ............................................................................................................................... 36
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK .................................................................................................................... 37
Governance ...................................................................................................................................................37
Improve government procedures and develop human resource to reduce occasions for corruption and
bring violators to justice ............................................................................................................37
Strengthen democratic processes thru continuing education, inclusive participation, cooperativism,
and volunteerism .......................................................................................................................37
Ensure mainstreaming of the following in various development planning processes: Gender and
Development, Population and Development, Human Rights Based Approach, Disaster Risk
Reduction/Climate Change Adaptation and Sustainable Development Concepts ...................38
Improve taxation and fiscal management ............................................................................................... 38
Improve local investment programming through the PLPEM guidelines and the Joint Memorandum
Circular No. 1, s. 2007 on the Guidelines on the Harmonization of Local Planning, Investment
Programming, Revenue Administration, Budgeting and Expenditure Management ...............39
Improve the effectiveness and targeting of social safety nets ............................................................... 39
Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) ...............................................................................39
Peace and Order and Public Safety ..............................................................................................................40
Basic services and economic reconstruction ..........................................................................................40
Security sector reform ............................................................................................................................. 41
Good Governance ....................................................................................................................................42
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ................................................................................ 43

Chapter 3: Access, Logistics, and Other Infrastructure Services


I.

II.
III.

xvi

25

59

ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES ........................................................................................................ 59


Transportation ..............................................................................................................................................59
Power and Electrification .............................................................................................................................. 60
Communications ...........................................................................................................................................62
Water Resources Development ....................................................................................................................63
Social Infrastructure .....................................................................................................................................65
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK .................................................................................................................... 65
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ................................................................................ 67

Contents

Chapter 4: Trade, Industry and Tourism


I.

II.

III.

ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES........................................................................................................ 79


Investments and Entrepreneurship Development ...................................................................................... 79
Exports Development and Promotion .......................................................................................................... 80
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ................................................................................................................... 83
Investments and Entrepreneurship Development ...................................................................................... 84
Investments Promotion and Facilitation ................................................................................................. 84
Enhancing the Operations of MSMEs ..................................................................................................... 84
Supporting the Growth of Priority Industries .......................................................................................... 86
Improving the operational environment for MSMEs .............................................................................. 86
Exports Development and Promotion .......................................................................................................... 86
Tourism Development .................................................................................................................................. 87
Strengthen the tourism hub concept...................................................................................................... 87
Entice private sector investments in tourism-related facilities and activities ........................................ 88
Reinforce licensing and accreditation of tourism facilities and services groups ................................... 88
Ensure quality service providers in the Laguindingan Airport ................................................................ 88
Pursue collaborative partnerships in planning and promoting tourism investments and destinations 88
Promote affordable and standard tourism complementary products and services .............................. 88
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ............................................................................... 90

Chapter 5: Environment and Sustainable Development


I.

II.
III.

IV.

103

ASSESSMENT OF PERFORMANCE ..................................................................................................... 103


Forest Resources Management ................................................................................................................ 103
Forestland Vegetative Cover and Protected Areas ............................................................................... 103
Watershed Management ........................................................................................................................... 103
Land Management ..................................................................................................................................... 104
Ecological Solid Waste and Air Quality Management ................................................................................ 104
Freshwater, Marine, and Coastal Waters .................................................................................................. 104
Mineral Development and Geohazard Mapping ........................................................................................ 105
CHALLENGES ................................................................................................................................... 105
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ................................................................................................................. 111
Forest/Upland Ecosystem ......................................................................................................................... 111
Agriculture/Lowland Ecosystem ................................................................................................................ 112
Urban Ecosystem ....................................................................................................................................... 112
Freshwater, Coastal and Marine Ecosystem ............................................................................................. 113
Biodiversity ................................................................................................................................................. 113
Minerals/Mining Development .................................................................................................................. 114
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) System ...................................................................................... 114
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ............................................................................. 115

Chapter 6: Well-being and Improved Welfare


I.

79

129

ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES...................................................................................................... 129


Health and Nutrition .................................................................................................................................. 129
Housing ...................................................................................................................................................... 131
Housing Affordability and Delivery ........................................................................................................ 131

xvii

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

II.

Sustainable Communities .................................................................................................................... 132


Social Protection ................................................................................................................................... 133
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ..................................................................................................................134
Health and Nutrition .................................................................................................................................. 135
Housing ...................................................................................................................................................... 136
Housing Affordability and Security of Tenure ....................................................................................... 137
Sustainable Communities .................................................................................................................... 137
Legislative and Research Agenda ........................................................................................................ 137
Social Protection ........................................................................................................................................ 138

Chapter 7: Agriculture and Fishery


I.

II.

III.

ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES ......................................................................................................161


Crops Development ................................................................................................................................... 162
Rice .............................................................................................................................................. 162
Corn. ........................................................................................................................................ 163
Fruits and Vegetables ........................................................................................................................... 163
Industrial Crops .................................................................................................................................... 163
Livestock and Poultry Development .......................................................................................................... 164
Fishery Development ................................................................................................................................. 165
Irrigation and Other Infrastructure Support ............................................................................................... 165
Agricultural Livelihood Projects ................................................................................................................. 165
Agrarian Reform ......................................................................................................................................... 166
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ..................................................................................................................167
Crops Development ................................................................................................................................... 169
Livestock and Poultry Development .......................................................................................................... 169
Fishery Development ................................................................................................................................. 170
Irrigation and Other Infrastructure Support ............................................................................................... 170
Agricultural Livelihood Projects ................................................................................................................. 170
Agrarian Reform ......................................................................................................................................... 170
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ..............................................................................172

Chapter 8: Education and Youth Empowerment


I.

II.

xviii

161

179

ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES ......................................................................................................179


Early Childhood and Basic Education ........................................................................................................ 179
Access and Equity ................................................................................................................................. 179
Efficiency .............................................................................................................................................. 180
Quality.. .................................................................................... .181
Technical Vocational Education and Training ........................................................................................... 182
Higher Education ....................................................................................................................................... 183
Quality and Excellence.......................................................................................................................... 183
Relevance and Responsiveness........................................................................................................... 184
Access and Equity ................................................................................................................................. 184
Efficiency and Effectiveness ................................................................................................................. 185
Youth Empowerment ................................................................................................................................. 185
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ..................................................................................................................186
Basic Education ......................................................................................................................................... 186

Contents

III.

Access and Equity ................................................................................................................................. 187


Efficiency ............................................................................................................................................... 187
Quality ............................................................................................................................................. 187
Technical Vocational Education and Training ............................................................................................ 188
Higher Education ....................................................................................................................................... 190
Quality and Excellence .......................................................................................................................... 190
Relevance and Responsiveness ........................................................................................................... 191
Access and Equity ................................................................................................................................. 191
Efficiency and Effectiveness ................................................................................................................. 191
Youth Empowerment ................................................................................................................................. 191
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ............................................................................. 192

Chapter 9: Science and Technology


I.

II.
III.

209

ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES...................................................................................................... 209


Inadequate S&T Human Resource Capability Building ............................................................................. 210
Underinvestment in R&D and Underutilization of Its funds ...................................................................... 210
Low Share in the Number of Internationally Recognized Research Publications ..................................... 211
Slow Adoption of Commercially-Ready Technologies ................................................................................ 211
The Need to Address Concerns on Improving Competitiveness and Resiliency of the Regional Economy in
the Face of Globalization and Climate Change .................................................................................... 211
The Need to Establish S&T Infrastructure and Facilities ........................................................................... 211
The Need to Widen Dissemination of and Popularize S&T Knowledge and Information .......................... 212
STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ................................................................................................................. 212
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ............................................................................. 214

Annex 1: Key Employment Generators (KEGs)

219

Annex 2: State Universities and Colleges

220

I.

II.

STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK ................................................................................................................. 220


Quality and Excellence .......................................................................................................................... 220
Relevance and Responsiveness ........................................................................................................... 220
Access and Equity ................................................................................................................................. 220
Efficiency and Effectiveness ................................................................................................................. 220
RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING MATRIX ............................................................................. 221

xix

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

List of Tables

List of Tables
Table 1.
Table 2.
Table 3.
Table 4.
Table 5.
Table 6.
Table 7.
Table 8.
Table 9.
Table 10.
Table 11.
Table 12.
Table 13.
Table 14.
Table 15.
Table 16.
Table 17.
Table 18.
Table 19.
Table 20.
Table 21.
Table 22.
Table 23.
Table 24.
Table 25.
Table 26.
Table 27.
Table 28.
Table 29.
Table 30.
Table 31.

xx

Gross Regional Domestic Product (GRDP), 2004 to 2009 Level and


Average Annual Growth Rate, At Constant Prices: 1985=100; (Value in Billion Pesos) ..................... 2
GRDP (at Constant Prices, 1985=100) Growth Targets and Actual
by Industry Group, Region X: 2004-2009 (in percent)......................................................................... 2
Annual Per Capita Poverty Threshold, Poverty Incidence Among Families and
Magnitude of Poor Families, by Province, Region X: 2006 and 2009 ................................................. 5
Annual Per Capita Food Threshold, Subsistence Incidence Among Families and
Magnitude of Subsistence Poor Families, by Province, Region X: 2006 and 2009 ........................... 7
Comparative Average Annual Family Income
Mindanao Regions: 2000, 2003 & 2006 (in Pesos) ........................................................................... 7
Average Annual Family Savings Mindanao Regions: 2000, 2003 & 2006 ........................................ 8
Gini Coefficients Philippines and Mindanao Regions: 2003 & 2006 ................................................ 8
Labor Force and Employment Region X: October 2005-2009 ........................................................... 9
Pace of Progress in terms of Attaining the MDG Targets, Region X ..................................................10
Number of Affected Families and Persons
by Type of Natural Disaster, Region X: 20042009 ..........................................................................13
Number of Lives Lost by Type of Natural Disaster, Region X: 20042009...................................... 14
Estimated Cost of Damage by Type of Natural Disaster, Region X: 20042009 ............................. 14
Economic Growth Targets Region X, 2010-2016 (in percent) ........................................................... 22
Poverty Reduction Targets Region X: 2015 (in percent) ....................................................................23
Summary of Internal Revenue Collections
by Type of Tax Region X: 2004-2009 (in million pesos) ....................................................................27
Customs Collections Performance Region X: 2004-2009 (in million pesos) ...................................28
Share of IRA and Income from Local Sources
to Total LGU Income Region X: 2004-2009 ......................................................................................28
Total LGU Income from Local Sources Region X: 2004-2009 (in thousand pesos) ..........................28
Selected Data on Cooperatives Region X: 2004-2006 & 2008 .......................................................29
Crime Statistics Region X : 2004-2008 ............................................................................................. 34
Early Recovery and Rehabilitation Projects for
Internally Displaced Persons (as of May 2010) ................................................................................36
Roads and Bridges Length Inventory Region X:
As of 31 December 2009 (In kilometers) ..........................................................................................59
Tourist Arrivals Region X: 2004-2009 ............................................................................................... 81
Issues and Challenges Confronting Region X Tourism Hubs ............................................................. 83
Priority Investment Areas Region X ....................................................................................................89
Targets on Investment Levels, MSMEs Developed and Assisted, and
Value of Exports and Tourist Arrivals Region X, 2011-2016 ............................................................. 89
Projected Global Average Surface Warming and Sea Level Rise
at the End of the 21st Century by SRES Scenarios ........................................................................ 109
Estimated Risks in the Philippines Due to Temperature Increase and
Rainfall Changes and Tropical Cyclones in 2020 ........................................................................... 110
Estimated Risks in the Philippines Due to Temperature Increase and
Rainfall Changes in 2050 ............................................................................................................... 110
Health Indicators vs. Targets Region X: 2004-2009 ..................................................................... 129
Targets and Accomplishments on Housing Production January 2004 June 2010 .................... 132

Contents

Table 32.
Table 33.
Table 34.
Table 35.
Table 36.
Table 37.
Table 38.
Table 39.
Table 40.
Table 41.

Targets of Vital Health and Nutrition Indicators .............................................................................. 136


Projected Housing Needs by Province and Key City........................................................................ 137
Agricultural Production, Region X: 2004-2009 (in thousand metric tons) ..................................... 161
Value of Agricultural Production Region X: 2004-2009 (in million Pesos) .................................... 162
Gap Between Region X Productivity and the Potential Productivity
based on ASEAN Countries ............................................................................................................. 162
Land Tenure Improvement (CARP) Region X: 2004-2009 .............................................................. 166
Agrarian Justice Delivery (CARP) Region X: 2004 - 2009 ............................................................... 167
Status of Organization in the ARCs Region X, As of June 2009 ..................................................... 167
Agriculture and Fishery Targets Region X: 2011-2016 .................................................................. 171
Basic Education Targets Region X: SY 2011-2012 to SY 2015-2016 ........................................... 188
List of Figures

List of Figures
Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 5.
Figure 6.
Figure 7.
Figure 8.
Figure 9.
Figure 10.
Figure 11.
Figure 12.

GRDP Share by Industry Group Region X: 2004-2009 ........................................................................ 2


Human Development Index by Province, Region X: 2003 & 2006 .................................................... 8
Number of Natural Disaster Events by Type Region X: 20042009 ............................................... 13
Distribution of Estimated Cost of Damage by Type of Disaster, Region X: 20042009 ................ 14
RDP, 2011-2016 Framework of Northern Mindanao ....................................................................... 21
LGU Income by Source (Target and Actual) Region X: 2004-2009 (in pesos) ................................ 29
Container Traffic (in TEUs) Mindanao Container Terminal, PHIVIDEC .............................................. 60
Distribution and Classification of Airports ......................................................................................... 60
Level of Irrigation Development Region X: As of December 2009 .................................................. 63
Proportion of Households By level of Water Supply Region 10, 2008 .......................................... 63
Number of Classrooms Constructed Region X: 2004-2009 ............................................................. 65
Convergence Framework for Poverty Reduction ............................................................................ 138
List of Maps

List of Maps
Map 1.
Map 2.
Map 3.
Map 4.
Map 5.
Map 6.
Map 7.
Map 8.
Map 9.
Map 10.
Map 11.
Map 12.
Map 13.
Map 14.

Population Distribution, 2007 .............................................................................................................. 3


Population Density, 2007..................................................................................................................... 4
Poverty Incidence, 2003 ...................................................................................................................... 6
Polycentric Development Strategy .................................................................................................... 18
Corridor Development Strategy ......................................................................................................... 19
Strategic Development Clusters ........................................................................................................ 20
Income Classification by Municipality, 2008 .................................................................................... 30
Power and Transmission Lines .......................................................................................................... 61
Households with Access to Potable Water ........................................................................................ 64
Tourism Hubs and Ecotourism Sites ................................................................................................. 82
Economic Zones ................................................................................................................................ 85
Potential Geohazard Types and Distribution in Region 10 ............................................................. 106
Biodiversity ...................................................................................................................................... 107
Strategic Agricultural and Fishery Development Zones .................................................................. 168

xxi

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

xxii

Chapter 1: Macroeconomic Development


Framework
I. ADMINISTRATIVE JURISDICTION
Northern Mindanao (Region X) comprises the five provinces of Bukidnon, Camiguin, Lanao del Norte,
Misamis Occidental and Misamis Oriental. It has two highly urbanized cities (Cagayan de Oro and
Iligan) and six component cities (Gingoog, Malaybalay, Valencia, Ozamiz, Oroquieta and Tangub). It
has a total of 85 municipalities and 2,022 barangays with 13 congressional districts.

II. POPULATION
As of 2007 Census, the total population in the region reached 3,952,437, which is about 18.3 and
4.5 percent that of Mindanao and the Philippines, respectively. Over the past Censal years, the
region posted a downtrend in population growth, except for Lanao del Norte and the cities of
Cagayan de Oro, Iligan, Malaybalay, and Tangub. The 1.67 percent average annual growth rate
(AAGR) between 2000 and 2007 is the second lowest in Mindanao, next to the Caraga region. With
a constant AAGR, the region is projected to double its population in 41 years. Over the planning
period, the regions total population could reach over 4.2 million in 2011 and over 4.5 million in
2016.

III. REGIONAL ECONOMY


Economic Performance
Northern Mindanao is the biggest regional economy in Mindanao. In the previous plan period, its
share to the islands gross regional domestic product (GRDP) increased from 27.2 percent in 2004
to 28.1 percent in 2009. The region maintained a higher GRDP annual growth rate than that of
Mindanao regions and the countrys average. The regions growth rate was well within the target
except for 2009 which was the height of the global financial crisis when its GRDP growth was
overtaken by Regions IX and XI. With a GRDP of PhP73.207 billion in 2009 (at constant 1985
prices), the region has the third highest per capita GRDP nationwide, next to the NCR and CAR.
While the region is experiencing a gradual economic transformation from a traditionally agricultureled to being more of a services and industry-oriented economy, during the times of economic crisis, it
is the agriculture sector which provides the needed growth. In 2008, when the national domestic
economy grew by only 3.7 percent, the regions GRDP grew by 5.2 percent, the highest in the
country, courtesy of the 3.1 percentage points contribution by the agriculture sector as the industry
and services sectors provided only 1.3 and 0.8 percentage points, respectively. In the following year,
realizing a growth of only 2.9 percent, the agriculture sector again provided the biggest source of
growth with 1.3 percentage points while the industry and service sectors contributed 0.9 and 0.6
percentage points, respectively. Thus, during the crisis years, the agriculture sector gained in terms
of relative contribution to GRDP. While the services sector was still the biggest contributor with a
share of 38 percent, the agriculture sector dislodged the industry sector gaining 1.2 percentage
points over the period while the latter declined by 0.6 percentage points.

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Table 1. Gross Regional Domestic Product (GRDP), 2004 to 2009 Level and Average Annual Growth
Rate, At Constant Prices: 1985=100; (Value in Billion Pesos)
Area
Philippines (GDP)
Mindanao
Region IX
Region X
Region XI
Region XII
Caraga
ARMM
Rest of the Philippines

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

AAGR (%)

1,152.17

1,209.47

1,276.87

1,366.50

1,417.09

1,432.12

4.45

205.50
29.90
56.00
53.19
40.94
14.98
10.48
946.67

214.30
32.05
58.14
55.84
41.87
15.51
10.89
995.18

225.72
32.67
62.65
57.86
44.73
16.52
11.29
1,051.16

241.82
35.05
67.60
61.68
47.72
17.92
11.9
1,124.67

251.29
35.76
71.13
63.93
49.9
18.47
12.1
1,165.80

260.71
38.2
73.21
67.37
50.56
18.96
12.41
1,171.41

4.87
5.02
5.4
4.84
4.31
4.82
3.44
4.35

Source: NSCB-X

Figure 1. GRDP Share by Industry Group


Region X: 2004-2009

Source: NSCB-X

during the times


of economic crisis, it
is the agriculture
sector which
provides the needed
growth.

Table 2. GRDP (at Constant Prices, 1985=100) Growth Targets


and Actual by Industry Group, Region X: 2004-2009 (in percent)
Industry
20042005Group
2005
2006
AGRI, FORESTRY, FISHERY
Target
4.5
4.5
Actual
4.4
5.6
INDUSTRY
Target
6.4
6.8
Actual
2.0
7.3
SERVICES
Target
6.5
6.9
Actual
6.3
7.7
GRDP
Target
5.9
6.1
Actual
4.4
6.9
Source: NSCB-X

20062007

20072008

20082009

AAGR
(%)

4.6
6.3

6.8
10.5

6.8
4.2

5.4
6.2

6.9
8.6

6.9
4.1

6.9
3.1

6.8
5.0

7.0
8.1

7.1
2.1

7.3
1.7

7.0
5.2

6.2
7.7

6.9
5.2

7
2.9

6.4
5.4

Macroeconomic Development Framework

Poverty Incidence, Family Income and Income Inequity


Despite the high economic growth realized over the immediate past period, poverty incidence is still
high in the region.
Efforts in combating poverty fell short of plan targets. While Northern Mindanao was among the
eight regions which posted an increase in its poverty incidence among families between 2006 and
2009, the increase from 32.7 percent in 2006 to 32.8 percent in 2009 was the lowest. With a
continually growing population, the number of poor families increased by 17,793 in 2009.
Moreover, while the subsistence incidence among families declined between 2006 (16.3%) and
2009 (15.6%), the actual number of food-poor families increased by almost 3,000.
Among the provinces, Misamis Oriental and Bukidnon registered decreases in poverty incidence, the
former showing the bigger improvement of 6,224 families escaping the poverty line. The overall
trends in poverty incidence and magnitude indicate the need for more effective, intensified, and
targeted poverty reduction efforts.
Table 3. Annual Per Capita Poverty Threshold, Poverty Incidence Among Families and
Magnitude of Poor Families, by Province, Region X: 2006 and 2009
Region/
Province

Philippines

Annual Per Capita


Poverty Threshold
(In Pesos)

Poverty Incidence
Among Families (%)

2006

2009

Inc/ Dec

20.9

Inc/
Dec
-0.2

3,670,791

3,855,730

184,939

31.5

32.5

1,264,133

1,374,205

110,072

2006

2009

2006

2009

13,348

16,841

21.1

Mindanao

Magnitude of Poor Families

Clustering of
Provinces*
2006

2009

Region X

12,987

16,568

32.7

32.8

0.1

257,640

275,433

17,793

Bukidnon

12,711

16,297

31.3

33.0

1.7

72,969

70,072

-2,897

Camiguin

14,157

18,150

37.8

36.4

-1.4

6,366

8,793

2,427

Lanao del Norte

12,373

15,939

34.3

39.0

4.7

56,429

69,237

12,808

Misamis Occidental

12,091

15,588

38.2

36.9

-1.3

42,413

54,092

11,679

Misamis Oriental
14,088 18,073
30.2
26.3
-3.9
* where cluster 1 indicates the bottom (poor) cluster of provinces
Source: NSCB

79,463

73,239

-6,224

The average annual income of families in the region increased annually by 9.2 percent from CY 2003
to 2006. Over the six-year period 2000-2006, family income grew annually by 4.3 percent.
In 2006, the average annual income of families in Northern Mindanao at PhP141,733 although
lower than the national average, was the highest among Mindanao regions.

Macroeconomic Development Framework

Table 4. Annual Per Capita Food Threshold, Subsistence Incidence Among Families and
Magnitude of Subsistence Poor Families, by Province, Region X: 2006 and 2009
Annual Per
Capita Food
Threshold
(In Pesos)

Province

Philippines

Subsistence Incidence
Among Families (%)

Magnitude of Subsistence Poor Families

2006

2009

2006

2009

Inc/Dec

2006

2009

Inc/Dec

% Change

9,257

11,686

8.7

7.9

-0.8

1,511,579

1,453,843

(57,736)

-3.82

14.1

13.8

-0.3

565,257

582,961

17,704

3.13

-0.7

128,513

131,304

2,791

2.17

Mindanao
Region X

9,080

11,543

16.3

15.6

Bukidnon

8,889

11,365

14.5

15.6

1.1

33,772

33,090

(682)

-2.02

Camiguin

9,926

12,682

17.5

9.2

-8.3

2,948

2,221

(727)

-24.66

Lanao del Norte

8,635

11,096

18

18.4

0.4

29,493

32,687

3,194

10.83

Misamis Occidental

8,430

10,887

18.3

17.8

-0.5

20,380

26,043

5,663

27.79

Misamis Oriental
Source: NSCB

9,814

12,594

15.9

13.4

-2.5

41,920

37,263

(4,657)

-11.11

Region X families had an average annual savings of PhP25,106 in 2006, up by 12 percent from
2003, and completely reversing the decrease experienced in the previous three-year period.
Among the Mindanao regions, Region X had the highest annual family savings in year 2000, but was
overtaken by Central Mindanao in 2003, and by Western Mindanao in 2006.
A clear evidence that the high growth did not filter down the lower economic class is the high income
inequity. While income distribution, as measured by the Gini coefficient, improved very slightly from
0.4817 to 0.4806, Region X has the second highest income disparity among Mindanao Regions
which is also higher than the national average.
Table 5. Comparative Average Annual Family Income
Mindanao Regions: 2000, 2003 & 2006
(in Pesos)
Region
PHILIPPINES
Region IX Western Mindanao
Region X Northern Mindanao
Region XI Southern Mindanao
Region XII Central Mindanao
CARAGA
ARMM Muslim Mindanao
Source: NSCB-X

Ave. Annual Family Income


(In Pesos)
2000

2003

2006

144,039
86,135
110,333
112,254
90,778
79,590
81,519

148,000
93,000
109,000
117,000
113,000
90,000
83,000

172,730
125,445
141,773
134,605
113,919
118,146
88,632

Ave. Annual Growth Rates


20002003
0.9
2.6
-0.4
1.4
7.6
4.2
0.6

20032006
5.3
10.5
9.2
4.8
0.3
9.5
2.2

20002006
3.1
6.5
4.3
3.1
3.9
6.8
1.4

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Table 6. Average Annual Family Savings


Mindanao Regions: 2000, 2003 & 2006

Regions

Average Annual Family


Savings (In Pesos)

25,550
26,770

20002003
-2.7
2.6

20032006
2.1
14.1

20002006
-0.3
8.2

18,000

25,106

-11.4

11.7

-0.5

21,386

17,000

19,480

-7.4

4.6

-1.5

16,062
13,302
9,411

28,000
12,000
16,000

18,083
18,197
13,794

20.4
-3.4
19.4

-13.6
14.9
-4.8

2
5.4
6.6

2000

2003

2006

PHILIPPINES
Region IX Western Mindanao
Region X Northern
Mindanao
Region XI Southern Mindanao

26,037
16,683

24,000
18,000

25,856

Region XII Central Mindanao


CARAGA
ARMM Muslim Mindanao
Source: NSCB-X

Growth Rates

Table 7. Gini Coefficients


Philippines and Mindanao Regions: 2003 & 2006
Philippines
Region IX (Zamboanga Peninsula)
Region X (Northern Mindanao)
Region XI (Davao)

2003
0.4605
0.5197
0.4817
0.4574

2006
0.458
0.5054
0.4806
0.4225

Inc/Dec
-0.0025
-0.0143
-0.0011
-0.0349

Region XII (SOCCSKSARGEN)


Region XIII (Caraga)
Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao

0.4774
0.4303
0.3578

0.4006
0.4452
0.3113

-0.0768
+0.0149
-0.0465

Source: NSO-X

All the five provinces in the region posted improvements in HDI (a summary measure of three major
indicators in terms of longevity, knowledge and decent standard of living) in 2006 as compared to
their levels in 2003. However, disparities exist among the provinces in the region. Only Misamis
Oriental posted an HDI higher than the national average of 0.716. Meanwhile, Lanao del Norte was
the top gainer from an HDI of 0.670 in 2003 to 0.689 in 2006, thus increasing its rank from 33 to
23 in terms of highest HDI among 77 provinces nationwide.
Figure 2.
Human Development Index
by Province,
Region X: 2003 & 2006

Macroeconomic Development Framework

Labor Force and Employment


Over the period 2005-2009, the region experienced high employment rates of not less than 94
percent. This is translated into 1.915 million employed persons in 2009, from 1.784 million in 2005
or an absolute increase of 131,000 over the five-year period. Underemployment rate, however, was
likewise high at over 30 percent in most years, except in 2008 when it improved significantly to 21
percent. Household population 15 years and over increased by two percent, but labor force
participation rate dropped slightly by less than one percentage point.
Table 8. Labor Force and Employment
Region X: October 2005-2009

Household Population 15 years and


over (000)
Labor Force ('000)
Labor Force Participation Rate
Employed Persons (000)
Employment Rate
Underemployed Persons (000)
Underemployment Rate
Unemployed Persons ('000)
Unemployment Rate

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

AAGR
20052009

2,593

2,652

2,622

2,726

2,808

2.01

1,885
72.7
1,784
94.6
637

1,935
72.96
1,836
94.9
654

1,867
71.2
1769
94.9
631

1,953
71.6
1,872
95.8
398

1,999
71.2
1,915
95.8
594

1.48

33.8
102
5.4

33.8
104
5.12

33.8
95
5.1

21.3
82
4.2

31.0
84.0
4.2

1.79
-1.74
-4.69

Source: NSO-X

A 95.8 percent employment rate was sustained in years 2008 and 2009. The 2008 improvement in
underemployment, however, was not sustained, as some companies resorted to work reduction and
shift rotation to cope with the global economic slowdown. There was instead a 50 percent increase
in underemployed persons, bringing the underemployment rate back to a high 31 percent in 2009.
In comparison, the national average underemployment in 2009 was much lower at 19 percent.
From 2005 to 2009, services and agriculture each absorbed over 40 percent of workers, together
accounting for around 90 percent of total employed persons, while industry employed the remaining
ten percent. Considering that GRDP distribution is nearly balanced among the three sectors, labor
productivity is highest in the industry sector. Over the five-year period, the employment share of
services sector expanded by 2.57 percentage points, agriculture share contracted by 2.72
percentage points, and industry share expanded by less than one percentage point.

From 2005 to 2009, services and agriculture


each absorbed over 40 percent of workers
industry employed the remaining 10 percent.

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Progress towards the MDGs


Based on the probability of attaining the targets, the region will highly likely to achieve the targets
along reducing malnutrition among children, reducing child and maternal mortality, reducing the
incidence of malaria, improving simple literacy, and making available the benefits of
communications. Meanwhile, there is moderate likelihood of achieving the targets in eradicating
extreme poverty and hunger, and gender equality in secondary education.
The region will have difficulty in attaining the targets of achieving universal access to primary
education, gender equality in primary education, universal access to reproductive health, sustainable
access to safe water and improved sanitation, and environmental sustainability.
With just five years before the 2015 MDG deadline, doubling of efforts of all stakeholders and duty
bearers is an imperative. Getting as close as possible to the targets, if not surpass them, is crucial in
realizing a truly transformative development.
Table 9. Pace of Progress in terms of Attaining the MDG Targets, Region X
Goals/Targets/Indicators
Baseline
Target
Latest
Probability*
Goal 1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
Target 1.A
Halve, between 1990s and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is less than one dollar
a day
Indicator
Proportion of population below regional
45.3
22.6
39.6
low
1.1
poverty threshold
Source: NSCB
1991
2015
2009
Proportion of families below regional
41.5
20.7
32.8
medium
poverty threshold
Source: NSCB
1991
2015
2009
Target 1.B
Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger
Indicator
Prevalence of underweight children under 5
34.3
17.2
9.9
high
1.2
years of age
Source: DOH-X
1998
2015
2009
Indicator
Proportion of population below subsistence
26.3
13.2
20.7
medium
1.3
(food) threshold
Source: NSCB
1991
2015
2009
Proportion of families below subsistence
22.7
11.3
15.6
medium
(food) threshold
Source: NSCB
1991
2015
2009
Goal 2. Achieve universal primary education
Target 2.A
Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full
course of primary schooling
Indicator
Net enrolment ratio in primary education
78.2
100
81.8
low
2.1
Source: BEIS, DepEd-X
1991
2015
2008
Indicator
Proportion of pupils starting grade 1 who
61.7
100
65.7
low
2.2
reached grade 6
Source: BEIS, DepEd-X
1991
2015
2009
Indicator
Simple Literacy Rate of 10-14 years old
61.7
100
92.2
high
2.3
Source: FLEMMS,NSO-X
1991
2015
2003
Indicator
Ratio of literate females to males of 15-24
0.93
1
1.03
high
2.3a
year olds
Source: FLEMMS, NSO-X
1994
2015
2003

10

Macroeconomic Development Framework

Goal 3. Promote gender equality and empower women


Target 3.A
Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education preferably by 2005 and to all
levels of education no later than 2015
Indicator
Ratio of girls to boys in primary education
0.96
1
0.93 low
3.1a
Source: BEIS, DepEd-X
1993
2015
2009
Indicator
Ratio of girls to boys in secondary education
1.1
1
1.06 medium
3.1.b
Source: BEIS, DepEd-X
1993
2015
2009
Indicator
Ratio of girls to boys in tertiary education
1
1.22
3.1.c
Source: CHED-X
1991
2015
2008
Goal 4. Reduce child mortality
Target 4.A
Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate
Indicator
Under-five mortality rate (per 1,000
85
28.3
27 high
4.1
livebirths)
Source: NDHS, NSO-X
1993
2015
2008
Indicator
Infant mortality rate (per 1,000 livebirths)
37
12.3
19 high
4.2
Source: NDHS, NSO-X
1993
2015
2008
Infant mortality rate (per 1,000 livebirths)
20.1
6.93
7.2 high
Source: DOH-X ( administrative data)
1990
2015
2009
Goal 5. Improve maternal health
Target 5.A
Reduce by three-quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio
Indicator
Maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000
96.2
24.1
51 high
5.1
livebirths)
Source: NDHS, NSO-X
1993
2015
2008
Maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000
132
33
94 medium
livebirths)
Source: DOH X ( administrative data)
1990
2015
2009
Target 5.B Achieve, by 2015, the universal access to reproductive health
Indicator
Proportion of births attended by skilled
49.9
100
47.7 low
5.2
health personnel
Source: NDHS, NSO-X
1999
2015
2008
Indicator
Contraceptive prevalence rate
59.8
100
53.2 low
5.3
Source: Family Planning Survey, NSO-X
1997
2015
2008
Contraceptive prevalence rate (for all
61.56
80
45 low
methods)
Source: DOH-X ( administrative data)
1990
2015
2009
Indicator
Prenatal care coverage
59.63
95.0
67.76 low
5.4
Source: DOH -X (administrative data)
1990
2015
2009
Indicator
Postnatal care coverage
70.05
95.0
88.0 high
5.5
Source: DOH -X (administrative data)
1990
2015
2009
Goal 6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
Target 6.A
Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the incidence of malaria and other major diseases
Indicator
Death rate associated with malaria (per
71.1
0
1.8
high
6.1
100,000 population)
Source: DOH-X
1998
2015
2009
Indicator
Prevalence associated with tuberculosis
778
0
735
low
6.2a
Source: DOH-X
1998
2015
2009
Indicator
Death rate associated with tuberculosis (per 28.7
0
19.6
medium
6.2b
100,000 population)
Source: DOH-X
1998
2015
2009

11

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Target 6.B
Indicator
6.3
Indicator
6.4

Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS


Percentage of Women having one sexual
- increasing
partner
Source: NDHS, NSO-X
Using condoms as protection from disease
- increasing

63
2008
54

Source: NDHS, NSO-X


2008
Goal 7. Ensure environmental sustainability
Target 7.A
Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies & programs to reverse
the loss of environmental resources
Indicator
Proportion of land area covered by forest
56.8
increasing
53.7
7.1
Source: DENR-X
2009
Target 7.B Halve, by 2015, the proportion of population without sustainable access to safe drinking water
and improved sanitation
Indicator
Proportion of households with access to
87.1
100.0
88.0 low
7.2
safe water supply
Source: DOH-X
1998
2015
2008
Indicator
7.3

Proportion of households with sanitary toilet


67.5
83.8
73.1 low
facility
Source: NSO-X
1990
2015
2009
Goal 8. Develop a global partnership for development
Target 8
In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies,
especially information and communications
Indicator
Telephone lines subscribers per 100
3 increasing
3.8 high
8.1
population
Source: NTC-X
1990 2009
* Computation of pace of progress is based on UNSIAP methodology
Pace of progress = Actual rate of progress / Required rate of progress where: Actual rate of progress = [(latest data /
baseline data) 1] / no. of years elapse; Required rate of progress = [(target rate / baseline data) 1] / no. of years
covered
Probability of attaining the target:
LOW if pace of progress is less than 0.5;
MEDIUM if pace of progress is between 0.5 and 0.9; and,
HIGH if pace of progress is greater than 0.9
Source: NSCB-X and DOH-X, and updates based on RDP, 2004-2010 assessment report

Vulnerability of Region X to Disasters


Number of Natural Disasters
For the period 2004-2009, there were 58 disaster events reported. Flash flood recorded the most
number of occurrences. For the year 2008 alone, there were 13 flashfloods. Meanwhile, there were
10 occurrences of big waves with storm surge during the period, eight of which were observed in
2008.
On an annual basis, 2008 posted the highest number of disaster events. There were 15 disaster
events in 2007 and seven in 2009.

12

Macroeconomic Development Framework

Figure 3. Number of Natural Disaster Events by Type


Region X: 20042009

Affected Families/Persons
Over 64,000 families, equivalent to 312,173 individuals, were affected. Flashflood with raininduced landslide affected the most number of families and individuals.
Table 10. Number of Affected Families and Persons
by Type of Natural Disaster, Region X: 20042009
Disaster Event
Big Waves
Big Waves with Storm Surge
Strong Winds
Tornado
Flash Flood

Number
Families
Persons
1,859
8,616

% Distribution
Families
Persons
2.90
2.76

4,722
31
14
2,961

18,723
164
78
15,213

7.37
0.05
0.02
4.62

6.00
0.05
0.02
4.87

Flashflood with Rain-Induced Landslide


Flood
Flood with Landslide

49,132
1,259
3,097

247,954
3,176
13,499

76.69
1.97
4.83

79.43
1.02
4.32

Flood with Rain-induced landslide


Heavy Rains with Strong Wind
Rain-Induced Landslide
Earthquake
Total

921
72
64,068

4,575
60
115
312,173

1.44
0.11
0.00
0.00
100.00

1.47
0.02
0.00
0.04
100.00

Source of Data: OCD-X

Of the 61 recorded deaths, 39 were caused by flashfloods with rain-induced landslide. Meanwhile,
there were 26 injured and six missing.

13

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Economic Damage

Table 11. Number of Lives Lost by Type of

Natural Disaster, Region X: 20042009


Number
Disaster Event
of Lives
Lost
Big Waves
2
Big Waves with Storm Surge
5
Flash Flood
6
Flashflood with Rain-Induced Landslide
39
Flood with Landslide
1
Heavy Rains with Strong Wind
2
Rain-Induced Landslide
2
Lightning/Thunderstorm
Total

Percent
Distribution
3.28
8.20
9.84
63.93
1.64
3.28
3.28

6.56

61

100.00

Source of Data: OCD-X

Table 12. Estimated Cost of Damage by Type of


Natural Disaster, Region X: 20042009
Cost
Disaster Event
(In Pesos)
Big Waves with Storm Surge
6,300,000
Flash Flood
Flashflood with Rain-Induced
Landslide
Flood
Flood with Landslide
Flood with Rain-induced landslide
Total

Percent
Distribution
0.65

35,278,431

3.66

846,334,898

87.71

4,228,600
60,000,000
12,810,420
964,952,349

0.44
6.22
1.33
100.00

* Minimum cost incurred. Damages in a number of disaster events


were not determined/reported.
Source: OCD-X

For events with reported damage


costs, almost PhP1 billion worth of
properties were damaged. Affected
properties include houses,
agricultural crops, fisheries, and
public infrastructure.
Flashflood with rain-induced
landslide posted the greatest
impact accounting for 87.7 percent
of the estimated damage cost
during the period. The January
2009 event which affected the
cities of Cagayan de Oro, Iligan,
Gingoog, Oroquieta, Ozamiz, and
the provinces of Misamis Oriental
and Lanao del Norte caused a total
damage of PhP793.3 million.
There were 1,812 houses totally
damaged and 6,104 partially
damaged.
Among the provinces, Lanao del
Norte is the most adversely
affected by this disaster type. The
damage cost of the August 13,
2006 event that occurred in
Kapatagan, Lanao del Norte
reached PhP37.5 million. There
was also huge devastation to
livelihood as rice lands and
fisheries were deeply covered with
water.
On the other hand, flood with
landslide accounted for 6.2 percent
of the total estimated damage cost,
while flashfloods, 3.7 percent.

Figure 4. Distribution of

Estimated Cost of Damage


by Type of Disaster,
Region X: 20042009

14

Macroeconomic Development Framework

IV. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES


Its strategic location gives the region its biggest competitive advantage over all the other regions in
Mindanao. It is practically typhoon-free and physically linked to all regions in the island through a
network of roads. Moreover, with its deep harbor, the region is the best jump-off point for trading
with Visayas and Luzon, and the international market using the sea lanes. With relatively better port
facilities bannered by the Mindanao Container Terminal (MCT), which is the only containerized port in
Mindanao, and soon to be commissioned Laguindingan Airport, which is of international standard,
the region takes the pride of being the major GATEWAY of Southern Philippines.
Agriculture potential is also enormous with its vast agricultural lands, with soils highly suited for the
growing of many crops. Northern Mindanao leads in the production of major crops, especially in
Bukidnon and Lanao del Norte.
Having the biggest industrial output among all regions in Mindanao, as well as the presence of the
biggest industrial estate in the country are best manifestations of the huge potential for industrial
development. Industries locating in the region can also be well supported by the presence of electric
power generation service providers of which the region supplies at least 65 percent of the total
power capacities of Mindanao.
With a generally peace-loving people, the region has a peaceful and orderly environment making it
safe for investors and tourists. Its highly skilled and literate work force is ready to meet the
demands of investment locators.

V. DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES
Despite the gains in the overall economic performance of the region in the previous plan period, the
following development constraints and challenges shall be surmounted to usher inclusive growth
where everyone participates, contributes and benefits from the fruits of development:
Reducing poverty incidence and income inequality;
Sustaining a high growth path;
Improving access and quality of basic social services;
Enhancing productivity and competitiveness of basic sectors in the economy;
Accommodating into the job market the increasing working age population;
Improving logistics and support systems;
Adapting to the changes in climatic patterns and reducing disaster risks;
Protecting the already threatened natural resources;
Overcoming the negative perception on the peace and order situation; and
Improving public safety in all communities.

15

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

VI. GUIDING PRINCIPLES


In the pursuit of a high inclusive growth over the plan period, participation of the private sector in the
development endeavors shall be encouraged. As the real engine of growth, private sector
participation shall be strengthened while government will concentrate on facilitative activities.
Attaining an inclusive growth requires fully harnessing the regions resources. Thus, in the next six
years, the region will encourage resource utilization activities that adhere to the principles of
sustainable development and respect for basic human rights and gender considerations, indigenous
beliefs and traditions, and cultural heritage.

VII. DEVELOPMENT AGENDA


National Development Agenda
The national government shall focus on creating adequate employment opportunities for more
Filipinos to significantly reduce poverty in an inclusive and sustainable growth framework while at
the same time strategically positioning the country towards a more integrated ASEAN community by
the end of the plan period.
The national development priorities focus on translating the Presidents development agenda as
contained in his Social Contract with the Filipino People into strategies, policies and programs and
activities for the plan period, 2011-2016. The Social Contract envisions a country with an
organized and widely shared rapid expansion of our economy through a government dedicated to
honing and mobilizing the peoples skills and energies, as well as the responsible harnessing of our
natural resources. Further, the social contract focus on the following five key result areas: a)
transparent, accountable and participatory governance; b) poverty reduction and empowerment of
the poor and vulnerable; c) rapid, inclusive, and sustained economic growth; d) just and lasting
peace and the rule of law; and e) integrity of the environment and climate change adaptation and
mitigation.

Regional Development Vision and Agenda


Northern Mindanao is envisioned to be the leading industrial core and trade center in southern
Philippines with dynamic men and women enjoying equal opportunities in harnessing and sustaining
its agriculture and natural resources in building a decent, harmonious, and safe environment.
With a number of competitive advantages and facilitating factors over the other regions in Mindanao
and even in the Visayas and Luzon, the region presents itself as the most competitive, efficient and
attractive transshipment hub and venue for industrial ventures in the country. As the regional
economy undergoes transformation, more value-adding activities such as processing and
manufacturing shall be intensified to fully harness and sustain its rich agriculture and resourcebased endowments and potentials. With this scenario, it is expected that the share of the industry
and services sectors to the economy shall likely increase with agriculture providing the foundation of
development. Thus, in the next six years, Region X shall assert its role as the leader in high value
agri-based and fishery products and as the gateway, and industrial core and trade center in the
southern part of the Philippines.

16

Macroeconomic Development Framework

VIII. SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT DIRECTIONS


The region shall continue to adopt the twin spatial strategies, namely: a) Polycentric Development
Strategy (PDS); and b) Corridor Development Strategy (CDS) (Map Nos. 5 & 6).
Poverty incidence and its gravity increases as the distance from the development center increases.
Under the polycentric development strategy, development of more strategic centers throughout the
region shall be encouraged to influence growth in their nearby localities. As the major cities and
urban centers continue to play their roles as development catalysts, development of emerging
centers shall be supported in order to form a network of centers that will improve access to
economic services in the countryside.
Industrial development shall be pursued through a wider and longer strip of industrial development
corridors in order to disperse development from urban centers. While the realization of the CagayanIligan Corridor shall be given foremost attention, other important corridors shall also be supported
such as the Cagayan-Bukidnon; Tubod-Ganassi, Lanao del Sur; Iligan-Bukidnon; Tangub-OzamizOroquieta; Tubod-Kapatagan-Aurora; and Tukuran-Sultan Naga Dimaporo.

Spatial Development Clusters (SDCs)


Based on the commonality of resources, potentials and challenges, the following strategic
development clusters are identified to guide the desired direction given their functional role to the
regions and countrys economy, and likewise seize the opportunities brought by globalization.

SDC 1: Realizing the Cagayan-Iligan Industrial and Trade Corridor


Cluster 1 includes the western side of Misamis Oriental, eastern part of Lanao del Norte, and
northern part of Bukidnon. This expanded Cagayan-Iligan Corridor, which will be the center of
industrial development, stands to fully realize its potentials of becoming a rapidly industrializing area
with a large export base. Cagayan de Oro and Iligan, with their existing base of heavy and large
industries, serve as twin development poles that will draw more expansions along manufacturing
and processing. There are also several emerging growth centers in the corridor to disperse
development, as well as link resource-rich rural areas to growth and market centers. This spatial
layout creates potential for intra-regional linkages and complementary growth in the whole island of
Mindanao.

SDC2: Capitalizing on the Agri-Fishery and Eco-Cultural Tourism Endowments of Lanao del Norte and
Misamis Occidental
This cluster covers the western part of the region and radiates its influence to Lanao del Norte and
Misamis Occidental, capitalizes on the Agri-Fishery and Eco-Cultural Tourism endowments of the two
provinces covered. Improving physical accessibility and the utilization of productive resources shall
be the focus of activities in the next six years to hasten economic growth and eventually make the
area self-reliant and productive.

SDC3: Boosting Agri-business Ventures and Eco-Tourism in Bukidnon


Cluster 3 mainly covers the province of Bukidnon. The central part of Bukidnon shall continue to be
the main source of agricultural products and raw materials for the processing plants in the region.

17

LEGEND:
REGIONAL GROWTH CENTER
SUB-REGIONAL CENTER
CAMIGUIN

LARGE CITY

MAMBAJAO
MAHINOG

MEDIUM/SMALL CITY

CATARMAN

GUINSILIBAN

SAGAY

EMERGING GROWTH CENTERS

MAGSAYSAY
TALISAYAN

BALINGOAN
KINOGUITAN
SUGBONGCOGON
BINUANGAN
SALAY

G I N G O O G

B A Y

TO BUTUAN CITY

MEDINA

LAGONGLONG

MISAMIS ORIENTAL
JASAAN

BALIANGAO
SAPANG DALAGA

LAGUINDINGAN
GITAGUM
ALUBIJID
LIBERTAD
EL SALVADOR
OPOL
INITAO

PLARIDEL
LOPEZ JAENA

CALAMBA

GINGOOG CITY

BALINGASAG

MISAMIS OCCIDENTAL

CLAVERIA
VILLANUEVA
TAGOLOAN

MALITBOG

OROQUIETA CITY

CONCEPCION

PANAON
JIMENEZ

DON VICTORIANO

SINACABAN
TUDELA
CLARIN
BACOLOD

ZAMBOANGA
DEL NORTE

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY


MANOLO FORTICH

NAAWAN
MANTICAO
LUGAIT

ALORAN

LIBONA
ILIGAN CITY

KAUSWAGAN
LINAMON
OZAMIZ CITY
TAGOLOAN
MAIGO
BALOI
MATUNGAO
TANGUB CITY
PANTAR
TUBOD
KOLAMBUGANPOONA PIAGAPO
BONIFACIO
PANTAO RAGAT
BAROY
MUNAI
LALA
MAGSAYSAY
LAKE
SALVADOR
KAPATAGAN
LANAO
SAPAD
LANAO DEL NORTE
NUNUNGAN

SUMILAO
IMPASUGONG

BAUNGON

MALAYBALAY CITY

TALAKAG

CABANGLASAN
LANTAPAN
VALENCIA CITY

PANGANTUCAN
SAN FERNANDO
KALILANGAN

MARAMAG

SULTAN NAGA DIMAPORO

QUEZON

BUKIDNON

DON CARLOS

KITAOTAO
DANGCAGAN
KADINGILAN

KIBAWE
DAMULOG

BONGO
ISLAND

Source : RPFP, 2004-2030

Map 4.

POLYCENTRIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


Prepared by: NEDA-X (2010)

N
Not Drawn to Scale

LEGEND:
REGIONAL GROWTH CENTER

CAGAYAN-ILIGAN

SUB-REGIONAL CENTER
MAJOR THOROUGHFARES

CAMIGUIN

MAHINOG

LARGE CITY
CATARMAN

MEDIUM/SMALL CITY

MAGSAYSAY
TALISAYAN

BALINGOAN
KINOGUITAN
SUGBONGCOGON
BINUANGAN
SALAY

G I N G O O G

B A Y

TO BUTUAN CITY

MEDINA

LAGONGLONG

TANGUB-OZAMIZ-OROQUIETA

GINGOOG CITY

BALINGASAG

MISAMIS OCCIDENTAL

MISAMIS ORIENTAL
JASAAN

BALIANGAO

LAGUINDINGAN
GITAGUM
ALUBIJID
LIBERTAD
EL SALVADOR
OPOL
INITAO

PLARIDEL
LOPEZ JAENA

CALAMBA

GUINSILIBAN

SAGAY

EMERGING GROWTH CENTERS

SAPANG DALAGA

CAGAYAN-BUKIDNON

MAMBAJAO

CLAVERIA
VILLANUEVA
TAGOLOAN

MALITBOG

OROQUIETA CITY

CONCEPCION

PANAON
JIMENEZ

DON VICTORIANO

LIBONA
ILIGAN CITY

SINACABAN
TUDELA
CLARIN
BACOLOD

ZAMBOANGA
DEL NORTE

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY


MANOLO FORTICH

NAAWAN
MANTICAO
LUGAIT

ALORAN

KAUSWAGAN
LINAMON
OZAMIZ CITY
TAGOLOAN
MAIGO
BALOI
MATUNGAO
TANGUB CITY
PANTAR
TUBOD
KOLAMBUGANPOONA PIAGAPO
BONIFACIO
PANTAO RAGAT
BAROY
MUNAI
LALA
MAGSAYSAY
LAKE
SALVADOR
KAPATAGAN
LANAO
SAPAD
LANAO DEL NORTE
NUNUNGAN

SUMILAO
IMPASUGONG

BAUNGON

MALAYBALAY CITY

CABANGLASAN
LANTAPAN
TALAKAG

VALENCIA CITY
SAN FERNANDO

PANGANTUCAN
KALILANGAN

MARAMAG

SULTAN NAGA DIMAPORO

QUEZON

TUBOD-GANASSILANAO DEL SUR

BUKIDNON

KITAOTAO
DANGCAGAN
KADINGILAN

TUBOD-KAPATAGANAURORA

DON CARLOS

TUKURAN-SULTAN
NAGA DIMAPORO

KIBAWE
DAMULOG

BONGO
ISLAND

ILIGAN-BUKIDNON

Map 5.

CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY


Prepared by: NEDA-X (2010)

Source : RPFP, 2004-2030

N
Not Drawn to Scale

Strategic Development
Clusters (SDC)
SDC 1 Realizing the Cagayan-Iligan
industrial and trade corridor
SDC 2 Capitalizing on the agri-fishery and ecocultural tourism endowments of Lanao
del Norte and Misamis Occidental
SDC 3 Boosting agri-business ventures in
Bukidnon
SDC 4 Harnessing the Gingoog-Camiguin
tourism adventure loop

CAMIGUIN

Mambajao
To/from Caraga

G I N G O O G

SDC 4

To/from
Region IX

B A Y

Gingoog City
AGUSAN
DEL NORTE

To/from
Caraga

MISAMIS OCCIDENTAL

Oroquieta City

To/from
Caraga

SDC 1 Cagayan de Oro City


SDC 2

Iligan City

Malaybalay City

Ozamiz City
Tangub City

Marawi City

Tubod

To/from
Caraga

SDC 3
Valencia City

To/from
Region IX

LAKE
LANAO
LAKE
LANAO

LANAO DEL NORTE

To/from
Region IX

LANAO
DEL SUR

BUKIDNON

To/from
Region XI

LEGEND:
Provincial Boundaries
Municipal Boundaries
Strategic Roads
Inter Regional Linkages
Inter Island Linkages

To/from
Region XI

To/from
Region XII

Core Industrial Center


Key Growth Center (KGC)

Map 6.

STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT CLUSTERS


OF NORTHERN MINDANAO
Prepared by: NEDA-10 (2009)

COTABATO

N
Not Drawn to Scale

Macroeconomic Development Framework

While the two cities of Malaybalay and Valencia are the main growth centers that will drive
development of the SDC, the emerging urban center of Maramag is expected to spur development in
the southern part of the area. Potentials along eco-tourism and recreation shall also be developed
especially with the opening of major roads linking the province to Davao and Cotabato.

SDC4: Harnessing the Gingoog-Camiguin Tourism Adventure Loop


For Camiguin to become a major tourist destination in the country, the framework is to create an
integrated adventure-type coastal and/or expanded tourism highway. While working on the
improvement of access to tourism sites and facilities, tour packages shall be arranged to connect
tourists in Cagayan de Oro passing the tourism sites in Misamis Oriental, such as Mantangale in
Balingoan and Duka Bay in Medina to Camiguin, and then to Bohol and Cebu and vice versa, through
the nautical highway. This would complement the development of adventure tourism in Bukidnon
and other areas of the region.

IX. DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK


The Macroeconomic Development Framework (Figure 5) sets the overall development agenda of the
region including the major targets to be attained during the plan period. Thus, the regional
development agenda and priorities are laid down to fully attain its desired role while ensuring a
sustainable and shared prosperity across all areas in the region.
Figure 5. RDP, 2011-2016 Framework of Northern Mindanao

21

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

In asserting its role as the major GATEWAY, and industrial core and trade center in the South,
strategic actions shall be pursued along the following areas: Good Governance and Peace and
Order; Access, Logistics and Other Infrastructure Services; Trade, Industry and Tourism;
Environment and Sustainable Development; Well-being and Improved Welfare; Agriculture and
Fishery; and Education and Youth Empowerment. Meanwhile, Science and Technology, as a crosscutting concern, is critical in attaining productivity and competitiveness of the regional economy.
Embedded in the development framework is along disaster risk reduction and climate change
adaptation (DRR/CCA) to sustain the gains the region has achieved over the years. Prevention and
mitigation measures through institutional capacity building, mainstreaming in development and land
use plans, implementation of nonstructural measures are meaningful strategies to complement and
ensure effectiveness of the existing or instituted structural measures to build resilient communities.
Thus, strategies such as protection and rehabilitation of watershed, implement existing anti-pollution
regulations, encourage use of environment-friendly technology, public education/advocacy, and
periodic review of zoning ordinance and site plan standards shall be in place and pursued.

X. MACROECONOMIC TARGETS
Economic Growth
Having a highly resilient economy, the region is expected to make a quick rebound from the global
financial crisis. GRDP growth will be modest for 2010 and 2011 at a range of 4.57 percent, but will
accelerate in 2012 towards the end of the plan period within a range of 7-7.5 percent as more
development projects and private investments are implemented. Being one of the regions
contributing significantly to the national economic growth, this target growth is supportive of the
national growth target of 7-8 percent over the planning period.
While the agriculture sector will continue to be the backbone of the regional economy, growth in this
sector would be rather modest compared to the growths in the industry and services sectors. This
shall likely happen as the region continues to transform into an industrializing economy by improving
productivity and competitiveness of all sectors particularly agriculture.
Table 13. Economic Growth Targets
Region X, 2010-2016 (in percent)
Industry/Year

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Agri., Fishery, Forestry


Industry

5.5-6
3.5-4

6.5-7
7-7.5

6.5-7
7-7.5

6.5-7
7.5-8

6.5-7
7.5-8

6.5-7
7.5-8

6.5-7
7.5-8

Services

4.5-5

7-7.5

7.5-8

7.5-8

7.5-8

7.5-8

7.5-8

Gross Regional Domestic Product

4.5-5

6.5-7

7-7.5

7-7.5

7-7.5

7-7.5

7-7.5

5-6

7-8

7-8

7-8

7-8

7-8

7-8

Gross Domestic Product Target

Poverty Reduction
Reducing poverty remains the biggest challenge that the region faces in the next six years. Meeting
the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of cutting by half the poverty incidence among families in
1991 to around 21 percent by 2015 is a very tall order. Nevertheless, being one of the more
progressive regions, Region X has more opportunities of improving the poverty situation. As the

22

Macroeconomic Development Framework

country pursues an inclusive growth policy and high economic growth regime in which the region is
also expected to benefit, the target of reducing poverty is attainable.

Family Income and Savings


As the regions economy grows rapidly over the next six years, the average annual family income is
also expected to improve by about five percent annually, reaching over PhP215,000 from the
PhP142,000 in 2006. With this, the average family savings is expected to improve from the
negative growth it has shown between 2000-2006. A two percent annual improvement in savings
will already be modest for the region during the next six years.
Table 14. Poverty Reduction Targets
Region X: 2015 (in percent)
Actual

Indicators
Poverty Incidence (Population)
Poverty incidence (Families)
Subsistence Incidence (Population)
Subsistence Incidence (Families)

1991
45.3
41.5
26.3
22.7

2003
38.8
32.4
21.2
16.1

2006
39.7
32.7
21.8
16.3

2009
39.6
32.8
20.7
15.6

RDP and MDG


Targets
2015
22.6
20.7
13.2
11.3

Source of actual data: NSCB-X

Employment
With a relatively high employment rate over the past years, the labor sector is expected to gain from
the investments expected during the plan period and therefore would easily meet the threshold of
full-employment (96%) over the plan period. To meet such level of employment, the region must
generate at least 35 thousand net jobs in 2010 and 45-50 thousand net jobs per year in the next
five years. The biggest problem, though, is how to bring down underemployment rate which is
relatively high compared to the other regions in the country. With new job opportunities coming in,
underemployment could be brought down to about 20 percent by 2016.

Managing Population Growth


While the determination of the manageable size of the family is better left to the couples, the
government has the obligation to educate its population on responsible parenthood and the effects
of a fast growing population on the utilization of resources. It is also the responsibility of government
particularly the LGUs to provide access, especially the poorest sector, to the various modes of family
planning and birth control.
.
the
government has the obligation
to educate its population on
responsible parenthood and the
effects of a fast growing population
on the utilization of resources.

23

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

24

Chapter 2: Good Governance and


Peace and Order
Strengthening Capacity and Accountability

I. ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES


Good Governance
Improving governance is a key to poverty reduction and sustained economic growth. It is the
vulnerable sector who suffers the most from the consequences of weak governance. Efficiency,
effectiveness, accountability, responsibility and transparency in terms of structures, mechanisms,
processes and procedures, information sharing, capacity-building, among others, are therefore
examined to strengthen and enhance the role of government in attaining inclusive patterns of
economic growth.

Functionality and Effectiveness of Government Structures, Procedures, and Frontline Services


Functionality of the Local Special Bodies
While local special development bodies are organized in all LGUs as mandated by law, questions are
being raised as to their dynamism and efficient functioning. Efforts in making these development
bodies effective are continuously undertaken including the granting of awards and commendations
to various local bodies which exhibited exemplary performance. The DILG has also installed an
internet based self- assessment indicator system (Local Government Performance Management
System or LGPMS) to enable the LGUs to monitor and check their level of performance and
productivity in several areas of governance and help the LGUs in determining the development gaps.
Part of the activities which shall be undertaken will be the conduct of trainings on LGPMS and in the
formulation of the State of the Local Government Performance Report (SLGPR) and the State of
Local Development Report (SLDR).
Even then, there are still issues hampering the operations of these bodies like the overlapping of
functions and membership of too many special bodies created; the lack of enthusiasm in some
LGUs which may be because of the lack of a disciplinary mechanism for erring LGUs and capabilityrelated issues; and other concerns.
Wider use of computerization to enhance delivery of services
Computerization has helped a lot in improving the delivery of services among government offices.
Improvements in the processing of transactions are noted among agencies like the business name
registration of DTI, loans processing of HDMF and licensing of LTO, among others. It also facilitated
improvements in the delivery of services among the local government units. Even then, the use of ICT
is still very much limited due to the following issues: a) lack of equipment; b) lack of connectivity
especially for municipalities which are far from major development centers; c) lack of priority
especially among some local executives; and d) lack of manpower capability. What is evidently
lacking is a government backbone that will link all government offices through one communication
network.

25

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Professionalizing the Civil Service


Under the Civil Service Commission Agency Accreditation Program (CSCAAP), 115 agencies as of
2009 were given authority to take final actions on appointments from only 95 in 2008.
The installation of a Performance Management System-Office Performance Evaluation System
(PMS-OPES) as an evaluation strategy is continually pursued by government agencies including State
Universities and Colleges (SUCs), Government-Owned and Controlled Corporations (GOCCs), and the
LGUs.

Improving Government Discipline, Efficiency and Equity in Managing Resources


Strengthening the Capacity of Government to Address Graft and Corruption
The implementation of the Anti-Red Tape Act (ARTA or R.A. 9485) was closely monitored. The CSC-X
assisted the agencies in crafting the Agency Citizens Charter (ACC), the setting up of Public
Assistance and Complaints Desk (PACD), and monitored compliance with the anti-fixer campaign. As
of 2009, ninety-five percent of LGUs have crafted their Citizens Charter.
The Association of Resident Ombudsman in Government Agencies in Region X (AROGA-X), in
coordination with the Office of the Ombudsman for Mindanao, has been continually conducting
orientation and seminar-workshops on integrity development, public accountability, procurement,
and statutory perspective of corruption (penalizing corruption). The association has also launched
activities to institutionalize and strengthen whistle blowing and tipping in the region.
However, there is still a need for a more concerted effort among the agencies whose mandates
relate directly to preventing or minimizing graft and corruption and have a unified and
implementable strategy.
Improving Development Planning Capability
Initiatives to improve capabilities along development planning were also undertaken. All provinces
have completed their Provincial Development and Physical Framework Plans (PDPFPs) using the new
guidelines on Provincial/Local Planning and Expenditure Management (PLPEM) formulated by NEDA
with assistance from the Asian Development Bank (ADB). Under this set of guidelines, the province
will prepare one main plan document incorporating/merging the socio-economic/sector
development and the land use/physical aspects, instead of two separate plans.
All cities and municipalities have prepared/updated their comprehensive development plans (CDP),
using the DILG guidelines (Rationalized Planning System). Likewise, these LGUs are also updating
their Comprehensive Land Use Plans (CLUPs) using the HLURB guidelines. All cities and
municipalities of Bukidnon and Misamis Oriental have completed their Executive Legislative Agenda
(ELA), a three-year strategy plan, corresponding to the term of elected local officials.
Seven out of the eight cities, and 43 out of the 85 municipalities in the region have completed the
final module III (data processing and mapping) of the Community Based Management System
(CBMS). Map digitizing is ongoing in many municipalities and cities. The CBMS is being adopted
regionwide to answer the need for a more reliable household level data and small area statistics for
development and project planning purposes.

26

Good Governance and Peace and Order

Information sharing among LGUs, academe, and other entities interested in local governance is
facilitated through the Regional Local Governance Resource Center (RLGRC), established by DILG-X
in 2006. Visitors from outside the region continue to visit the center for various information and
especially on the regions best practices in governance. At the barangay level, 78 percent of the
barangays have functional Gabay sa Mamamayan Action Centers (GMAC).
In spite of all these efforts, improving capabilities of the bureaucracy along development planning is
still an area of concern both at the LGUs and the regional offices.

Development Finance
Revenue Generation
Total internal tax revenues generated from CY2004 to CY2009 reached PhP23.53 billion, growing
annually by 7.67 percent. The highest growth was achieved during CY 2005, when the region
experienced high inflation rates especially for fuel, light and water commodity items. This was
attributed to the intensified tax information and education campaign which succeeded in improving
collections.
Table 15. Summary of Internal Revenue Collections by Type of Tax
Region X: 2004-2009 (in million pesos)
Type
of Tax

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Regional Total
3,124.31
Percent
Inc./Dec.
Income
2,169.23
Value Added
650.55
Percentage
142.56
Excise
0.66
Others
161.31
Source: RSET, BIR-X

3,609.66

4,017.55

4,018.20

4,263.08

4,493.08

15.53

11.30

0.02

6.09

5.40

2,534.62
667.12
175.80
232.13

2,537.09
1,053.90
172.81
0.48
253.27

2,439.91
1,036.14
226.64
0.33
315.19

2,554.16
1,088.06
235.20
0.54
385.11

2,643.11
1,275.54
239.14
2.10
333.20

Total
23,525.88
7.67
(Ave)
14,878.12
5,771.31
1,192.15
4.11
1,680.21

Customs collection during the plan period was on the uptrend, growing annually by 21 percent, which
was nevertheless below the 28 percent target. The year 2006 saw a big drop in collection, but this
was due to a high statistical base for 2005 when importations of major components occurred for the
construction of the STEAG-operated coal-fired power plant at the PHIVIDEC industrial estate.
Collection dropped again by 11 percent in 2009 as the regional economy was affected by the global
financial crisis.
The operation of the Mindanao Container Terminal (MCT) starting in CY2007 gave a definite boost to
the regions customs collection. Moreover, the strong performance of the export sector, reinforced
by the favorable dollar-peso exchange rate (weaker peso) and higher oil prices in CY2008
contributed likewise to the growth.

27

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Table 16. Customs Collections Performance


Region X: 2004-2009 (in million pesos)
Target

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Ann. Ave.

AAGR

1,225

1,570.0

3,111.0

2,343

2,893

4,206

2,558

27.98

1,316.7

2,390.1

1,887.8

2,631.16

3,914.80

3,466.99

2,601.27

21.36

107.5

152.2

60.68

112.3

135.32

82.43

108.41

1,148.1

2,062.3

1,546.31

1,635.94

1,245.17

833.47

1,411.88

-6.20

165.4

325.4

340.49

261.64

469.66

144.99

284.59

-2.60

3.2

2.4

1.04

1.88

9.87

16.12

5.76

37.92

731.70

2,190.09

2,472.41

899.03

27.57

Total
1,316.7
2,390.0
1,887.83
Source: Bureau of Customs, Collection District X

2,631.16

3,914.80

3,466.99

2,601.25

21.36

Actual
Collection
Efficiency (%)
Cagayan de Oro
Iligan
Ozamiz
MCT

LGUs are still heavily dependent on the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA). As of 2009, IRA, on the
average is around 73 percent of the total local government income compared to the 66.3 percent
share in 2004. Nevertheless, the proportion of income from local sources has improved from about
20 percent in 2004 to 25 percent in 2009 indicating that efforts at improving local revenue
generation has met some success.
Table 17. Share of IRA and Income from Local Sources to Total LGU Income
Region X: 2004-2009
Particulars
Internal Revenue Allotment
Income from Local Sources
Source: BLGF-X

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

66.32
19.62

71.39
22.68

76.48
22.56

66.49
20.01

69.74
22.18

72.80
25.03

Table 18. Total LGU Income from Local Sources


Region X: 2004-2009 (in thousand pesos)
2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

AAGR

Target

1,594,100

1,795,200

2,292,067

2,617,296

2,804,517

2,838,804

12.23

Actual

1,820,651

2,213,413

2,387,127

2,509,504

3,002,018

3,862,562

114.21

123.30

104.15

95.88

107.04

136.06

16.23
132.93
(Ave.)

Actual/Target (%)
Source: BLGF-X

Also in 2009, there was an upsurge in income generated from fees and charges by almost three
times the 2008 figure or its average level in the past five years, accounting for 29 percent of total
income for that year. For the first time in the past six years, income from fees and charges overtook
real property as the major income generator for LGUs.
Initial evaluation of the Real Property Tax Administration project implemented in years 2007-2008 in
28 municipalities (3rd to 6th class) in the region indicated positive outcomes. Real property units
assessed increased by 16 percent over the pre-project implementation figures. Assessed value of
these properties went up by 51 percent. The project also established a 45 percent increase in
collectibles, as well as caused a 62 percent increase in real property tax collections.

28

Good Governance and Peace and Order

Figure 6. LGU Income by Source (Target and Actual)


Region X: 2004-2009 (in pesos)

Source: BLGF-X

Cooperativism
The cooperative movement has provided access to capital especially for the small businesses both
in the urban areas and in the countryside. Cooperativism in the region has been thriving as
indicated by an 82 percent increase in paid-up capital, 80 percent increase in total volume of
business, and 80 percent increase in net surplus, in year 2008 over the 2004 figures. This is,
however, just a partial approximation coming only from more or less 800 cooperatives that
submitted their annual financial reports to CDA. Paid-up capital as of 2008 of these reporting
cooperatives was about PhP2.7 billion or an average of PhP4.1 million per cooperative. Total volume
of business generated reached PhP8.7 billion generating 4,709 direct employment.
Table 19. Selected Data on Cooperatives
Region X: 2004-2006 & 2008
2004
No. of Coops
737
Submitted AR/AFS
Total Employees
5,901
Total Members
294,238
Paid-Up Capital (PhP)
1,478,580,770.53
Total Volume of
4,848,833,178.02
Business (PhP)
Net Surplus (PhP)
372,333,779.91
Source: CDA-X, Local Government Finance

2005

2006

2008

793

849

655

6,207
323,760
1,762,703,748.20

6,265
345,485
1,999,358,554.06

4,709
404,393
2,684,371,648.88

5,832,677,329.06

8,320,765,473.94

8,724,113,571.07

386,072,557.73

432,416,839.61

597,187,938.99

29

LEGEND:

Based on Average Annual Income


of LGUs and DOF D.O. 20-05

1st Class (Php50M or more)


2nd Class (Php40M or more but less than Php50M)
3nd Class (Php30M or more but less than Php40M)
4th Class (Php20M or more but less than Php30M)
5th Class (Php10M or more but less than Php20M)
6th Class (Below Php10M)

Good Governance and Peace and Order

Reforms in Budgeting/Procurement/Accounting/Auditing Systems


As of 2009, all provinces and cities in the region have operational Government E-Procurement
System (G-EPS). Malaybalay Citys G-EPS has been operational since 2004. The city has also
reported implementation of the Electronic New Government Accounting System (E-NGAS), and a
barangay accounting system.
Pursuant to Local Budget Circular No. 80 and Local Budget Memorandum No. 82, the DBM
introduced to the local government units new manuals and supplemental guidelines on local
government budget operations, namely: the Updated Budget Operations Manual (UBOM) for
provinces, cities and municipalities; and the Budget Operations Manual for Barangays (BOMB) for
barangay officials.
Budget tracking initiative were also implemented in Misamis Oriental, El Salvador, Gingoog,
Malaybalay, Ozamiz and Oroquieta to pursue transparent and accountable governance.
LGU Capacity in Accessing ODA and other Financial Sources
As earlier noted, the LGUs have remained largely dependent on the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA).
With the bulk of the IRA already earmarked for operations and maintenance expenses, only a small
amount is left for the delivery of basic social services, much less for infrastructure projects.
To capacitate the LGUs in the availment of ODA and other local financial loan facilities for financing
development programs, trainings on the preparation of project feasibility studies and project
proposals were continually conducted to the technical staff and executives of provinces and cities.

Gender and Development Mainstreaming


Progress has been noted as far as mainstreaming of gender is concerned, especially along the
implementation of laws protecting women and children. Lanao del Norte, Misamis Occidental, and
Iligan City have formulated their GAD Code, while the rest of the LGUs are in the process of
formulating their own. GAD orientation/gender sensitivity seminars/trainings were continually
conducted for government agencies/LGUs/NGOs and SUCs. Briefings on Republic Act No. 7877
(Anti-Sexual Harassment Act of 1995), and Republic Act No. 9262 (Anti-Violence Against Women and
their Children Act of 2004) and other gender-friendly legislations were conducted by the Commission
on Human Rights (CHR) and other GAD partners in the region. Likewise, the CSC conducted seminarworkshops on Administrative Investigation and Anti-Sexual Harassment for members of the
Committee on Decorum and Investigation (CODI) of national government agencies and local
government units.
Women and Children Concerns Desks (WCCD) in LGUs are put in place to handle women and
children cases. The DILG recently introduced the new program on barangay human rights entitled
Accessing Justice through a Gender-Responsive and Child-Friendly Barangay Justice System
piloting 10 barangays in the region.

31

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

The January 2009 flood


affected more than 41,000
families and left 22 dead.
Disaster Preparedness and Response
From 2004 to 2009, there were 1,238 fire incidences recorded costing 55 deaths, 118 injuries and
PhP351 million damaged properties.1 Natural disasters from 2005 to 2009, on the other hand,
caused 60 deaths, 21 injuries and six missing. The worst disaster that hit the region was in 2009.
The tail of the cold front that came early in the year caused floods, storm surges and landslides
throughout the region and affected 309,973 persons and damaged almost a billion worth of houses,
agricultural properties and public infrastructures (Please refer to Chapter 1 for more detailed
assessment of natural disasters).
The set of action agenda indicated in the plan was carried out by concerned agencies and
stakeholders. Several activities related to disaster preparedness at the local level, including the
formulation of the local disaster preparedness plans and community-based trainings on disaster
preparedness, were conducted.
Local governments continued to promote the organization/operationalization of Barangay Disaster
Coordinating Councils (BDCC), as well as volunteer fire brigades. Camiguin was able to establish
volunteer fire brigades at the barangay, municipal and provincial levels.
Malaybalay City has established 117 communication centers with trained personnel and modernized
rescue and operation equipment. The citys Geographic Information System (GIS) and the Malaybalay
Integrated Survey System (MISS) facilitated the Disaster Mapping/Risk Area Profiling. Iligan City, on
the other hand, adopted an information system at the traffic management office that maintains a
database of all traffic citations for better traffic monitoring.

32

Regional Socio-Economic Trends, 2010 and the RDC-X MONITOR, 2010 First Quarter Issue

Good Governance and Peace and Order

The region conducted the 2009 Fire Olympics Competition with Camiguin PDCC Response Group as
the overall champion. The said competition brought BFP personnel in the region together,
strengthened their camaraderie, and enhanced their skills along firefighting.
Seven LGUs in the region garnered the Gawad Kalasag awards and Best Disaster Coordinating
Councils (BDCCs). Outstanding city disaster council for the year was awarded to Iligan City, which in
2008 had formulated its disaster plan. The city also had four BDCCs and three volunteer groups
organized.
The Bureau of Mines and Geosciences (MGB) continues to conduct geohazard assessment at the
barangay/municipal level which is important in integrating DRR in the LGUs development and land
use plans. At the regional level, DRR/CCA orientations/briefings including two major fora were
conducted by RDC and RDCC to generate support from local chief executives, heads of national
government/regional line agencies, non-government/peoples organizations, academe and
academic institutions and the private sector.
In 2009, the RDC-X launched the project Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change
Adaptation (DRR/CCA) in Local Development Planning and Decision-Making Processes. This project
aims to capacitate the LGUs in mainstreaming/integrating DRR/CCA into their plans to build safer
and resilient communities. This is being implemented by the NEDA with fund support from the UNDP
and the AusAID. A supplement to the Guidelines on PLPEM, is the Guidelines on Mainstreaming
Disaster Risk Reduction in Sub-national Development and Land Use Physical Planning. Part of the
project roll-out is the utilization of these Guidelines by the LGUs in the preparation of their DRR/CCAenhanced Provincial Development and Physical Framework Plans (PDPFPs).

Peace and Order and Public Safety


Development cannot thrive in an environment bereft of peace, order and security. The national
government's Strategic Framework and Action Plan for Inclusive Growth2 echoes this truth stating,
a society that wants to modernize requires peace and order. The document cited the 2003 Poverty
Small Area Estimates (PSAE) that more than 50 percent of the top 20 poorest provinces in the
country are in Mindanao; two of these (Lanao del Norte and Misamis Occidental) are in the region,
and further linked poverty to the peace and order problem haunting these areas for decades.
Communities cannot pursue meaningful social, political, economic, even religious, activities unless
their lives and livelihood are secured either from human or natural threats.3 War and natural
disasters destroy properties, disrupt livelihoods and displace people.
The past planning period dwelt on four strategic areas to maintain public safety and security. These
were crime management, pursuit for lasting peace, disposition of justice, and disaster preparedness
and response.

2 A Strategic Framework and Action Plan for Inclusive Growth


3 Article 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)

33

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Crime Management
Strategies for crime management included mobilizing the community in the anti-crime effort, and
professionalizing and modernizing the police and the military.
Activities that served to maintain peace and security in the region were the revitalization of Patrol
117 (police hotline), activation of peace and order councils, conduct of seminars on the
improvement of peace and order in local communities, and the formulation of Integrated Area
Community Public Safety Plans (IACPSP).
A major contributory factor to crime prevention and resolution was the establishment of the
Barangay Intelligence Network (BIN), a people-based network. A total of 2,484 BINs were
established in the region that intensified intelligence monitoring. Coordination with the military and
intelligence counterparts in the region complemented the strength of the police force which had a
ratio of about 1:1,000 in 2008, twice lower than its target for the plan period of 1:500.
Thus, crime volume from 2004-2008 showed a decreasing trend. Total crime volume in the first
three quarters of 20094 averaged 6,177 per quarter from only 1,649 in the second quarter to
11,259 in the last quarter. The statistical increase in crime volume did not necessarily mean a
worsening situation, but was a result of more efficient and accurate reporting under the new national
crime reporting system.
Despite the declining trend in crime incidence over the five-year period, crime solution efficiency,
however, was decreasing. Based on the new definition of crime solution, crime solution efficiency for
2009 was highest in Lanao del Norte and Misamis Occidental at 38 percent and 29 percent,
respectively.
Table 20. Crime Statistics
Region X : 2004-2008
Indicator
Crime Volume
Crime Solved
Crime Solution Efficiency (%)
Source: PNP-X

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

3,981
3,644
91.53

3,929
3,635
92.52

3,624
3,335
92.03

3,506
3,168
90.36

3,527
3,185
90.30

To support the modernization of law enforcement capabilities, the region has been advocating for
the implementation of AFP modernization program and for the bill modernizing the PNP.
As of 2009, there were 13 identified criminal gangs operating in the region. With an estimated 145
members, these groups were involved in various crimes from robbery or hold-up and thievery to gun
running and drug trafficking.

4 Effective the second quarter of 2009, the Philippine National Police (PNP) adopted a new system of generating and recording data of crime incidents. Under the
new system, sources of data have been expanded to include the barangays, NBI, PDEA, BFAR, DENR, DSWD, and other law enforcers in the community. The
new system also modified the definition of crimes solved, namely, crimes are considered solved after the suspects are identified, evidences collected, warrant
of arrest issued, case filed in court, and the suspects already arrested. Before that, the definition did not include suspects already arrested. Thus, data from
previous year could not be compared with data gathered using the new system.

34

Good Governance and Peace and Order

Pursuit for Lasting Peace


The locally initiated GRP-RPM-M5 peace process has been moving forward and gaining successes
since it started in 2003. A formal agreement on the cessation of hostilities was signed in 2005. In
2006, two documents were signed: the Guidelines and Ground Rules for the Implementation and
Monitoring of the Agreement on the Cessation of Hostilities and the Joint Resolution to Further
Advance the Gains of the GRPRPMM Peace Process. Various peace and development activities
have already been implemented including infrastructure and livelihood projects in the fifteen
barangays of Sultan Naga Dimaporo, Lanao del Norte.
Presently, the region is confronted with the communist terrorist movement, the secessionist
movement and their breakaway groups.
As of third quarter of 2009, the PNP6 reported that Lanao del Norte was affected by both the MoroIslamic Liberation Front (MILF) and the National Democratic Front, with the former getting a
stronghold in the province. The latter, on the other hand, still operates in more barangays in Misamis
Occidental than in any other province in the region.
The Internal Displacement Monitoring Center 7 comprehensively documents the displacements of
people worldwide. Its November 2009 report8 on the Philippines revealed that 148,000 people were
displaced in the province of Lanao del Norte due to the August 2008 AFP-MILF hostilities. The MILF
attacked the municipalities of Kolambugan and Kauswagan, in the said province as a reaction to the
botched Memorandum of Agreement on ancestral domain (MOA-AD) that would have created a
Bangsamoro Juridical Entity.
Of the 148,000 displaced people, only 52 percent had been accommodated in evacuation centers.
Households reporting crop production as a means of livelihood dropped from 92 to 18 percent.
Misamis Occidental was not spared. There were 11,000 people displaced, though almost 81 percent
were accommodated inside evacuation centers.
Fortunately 20,557 families were able to quickly return or resettle as the government and civil
society organizations (CSOs) were able to provide various early recovery and rehabilitation projects.
To rebuild the lives of these internally displaced persons (IDPs), peace and development
communities (PDC)9 had been established. Fifty PDCs had been created in Lanao del Norte by the
end of 2008. Still, as of August 2009, 260 families in LDN have been displaced.

5 Government of the Republic of the Philippines-Rebolusyonaryong Partido ng Manggagawa ng Mindanao Peace Process.
http://www.balaymindanaw.org/grprpmm/about.html
6 PNP Regional Office No. 10 3rd Quarter 2009 Report
7 The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre was established in 1998 by the Norwegian Refugee Council, the leading international body monitoring conflictinduced internal displacement worldwide. http://www.internal-displacement.org.
8 IDMC-NRC. PHILIPPINES: Cycle of conflict and neglect: Mindanao's displacement and protection crisis. A profile of the internal displacement situation, 5
November, 2009
9 Act for Peace Programme, http://www.actforpeace.ph/communities/western mindanao.htm

35

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Other projects were likewise forged by the local government of Lanao del Norte with CSOs operating
in the province. Nine infrastructure projects were completed through the help of the Growth with
Equity in Mindanao (GEM) from solar driers to trading centers and foot bridges. In the middle of
2010, there were 808 more families expected to avail of 55 core shelters, health stations, day care
centers, livelihood development support, and seminars relating to Culture of Peace, Islamic
leadership and governance, United Nations Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement (UNGPID)
and disaster risk reduction, which cost almost P12 million.
Table 21. Early Recovery and Rehabilitation Projects for Internally Displaced Persons
(as of May 2010)
Project /Program/Activities

Number of Beneficiaries

Relief goods
5,651 families
Supplementary feeding
8,305 children
Medicines
5,869 families
Psychosocial services and therapy
12,528 adults and children
for trauma healing
Temporary shelters
1,094 families
Construction of core shelters
641 units
Level 1 water systems
90
Level 2 water systems
14
Source: ACT for Peace, http://www.actforpeace.ph

Project /Program/Activities
Barangay Health Stations
Mini-pharmacies for the barangays
Integrated health and nutrition program
Farm inputs and fishing gears
Community enterprise for IDP women
Play areas
Grassroots-based peace building dialogs

The violent incidents and similar hostilities made almost simultaneously in some areas in Mindanao
caused consular offices in the country to issue advisories against travelling to Mindanao. This
placed the region in the hotspot and the distorted perception that the whole of Region X was not
secured, was provided with evidence.
While the atrocity and the travel advisories did not impact significantly on the economy of the
region10, the fact remains that lives were lost and thousands of families were displaced from their
homes and their livelihood11.
This threatreal or otherwiseof insurgency and secession perpetuated by the communist guerrillas
and the Moro rebels, respectively, more than the crimes attendant to growth in population, continue
to be the major constraints to the regions sustained development.

Disposition of Justice
Injustice is one issue that triggers another crime or results to armed struggle. Thus, a just and
speedy resolution of cases is just as critical as law enforcement as a deterrent. Of the 166 cases of
human rights violation recorded from 2004 to 2008, there were 125 terminated, 11 more were
archived, and only eight were filed.12 Number of indigent litigants served reached 21,011.
Improving the barangay justice system and increasing public access to justice especially by the
marginalized were the strategies identified to ensure speedy disposition of cases and equal

36

10

Quarterly Regional Economic Situationer, Third Quarter 2008 and Annual 2008

11

Internal Displacement Monitoring Center (IDMC). Cycle of conflict and neglect: Mindanao's displacement and protection crisis, November 2009

12

Regional Socio-Economic Trends

Good Governance and Peace and Order

protection under the law. To this end, a Mediation, Conciliation, Arbitration and Penalty Guide for
Punong Barangays and Pangkat members were introduced to the lupon. Likewise, trainings on the
barangay human rights program were also conducted for the Lupong Tagapamayapa.
Local governments actively participated in the Lupong Tagapamayapa Incentive Awards Program,
producing 11 winners. Two were national awardees, namely, barangay Tubod (Iligan City) as Most
Outstanding Lupon in the Philippines, and barangay Bugo (Cagayan de Oro City) as 2nd runner up.

II. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


Governance
The conditions for economic growth and investments are directly related to the capacity and
credibility of governing institutions. Efficient, accessible and responsive public institutions build a
sustainable platform for public confidence, community participation and create an effective vehicle
for public and private partnerships. While governance covers a wide range of activities, its focus
during the plan period entails enhancing the efficiency and transparency of government services and
interventions for the common good; reducing corruption; enhance capacity-building; mainstreaming
of major development concepts/norms such as human rights, GAD, DRR/CCA, sustainable
development among others; resource mobilization; community participation/empowerment;
volunteerism; focus targeting and provision of social safety nets.

Improve government procedures and develop human resource to reduce occasions for corruption
and bring violators to justice
A major challenge for the region includes sustaining the high growth path that it has experienced, but
was impeded by the worldwide financial crisis in 2007-2008. Good governance and observance of
the rule of law contribute to the economic rebound by strengthening investor confidence. The
regions tremendous growth potential may be realized if investors are attracted, and would likely
sustain their operations because of favorable investment climate fuelled by good governance.
Priority activities in fighting corruption are: a) improving efficiency in resolving corruption cases
brought to the legal and judicial system and carrying out sanctions against violators; b) establishing
well-defined and implementable rules and procedures in transacting with government, such as those
prescribed in the Government Procurement Reform Act (R.A. No. 9184); and c) professionalizing the
career civil service. The region can support legislation that will insulate from political intervention
the filling up of government positions, and reduce the scope of political appointments.

Strengthen democratic processes thru continuing education, inclusive participation, cooperativism,


and volunteerism
Stable and credible democratic processes strengthen investors confidence. While Northern
Mindanao is not known for massive protest actions, it has experienced sporadic incidents of dissent
from indigenous peoples and outlawed members of MILF, which are manifestations of issues that
were not successfully resolved through legitimate venues. Pre-empting these incidents may be done
through expanding opportunities and venues for participation by the private sector (CSOs, NGOs,
POs) in various development endeavors. As a guiding principle in planning, participation ensures
that all points of view are taken into consideration. It also recognizes that the private sector is the
real engine of growth.

37

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

To enhance political stability is the conduct of persistent and continuous voters education. This is
certainly a challenging task as long as many voters would rather give priority to satisfying immediate
survival needs during election time, and not really pay attention to issues or platform of governance
or past performance of incumbent officials. Ensuring adequate safeguards to the integrity of the
next elections whether automated or manual is a worthy policy to pursue for the purpose of
enhancing political stability and electing the best qualified officials.
Foster the creation and functionality of cooperatives as a practical vehicle for promoting self-reliance
and harnessing people power towards the attainment of economic development and social justice
shall be continuously undertaken.
Likewise, greater participation and involvement through volunteerism from among the people is also
seen as a significant strategy that will bring collective efforts in the attainment of development goals
and objectives. Thus, dynamic partnership among the government, the private sector and the
community, through the complementation, maximization and integration of efforts and resources
shall be strengthened. Through volunteerism, talents, expertise, time and energies will have to be
tapped and mobilized to ensure cost-effective and appropriate resource sharing in the provision of
technical assistance, delivery of social services, undertaking humanitarian efforts, and responding to
disasters, among others.

Ensure mainstreaming of the following in various development planning processes: Gender and
Development, Population and Development, Human Rights Based Approach, Disaster Risk
Reduction/Climate Change Adaptation and Sustainable Development Concepts
Providing more equitable access to opportunities aligns with the regions challenge of reducing
poverty and income inequality. The capacities of people, especially of the disadvantaged, need to be
expanded. The mainstreaming of GAD, PopDev, HRBA, DRR/CCA and SD, among others in the
various planning processes ensures that the concerns of the vulnerable groups are prioritized.
These require a lot of painstaking analysis of data and ability to arrive at appropriate
recommendations for redress or for taking advantage of opportunities. These are soft skills that
need to be learned and developed by project and development planners and implementers
especially at the local level.

Improve taxation and fiscal management


The high level of current needs in all aspects of development due to population increase and rising
expectations brought about by the availability and rapid changes of information and communications
technology increase the pressure for LGUs to deliver quality and comprehensive services. LGUs
shall have the capacity to mobilize resources and maximize their taxing powers. The tax effort in the
region (BIR and BOC collections combined as percentage of GRDP) averaging at around 10 percent
in recent years, needs to at least approximate if not exceed the national level. The IRA, while
expected to increase along with increased revenue collection and as the economy grows, should be
augmented by income from local sources. More LGUs should wean themselves from IRA
dependency and exercise their mandated authority to raise revenues from local sources. The ability
of LGUs to mobilize local resources may be taken as a core indicator of good governance.
Moreover, LGUs should strive to be creditworthy and able to access funds from official development
assistance (ODA) facilities. The current thrust of Public Private Partnership (PPP) for infrastructure
development is an opportunity for expanding the scope of LGU funding. The LGUs should take a

38

Good Governance and Peace and Order

facilitative role in expanding access to credit of micro and small businesses in their locality provided
by existing laws and in encouraging the development of cooperatives.
The need to rationalize the criteria for internal revenue allocation should lead towards making the
sharing scheme an incentive for LGUs to work harder in improving local governance and achieving
genuine local autonomy.

Improve local investment programming through the PLPEM guidelines and the Joint Memorandum
Circular No. 1, s. 2007 on the Guidelines on the Harmonization of Local Planning, Investment
Programming, Revenue Administration, Budgeting and Expenditure Management
The effectiveness of development programs starts with the identification of programs and projects
that respond to the needs of the population as reflected in the regional and local development plans.
For this purpose, there is a need to improve local investment programming, using the PLPEM
guidelines and JMC No. 1, s.2007 at the regional and local levels. To assure continuity of programs
and optimization of resources, local government executives need to expand the time frame of their
investment programming from three short years coinciding with their term of office to at least six
years to coincide with the regular medium term planning.
The Investment Programming and Revenue Generation Guidebook should include a legal mandate
for the preparation of six-year investment program. Continuous improvement of program/project
management is needed at the regional and local levels.

Improve the effectiveness and targeting of social safety nets


Providing more equitable access to opportunities is facilitated when reliable data exist that allow
precise targeting of beneficiaries especially of programs providing social safety nets and even
disaster relief. Community-based data gathering and monitoring tools such as the CBMS should be
fully developed and utilized in all LGUs. The results of the NHTS-PR shall also be used for focused
targeting of poverty reduction programs.

Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM)


For the plan period, it shall adhere and call for the full implementation of the Republic Act 10121
Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010, as well as the Climate Change
Act of 2009 (RA 9729). Both laws seek to adopt a disaster risk reduction and management
approach that is holistic, comprehensive, integrated, and proactive in lessening the socio-economic
and environmental impacts of disasters including climate change, and promote the involvement and
participation of all sectors and stakeholders concerned, at all levels, especially the local community.
Moreover, Executive Order No. 888 signed on June 7, 2010 Adopting the Strategic National Action
Plan (SNAP) for Disaster Risk Reduction, 2009-2019 and Institutionalizing DRR laid down 18
priority programs and projects towards building communities resilient to natural disasters through
active engagement with stakeholders at all levels of governance.

39

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Peace and Order and Public Safety


Consistent with the present administrations goal to create a sustainable development for reform
along justice, peace, and security13, Region X aims to attain a more peaceful, orderly and secured
environment with empowered, resilient and productive communities.
The proposed National Security Plan identified four pillars to achieve lasting peace, namely: a)
delivery of basic services; b) economic reconstruction and sustainable development; c) security
sector reform; and d) good governance.
Delivery of basic services is essential in achieving lasting peace as one of the major causes of
dissention is neglect and exclusion from government of these services required for meaningful
human existence.
In conflict-affected areas where lives and livelihoods are lost, rehabilitation and reconstruction have
to be undertaken to rebuild communities and be able to contribute to the growth and development of
the nation.
Reforming the security sector involves restoring the trust and integrity of the law enforcersthose
who vow to protect our lives and properties. A more disciplined and capable security force is vital to
security and sustainable peace and order.
Lastly, as the country is built on democratic principles it is imperative that institutions promote the
needed values like accountability, fairness, justice and the like, to strengthen peoples faith in the
democratic processes and preclude any form of dissatisfaction, restiveness or disorder that will
threaten peace and security.
As this framework employs an inclusive approach to the just resolution of conflicts and the
maintenance of security, the region adopts and works within these four pillars. Governance in this
respect involves administration of justice.
The strategies set out in this chapter are expected to bring about the following outcomes: a)
economically sustainable and empowered, peaceful, orderly and secured communities; b) regained
respect, integrity and high morale of the police and the military; c) more confidence towards the
judiciary and the justice system; and d) more prepared and resilient communities against humaninduced and natural hazards.

Basic services and economic reconstruction


Sustain the initiatives in providing recovery and rehabilitation activities
There are still a few more families displaced from the recent armed hostilities. The recovery and
rehabilitation efforts undertaken both by government agencies and non-governmental organizations
need to be continued to help these people fully regain their dignity as people living in peaceful
communities.

13 The Presidents Social Contract with the Filipino People

40

Good Governance and Peace and Order

Implement more focused, integrated, direct anti-poverty intervention


through convergence of activities
To effectively and efficiently deliver basic services to the IDPs, and to ensure more impact of
intended programs, a more focused approach should be adopted. The Kapit-bisig Laban sa
Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (KALAHI-CIDSS) and the
Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) need to be enhanced particularly on targeting intended
beneficiaries.
Sustain the culture of peace initiatives to once conflict-affected communities
After an experience in terror, communities once affected by armed conflict deserve to live in peace
and harmony; and to sustain such condition in perpetuity by implementing programs that promote
non-violence, equality, human rights, tolerance, and sustainable socioeconomic development. The
PAMANA (Payapa at Masaganang Pamayanan) approach serves as the platform for convergence and
people-powered response to the situation in conflict-affected areas in coordination with key service
delivery agencies of government, and in partnership with peoples organizations, local peace
advocates and international partners.
Continue social integration of former rebel combatants and their families
Former rebels and their families must be provided with utmost support for them to recover their faith
in the democratic processes and be fully reintegrated into the society. This gesture is an indication
that the government is sincere in its effort to help these communities rise above their present
predicament and is a step towards attracting adherents to peaceful means of resolving conflicts and
winning the peace.

Security sector reform


Provide a more adequate picture of the public safety and security, and, peace and order situation
Quarterly data on peace and order situation include only the volume of crimes by types, whether
index or non-index. Regular and timely information related to illegal drug use, human trafficking,
human rights violations, terrorism and the like are still wanting.
Capacitate LGUs, POCs, local communities and civil society groups to make neighborhoods safe
One of the security pillars of society is the community. The organization of community-based
intelligence or peacekeeping network has proven to be effective in deterring or solving crimes.
Besides, along with the LGU and the local peace and order councils, these groups have to be
capacitated on conflict management and peace-building.
Ensure peace and order and public safety especially in highly urbanized centers
The urban center is the heart of socio-economic activities. This is where people converge; this is
where the action is. A slight disturbance on peace in these areas sends shocks and ripples far and
wide. A failure in security sends a chilling message to the peripheral areas which would become
more vulnerable to the imminent threat. Ensuring the safety of these areas is, thus, critical to
maintaining a sense of security throughout the region.
Promote the rights-based policy in law enforcement
Law enforcers are in the middle of the issue of human rights violations. From the point of view of the
victims, the enforcers become the violators and crime perpetrators themselves.

41

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Develop transformational leaders


The Philippine National Police understands that in order to win the fight against criminality it must
also win the hearts of the people it seeks to protect. Posed with this challenge, the institution came
up with a program that seeks to reform the security force and develop leaders who will transform the
institution from within.
Support the PNP legislative agenda on institutional development
To support its vision of transforming the police sector, the PNP promotes for the enactment of the
following legislation: PNP Reorganizational Bill, Comprehensive Firearms Bill and PNP Modernization
Bill.

Good Governance
Speedy and efficient administration of justice
Justice delayed is justice denied, it is said. A speedy and efficient legal process will positively reflect
on the judiciary and the whole of the judicial system, thus gains the confidence of the people
towards the courts.

42

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

III. RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING


MATRIX

43

44

Good Governance and Peace and Order

45

46

Good Governance and Peace and Order

47

48

Good Governance and Peace and Order

49

50

Good Governance and Peace and Order

51

52

Good Governance and Peace and Order

53

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Good Governance and Peace and Order

55

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Good Governance and Peace and Order

57

58

Chapter 3: Access, Logistics, and


Other Infrastructure Services
Paving the Way for Greater Mobility and Connectivity

I. ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES


The infrastructure sector contributed significantly in stimulating economic growth and in mobilizing
private sector investments to support the growing requirements of all sectors of the economy in
Region X. However, the increasing demand for adequate, reliable and efficient physical
infrastructure support facilities and utilities has been among one of the greatest challenges of the
region.

Transportation
Road development in the region is still a major concern. As of December 2009, the region has a
total road network of 22,078.166 kilometers, which comprised about eight percent national roads
and 92 percent local roads. Of the total 1,701.322 kilometers of national roads, about 69 percent
(1,180.542 km.) are paved. The remaining 31 percent (520.780 km.) are still graveled which are
mostly located in the province of Bukidnon. The total length of national roads increased slightly by
one percent annually from 1,623 kilometers in 2004. The total paved road has increased by 3.7
percent annually for the period 2004-2009.
For the local provincial roads in the region, only 12 percent (312.810 km.) are paved while 88
percent (2,640.528 km.) are either graveled or earth road. Majority of the graveled or earth roads
are in the provinces of Misamis Oriental (831.390 km.) and Bukidnon (753.190 km.). The
improvement of the physical conditions of local provincial and barangay roads remains a major
challenge to local governments. The allotment for road maintenance has to compete with other
sector development concerns in the LGUs limited internal revenue allotment (IRA).
Table 22. Roads and Bridges Length Inventory
Region X: As of 31 December 2009
(In kilometers)
National

Province/City
Bukidnon
Camiguin
Lanao del Norte
Mis. Occidental
Misamis Oriental
Cagayan de Oro
Regional Total

Roads

Bridges

Total

724.901
63.536
306.350
224.437
302.730
79.3680
1,701.322

3.617
0.627
2.319
2.168
4.650
1.092
14.474

728.518
64.163
308.670
226.605
307.380
80.460
1,715.796

Local
Road*

Total

Land Area
(sq. km.)

7,258.780
428.910
5,235.900
2,821.839
3,914.801
702.140
20,362.370

7,987.298
493.073
5,544.570
3,048.444
4,222.181
782.600
22,078.166

10,498.590
291.870
3,824.790
2,055.220
3,102.900
412.800
20,186.170

Road
Density
(km./
sq. m.)
0.761
1.689
1.450
1.483
1.361
1.896
1.094

* Local road includes, provincial, municipal, city and barangay roads


Source: DPWH-X, RPFP: 2004-2030

59

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Several portions of the existing strategic roads network in Region X are either already overloaded or
will experience overloading in a couple of years. Traffic congestion is evident in Cagayan de Oro and
in other major cities of the region. Overloading hastens the deterioration of the roads and
compromises safety of the passengers and other road users. Moreover, farm to market roads (FMRs)
linking production areas to market centers are inadequate or inaccessible, with only six percent of
the total length of 14,121 kilometers are paved.
Figure 7. Container Traffic (in TEUs)
Mindanao Container Terminal, PHIVIDEC

Figure 8. Distribution and Classification of Airports

The regions airports have limited capacity


and cannot accommodate wide bodied
aircrafts. The location of the Cagayan de
Oro Lumbia Airport poses high-risk for
take-off and landing of aircrafts, especially
during bad weather which often caused
cancellation of flights. This situation
reinforces the need to fast track the
implementation of the Laguindingan
International Airport in Misamis Oriental.
Meanwhile, the major seaports in the
region provide additional and improved
accessibility and mobility to the public and
business sectors. To make these ports
more efficient and effective, various ports
development initiatives are being
undertaken such as enhancing berthing
facilities and providing additional seaport
facilities to handle increasing volume of
cargoes and ship calls. Moreover,
harnessing the full potential of
international seaport in the region, such as
the Mindanao Container Terminal (MCT) is
crucial. The MCT is not maximized
because shippers from Bukidnon and
Cotabato prefer to ship thru Davao due to
unfavorable geometric structure or design
of roads (accident prone especially for
trailers/cargo trucks).

Power and Electrification


The power generation efficiency of the region has decreased by 16.4 percent from 92 percent in
2004 to only 75.7 percent in 2009. The decline in the efficiency was caused by the non-operation of
the 44.80 MW Iligan Diesel Power Plant II and the diminished dependable capacity of hydroelectric
power plants due to vulnerability to drought, siltation, and wear and tear over the years. Climate
change likewise affected the dependable capacities of the hydro power plants as temperature within
the watershed areas increased and rainfall pattern changes. The declining forest cover contributed
to the increase in temperature within the watershed areas.

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The Mindanao power peak demand grew from 1,049 to 1,390 megawatts or an increase of 5.8
percent over five years (2004-2009). The DOE projected that the Mindanao peak demand would
increase from 1,049 megawatts in 2004 to 1,864 megawatts in 2013 or a projected growth rate of
6.6 percent. In Region X, the power peak demand grew by 3.5 percent from 391 megawatts in 2005
to 464 megawatts in 2009. With the increasing economic activities and expected influx of major
industries, there is a need for more investments along power generation. Of the target 1,118
megawatts of additional power capacity, only 19 percent (211 megawatts) was added in the
generation capacity of Northern Mindanao within the period 2004-2009. In terms of number of
power generation projects, two of the ten indicative projects were completed within the plan period.
The investment for power generation is now vested with the private sector as mandated by the
Electric Power Industry Reform Act (EPIRA) of 2001. The lack of private sector interest to put up the
identified additional capacities in Mindanao is a critical factor that contributed to the power crisis
experienced in 2010. This can be attributed to regulatory uncertainties, bureaucratic delays,
creditworthiness of offtakers and peace and order situation in some areas.
Along power transmission, the Agus 2-Kibawe
and Abaga-Tagoloan 138 kV lines are the
main corridors currently connecting the Agus
complex to the Mindanao grid. The tripping
of the Agus 2-Kibawe line in the past due to
bombing incidents had resulted in huge
power swing to the other corridors, one of
which is the Pulangi-Kibawe line, resulting in
N-1 loading violation. The ongoing
implementation of the Abaga-KirahonMaramag-Bunawan transmission line
projects will address the problem on power
swing. With this 230 kV-designed corridor,
which extends from the Agus hydro complex
in the north to the Bunawan substation in the
southeast, the huge hydro capacity of Agus
(about 38% of the total grid) will have a
reliable backbone to allow the delivery of its
output to the major load centers located in
Transmission Towers, Maramag-Bunawan
Southern Mindanao (about half of the
islands total demand). Security problem, as what has been experienced in the bombing of Agus 2Kibawe and other installations, remains a serious concern.

Communications
In 2009, the number of equipped telephone lines in Region X was 148,206, decreasing by 4.42
percent annually over the past five years. About 48 percent of equipped telephone lines were
subscribed, leaving 77,118 equipped telephone lines still open to subscription. As of fourth quarter
2009, the region has a telephone density of 3.75 lines per 100 persons for equipped telephone
lines, but only 1.80 lines per 100 persons for subscribed telephones.
Wider accessibility of the cellular phones remained a key factor that kept the subscription rate of
equipped telephone lines low and decreasing. The region was able to provide favorable conditions
for the telecommunication companies to install additional and dispersed cellular towers/facilities

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with an average annual increase of 15 percent during the period, 2005-2009. The number of
cellular sites in the region reached 514 as of December 2009 with Globe Telecom covering 46.1
percent, followed by Smart (36.2 %) and Digitel (17.7 %).
While reforms in the telecommunication sector have resulted in the installation of additional and
dispersed cellular towers and increase of available lines and service providers, the benefits are felt
mainly in the major cities of the region. There is still low connectivity in rural areas due to limited
telecommunication facilities. Further, it is still a challenge for the telephone companies in the region
to increase the number of telephone lines interconnected to various service providers particularly in
urban areas to remedy failed cross calls especially during peak hours.
Figure 9. Level of Irrigation Development
Region X: As of December 2009

Figure 10. Proportion of Households


by Level of Water Supply
Region 10, 2008

Water Resources Development


The present irrigation system provides water to only
46 percent of the total potential irrigable area of
123,272 hectares. The lack of irrigation facilities is
very pronounced in areas with great potential for
agricultural production such as Bukidnon and Lanao
del Norte which still have 49,411 and 6,833
hectares of unserved irrigable land, respectively.
There is a need to provide a comprehensive irrigation
development package that would include farmers
assistance for land conversion and institutional
development for irrigators association.
Poor flood control and drainage system and heavy
siltation in rivers and creeks increased the flood
hazard and vulnerability of the region. Hence, the
construction and improvement of drainage canals
and flood control measures should be prioritized in
the budget of the LGUs and DPWH. Disaster risk
reduction should also be mainstreamed in the
improvement of flood control and drainage system,
especially in highly susceptible areas.
In CY 2008, the proportion of the total households in
the region which have access to potable water supply
reached 88 percent. Reducing the 94,969
households or about 12 percent of the total
household population with doubtful sources or
unsafe water supply is still a concern to address.
The problem is most evident in Lanao del Norte,
Camiguin and Bukidnon which posted at 68.9, 10.8
and 10.1 percent, respectively.

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Social Infrastructure
From 2004 to 2009, the DPWH constructed a total of 790 classrooms with total expenditures of
about PhP 340.107 million. The total number of classroom constructed fell short from the plan
target of 200 classrooms per year or a total of 1,200 classrooms over six years. The total classroom
backlog as of SY 2009-2010 already reached 2,156.
Figure 11. Number of Classrooms Constructed
Region X: 2004-2009

Source: DPWH X RPMES Reports/MIS Database

For health facilities, the region


has a total of 1,028 barangay
health stations (BHS), 95
municipal health centers (MHC)
and 109 hospitals as of
December 2009. In terms of
ratio to population, one BHS
serves 4,060 persons, one
MHC to 43,338 persons and a
hospital bed to 974 persons.
Thus, there is a need for
additional construction of
MHCs to contribute to the
improved accessibility to health
services since the existing MHC
to population ratio of 1:43,338
is far below the standard ratio
of 1 MHC to 20,000
population.

II. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


As the backbone of the regions development, adequate and efficient logistics system, integrated
intermodal transportation system, and infrastructure support and services are crucial in enhancing
access and capacity for the efficient and economic movement of people, goods, services and
information.
The establishment of the Mindanao Container Terminal (MCT) in PHIVIDEC paves the industrial trade
development in the region. The operation of the Laguindingan Airport in 2012 shall also boost trade
and services, and other economic activities in the region. Other complementary and support
infrastructure facilities shall also flourish which could translate to the creation of more jobs and
investments in the region.
In asserting the role of Northern Mindanao as the gateway and industrial core and trade center in
the South, among the key strategies that shall be pursued along infrastructure development are:
Maximize utilization of the MCT; operation of the Laguindingan Airport by 2012; and push for
the establishment of the Cagayan de Oro-Iligan Corridor (CIC) Mindanao Railway to support
the full development of the Cagayan-Iligan Industrial and Trade Corridor;

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Complete construction of ongoing bridge projects along national roads and prioritize
upgrading of national and local roads to address traffic congestion, improve safety in urban
centers, and enhance linkage between growth centers and strategic tourism destinations;
Development and continuing improvements of logistics system and transport infrastructure
(i.e., land, sea and air), through private sector engagement, as well as public and private
partnership (PPP), to better link the regions economy to the rest of Mindanao, as well as to
Luzon and Visayas;
Prioritize construction/maintenance/rehabilitation of local roads and farm-to-market roads
linking production areas to processing and market centers to boost agri-business ventures;
Establish an efficient agri-business logistics system (e.g., farm-to-market roads and postharvest facilities) to strengthen exports, as well as hasten distribution of agriculture products
to domestic markets outside the region;
Improve the level of irrigation development to attain self-sufficiency and surplus production
in rice;
Improve the communication connectivity and enhance the ICT subsector which are among
the key targets under MDG No. 8 of developing a global partnership for development;
Improve a) power generation system through private sector investments (including renewable
energy projects) and by enhancing capacities of hydro power plants through sustained forest
protection, enforcement of forest laws and plantation establishments, and proper watershed
management; b) power transmission system and; c) distribution systems to ensure stable
and quality supply of energy to drive dynamic and sustainable development;
Improve household level of electrification towards a better quality of life especially in the
rural areas; and
All infrastructure development shall comply with quality and safety standards and with the
accessibility law (BP344).
Key infrastructure development strategies along social development are also identified to support
the national strategy of equalizing access to development opportunities as follows:
Provide people access to safe, adequate and sustainable water supply which is a basic
human right and one of the key targets under MDG No.7 of halving by 2015 the proportion of
population without sustainable access to safe drinking water; and
Construction of disaster-resilient classrooms and health facilities through PPP as key
elements for inclusive growth
Finally, infrastructure support to manage/reduce disaster risks and adapt to climatic changes shall
be undertaken by preventing and mitigating natural disasters such as flooding through the
establishment of flood control and drainage systems, thus ensuring sustainable development of the
region.

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III. Results Evaluation and Monitoring Matrix

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

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77

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Chapter 4: Trade, Industry and Tourism


Unleashing its resources and potentials

I. ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES


Both the industry and services sectors posted accelerated growths from 2.0 percent in 2004 to 8.6
percent in 2007 for the industry sector and from 6.3 percent to 8.1 percent for the services sector
during the same period. Even with the positive performance, these sectors were not spared from the
global financial crisis. Growth rates plunged in 2009 to as low as 3.1 percent and 1.7 percent for
the industry and services sectors, respectively.
The high growth of industry and services sector in 2007 lessened the impact of the global financial
crisis on the regions economy. Thus, up to 2009, despite the declining growth rates, GVA of the
industry and services sectors continued to gradually rise.
Between 2007 and 2009, the services sector continually contributed the biggest share to the
regions economy, although the industry sector ranked behind the agriculture, fishery and forestry
sector. With a combined average share of 69 percent for the same period, it is notable that the
regions economy is largely fueled by its industry and services sectors.
Despite these gains, more concerted efforts have to be undertaken to ensure that the region attains
its potential for economic growth. In general, there is still a strong need to improve Northern
Mindanaos image as a viable investment destination attracting both foreign and local investors, as
well as, encourage more tourists and visitors. Thus, local administration and governance has to be
strengthened to respond to concerns on red tape and procedural hassles, which are serious
deterrents to potential investors.

Investments and Entrepreneurship Development


On the overall, entry of investments to the region was slow during the previous plan period. The
value of DTI-monitored investments from 2004 to 2009 totaled PhP97.62 billion, which was only 73
percent of the plan target. The annual growth rate was negative 4.6 percent. Also, there were
notable decreases of investment inflows from 2007-2009, an indication of low investor confidence
and slower business expansions.
Over the six-year period, the bulk of investments was classified as agriculture-based, covering 22
percent of the regional total. This was closely followed by infrastructure and services with a 20
percent share, and trading with 15.5 percent share. There were evident shifts in the sectoral
distribution of investments every year, indicating changes in business priorities.
The need for local government units to actively generate investments was also felt during the period.
To date, there are only 14 LGUs with investment incentives codes and only six functional investment
promotion units in the region.
To deal with the decreasing entry of investments for large industries as monitored by DTI, the region
looked inward for investments through the campaign of developing the micro, small and medium
enterprises.

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

A rise in the number of MSMEs was evident during the plan period, surpassing the target by 29
percent at 9,609 new MSMEs developed. These MSMEs also provided a total of 204,484 new jobs
which was more than double the target of 95,356. Gross domestic sales during the period was
PhP2.76 billion, surpassing the target of PhP2 billion by 38 percent.
Even with these gains, the growth potential of MSMEs is still hampered by lack of competitiveness.
This indicates the need to intensify the provision of business counseling services, provision of
skills/productivity/managerial/entrepreneurship trainings, integrated product development and
marketing assistance.
The amount of loans released to MSMEs was only PhP233.95 million or 47 percent of the plan
target. This implies that most MSMEs assisted by the DTI had opted not to fully avail of the approved
maximum loan amount by the GFIs. In addition, there were loan releases made only a year after its
approval, thereby contributing to the disparity between amount of loan approved and amount of loan
released per year.
In general, access to financing remained to be minimal. In addition, there is low availment of loans
due to the inability of MSMEs to comply with documentary and/or collateral requirements and the
high minimum loanable amount offered by GFIs.

Exports Development and Promotion


Exports remained strong throughout the previous plan period, except in year 2009 when it fell below
target, and posted the highest annual decline at 41 percent. Total regional exports over the five-year
period amounted to USD3.27 billion, with an average annual growth rate of 6.6 percent.
However, there are still areas needing urgent interventions especially along reducing the cost of
doing business, enterprise support, enabling business environment, infrastructure and logistics.
Among the difficulties cited by exporters were high freight cost, cumbersome export procedures and
informal fees that add to their cost and undermine their competitiveness. Added to this is the lack of
market information particularly on the foreign buyers, their products of interests, market guides, and
market requirements by potential markets, pricing mechanisms and other export-related
information.
Another related concern is the need to improve product quality and address the high cost of
packaging materials that usually affect the competitiveness of the product. In the area of product
quality assurance and standardization, the region has very limited laboratory facilities to carry out
various tests required by industries.
Tourism Development
With its rich natural endowments, varied cultural heritage, good climatic conditions (outside the
typhoon belt), peoples natural aptitude for music, arts, hospitality and entertainment and good pool
of human resource, Northern Mindanao can compete and win along tourism development.
The performance of the tourism sector, with total tourist arrival rising from 701,266 in 2004 to
1,048,662 in 2009, indicates the regions strong potential to become a major tourist destination in
the country. Although the countrys approach along tourism development is complementation of

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various tourist attractions and destinations, the region still needs to harness its tourism potentials to
become a leading ecotourism destination in the South14.
Table 23. Tourist Arrivals
Region X: 2004-2009
Types of
Tourists
Domestic
Foreign
Total
AGR (%)

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

676,568
24,698
701,266

678,210
29,597
707,807
0.93

854,031
39,040
893,071
26.2

1,355,104
41,226
1,396,330
56.4

998,429
41,933
1,040,362
-25.5

999,701
48,961
1,048,662
0.8

Total
5,562,043
225,455
5,787,498

% Share
96.10
3.90
100

Source: DOT-X

The promotion of adventure tourism packages, upgrading of major entry points to key tourist
destinations and participation to domestic and international expositions have enticed more tourists
to come to the region and contributed to the 174 percent accomplishment over the RDP 2004-2009
target of 3.3 million visitors. However, the region still needs to develop potential ecotourism areas to
benefit from the growing global interest on ecotourism. Concerted efforts are also required to make
festivals and key tourist destinations unique, highlighting the local culture and indigenous arts and
activities, making these destinations more attractive to visitors. Moreover, there is still a need to
urge private sector investments along putting-up needed facilities and services to widen participation
in tourism development in the localities.
Data from 2004-2009 revealed an almost double increase of foreign tourist arrival in the region from
24,698 in 2004 to 48,961 in 2009. Majority of these travelers came from the USA, Japan and
Korea, while sizable growths were registered from Saudi Arabia, Canada, Taiwan, United Kingdom,
and the Netherlands. More foreign visitors are expected to come to the region when the
international standard Laguindingan Airport will operate in 2012. Thus, necessary preparations shall
be undertaken to respond to the foreseen growth and demand for tourism-related services and
facilities in the area.
One of the anticipated growths in major activities is along MICE (meetings, incentives, conventions
and exhibitions) tourist segment which has shown substantial improvements in the past six years. A
total of 18,320 events were held in the region in the previous plan period registering 1,625,533
event delegates. However, average hotel occupancy rate from 2004-2009 is only 60.1 percent. The
region shall further encourage longer stay of tourists in the area. Specifically, the province of Lanao
del Norte shall capitalize on the availability of major sports and convention facility to attract major
conventions and national sports activities. At present, the facility is still largely underutilized.
Another contributory factor to the overall performance of the tourism industry is the adoption of the
tourism hub expansion concept. This concept clusters major attractions into major hubs and
positions collective attractions towards complementing themes, thereby providing diverse tour

14 Regional Tourism Master Plan, 1997-2010

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packages for tourists and enticing visitors for repeat visits or to lengthen their stay. The positive
response displayed by tourists to this concept requires the provision of more organized tours and
development of hubs to further encourage more tourist arrivals, particularly in Bukidnon, Lanao del
Norte and Misamis Occidental. Shown in Table 24 are issues/challenges confronting Region X
tourism hubs.
Table 24. Issues and Challenges Confronting Region X Tourism Hubs
Tourism Hub

Tourism Hub 1 (Coastal Corridor) Cagayan


de Oro City , Misamis Oriental, Iligan and
Lanao del Norte

Tourism Hub No. 2 (Hinterland Corridor)


Magsaysay, Gingoog City & Claveria and
Tourism Hub No. 3 (Natures Loop)
Camiguin
Tourism Hub No. 4 (Adventure Block) and
Tourism Hub No. 5 (Eco-Cultural Route)
Cagayan de Oro- Bukidnon
Tourism Hub No. 6 (Natures Circuit)
Ozamiz and Misamis Occidental

Tourism Hub No. 7


(Agri-Aqua-Cultural Path)
Lanao del Norte

Issues/Challenges
Need to enhance advocacy on protected areas developed as
ecotourism sites
Improper management of eco-tourism destinations
Need to give priority attention to areas with great potential
for tourism (caves, completion of convention center)
Need to maximize utilization of sports and convention facility
in Lanao del Norte
Improve tourism transport services
Need to enhance accessibility of the different attractions
and waterfalls in Iligan City
Lack of aggressive promotion activities
Lack or inadequate tourism facilities
Limited accessibility due to non-availability of airlines
serving Camiguin
Lack of participation of indigenous peoples in ecotourism
development
Inadequate infrastructure support facilities to tourism
Untapped tourism potentials of the province
Lack/limited aggressive promotion on the areas rich tourism
destinations
Limited accessibility due to limited flights and airlines
serving Ozamiz City Airport
Lack/limited aggressive promotion on the areas rich
tourism destinations
Negative perception on the peace and order situation
particularly in Lanao del Norte which is deterrent to the
tourism industry

To become competitive, the region shall continuously improve the quality of its tourism facilities and
services. There is still minimal number of establishments (75) that are accredited by the Department
of Tourism throughout the region. Moreover, the region lacks affordable and standard
complementary products such as local souvenirs, wellness and health-related services and other
tourism-related commodities that will help increase the income of local MSMEs and service
providers.

II. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


Given that the industry and services sectors comprised the bulk of economic activities, the region
shall focus its efforts towards improving the productivity and sustaining the competitiveness of these
sectors. Increasing the attractiveness of the region for businesses and industries is seen as a
critical step in sustaining the gains of economic growth, which shall redound to the creation of more

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jobs, generation of more exports receipts, entry of new domestic and foreign investments, and arrival
of more tourists and visitors to the region.

Investments and Entrepreneurship Development


In the next six years, the regions strategy is anchored on improving productivity and competitiveness
to increase investments and develop entrepreneurship. Transforming the industries and MSMEs to
be competitive shall not only require government intervention but also private sector involvement
and initiatives.
Building up competitiveness of local business players involves the following: a) firm-level resiliency
against crisis; b) lower price advantage; c) over-all product and process improvement resulting in
higher productivity; and d) high marketability of products. On the part of the government,
competitiveness means more entry of investments that shall create jobs, increase local taxes
collections and promote the general well-being of the populace through putting in place set of
institutions, policies and factors that increase the level of productivity.
Overall, this means efforts and funding shall be directed toward investments promotion, enhancing
the operations of MSMEs, supporting the growth of priority industries, and improving the operational
environment for MSMEs. Below are the corresponding priority strategic actions.

Investments Promotion and Facilitation


Conduct local and international investment fora and business matching; and
Provide an investor friendly-environment.

Enhancing the Operations of MSMEs


Provide assistance along product development and marketing for MSMEs to become
competitive in both the local and international markets;
Establish a regional one-stop souvenir arcade/mall to showcase products of local MSMEs;
Continue to implement the OTOP and CARP programs to promote business expansion and
additional capital formation for existing MSMEs;
Identify and develop business opportunities to diversify the regions products and industrial
structure; and
Support the establishment of the Northern Mindanao Entrepreneurship Academy to respond
to the need of MSMEs for client-focused training and classroom discussion geared toward
enhancing their technical and management skills.

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Supporting the Growth of Priority Industries


Strengthen the priority industry clusters, namely: a) high-value vegetables; b) tourism;
c) abaca; d) seaweeds; e) aquamarine; f) processed food; g) ICT; h) multi-fiber; and i) metals.
Reactivate the Region X Industry Cluster Support Group, a subcommittee of the RDC
Economic Development Committee, to assist the industry clusters in improving their business
viability;
Intensify support for the development and operations of declared and potential special
economic zones and industrial centers to increase their suitability to investors;
Intensify promotion of existing agri-industrial economic zones in Lanao del Norte and
Cagayan de Oro City; and
Pursue the development of new agri-industrial economic zones in Bukidnon to support the
needs of growing fruit and vegetable-based processing plants and packing industries.

Improving the operational environment for MSMEs


Push for the establishment of National Economic Research and Business Action Centers
(NERBAC) in cities and major provincial centers;
Support and strengthen the implementation of the National Business Permit and Licensing
System Project to streamline registration and licensing procedures for MSMEs;
Set-up a packaging center for the processed food sector, as well as, design center for the
craft sector in the region in partnership with the private sector;
Conduct advocacy activities for the LGUs to implement the Barangay Micro-Business
Enterprise (BMBE) Law;
Institute reforms on financing for MSMEs through strengthening institutions that provide
direct and appropriate financial support and make relevant policy recommendations to
improve the governments financing program;
Aggressively adopt the technology business incubation (TBI) program to develop start-up
enterprises in partnership with DOST, DTI, other government agencies, the academe and the
private sector; and
Responsible media advocacy in marketing the rich resources and potentials, as well as the
favorable peace and order condition in the region (Refer to Chapter 2: Good Governance and
Peace and Order).

Exports Development and Promotion


Expanding exports and increasing the number of exporters shall continue to be one of the regions
major tasks in the next six years. To achieve the exports target of the region, the following strategies
shall be undertaken:
Provide holistic support to exporters and service providers through the continued
implementation of the Export Pathways Program (EPP) that assists exporters from the startup stage until the market sustainability stage when exporters have entered the target
market. This program includes product development, financing support, market information
and marketing assistance, among others;

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Strengthen the Regional Export TWG as a subcommittee of the RDC Economic


Development Committee to look after the concerns/issues of exporters and importers;
Strengthen exports through the promotion and development of the Halal industry;
Promote trade with BIMP-EAGA and with other countries where the Philippines has Free
Trade Agreements (i.e., ASEAN (AFTA), +AANZ, China, India, Japan, and Korea);
Expand access of exporters to testing laboratory/facilities and services;
Develop web-based marketing to facilitate efficient and effective trading with foreign
markets;
Participate and coordinate attendance to international trade fairs and events to promote
regional products and assist aspiring exporters to enter the foreign market;
Provide support to firms embarking on the production of green or environment-friendly
products not only to tap the growing market for such, but also to include the concept of
climate change adaptation in doing business, which is both a local and global concern; and
Review legislations and policies which are deemed to be disadvantageous to exporters, such
as the cabotage law, imposition of terminal handling charge of international shipping lines in
the country, imposition of non-tariff barriers for exports, among others, and come up with
practical solutions to resolve them.

Tourism Development
In the medium-term, the region shall endeavor to be the leading ecotourism destination of the south
and to excel in business and leisure activities with its quality and standard tourism facilities, services
and complementary local products. Among the broad strategies that shall be implemented in the
next six years are the following: a) strengthen the tourism hub concept; b) entice private sector
investments in tourism-related facilities and activities; c) reinforce licensing and accreditation of
tourism facilities and services groups; d) ensure quality service providers in the Laguindingan Airport;
e) pursue collaboration in planning and promoting tourism investments and destinations; f) promote
affordable and standard tourism complementary products and services; and d) development and
continuing improvements of logistics system and transport infrastructure (i.e., land, sea and air),
through private sector engagement, as well as public and private partnership (PPP), to better link the
regions economy to the rest of Mindanao, as well as to Luzon and Visayas.

Strengthen the tourism hub concept


Strengthen linkages among tourist destinations through a more organized and
institutionalized tour packages and collaterals with emphasis on nature and business/leisure
activities;
Maximize utilization of tourism facilities especially in Tourism Hub 1 (Misamis OrientalCagayan de Oro City) as the major gateway
Push for more aggressive promotion activities especially for Camiguin as the regions Nature
loop, as well as the other tourism hubs.
Pursue the development of protected areas and relevant eco-tourism sites through
community-based tourism development that includes preservation of rich cultural heritage

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and direct involvement of the indigenous people specifically in Tourism Hub No. 4
(Bukidnon);
Encourage local government units to persuade local communities to maintain cleanliness
and undertake proper solid waste management and safety measures in their respective
areas to attract more tourists and promote repeat visits; and
Encourage LGUs to adopt necessary mitigating measures for hazard prone
destinations/attractions and equip local residents with disaster preparedness capabilities.

Entice private sector investments in tourism-related facilities and activities


Provide incentives for tourism-related investments;
Participate in investment promotion activities especially for the promotion and development
of eco-tourism, meetings, incentives, conventions and exhibitions (MICE), agri-tourism,
adventure tourism, health, wellness and medical tourism, among others; and
Encourage public-private partnerships in the improvement of tourism-related
amenities/facilities.

Reinforce licensing and accreditation of tourism facilities and services groups


Implement fully the Tourism Act of 2009 to strengthen the capabilities of the Department of
Tourism and its attached agencies in performing their functions particularly, along
implementing tourism policies;
Require tourism service providers to accredit their facilities and services with the Department
of Tourism to ensure quality and efficient operations; and
Train local tourism and travel front liners to make them effective ambassadors of goodwill
with a culture of friendliness, hospitality and trustworthiness.

Ensure quality service providers in the Laguindingan Airport


Conduct consultation with stakeholders in improving tourism-related services at the
Laguindingan Airport; and
Conduct accreditation of major establishments and service providers/locators in the
Laguindingan Airport.

Pursue collaborative partnerships in planning and promoting tourism investments and destinations
Assist LGUs in the formulation of their tourism framework plans and strategic action plans;
Monitor existence and functionality of local tourism councils in the cities and provinces;
Create monitoring scheme in tourism-related employment; and
Strengthen partnerships with BIMP-EAGA and private-led tourism boards.

Promote affordable and standard tourism complementary products and services


Continue to implement the Grassroots Enterprises and Employment in Tourism (GREET)
program to raise the standards of local enterprises and promote greater awareness for
conservation and protection of cultural resources of tourist destinations;

88

Trade, Industry and Tourism

Assist MSMEs in developing local tourism complementary products of the region; and
Improve air accessibility of existing and potential tourism destination areas.
The above strategies are geared toward promoting and supporting the identified priority products
and services which are considered to be winners based on the regions comparative advantages and
natural endowments. By purposively and aggressively marketing the regions investments priorities,
local entrepreneurs and potential investors will be guided on making informed business decisions,
as well as, produce goods and services that will respond and complement the needs of existing and
emerging industries.
Table 25. Priority Investment Areas
Region X
Sector

Priority Products and Services


Food processing
Fruits
Poultry
Vegetables
Aquamarine
Crafts
Processing facility for furniture components and other wood-based
construction materials
Steel fabrication
Fabrication of agricultural implements and post harvest facilities
Transport
Communications
Logistics support
Trading
Financial services
Real Estate Development

Agriculture

Manufacturing

Service Sector

Below are the major development targets of the trade, industry and tourism sectors.
Table 26. Targets on Investment Levels, MSMEs Developed and Assisted, and
Value of Exports and Tourist Arrivals
Region X, 2011-2016
Indicators
Value of DTI-Monitored Investments
(In Million Pesos)
Number of MSMEs Developed And
Assisted
Value of Exports
(In Million USD)
Tourist Arrivals (In Million)

Annual Growth
Rate
2011-2016

Projected Level
2011

2016

10

11,017.84

17,744.34

10

1,060

1,708

10

754

1,214

12

2.102

3.691

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

III. RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING


MATRIX

90

Trade, Industry and Tourism

91

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

92

Trade, Industry and Tourism

93

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

94

Trade, Industry and Tourism

95

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

96

Trade, Industry and Tourism

97

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

98

Trade, Industry and Tourism

99

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

100

Trade, Industry and Tourism

101

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

102

Chapter 5: Environment and


Sustainable Development
Ensuring environmental integrity and sustainability of resources

I. ASSESSMENT OF PERFORMANCE
Forest Resources Management
In the previous plan period 2004-2009, Community-Based Forest Management (CBFM) program
accomplished 92 percent or 2,886 hectares of the plan target of 3,127 hectares of lands to be
planted with various tree species. In addition, other reforestation activities undertaken during the
plan period resulted to the rehabilitation and development of 4,572 hectares and planting of trees
along 530.50 kilometers of urban roadsides across the region.
The implementation of Upland Development Program (UDP) in 2009 resulted to the development of
1,699 hectares for agro-forestry, reforestation of 1,698 hectares, and regeneration of 729 hectares
in the regions five provinces.

Forestland Vegetative Cover and Protected Areas


As of 2009, the region has a total land area of 2,018,716 hectares, of which 414,266 hectares are
under forestland vegetative cover, indicating a regional forest cover of 20.5 percent. At the provincial
level, Misamis Occidental has the most forestland cover, followed by Lanao del Norte, Misamis
Oriental, Bukidnon, and Camiguin tailing at 5th. By type of regional vegetative cover, second growth
or residual forest accounted for 40 percent share, followed by brushland at 32 percent, old growth
forest at 11 percent, forest plantations at 11 percent, mossy forest at four percent, while mangroves
accounted for two percent share.
The region has nine sites under the National Integrated Protected Area System (NIPAS), covering a
total of 157,340 hectares. Of these sites, four are classified as protected landscapes and seascapes
and five are classified as natural parks. In terms of percent share, total protected areas constitute
7.8 percent (157, 340 hectares) of the regions total land area of 2,018,716 hectares.
On forestlands delineation, a total of 13,097 hectares were mapped as production forests in
Bukidnon (4,324 hectares) and Misamis Oriental (8,773 hectares), during the period 2005-2006.

Watershed Management
The region has an inventory of 70 watersheds, covering a total of 1,880,168.83 hectares. These
watersheds are classified according to uses, namely, 31 percent are critical watersheds for
hydropower and irrigation uses; and, 69 percent for other watershed services (e.g. water for
domestic use). By category, the region has 43 small watersheds (10,000 hectares or less) and 27
big watersheds (10,001 hectares and over). However, carbon sequestration potentials to support
efforts to respond to climate change challenges and other types or values of environmental services
of these forests have not yet been fully determined.

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Land Management
In support to economic growth strategies and promoting jobs in the region especially in Agrarian
Reform Communities (ARCs), issuance of land patents for ARCs in 2004-2009 posted 99 percent
accomplishment against the plan target on lots distribution. In terms of area surveyed for patent
processing, a 102 percent accomplishment over the plan target was recorded. In contrast, to the
survey for patent processing and issuance in support to the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform
Program (CARP), the area surveyed accounted for 63 percent performance against the plan target.
Surveys of public lands achieved 103 percent over the plan target.

Ecological Solid Waste and Air Quality Management


Compliance monitoring to the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000 (RA 9003)
particularly on the decommissioning of dumpsites and their replacement with sanitary landfills
indicated only eight LGUs have undertaken efforts to comply with the law, as most LGUs claim
budgetary constraints. Talakag and Kalilangan in Bukidnon have closed two dumpsites, Iligan City
has submitted a closure plan, Cagayan de Oro City is preparing a closure and rehabilitation plan,
Laguindingan in Misamis Oriental suspended its open dumpsite operation, while the cities of
Malaybalay, Valencia, and Gingoog re-evaluated their Solid Waste Management Plans (SWMPs).
Monitoring of ambient air quality in the Metro Cagayan de Oro Airshed is done through the Telemetry
System which operates 24-hour daily to monitor concentration levels of pollutants in the
atmosphere. Among the regions urban centers, Cagayan de Oro is noted for heavy vehicular traffic
volume in its major streets. However, the concentration levels of criteria pollutants monitored in this
area are below the standard ambient air quality set by law indicating relatively good air. In 20052009, concentration of criteria pollutants (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone) was recorded
to be below the Philippine guideline values which indicate relatively acceptable ambient air quality.

Freshwater, Marine, and Coastal Waters


In the previous plan period, Cagayan de Oro River was identified as one of the 19 priority rivers
nationwide under the Sagip Ilog Program to improve its biological oxygen demand (BOD) and
dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration levels to determine water use suitability for domestic purposes
and other uses. Although BOD and DO levels in this river were within standards, these parameters
are exceeded during rainy days. Other surface water bodies closely monitored are the rivers of
Iponan, Tagoloan, and Umalag because these are recipients of wastewater discharges from
upstream mining and nearby industries. Macajalar and Duka bays were also closely monitored to
ensure their suitability for recreation activities.
Marine sanctuaries established during the plan period totaled 150 hectares with Misamis Occidental
topping the list at 55 hectares, followed by Misamis Oriental at 41 hectares, Lanao del Norte at 38
hectares, and Camiguin at 16 hectares.
The regions major coastal resource management project started in 2007 in Camiguin through grant
assistance by the New Zealand Agency for International Development (NZAID). Costing Php116
million at cost-sharing of 75 percent grant and 25 percent GOP/LGU counterpart, the project is
expected to end in late 2012. Project components include institutionalization of CRM mechanisms
in the islands five municipalities and the province, and community-based livelihood projects, among
others.

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Environment and Sustainable Development

Mineral Development and Geohazard Mapping


Supportive of the governments thrust to revitalize the mining industry in the region and boost
employment in the mining sector, a total of 16,647 jobs were generated for the period 2004-2009,
representing a considerable accomplishment against the plan target of 1,050 jobs. Further, in
compliance with the establishment of Social Development and Management Program (SDMP)
required by the Philippine Mining Act of 1995 (RA 7942), mining companies in the region
operationalized 86 livelihood activities, representing 49 percent of the plan target of 176 livelihood
projects in 16 mining communities. In terms of skills development for mining community residents,
a total of 667 persons were trained on masonry, welding, driving, metal craft and driving,
representing 100 percent accomplishment against the plan target of 667 persons.
In line with the efforts of reducing environmental risks, 12 geological hazard maps were prepared for
three municipalities in Bukidnon, five municipalities in Misamis Oriental and the cities of Valencia,
Malaybalay, Cagayan de Oro and Gingoog. In addition, a list has been prepared identifying areas in
the region that are flood-prone and/or affected areas and landslide-prone areas. Preliminary hazard
assessments were conducted regionwide in 2004-2009 in 1,818 barangays (90 percent of the
regions 2,022 barangays).
The geographic location and the tectonic cut and combination of volcanic features expose the region
to geologic hazards. These hazards include volcanic eruption, earthquake, and mass movement.
Local hazards include flooding, tsunami, landslides, erosion, subsidence and salt intrusion.

II. CHALLENGES
The consistent annual upbeat performance of the regional economy in the previous plan period
poses both challenges and opportunities to the regions ecosystems amid the widespread changes in
climate patterns that are taking place. Environmental stressors mainly the increased human
activities result to the physical degradation of the regions ecosystems, namely, forest/upland,
agricultural/lowland, urban, freshwater and coastal/marine, and critical resources such as
biodiversity and minerals. In addition, the need for equitable access and benefit sharing regime for
genetic resources and Payments for Environmental Services (PES) schemes poses a challenge to
local government officials, academic researchers, commercial users, communities, and regulators.
The forest/upland ecosystem remains under stress due to continuing demands for forest products
and services resulting to deforestation that endangers not only the forest resources but the
biodiversity assets in watershed areas. Illegal activities in forestlands include settlements,
conversion of forestlands to agricultural uses, and cutting of trees/timber poaching. However,
effective management of this ecosystem is constrained by inadequate budget especially for
reforestation and other conservation measures.

the increased human activities


result to the physical degradation
of the regions ecosystems

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

The agricultural/lowland ecosystem is similarly confronted by the need to address the demands for
food and the conversion of agricultural areas for non-agricultural purposes. Farming, particularly
industrial-scale agriculture, contributes to discharges of untreated chemical runoffs from use of
pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, among others that, in turn, threaten water supply that is critical to
human consumption and food production. In addition, conversion of agricultural lands into
residential, commercial and industrial areas continues to pose challenges in sustaining areas for
agricultural purposes.
The urban ecosystem, particularly the regional capital, Cagayan de Oro City, and sub-regional cities
are saddled with the influx of people that result to urban sprawl and emergence of blighted areas.
While this situation widens the consumer base that demands more commercial goods and services,
it constrains urban space and also contributes to increased waste generation, clogged waterways
that causes flooding, as well as, vehicular and industrial air pollution that causes respiratory and
cardiovascular diseases, among others. Also, the improper disposal of hospital or bio-medical
wastes poses health risks, hence, the need to develop an alternative technology for its proper
disposal (incineration facility is banned under the Clean Air Act of 1999).
The integrity of freshwater and coastal/marine ecosystems to sustain aquatic resources is also
compromised by increased human activities in upstream rivers, along riverbanks, and foreshores
areas. With the onset of climate change, it was projected that by the 2050s, freshwater availability
in South-East Asian countries particularly in large river basins, will decrease. Coastal areas,
especially heavily populated megadelta regions in South-East Asia, will be at greatest risk due to
increased flooding from the sea and, in some megadeltas, flooding from the rivers. 15 On top of that,
untreated industrial and commercial wastewater discharges and solid waste disposal into the
waterways and water systems threaten not only the quality of water resources that are critical to
aquaculture production, recreational activities, and shore protection, but also damage aquatic
vegetation that holds potential for carbon sequestration.
Similarly, the regions biodiversity and mineral resources are adversely affected by resource
extraction that results to the degradation and loss of habitats of various biological species thereby
threatening their existence. For instance, illegal activities of placer gold miners through use of
hydraulic equipment in upstream mineral areas, particularly in upland barangays of Iponan
watersheds in Cagayan de Oro and Opol, Misamis Oriental, damaged not only the forest ecosystem,
but also cause siltation and mine tailings along rivers/river systems. Meanwhile, regional smallscale mining activity is affected by regulatory concerns such as under-reporting or non-reporting of
exact mineral production to evade payment of correct excise tax. In addition, enforcement of mining
laws is hampered by the presence of armed persons in mining areas.
There is high agreement that with current climate change mitigation policies and related sustainable
development practices, global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will continue to grow over the next
few decades. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions
Scenarios (SRES) projects an increase of global GHG emissions by 25 to 90 percent between 2000

15

108

Source: IPCC 4th Assessment Report, 2007

Environment and Sustainable Development

and 2030.16 The IPCC categorized the increases of global temperature (best estimate and likely
range) and its corresponding sea level rise according to different scenarios (Table 27).
Table 27. Projected Global Average Surface Warming and Sea Level Rise
at the End of the 21st Century by SRES Scenarios
Temperature change
(C at 2090-2099 relative
to 1980-1999) a, d

(m at 2090-2099
relative to
1980-1999)

Sea level rise

Likely range

Model-based range
excluding future rapid
dynamical changes in ice
flow

Scenario/Case
Best estimate
Constant year 2000
concentrationsb
B1 scenario***
A1T scenario
B2 scenario
A1B scenario*
A2 scenario**
A1FI scenario

0.6

0.3 0.9

Not available

1.8
2.4
2.4
2.8
3.4
4.0

1.1 2.9
1.4 3.8
1.4 3.8
1.7 4.4
2.0 5.4
2.4 6.4

0.18 0.38
0.20 0.45
0.20 0.43
0.21 0.48
0.23 0.51
0.26 0.59

Notes:
a) Temperatures are assessed best estimates and likely uncertainty ranges from a hierarchy of models of varying
complexity as well as observational constraints.
b) Year 2000 constant composition is derived from Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) only.
c) All scenarios above are six SRES marker scenarios. Approximate CO2-eq concentrations corresponding to the computed
radiative forcing due to anthropogenic GHGs and aerosols in 2100 (see p. 823 of the Working Group I TAR) for the SRES
B1, AIT, B2, A1B, A2 and A1FI illustrative marker scenarios are about 600, 700, 800, 850, 1250 and 1550ppm,
respectively.
d) Temperature changes are expressed as the difference from the period 1980-1999. To express the change relative to
the period 1850-1899 add 0.5C.

Of the above-indicated scenarios where there is continuous increase in temperature and changes in
rainfall patterns, the affected provinces throughout the country were identified (Tables 28 & 29).

untreated industrial and commercial wastewater discharges


and solid waste disposal into the waterways and
water systems threaten not only the quality of water resources
that are critical to aquaculture production, recreational
activities, and shore protection, but also damage aquatic
vegetation that holds potential for carbon sequestration

16

Ibid.

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Table 28. Estimated Risks in the Philippines Due to Temperature Increase and
Rainfall Changes and Tropical Cyclones in 2020
Parameters
A1B*
Temperature Increase
Northern Luzon, Nueva Viscaya,
Low Risk
Mindoro, Palawan, Whole of Visayas
except Cebu and Northern Samar
High Risk

A2**
Northern Luzon, Palawan,
Zambales, Bulacan and
Rizal

Southern Mindanao, Metro Manila,


Cebu

Western Mindanao and


Cebu

Rainfall Changes
Regions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 except La
Union, Whole of Visayas except
Low Risk
Cebu, Bohol and Southern Leyte,
Western and Southern Mindanao

Ilocos Norte, Nueva Viscaya,


Samar, Western Samar and
Southern Mindanao

Extremely
High Risk

Surigao, Misamis Oriental, La Union

La Union, Pangasinan,
Pampanga, Nueva Ecija,
Batangas, Camarines Norte,
Albay, Cebu

B1***
Bicol Region, Eastern parts
of the country, Palawan,
Capiz, Antique
Pangasinan, La Union,
Cebu, South Cotabato,
Lanao del Norte and
Misamis Occidental

Almost entire country


Bohol, Surigao del Norte,
Misamis and Lanao del
Norte

*For SRES scenarios A1B, A2, B1, Refer to Table 5-1

It was projected that by year 2020, the provinces of Misamis Occidental and Lanao del Norte are
extremely high risk due to temperature increases and changes in rainfall patterns. And by year
2050, Misamis Oriental and Lanao provinces will be at high-risk to temperature and rainfall changes.
Table 29. Estimated Risks in the Philippines Due to Temperature Increase
and Rainfall Changes in 2050
Parameters

A1B*

A2**

B1***

Temperature Increase
Low Risk

Most of regions 1, 2, 3 and Davao


del Norte

Cebu, Negros Occ., Zamboanga del


Norte, South Cotabato Lanao,
Misamis Oriental, Maguindanao
Rainfall Changes
High Risk

Low Risk:

Extremely
High Risk

Whole of Luzon except Bicol Region,


Masbate and Romblon, North
Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat and
Davao del Norte
Cebu, Surigao del Norte, Misamis
Oriental, Agusan del Norte, Lanao
del Sur, Maguindanao

*For SRES scenarios A1B, A2, B1, Refer to Table 5-1

110

Northern Luzon, Bataan,


Southern Bicol Region,
Eastern portions of the
country
Cavite, Batangas, Cebu,
Negros Occ., Lanao, South
Cotabato, Misamis
Only Bataan, Zambales,
Ilocos, Cagayan, Aurora
and Nueva Viscaya
Cebu, Bohol, Iloilo, Negros
Occ., Agusan del Norte,
Misamis Oriental, Lanao,
Maguindanao, South
Cotabato

Ilocos Sur, Apayao,


Mindoro, Palawan, Whole
of Visayas except Cebu,
Zamboanga
Metro Manila, Cavite,
Cebu, Central Mindanao
Whole of Luzon except
Palawan, Whole of Visayas
except Cebu and Whole of
Mindanao except Sulu,
Basilan, Tawi-tawi and
Maguindanao
Cebu, Bohol, Surigao del
Norte, Misamis and Lanao
del Norte, Palawan

Environment and Sustainable Development

III. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


The overarching goal of the sector is to ensure environmental integrity and sustainability of
resources. To this end, the various ecosystems shall be efficiently managed, sustainably utilized,
and properly developed to maintain biodiversity and ensure resilient human communities. This is an
imperative particularly that any adverse change in the ecosystems results to corresponding negative
effects on the capabilities of ecosystems to sustainably provide the goods and services that society
needs.
This is however a tall order amidst the major drivers of change in the ecosystems, namely, climate
change, destructive human practices and activities, and ecological stressors such as La Nia and El
Nio phenomena and the like. Changes in climatic patterns pose a critical challenge in managing
the integrity of the regions ecosystems and natural resources.
There is therefore a need for a comprehensive set of interventions consisting of, on one hand,
measures to manage destructive human practices and activities; and, on other the other hand,
strategic actions to mitigate, prepare for, reduce the occurrence of, and enable species including
humans and communities to adapt to climate change and become resilient to disasters.
The strategies outlined in each ecosystem are anchored on several environmental laws and policies
including the most recent ones (RA 10121 or the DRRM Act and RA 9729 or the Climate Change
Act). The aim is to enable key stakeholders to manage environment and natural resources,
encourage sustainable use of resources and cope with the impacts of environmental emergencies
for the benefit of the present and future generations.

Forest/Upland Ecosystem
To reduce the intrusion of human settlements/activities to forest/upland ecosystem, improve
management of watersheds therein, and respond to climate change challenge, major interventions
such as the following shall be pursued:
Enforcement of forest laws and protection of about 118,523 hectares of untenured lands
over 3,000 hectares of plantation forests regionwide;
Production of high quality forest trees planting materials;
Development and management of economically important non-timber species;
Enhancing and strengthening the productivity of reforestation and upland areas;
Assessment and monitoring of major ecosystems as affected by climate change through
impact study on extent and magnitude of flooding and landslides in selected major
watersheds;
Development of improved rehabilitation technologies on degraded and marginal areas;
Management of the regions protected areas under NIPAS, rehabilitation of 3,330 hectares
of degraded protected areas, delineation of forestland boundaries, management of critical
habitats in four sites, and development of business plans for ecotourism areas in four sites
in partnership with LGUs and private enterprises;

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Management of forests through the provision of alternative jobs for upland dwellers through
the Upland Development Program (UDP), development of tree farming sites for fuel wood to
reduce stress on natural forests, and monitoring of threatened forest species; and,
Formulation of acceptable PES schemes in collaboration with the communities and
indigenous peoples in order to address budget constraints on forest management.
In support to Biofuels Act of 2006 (RA 9367), researches on tree improvement program for priority
indigenous and endangered species shall be conducted through seed collection, progeny trials, and
establishment of clonal banks for important tree species.

Agriculture/Lowland Ecosystem
Untreated chemical runoffs from inorganic farming activities will continue to be monitored through
water analysis in various water sampling stations. Use of organic fertilizers and pesticides, as well
as, adoption of biological control agents shall be promoted among farmers.

Urban Ecosystem
To ensure standard-level air quality in the urban ecosystem and reduce greenhouse gas emissions
particularly from commercial/industrial sources, more vigorous implementation of various
environmental laws will be pursued through the following:
Effective enforcement of Clean Air Act of 1999 (RA 8749) by promoting use of cleaner and
alternative fuels such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), coco methyl ester, and compressed
natural gas (CNG), video monitoring of private emission testing centers (PETCs), and
monitoring of industrial effluents; and
Monitoring of ambient air criteria pollutants (e.g., PM 10, CO2, Toluene, p-Xylene, Benzene,
NO2, Ozone) through the telemetry system from mobile and stationary sources especially in
the Metro Cagayan de Oro Airshed that spans from PHIVIDEC Industrial Estate on eastern
part of Misamis Oriental to El Salvador, Misamis Oriental on the western side.
In compliance to the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000 (RA 9003), and to address
issues of improper waste disposal and occurrence of flooding attributed to waste dumping in
waterways, the following interventions shall be pursued:
Safe closure and rehabilitation and replacement by sanitary landfills (SLFs) of open and
controlled dumpsites regionwide;
Development and advocacy of other cleaner forms of disposal system;
Establishment of Regional Ecology Center;
Identification of training centers on composting and recycling;
Establishment of LGU Materials Recovery Facilities (MRFs);
De-clogging of waterways/canals; and
Review of RA 9003 particularly on the prohibition of incineration facilities for hospital or biomedical wastes.

112

Environment and Sustainable Development

Also, in compliance to Toxic Substances and Hazardous and Nuclear Wastes Control Act of 1990 (RA
6969), the monitoring of transport, use, and disposal of toxic chemicals, hazardous wastes, and
healthcare wastes shall continue.

Freshwater, Coastal and Marine Ecosystem


Guided by policies under the Clean Water Act of 2004 (RA 9275), structural and vegetative
interventions to manage water quality, improve fishery production, and respond to climate change
challenges will be undertaken in the regions major river systems and coastal/marine areas inclusive
of mangroves and beach forests. Interventions include the following:
Conservation and management of biological resources through assessments of carbon sink
potential of mangroves and beach forests, mangrove-friendly nipa aquaculture as alternative
livelihood, biofuels from mangrove and beach forests, and identification of alternative uses
of invasive foreign species;
Management and rehabilitation of coastal resources and wetlands through conduct of
carrying capacity17 studies on coasts and rivers, species matching, and biodiversity
assessment of important rivers;
Institutionalizing integrated coastal resource management at the LGU levels through
development of framework plan for CRM;
Development and operationalization of Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) through
conduct of participatory resource assessment of coastal and marine areas, preparation of
municipal CRM plan and integrated coastal management plan, conduct of coastal zoning
surveys;
Conservation of mangrove areas through rehabilitation, maintenance, and protection
activities, integration of Taytay, El Salvador, Misamis Oriental mangrove rehabilitation to ICM
program, and management of beach forests;
Management of foreshore areas through co-management, relocation, or judicial process to
address illegal occupations along riverbanks and coastal/foreshore areas;
Sustain strict implementation of Clean Water Act of 2004 (RA 9275) through monitoring of
industrial effluent discharges, improving the biological oxygen demand (BOD) and dissolved
oxygen (DO) levels of Cagayan de Oro and Umalag rivers, including monitoring of beaches
along Macajalar and Duka bays; and
Monitoring of coral reefs and associated life forms.

Biodiversity
Unlawful resource extraction through bioprospecting of forest and marine flora and fauna for
pharmaceutical, industrial, and other uses threaten not only the organisms themselves but also their
fragile habitats. Among the management interventions include:

17 The maximum population that an area will support without undergoing deterioration.

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Establishment of five new protected areas for inclusion under NIPAS law (RA 7586) and four
critical habitats;
Continuing management of nine existing protected areas; and
Strict implementation of laws (e.g. Executive Order 247, series of 1995) on commercial and
research uses of biodiversity resources to ensure equitable access and benefit sharing
among stakeholders.

Minerals/Mining Development
In pursuit of the countrys mineral industry development program and mineral investment promotion
program under the Philippine Mining Act of 1995 (RA 7942) and Peoples Small Scale Mining
Program Act (RA 7076), mining activities will continue to be regulated to ensure sustainable use of
mineral resources, respond to climate change challenges, and mitigate disasters through:
Conduct of compliance audit on health, environment, and social approved work program of
mining companies;
Provide support to formulation of policies requiring mining companies to design and
implement measures related to climate change adaptation/mitigation and disaster risk
reduction;
Review of roles and responsibilities of agencies and LGUs in managing small-scale mining
activities;
Advocacy on mineral resources and geosciences;
Geological survey and assessment to determine vulnerability of ground water resources to
changing climate pattern;
Inspection to ensure safety status of waste disposal sites which are mostly dumpsites; and
Review of responsibilities between agencies and LGUs on geohazard zonation activities,
especially toward integrating geohazard maps in comprehensive land use plans (CLUPs).

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) System


The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process will be enhanced through updating of maps for
environmentally critical areas (ECAs) and mapping of projects issued with Environmental Compliance
Certificate (ECC).

114

Environment and Sustainable Development

IV. RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING


MATRIX

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118

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122

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124

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126

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128

Chapter 6: Well-being and


Improved Welfare
Effecting Better Standard of Living

I. ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES


Poverty is manifested with limited access to comprehensive and integrated basic social services
particularly health, housing and social protection. The vulnerable groups and those living in poverty
are continuously threatened and marginalized by social, economic, and environmental pressures
and natural disasters, as well as economic shocks. Greater access to improved social services is
crucial to development, productivity and social inclusion.

Health and Nutrition


The regions health situation in the past five years (2004-2009) remained a struggle even with the
implementation of FOURmula One for Health as the framework of health sector reforms in the
country. Most of the health and nutrition indicators showed downward trends and are below the
2010 plan and MDG targets by 2015.
Table 30. Health Indicators vs. Targets
Region X: 2004-2009
Indicators

2004

2006

2008

2009

Crude Birth Rate (per 1,000 population)


Crude Death Rate (per 1,000 population)
Maternal Mortality Rate (per
100,000livebirths)
Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 livebirths)
Prenatal Care (% to total pregnant women)
Postnatal Care (% to total women
who gave birth)
Access to sanitary toilet facilities
(% to total HHs)
Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (%)
Percent of births assisted by skilled
attendants
Prevalence of Below Normal Low (BNL)
pre-school children
Prevalence of Below Normal Very Low (BNVL)
pre-school children
/
Source: DOH-X, 2008 NDHS *2003 NDHS

23.14
3.89

22.22
4.06

23.73
4.22

22.03
4.43

2010
Plan
Targets
21.17
3.37

90.00

75.00

51.00

94.00

57.00

-37.00

8.12
70.67

8.23
64.85

9.13
69.11

7.20
67.76

7.17
80.26

-0.03
-12.5

70.15

67.74

70.48

88.00

80.95

+7.05

64.90

74.57

75.29

73.06

85.04

-11.98

43.12

53.2/

45.0

59.17

-14.17

41.4*

57.69

47.7/

77.79

94.88

-17.09

13.26

10.71

9.31

8.82

1.80

1.42

1.05

1.01

55.2*

Difference
(2009-2010
Targets)
-0.86
-1.06

Crude death rate posted an overall upward trend. Maternal mortality rate increased to 94 per
100,000 live births in 2009 from only 51 in 2008. Meanwhile, the proportion of births assisted by
skilled attendants in 2009 was 78 percent. Home births are still common in remote rural areas.
However, post-natal care showed improved coverage (88%) and surpassed the 2010 plan target.
Pre-natal care coverage remained low in the past years.

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With the implementation of programs on nutrition and hunger-mitigation, there is an improvement


in the nutritional status of pre-school children based on Operation Timbang (OPT) results with the
reduction in the prevalence of BNL from 13.26 in 2004 to 8.82 percent in 2009, and BNVL from 1.8
percent to 1.01 percent during the same period.
Access to sanitary toilets is still far from the 2010 plan and 2015 MDG targets. The situation
deserves priority attention to ensure proper health and sanitation practices especially that endemic
morbidity and mortality due to diarrheal disease primarily associated with floods and droughts are
expected to rise in South-East Asian countries due to projected changes in the hydrological cycle 18.
There was a reduction in crude birth rate in the past five years. This can be attributed to the
continuing advocacy of Family Planning Program (FPP) and the conduct of Responsible Parenting
Movement classes in all provinces. Thus, the use of modern Natural Family Planning (NFP) method
increased to 1.1 percent in 2008. However, advocacy efforts need to be intensified since unmet
need for family planning in the region increased to 18.7 percent, 7.7 percent for spacing and 11
percent for limiting birth (2008 NDHS). On the other hand, some LGUs established Teens
Healthquarters (THQ) to address the increasing problems along sexuality and reproductive health
among the youth.
As of 2009, a total of 986 Botika ng Barangays (BnBs) were established in Region X, almost
attaining the target of 1,014 in 2010 or one BnB in every two barangays to ensure the accessibility
of low-priced, safe, effective, and quality essential drugs to the local communities.
Although Tuberculosis is still one of the leading causes of mortality, the case detection rate was 79
percent in 2008, higher than the plan target of 70 percent. Similarly, trend of TB mortality rate
declined from 23.25 per 100,000 population in 2003 to 19.55 in 2008 (2009 RSET). The TB cure
rate is also high at 90 percent which is within the plan target. While there is significant improvement
in terms of reducing incidence of malaria in the region, dengue prevalence is increasing with almost
doubling the plan target of 20 per 100,000 populations in 2009. Meanwhile, efforts along the
provision of Vitamin A to infants and children and TT2 to pregnant women fell short of plan targets.
With concerted effort in delivering quality health care for all Filipinos, PhilHealth coverage surpassed
its plan target in 2009. A total of 1,156,719 registered members were reported or 144 percent of
the total targeted population. The increase of membership is largely attributed to the wide coverage
of indigent families which exceeds by 86 percent of the target population. The LGUs continue to be
supportive with government-sponsored membership.
As of 2009, PhilHealth has accredited 101 hospitals, 45 MCPs, 51 TBDOTs, 75 RHUs and 1,155
health professionals. On the other hand, the accreditation of some hospitals was not renewed due to
non-compliance to standards.
On the overall, the slow progress of the health sector has been due to inadequate access, limitedavailability, non-affordability and poor quality of basic health care services particularly in remote and
hard to reach areas in the region. Disparities exist for hospital bed to population ratio from 1:502 to
1:1,287 in 2007 particularly in major cities. Except for midwives, other health personnel to

18 IPCC 4th Assessment Report, 2007

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Well-being and Improved Welfare

population ratios such as physicians (1:35,931) and nurses (1:20, 373) are below the standard of
1:20,000, and also for dentists (1: 61,767 vs. 1:50,000). Moreover, there is a need to sustain
health insurance coverage especially the indigents to achieve universal coverage. Another concern
is to ensure responsive benefits of members at reasonable premiums.

Housing
Housing Affordability and Delivery
Region X comprised 3.5 percent (20,537 families) to the total informal settler families in the
country19. From 2000 to 2007, the number of families living in makeshift housing materials
decreased by 70 percent from 2,051 families/units in 2000 to 600 families/units in 2007, of which
its proportion to the total occupied housing units is less than one percent 20.
The government housing agencies targeted to produce 29,739 units or 18.4 percent of the 161,289
projected housing needs of the region for the years 2000-2010. Of these, from 2004 to June 2010,
the different housing programs were able to provide/finance 17,700 housing units valued at PhP5.8
billion. This total represents 60 percent of the target for the same period. Fifty-six percent or 9,986
of the total units produced are classified as socialized housing.
Pag-IBIG or the Home Development Mutual Fund (HDMF) has consistently been the biggest provider,
surpassing its own targets. Its accomplishment comprised 65 percent of the housing units produced
with a loan exposure of PhP5.306 billion or 91 percent of the total loan value.
On the other hand, the NHA was not able to reach its target along the Resettlement and Joint
Venture due to the delay in the approval of project proposals.
The Community Mortgage Program (CMP) of the Socialized Housing Finance Corporation also has a
low turn-out despite the reduction of documentary requirements. One of the major causes is the
associations lack of funding to pay for its equity and the processing of other pre-requisites like
survey costs. The squabble among members and the inaccessibility of the land-owners also
contributed to the delay of the compliance.
The suspension of the GSISs Bahay Ko Program and Land Banks Cooperative Housing has also
affected the accomplishment of the housing sector.
There is a need to reduce the gap between the housing supply and the needs. The continued
spiraling price of land, land development, and construction supply plus the increased zonal valuation
of the raw land have all the more affected the affordability level of the low-income earners and
discouraged the private developers to engage into socialized housing development.
In identifying areas for housing and settlement development, the effects of climate change shall be
taken into consideration. With the changes in climate that may result to a) water shortages in
settlements; b) declining air quality in cities; c) reduced hydropower generation potentials; and

19

Annual Poverty Indicators Survey, NSO, 2002

20

Regional Social and Economic Trends (RSET), NSCB, 2000 & 2007

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d) disruption of settlements, commerce, and transport due to flooding among others, there is
potential for population migrations and loss of property and lives if settlement areas are haphazardly
selected. With this arises the need to fast-track the provision of safe and affordable housing
especially for people without appropriate housing.
Table 31. Targets and Accomplishments on Housing Production
January 2004 June 2010
Agency
A. Socialized Housing
Resettlement (Sites and Sites Joint Venture/
Technical Assistance)
Community Based (CLASP & LTAP) (NHA)
Community Mortgage Program (SHFC)
Expanded Housing Loan Program (Pag-IBIG)
Bahay Ko Program (GSIS)
Cooperative Housing (LBP)
Presidential Proclamation (HUDCC)
Sub-Total
B. Economic/Open Housing
Expanded Housing Loan Program (Pag-IBIG)
Bahay Ko Program (GSIS)
Cooperative Housing (LBP)
Sub-Total
REGIONAL TOTAL

Targets
(2004-2010)

Accomplishment
(No. of units*)

9,677

1,697

80.77

6,000
671
3,004

3,201
353
4,504
1
133
97
9,986

15.90
31.22
1,254.13
0.18
17.10
0.00
1,399.30

7,023
628
63
7,714
17,700

4,052.13
329.98
14.39
4,396.50
5,795.80

147
19,499
6,496
3,744
10,240
29,739

Value
(in million PhP)

Pag-IBIG Accomplishment Report: Cagayan and Iligan branches only.


*One housing unit = one family/beneficiary
Source: Consolidated reports from HUDCC, NHA, HDMF, HLURB, HGC, NHMFC, SHFC

Sustainable Communities
In the task of providing assistance to LGUs in the formulation/updating and enforcement of
Comprehensive Land Use Plans (CLUPs), the HLURB was able to assist 34 LGUs. A total of
523.2360 hectares of re-classified lands were developed and licensed as residential subdivision
projects. With the goal of providing more affordable housing units, 53.49 percent of the total area
was developed as socialized housing (27.41%) and economic housing (26.08%), with the remaining
46.51 percent of the re-classified land left for the open market. With the merging of HLURB Regions
9, 10 and 13 into one office which is based in Cagayan de Oro, the challenge in terms of providing
timely assistance to its clientele has to be addressed.
As of 2010, a total of 194 housing units were foreclosed out of the total units granted/loaned during
the previous plan period. While collection is doing quite well, a more efficient collection system of
housing loans is needed so that money can be flowed back for circulation and makes them available
for other potential borrowers.
The projects of Gawad Kalinga, Paglaum Village, Habitat for Humanity, and other LGU housing efforts
also played a significant role in housing production. Facilitating factors identified by some NGOs are
as follows: LGUs strong commitment to partnership; faithfulness of partners to deliver their
commitments; volunteerism of schools, academe, local corporations; bayanihan spirit of

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homeowners; and presence of skilled workers. On the other hand, hindering factors include red
tape of some LGUs in the issuance of permits; lukewarm commitment of some partner LGUs; soaring
of prices of construction materials; and limited funding from donors.

Social Protection
The basic or the vulnerable sectors have increasingly felt the effects of the global economic crisis
which left them unemployed, unserved, underserved and with low and unstable income. Poverty
among the basic sectors showed that in 2006, the farmers sector posted the highest poverty
incidence among the eight basic sectors in the region at 54.3 percent, followed by children and
fishermen at 49.1 percent and 47.6 percent, respectively.
Poverty incidence for all sectors decreased from 2003 to 2006, except for the farmers sector which
posted an increase of 0.4 percent. The largest decrease was observed for the fishermen sector.
Children and women accounted for the largest number of poor population across all basic sectors at
0.83 million and 0.76 million in 2006, respectively.
The provision of social welfare services to the most vulnerable and disadvantaged sectors is
anchored on the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan (KALAHI) as the governments overall framework
for poverty reduction. It covers a wide range of activities including asset reforms, provision of human
development services, creation of employment and livelihood opportunities, social protection and
security against violence, and participation of basic sectors in governance.
A major intervention under the governments comprehensive and integrated approach for poverty
reduction and empowerment of the poor is the KALAHI-CIDSS (Comprehensive Integrated Delivery of
Social Services) project. The combination of traditional and new leadership functions in
communities has been strengthened, as well as improving the collective capacity of communities to
address their problems.
The project has benefitted 50,528 families in the areas covered in Lanao del Norte, Misamis
Occidental and Camiguin. A total of 244 projects were completed which included, among others:
health centers, water system, farm to market road, day care centers, drainage system, and corn
sheller with warehouse. Since most of the completed projects were along infrastructure
development, the direct economic impact and extent of poverty reduction on the poor households
need to be assessed.
In addressing hunger, the Food for School Program and Healthy Start Feeding Program were
implemented. These programs provided one kilo of iron-fortified rice per day of school and
supplemental food in day care centers using the 20 days menu recommended by the regional
nutritionist, respectively. Moreover, there were 989 Tindahan Natin Outlets established to provide
low-priced, but good quality rice and noodles to low-income families through a store jointly identified
and endorsed by the DSWD, the local social welfare and development offices, the local government
and subsequently accredited by the NFA.
Livelihood assistance to poor individuals, communities and organizations/ associations were
pursued through the Self-Employment Assistance Kaunlaran (SEA-K) and the Kabuhayan Program,
among others. The beneficiaries were provided capital assistance as additional working capital to
uplift their living conditions through self-employment, enhancement of existing self-employment
undertakings, and development of collective enterprise to augment their income. Likewise, the socio-

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

economic skills of poor families were enhanced through the organization of community-based
associations for entrepreneurial development. The readiness of the beneficiaries to manage and
sustain the projects is critical to uplift the living conditions of the families.
The Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) which provides direct cash assistance to respond to
the education and health needs of the poor was implemented. As of August 2010, a total of 69,682
poor households were provided with cash grants amounting to PhP613M covering 638 barangays of
Lanao del Norte, Misamis Oriental, Misamis Occidental, Camiguin, Bukidnon and Cagayan de Oro.
The 4Ps beneficiaries are identified through the results of the National Household Targeting System
for Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) conducted by DSWD in 93 LGUs in the region.
The region continues to provide for the recognition, protection and promotion of the interests and
well-being of the vulnerable sectors with due regard to their ancestral domains, lands and cultural
integrity of the Indigenous Peoples (IPs), self governance and empowerment, social justice and
human rights. Although there have been various laws and other mechanisms to protect the rights of
the vulnerable sectors, there is still low compliance resulting to the non-full enjoyment of the benefits
and privileges provided.
The convergence and sustainability of anti-poverty interventions is seen as one of the challenges
and priorities in the plan period. The National Anti-Poverty Commission (NAPC) issued Memorandum
Circular No. 1, (s. 2009) directing all anti-poverty programs and projects to focus on the one million
poor households identified under 4Ps as beneficiaries. Likewise, Executive Order 867 (s. 2010)
provides for the adoption of the NHTS-PR as the mechanism for identifying poor households who
shall be recipients of social protection programs nationwide. All government efforts for the real poor
will be synchronized, thus, ensuring that only those deserving will be provided government
assistance.
At present, the NHTS-PR has assessed 639,946 households in the region which were also subjected
to Proxy Means Test (PMT), (a statistical formula used in the ranking, classification and prioritization
of poor households). A total of 307,315 were identified as poor households as of July 15, 2010.
The overall trend in poverty incidence and magnitude indicates the need to protect the poor and
vulnerable from risks, reduce vulnerabilities and poverty, as well as alleviate pressures on
households. More resources must be allocated across sectors to effectively implement a holistic
framework and strategy.
Likewise, the role of the Local Government Units (LGUs) is crucial in the delivery of basic services to
the communities. With the devolution of powers and the concern of limited resources, local
programs and projects should be focused and strategic to directly address the needs of the poor
communities.

II. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


Improved well-being and sustained economic growth are closely interlinked. The strategic priorities
shall enable the vulnerable groups to benefit equitably from the opportunities that development
provides. The right investments to appropriate interventions in ensuring human security is therefore
necessary for inclusive patterns of growth and social development to take place.

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Health and Nutrition


Improving human capabilities especially of the poor and vulnerable sectors through the provision of
primary health care and nutrition is critical to ensure healthy and productive communities. With the
devolution of health care and nutrition services, there is a need for a more defined role between the
national government and local government in terms of service delivery and health care financing.
This heightened the need to strengthen the capacities of LGUs to deliver quality basic health care
services.
In the plan period, the Aquino Health Agenda of achieving universal health care for all Filipinos is
anchored on the health system goals of the World Health Organization, the Millennium Development
Goals and the National Objectives for Health, as follows: a) better health outcomes; b) more
responsive health system; and c) more equitable healthcare financing. To attain these primary health
goals, strategic thrusts and actions will be implemented to achieve the medium-term objectives
corresponding to the six health sector components as follows:
1)

Health Care Financing: Secure increased, better and sustained investments in health
Redirect PhilHealth operations to improve the national and regional benefit ratios;
Increase national and local government spending on health; and
Expand the National Health Insurance Program (NHIP)

2) Health Regulation: Assure the quality and affordability of health goods and services
Harmonize the licensing, accreditation and certification systems among health agencies; and
Assure the availability of low-priced quality essential medicines
3) Health Service Delivery: Improve the accessibility and availability of basic and essential
health care for all
Ensure availability of providers of basic health services in all localities;
Designate providers of specific and specialized services in strategic locations; and
Intensify the implementation of public health programs in the localities
4) Good Governance for Health: Improve health performance at the regional and local levels
Establish inter-LGU and public-private coordination and mechanisms;
Develop and implement performance assessment systems; and
Improve management support systems to enhance the delivery of health goods and services
5) Human Resources for Health: Ensure access to professional health care providers
Institutionalize professional career track mechanisms for human resources for health
6) Health Information: Establish a modern information system that shall provide evidence for
policy and program development
Use ICT to deliver universal health care with particular focus on GIDAs such as eHealth; and
Improve health and productivity through research and development.

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The major targets of the health sector are shown below:


Table 32. Targets of Vital Health and Nutrition Indicators
Indicator
Maternal Mortality Rate (per 100,000 livebirths)
Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000 livebirths)
Prenatal Care (%)
Postnatal Care (%)
Access to potable water supply (% to total HHs)
Access to sanitary toilet facilities (% to total HHs)
Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (%)
Under five mortality rate (per 1,000 livebirths)
Percent of births assisted by skilled attendants
Prevalence of underweight pre-school children (CGS)
Severely underweight (1.28%); underweight (6.81%)

Actual
2009
94.00
7.20
67.76
88.00
88.00
73.10
45
9.00
77.29
8.09
(2010)

Plan Target
2016
33.00
6.9
95.00
95.00
100.00
90.00
60 for modern
methods; 80 for
all methods
6.27
90.00

MDG Target
2015
33 .00
6.93
95.00
95.00
100.00
83.80
60 for modern
methods; 80 for
all methods
*
*

5.02

**

Notes: * absence of baseline data in the 1990s; ** changes in the definition/coverage/standards in monitoring
prevalence of malnutrition from Philippine Reference Standards (PRS) to International
Reference Standards (IRS) then to Child Growth Standards (CGS) starting in 2010
Source: DOH-X

The legislative agenda that will be pursued in the plan period is to amend Title V, Sections 102-103
of RA 7160 (Local Government Code) to include as follows: a) provide for a regular budget of Local
Health Board, similar with the Special Education Fund of the Local School Board wherein a
percentage of real estate tax collection is earmarked for LSB, b) include in the composition of the
LHB the local budget officers, local development planning coordinators and department heads
deemed necessary to push the health sector agenda by ensuring funding of health-related projects
in the local plans and investment programs, and c) define the secretariat of the LHB and be
earmarked with corresponding budgetary support. Meanwhile, there should be an agency policy to
accredit providers of services (particularly the NGOs) for health care, mental health care and other
nutrition-related services to ensure quality and compliance to health standards.

Housing
Shelter is a fundamental right of every human being. By year 2016, the total housing needs (defined
as backlog plus new households) of the region will reach a staggering 136,913 units. Bulk of the
housing need is in Bukidnon at 26 percent of the total housing needs of the region.
For the plan period, the housing sector is geared towards attaining these goals: a) providing quality
safe housing and security of tenure to the different housing market segments especially to the lowincome families; b) addressing unemployment thru job generation; and c) helping attain the MDGs of
improving the lives of slum dwellers. To be able to meet the aforementioned goals the following
strategies shall be adopted.

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Well-being and Improved Welfare

Table 33. Projected Housing Needs by Province and Key City


Province/Key City

Backlog (as of 2009)


Double-up

Province
Bukidnon
Camiguin
Lanao del Norte
Misamis Occidental
Misamis Oriental
Key City
Cagayan de Oro
Iligan
Northern Mindanao

For Replacement

Need to
Population
Growth
2010-2016

Total
Housing
Needs
(2010-2016)

4,939
181
2,738
3,259
3,236

1,454
80
727
518
965

29,074
1,590
14,541
10,356
19,294

35,467
1,851
18,006
14,133
23,495

7,582
2,853
24,788

1,189
407
5,339

23,788
8,143
106,786

32,559
11,403
136,913

Source: HUDCC-X

Housing Affordability and Security of Tenure


In the short to medium term, increasing the availability of housing credit and financial resources and
lowering the cost of land and housing production are to be pursued through:
a) creation of alternative funds to spur housing production; b) expansion of non-government
organizations participation in socialized housing; c) building of a strong public-private partnership;
and d) increasing capacity of the low-income earners.

Sustainable Communities
In building sustainable communities through rational utilization of land, regulations on developing
residential subdivision projects for formal and informal settlers are linked to the enforcement of
comprehensive land use plans where a combination of functions and amenities based on
environmental standards are considered. Ultimately, they need to be sustainable by providing
minimum service standards from the point of view of the global climate change phenomenon
(NUDHF 2009-2016). The following strategies will be adopted: a) institute the National Resettlement
Policy Framework; b) strengthen programs on Asset Reform/Sustainable Communities; c) strengthen
enforcement and monitoring of reclassification of agricultural to non-agricultural uses; and d)
transparency and good governance.

Legislative and Research Agenda


Institutionalize the creation of Local Housing Board (LHB) in every local government unit.
Once created, the LHB can serve as the governing body in the planning and implementation
of housing programs especially for the informal settlers.
Passage of the National Land Use Act which shall integrate efforts and monitor development
relating to land use.
Continue to provide incentives and explore ways to get tax and fiscal incentives for
developers.
Adopt alternative tenurial arrangements such as lease or usufruct which will reduce the cost
of land.

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Social Protection
The government has increased its focus on social protection by providing more resources to its
various programs on labor market, social welfare, social safety nets and social insurance. These are
geared towards providing mechanisms to reducing poverty and vulnerability, and protecting the poor
and vulnerable with the overarching goal of achieving an improved quality of life for all.
The existing programs and services of government agencies dealing with social welfare are
rationalized, clustered and strengthened. Thus, the DSWD, DOH, GSIS, SSS, DOLE and other
agencies concerned on social welfare are clustered to form a national social welfare framework and
strategy to ensure convergence and rationalization of resources across sectors.
The DSWDs Convergence Framework for Poverty Reduction maximizes the impact of poverty
reduction programs through an effective targeting system and a holistic community development
approach. This framework, also known as the Public Private Partnership (PPP) Pathway out of
Poverty, consists of the three key poverty reduction programs: 1) Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino
Program (4Ps), 2) Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of
Social Services (KALAHI-CIDSS), and 3) Self-Employment Assistance Kaunlaran (SEA-K). These
three programs are extended to the municipalities and barangays identified through the National
Household Targeting System for Poverty Reduction (NHTSPR).
Figure 12. Convergence Framework for Poverty Reduction

Source: www.dswd.gov.ph

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The three-pronged poverty reduction approach responds to the unique contexts of various segments
of the poor. Sensitive to the capacities and needs of the people, each of the three programs has its
own strategies and outputs. In every stage of development, both public and private sectors have
identified their contributions for the improvement of the beneficiaries well being.
SEA-K will enable the 4Ps beneficiaries to establish and manage their own micro-enterprises through
an entrepreneurial skills training program that includes the provision of non-collateral and interestfree loan amounting to PhP10,000 per family-beneficiary as seed capital. On the other hand, the
Guaranteed Employment scheme will access the 4Ps beneficiaries to locally available jobs through a
job network system that will be established in partnership with national government agencies, nongovernment organizations and business sector.
Other key elements that shall be optimized in complementing the different social protection
programs are the following: a) closely diagnose the mechanisms in targeting beneficiaries; b)
capacity building of local government units; c) empowering communities to undertake community
services through volunteerism and monitoring and evaluation; and d) establishing a referral system.
The convergence of three major anti-poverty programs, namely: the 4Ps, KALAHI-CIDSS, and SelfEmployment AssistanceKaunlaran (SEA-K) aims to bring greater impact in uplifting the economic
situation of the poorest families and communities through capacity building and the provision of
seed capital for sustainable self-employment and livelihood activities.
In addition, the following strategic agenda will be pursued to improve access to social assistance,
social security and social safety nets particularly the vulnerable groups:
Ensure social protection and rights of the vulnerable and disadvantaged sectors;
Increase social insurance coverage for members;
Implement/enforce laws and policies which provide for the benefits and privileges for the
vulnerable sectors;
Provide welfare, livelihood and employment and protection against sudden loss of income;
Intensify conduct of social preparation to ensure sustainability of projects provided to the
beneficiaries;
Enhance delivery of community-based services;
Strengthen community empowerment thru community-based sub-project operation and
maintenance groups, and peoples organizations;
Intensify poverty-focus targeting of beneficiaries;
Promote culture and traditions; and
Institutionalize basic sector participation in governance.

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III. RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING


MATRIX

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144

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145

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

146

Well-being and Improved Welfare

147

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

148

Well-being and Improved Welfare

149

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

150

Well-being and Improved Welfare

151

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

152

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153

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

154

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155

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

156

Well-being and Improved Welfare

157

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

158

Well-being and Improved Welfare

159

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

160

Chapter 7: Agriculture and Fishery


Rapidly progressing toward modernization
and greater productivity

I. ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES


The total volume of agricultural production between 2004 and 2009 reached 55,409,870 MT,
valued at PhP117.638 billion. Overall volume of production grew at an average annual rate of
4.6 percent while value of production grew by 5.9 percent. The average annual value of production
over the period was PhP19.607 billion. This performance contributed to the 6.2 percent annual
average growth rate of the agriculture and fishery sectors Gross Value Added (GVA) for the period
2004-2009.
Among the major commodity groups, crops consistently contributed the biggest share to annual
gross earnings at PhP11.566 billion. This is equivalent to a 59 percent share to the overall average
annual earnings for the period. The poultry subsector contributed 14.8 percent with its PhP2.908
billion average annual earnings. Meanwhile, the livestock and fisheries subsectors contributed 13.1
percent.
Table 34. Agricultural Production, Region X: 2004-2009 (in thousand metric tons)
2008

2009

Total

Ave.

8,260.7

10,122.9

10,422.0

52,994.6

8,832.4

AAGR
(%)
4.6

461.3

501.9

551.3

583.3

3,022.6

503.8

4.6

938.2

964.3

1,048.3

1,127.6

1,170.6

6,176.8

1,029.5

4.8

1,494.2

1,548.8

1,491.1

1,669.3

1,713.4

1,743.3

9,660.1

1,610.0

3.1

3,583.5

2,875.3

3,100.5

2,559.6

3,421.4

3,493.1

19,033.4

3,172.2

-0.5

Banana

571.6

590.0

662.2

933.1

1,631.3

1,657.7

6,046.0

1,007.7

23.7

Pineapple

889.6

891.6

911.2

924.5

1,007.0

1,026.9

5,650.8

941.8

2.9

Other Crops
Livestock and
Poultry
Fishery

402.0

432.0

529.0

624.0

671.0

747.0

3,405.0

567.5

13.2

228.4

242.6

258.5

268.2

286.9

302.5

1,587.2

264.5

5.8

125.4

127.4

126.8

143.0

149.8

155.5

828.0

138.0

4.4

Total
8,688.4
Source: BAS-X

8,105.0

8,504.9

8,672.0

10,559.6

10,880.0

55,409.9

9,235.0

4.6

Commodity

2004

2005

2006

8,334.5

7,734.9

8,119.6

Palay

465.9

459.0

Corn

927.7

Coconut
Sugarcane

Crops

2007

Coconut and sugarcane dominated the industrial crops with a combined annual average value of
output of PhP2.947 billion. Banana and pineapple, which shared the greatest bulk of total fruit
production, posted combined average annual gross earnings of PhP2.637 billion in the last six years.

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Table 35. Value of Agricultural Production


Region X: 2004-2009
(in million Pesos)
2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

10,225

10,186

10,556

11,471

13,254

13,701

69,393

11,566

AAGR
(%)
6.2

Livestock

2,307

2,400

2,481

2,584

2,722

2,879

15,373

2,562

4.5

Poultry

2,344

2,579

2,881

2,973

3,249

3,419

17,445

2,908

7.9

Fisheries

2,343

2,366

2,358

2,650

2,781

2,929

15,427

2,571

4.7

17,219

17,531

18,276

19,678

22,006

22,928

117,638

19,607

5.9

Commodity
Crops

Total
Source: DA-X

2009

Total

Average

Crops Development
Rice
Although productivity of rice slightly increased in both irrigated and rainfed areas between 2004 and
2009, it decreased between 2008 and 2009 in irrigated farms (from 4.14 mt/ha. to 4.08 mt/ha.)
and between 2007 and 2008 in rainfed farms (from 3.11mt/ha. to 2.96 mt/ha). This resulted to the
18 percent shortfall in the plans targeted palay production. The regions yield of 4.08 mt/ha in
irrigated farms in 2009 is still below the potential productivity of 5 mt/ha (Table 36).
Table 36. Gap Between Region X Productivity and the Potential Productivity
based on ASEAN Countries
Commodity
Rice -irrigated
Corn

Region X
(2009)

Philippines

Potential based on
ASEAN Performance

Gap (%)
Region X

Philippines

4.08 mt/ha

4.0 mt/ha

5 mt/ha (Vietnam)

18

20

3.1 mt/ha

2.8 mt/ha

4.5 mt/ha (Thailand)*

31

38

Source: DA-X and ADB*

Low rice yields, even in irrigated farms are attributed to the low adoption of modern and productive
technologies and infestation of pests and diseases in some areas. Also, some irrigation systems are
already damaged and need immediate rehabilitation and improvement. Compounding to this
situation is the problem on water availability and sufficiency in some areas being served by these
systems. This occurs during dry season when water becomes insufficient, as discharges of water
from the source decrease, to cover the entire service area of the systems. The systems adopted the
rotational water delivery scheme to mitigate water insufficiency problem.
The region achieved 75 percent and 81 percent rice sufficiency levels in 2008 and 2009,
respectively. However, these were lower than the plan targets for the same years by 12 and 11
percentage points, respectively. This performance is mainly attributed to the deteriorating
infrastructure facilities and other logistics support aggravated by damages caused by bad weather
conditions that affected agricultural production. The rising per capita consumption had also
contributed to the lower rice sufficiency levels during the period under review. An average of 93,965
MT of rice annually was imported to adequately meet the regions requirements.

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A total of 5,846,679 kgs of inbred/certified/hybrid rice seeds, or 80 percent of the plan target, were
distributed to farmers. Despite the promising yield of hybrid varieties, some farmers refused to use
them because these are expensive, supposedly susceptible to pest and diseases, and their seed
supply is not locally available. Most farmers in the region do not have the financial capacity to
engage in commercial production.
Another concern affecting rice production is the utilization of prime rice lands to other crops,
specifically banana. The shift in the use of land is generally due to lack of funding support for land
development. Also, the lack of credit support facilities to farmers, limited marketing support to
ensure price stability, inadequate processing and post harvest facilities, poor farm-to-market roads,
and increasing cost of farm inputs discourage rice farming.

Corn
Over the last six years, corn production totaled 6,176,770 MT. Despite its minimal annual growth of
4.8 percent, it exceeded the plan target by 31 percent. The net corn sufficiency levels for 2008
(111%) and 2009 (99%) surpassed the plan annual targets by 25 and nine percentage points,
respectively. Meanwhile, the average annual yield during the plan period was 2.7 mt/ha. In 2009,
the region was able to reach 3.1 mt/ha, which was still 31 percent lower than the potential yield of
4.5 mt/ha (Table 36).
While there was an evident shift from white corn to yellow corn farming, some of the lands (from
393,149 hectares in 2004 to only 381,373 hectares in 2009) planted with the crop were shifted to
sugarcane, pineapple, cassava and banana. Hence, corn production intruded into marginal/hilly
areas. The concern on reduction in total corn production area is compounded with problems such as
lack of post harvest facilities, bad condition of farm- to-market roads, limited access to credit, soil
fertility depletion, soil erosion, high cost of production and marketing, and insufficient price support.

Fruits and Vegetables


Among the fruits, banana registered the highest average production level at 1,008,000 MT and
average annual production increase at 23.7 percent. Average annual value of banana production
was PhP1.290 billion. Meanwhile, although pineapple posted a lower average production level
(942,000 MT) than banana, it however posted a higher value of production at PhP1.347 billion.
Overall, there is huge surplus in fruit production. This provides the opportunity for investments in
post-harvest facilities and other value-adding activities.
Meanwhile, tomato remained to be a major vegetable commodity valued at an annual average of
PhP168 million. Development of high value vegetables such as lettuce, broccoli, cabbage,
cauliflower and carrots were remarkable resulting from the clustering of production and marketing
initiated by private organizations. However, the lack of disease-free planting materials and
postharvest/packaging facilities, prevalence of pest and diseases and inaccessibility of prime
vegetable areas slowed down the development of the vegetable industry.

Industrial Crops
The region has been exerting efforts to revitalize its various traditional industrial crops such as,
coconut registering an annual average gross earnings of PhP1.932 billion; coffee, PhP143 million;
abaca, PhP9 million; and, rubber, PhP45 million. Incentives were provided for replanting of coconut

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trees. Good quality planting materials and production technologies were continually made available
for the other three commodities through the establishment and maintenance of abaca nurseries, as
well as coffee clonal and rubber budwood gardens.
The low productivity and inadequate replanting materials are the principal issues facing the coconut
industry. The main factors responsible for low productivity are the use of planting materials of low
genetic potential and virtual absence of fertilizer use on nutritionally deficient coconut lands.
Improper harvesting, drying and storage practices are responsible for poor quality resulting in low oil
extraction rate and higher refining cost.
The fast growing cassava industry, which provided a 19 percent increase in production in 2009, has
a ready market. However, the industry has inadequate post-harvest facilities, especially for
granulating and drying the products.
In reviving the abaca industry, rehabilitation of unproductive abaca plantations and opening of new
abaca plantations were done, thereby surpassing the plan targets by 39 and 82 percent,
respectively. However, the industry is beset with lack of quality planting materials and prevalence of
viral diseases such as abaca mosaic and bunchy top.
With all the challenges and constraints confronting the industrial crops sector, the farmers are enticed
to lease their farms to multi-national corporations rather than venture into farming by themselves.
From 2004 to 2009, a total of 148,541 hectares of new agribusiness lands were developed. The
output was 21 percent below the plan target of 188,871 hectares. This performance necessitates
appropriate interventions to hasten full realization of the agri-business potentials of the region.

Livestock and Poultry Development


The combined production of the livestock and poultry subsectors over the last six years totaled
2,415,250 MT. Output grew by 5.8 percent annually.
Except for carabao, all livestock species showed rising trends as sustained increases in the number
of fatteners were recorded during the period under review. Goat exhibited the highest growth of 9.53
percent yearly. This can be attributed to the investments in commercial goat production.
Despite efforts to improve the genetic quality of breeding animals, the native breed still dominates
the backyard farms. Meantime, insufficiency in milk is still a problem in the region.
The marketing of livestock, especially to Luzon and Visayas, is hampered by limited cargo vessels
with facilities to transport live animals, thus, challenged the industry to venture into shipping through
meat in a box mode. Meanwhile, selling of hot meat proliferates in third to sixth class
municipalities due to absence of slaughterhouses.

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Fishery Development
The total volume of fishery production between 2004 and 2009 was 828 MT, valued at PhP15.427
billion. Volume of production grew at an average annual rate of 4.4 percent, while value of
production grew by 4.7 percent on average.
Among the subsectors, aquaculture provided the biggest contribution in terms of volume at 41
percent, and had an average annual increase of 5.13 percent. This can be attributed to the
establishment of mariculture parks in Balingasag, Misamis Oriental and Sultan Naga Dimaporo in
Lanao del Norte, as well as, the Sagay Multi-species Hatchery in Camiguin.
While commercial fishing accounted for the second highest contribution in terms of volume at 31
percent, it grew only by 2.41 percent annually. Municipal fishing shared only 28 percent as a result
of the declining fish catch caused by destruction of coral reefs and mangroves, overfishing and
improper disposal of solid waste. Moreover, the impact of climate change affected the commercial
and municipal fisheries production because of the following changes in the ecosystem: a) increased
coral bleaching; b) increased shift of species; c) altered distribution, productivity and community
composition of marine resources; d) loss of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning of natural
habitats; e) ocean acidification; f) changes in migration patterns of some species; and, g) 30 percent
of species face extinction.

Irrigation and Other Infrastructure Support


As of CY 2009, the region attained 46.11 percent level of irrigation development as the 56,845
hectares of the 123,272 hectares of the potential irrigable area had been provided with irrigation
systems. This low level of irrigation development is due to inadequate funds for the establishment
of irrigation facilities.
A total of 693.76 kilometers of farm-to-market roads were constructed and rehabilitated utilizing the
PhP1.12 billion from the following special programs and fund sources: a) Infrastructure for Rural
Enhancement Sector (InfRES); b) Mindanao Rural Development Program (MRDP); c) Mindanao North
Coast Integrated Area Development Program (MNCIADP); and d) DA-Central Office.
Of the targeted 1,886 drying facilities, only 616 of them were distributed/established. These
facilities included flatbed dryers, tarpaulins, cob dryers, and multi-purpose drying pavements. A
farmer-level grain center was also established, complete with equipment while 182 grain
warehouses were constructed. With insufficient funds, only five of the targeted 12 units of cold
storage equipment were distributed. Another 148 post harvest facilities for various commodities
were also provided to include trading posts, corn and rice mills, corn shellers, coffee dehullers,
cassava and banana chippers, cassava granulator, hot water treatment tanks, and iron fortification
mixing plant.

Agricultural Livelihood Projects


The implementation of new programs, such as the MRDP and the MNCIADP during the later part of
the plan period, provided available funds for livelihood projects. These were in addition to livelihood
funds provided by the existing Livelihood Enhancement and Agricultural Development (LEAD) Project.
A total of 173 livelihood projects were granted with a total funding support of PhP47.5 million that
benefited about 2,000 beneficiaries.

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Agrarian Reform
From 2004 to 2009, a total of 33,149 hectares were distributed regionwide under the
Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program (CARP), representing an accomplishment of almost 96
percent against the plan target of 34,420 hectares.
In terms of Land Tenure Improvement (LTI), a total of 45,260 hectares have been covered with land
titles and leasehold contracts that allowed 28,915 agrarian reform beneficiaries (ARBs) proprietary
use of the lands (Table 37).
Table 37. Land Tenure Improvement (CARP)
Region X: 2004-2009
Particulars/Indicators
Emancipation Patents (EPs) Issuance
EPs Issued (no.)
Area Covered (hectares)
Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries covered (no.)
Certificate of Land Ownership Award (CLOA)
CLOAs Issued (no.)
Area Covered (hectares)
Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries covered (no.)
Leasehold Operation
Area Covered (hectares)
Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries covered (no.)
Total
Area Covered (hectares)
Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries covered (no.)

Accomplishment
136
225
121
12,515
32,924
24,158
12,561
4,636
45,260
28,915

Source: DAR-X

In support to the land acquisition and distribution, DENR-X has inspected, verified and approved
surveys covering 22,658 hectares.
On the disposition of agrarian justice involving judicial, quasi-judicial and agrarian law
implementation cases, the region posted 87 percent accomplishment for the period 2004 to 2009
(Table 38).
Efforts to develop and improve the capabilities of CARP beneficiaries through the Program
Beneficiaries Development (PBD) resulted to empowered and pro-active partners in rural
development. Various infrastructure projects have been provided to the agrarian reform areas. For
foreign-assisted projects alone, a total of 49,550 ARBs have benefitted. In addition, 21 communal
irrigation projects were completed to support the irrigation needs of ARBs.

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Table 38. Agrarian Justice Delivery (CARP)


Region X: 2004 - 2009
Year
2004
2005

Received
2,308
1,830

Resolved/Disposed
1,952
1,448

% Accomplishment
84
79

2006
2007
2008
2009
Total

1,733
2,176
2,881
6,029
16,957

1,283
1,714
2,637
5,800
14,834

74
78
91
96
87

Source: DAR-X

As of June 2009, the region had a total of 162 Agrarian Reform Communities (ARCs) with 43,446
members, of which 48.9 percent were ARB-members (Table 39).
Table 39. Status of Organization in the ARCs
Region X, As of June 2009
No. of Organizations
401

No. of Members
Male
Female
Total

No. of ARB Members


Male
Female
Total

24,667

12,944

18,779

43,446

8,305

21,249

Source: DAR-X

II. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


In pursuit of attaining food security and rural development, the region shall adopt the Agri-Pinoy
framework that endeavors to achieve countryside development, nurture sustainable agriculture, and
manage natural resources to enhance productivity and increase food production. This framework
shall focus on measures/interventions with long-term impact on productivity and incomes of farmers
and fisherfolk. These include adoption of sustainable farming practices, provision of infrastructures
and logistics systems, implementation of community-based agri-processing projects, promotion of
self-help food production activities, intensify technology transfer and extension, and provision of
other support services particularly training with capital/micro credit support and marketing
assistance. With the devolution in the delivery of agriculture services, the role of local government
units is highly recognized with the Department of Agriculture providing oversight and coordinative
functions. Meanwhile, the role of the private sector and other concerned agencies is also critical to
expand substantially the production base leading to modernization and improved productivity.

the region shall adopt the Agri-Pinoy framework


that endeavors to achieve countryside development, nurture
sustainable agriculture, and manage natural resources to
enhance productivity and increase food production.

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Agriculture and Fishery

Crops Development
The crops sector shall pursue the following strategies within the plan period:
Continue promotion of multi-cropping/integrated farming systems and crop diversification in
lowland and upland ecosystems;
Intensify promotion of Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) certification, organic farming and
balanced fertilization;
Increase adoption/practice of cost-efficient and proven package of technologies (POTs) to
increase productivity and production;
Strengthen and widen coverage for extension, education and training support;
Enhance production of disease-free planting materials and intensify integrated pest
management and utilization of biological control agents;
Intensify and encourage LGU-based and community-based seed production system;
Increase credit access and expand marketing assistance;
Promote clustering of small-sized farms (i.e., implementation of program under a small farm
cluster-based approach);
Strengthen crops quarantine activities in all ports of entry;
Intensify participation in the risk reducing mechanism such as crop insurance;
Continue the conduct of various research studies on crops to generate and verify
technologies concerning production, post harvest and marketing, climate change tolerance,
and resistance to emerging pest and disease; and,
Promote the transformation of farmlands into agribusiness enterprises through collaborative
efforts of the government, private investors and crop associations.

Livestock and Poultry Development


This sector shall give priority focus to the following:
Intensify promotion of good agricultural practices (GAP) for livestock;
Intensify the genetic improvement program with involvement of the LGUs and the private
sector while privatizing the artificial insemination program;
Establish community-based/LGU-based breeder production farms (Multiplier Farms);
Infuse new dairy cattle;
Intensify disease surveillance, prevention and control of highly contagious and zoonotic
diseases (e.g. brucellosis, anthrax, rabies and H5N1 or bird flu);
Strengthen the livestock quarantine activities in all ports of entry;
Intensify support services for slaughter operations in strategic areas and devise and
implement measures to minimize or eliminate trading of hot meat;
Intensify participation in the risk reducing mechanism such as livestock insurance; and

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Promote livestock/poultry enterprise development and value adding such as meat in a box,
egg powder and others.

Fishery Development
The fishery sector shall implement the following measures in the next six years:
Intensify campaign and coordination with the local government units against illegal fishing
activities and destructive fishing methods along with monitoring, control and surveillance
activities;
Increase fishery production through Aquaculture Development and improved infrastructure
in fisheries such as cold storage and post-harvest facilities which reduces spoilage of fishery
products;
Strengthen market linkages on both domestic and foreign markets;
Comprehensive promotion program of fishery products that have potentials for export and
market expansion; and,
Adaptation and mitigation to climate change through research and distribution of species
adaptable to changing climatic conditions; promotion of an integrated coastal and fisheries
management; improved aquaculture practices; effective use of genetic resources; and
improved infrastructure in fisheries.

Irrigation and Other Infrastructure Support


The sector shall continuously pursue in assisting marginalized farmers improve their productivity
through the provision of appropriate irrigation and other infrastructure facilities:
Establish and rehabilitate irrigation systems;
Establish and rehabilitate farm-to-market roads;
Improve production and post harvest facilities and equipment; and
Establish local seed production system and facilities, inclusive of seed quality control
laboratory.

Agricultural Livelihood Projects


The region will continue to mobilize resources to support peoples organizations in the countryside to
undertake community livelihood activities. Production-marketing linkages shall be strengthened in
the region and technical assistance shall also be provided to transform these livelihood undertakings
into successful agribusiness ventures.

Agrarian Reform
The three major components of CARP are as follows: a) Land Tenure Improvement; b) Agrarian
Justice Delivery; and c) Program Beneficiaries Development. Improved land tenure security of ARBs
and improved farm productivity of ARCs shall continue to be pursued. These shall involve land
acquisition and distribution, leasehold operations, capacity development, agribusiness promotion,
micro-credit assistance and provision of infrastructures such as, but not limited to farm-to-market
roads and bridges to link ARCs to the markets. Acquisition and distribution of the remaining

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Agriculture and Fishery

coverable lands shall continue until 30 June 2014 as prescribed under RA 9700 extending CARP for
five years after its expiration in June 2009.
By 2011, Land Tenure Improvement-Project Beneficiaries Development (LTI-PBD) integration shall be
pursued. Interventions shall be done simultaneously to ensure focused delivery of assistance to
ARBs. The corresponding CLOA beneficiaries shall be the source target for support services.
To meet the societal goal of poverty alleviation and rural development, there shall be intensified
coordination by the concerned agencies, LGUs and the civil society organizations to sustain the initial
gains of the program that includes agrarian peace and countryside stability, social justice for ARBs
and landowners and agri-based rural industrialization.
Table 40. Agriculture and Fishery Targets
Region X: 2011-2016
Commodity
Rice - Suff. Level (%)
Production (MT)
Yield (MT/Ha.)
Corn - Suff. Level ( %)
Production (MT)
Yield (MT/Ha.)
Vegetables Suff. Level (%)
Production (MT)
Fruits - Suff. Level (%)
Production (MT)
Livestock
Beef - Suff. Level(%)
Production (MT)
Carabeef Suff. Level (%)
Production (MT)
Pork - Suff. Level (%)
Production (MT)
Chevon Suff. Level (%)
Production (MT)
Chicken meat
Sufficiency Level (%)
Production (MT)
Fisheries:
Sufficiency Level (%)
- With seaweeds
- Without seaweeds
Production:
- Commercial (MT)
- Municipal:
Inland (MT)
Marine (MT)
- Aquaculture with
seaweeds (MT)
- Aquaculture without
seaweeds (MT)
Source: DA-X

2011
72.48
637,387
4.24
81.01
1,228,789
3.65
87
117,615
719
3,053,176

2012
78.27
699,067
4.54
79.74
1,290,229
3.77
88
121,611
741
3,189,998

2013
85.36
774,288
4.85
78.36
1,354,740
3.89
90
125,770
761
3,327,575

2014
88.11
812,372
4.95
76.87
1,422,477
4.05
90
130,337
768
3,471,575

2015
90.35
846,861
5.05
75.28
1,493,601
4.2
93
137,200
789
3,622,323

2016
93.1
887,317
5.16
73.6
1,566,281
4.35
97
144,668
811
3,780,164

295
34,973
572
7,523
263
142,708
1499
6,857

296
35,673
568
7,609
293
149,843
1577
7,337

297
36,386
564
7,685
302
157,335
1660
7,850

298
37,114
561
7,762
312
165,202
1747
8,400

299
37,856
557
7,839
322
173,462
1839
8,988

300
38,613
553
7,918
333
182,135
1935
9,617

362

395

432

471

515

562

109,754

121,627

136,228

150,103

166,614

184,941

124
96

127
98

130
102

134
103

137
106

141
109

47,841

48,798

49,774

50,769

51,785

52,821

4,882
42,937

5,809
45,084

6,913
47,338

8,226
49,705

9,789
52,190

11,649
54,799

74,032

77,734

81,621

85,702

89,987

94,486

35,536

37,312

41,178

42,137

43,194

45,353

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

III. RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING


MATRIX

172

Agriculture and Fishery

173

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

174

Agriculture and Fishery

175

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

176

Agriculture and Fishery

177

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

178

Chapter 8: Education and


Youth Empowerment
Building up human capital and contributing
to economic growth

I. ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES


In cognizance of the potency of education in building human capital, facilitating economic growth
and breaking the seemingly endless cycle of poverty, various commitments have been made to
address the issues pertaining to access, equity, quality, and relevance. These include commitments
to Education for All (EFA) 2015 and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). However, many of
the issues still require further urgent interventions in order to translate the commitments into real
educational benefits for everyone, particularly for the children and youth.

Early Childhood and Basic Education


Access and Equity
Working towards the EFA and MDG targets of providing universal access to primary education
together remain a tall order for the region. The current participation rates indicate that a large
number of children are not able to enjoy their basic human and constitutional right to basic
education.
In SY 2008-2009, the participation rates remained low at 81.8 percent in the elementary level and
54.7 percent in the secondary level. Both rates fell short of the targets of the previous plan period.
While the rates in both levels have been generally on the uptrend since SY 2006-2010, the rate of
progress is unimpressive.
Within the principle of inclusive education, the education system continued to encourage increased
participation of all children, male and female, and from all socio-cultural background. In SY 20092010, public and private schools catered to 998,578 preschool, elementary and secondary
students. About 20 percent or 173,178 students in public schools are from various indigenous
groups. Meanwhile, enrolment among children with special needs (CSNs) totaled 3,111. It is noted
that about 70 percent of these students are in regular classes or classes for non-CSN students. In a
classroom setting with predominantly non-CSN students, the needs of the CSNs generally tend to be
neglected.
The progress of improving literacy had likewise been very slow, indicating low probability of attaining
the MDG target literacy rate for the region of 100 percent by 2015. Over the 19-year period from
1989 to 2008, basic literacy rate increased only by 3.4 percentage points, from 90.5 percent to
93.9 percent. Meanwhile, functional literacy posted a faster pace of improvement during the same
period, increasing by 9.4 percentage points, from 76.5 percent to 85.9 percent.
The regions literacy rates are lower than the national rates. For basic literacy, the national rate is
95.6 percent, higher by 1.7 percentage points than that of Region X. The national functional literacy

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Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

rate of 86.4 percent is higher by 0.5 percentage point. Among the 17 regions, Region X ranked
seventh both in terms of basic and functional literacy rates.
In general, illiteracy is prevalent in remote and in conflict-affected areas, as well as in povertystricken areas. These findings indicate the need to continually intensify and expand the coverage of
Alternative Learning System (ALS) in said areas, alongside efforts to improve access to formal
education, as a means to improve equity of access and literacy, both among OSY and adults.

Efficiency
Meanwhile, various internal efficiency
indicators confirm the need for urgent
intervention to optimize the use of resources
allocated for basic education. Actual
repetition rate, dropout rate, completion rate
and cohort survival rate fell short of plan
targets.
The SY 2009-2010 elementary and
secondary repetition rates of 2.84 percent
and 3.41 percent, respectively, indicate that
more than 25,000 students are still in the
same grade or year level that they were
enrolled in during the previous school year.
In addition, the dropout rates for both levels
indicate that an average of 20,000
elementary and high school students
abandon school each year during the last
plan period. This large number of annual
dropouts is manifested in the low cohort
survival rates (CSR).

findings indicate the need to


continually intensify and expand
the coverage of Alternative
Learning System in
conflict-affected and
poverty-stricken areas

Actual dropout and cohort survival rates


have been consistently below the annual
plan targets over the last five years. On one
hand, the elementary level CSR for SY 20092010 is only 65.74 percent, 11 percentage
points lower than the plan target. On the
other hand, secondary CSR for the same SY
is lower than the plan target by 14.23
percentage points. Although the trend is
generally increasing since SY 2006-2007,
the annual progress however is very slow.
Most of elementary children who dropped
out of school did so between the first and
second grades. The frequently cited
interrelated reasons for dropping out are
poverty, undernourishment and short-term

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hunger. In addition, first and second graders who dropped out were not adequately prepared for
school. It was observed that majority of them did not attend pre-school. Meanwhile, high school
dropouts are usually forced to work to augment family income.
Assuming that the current elementary and secondary CSR, completion and transition rates of the
region will remain constant over time, together these rates will imply that of a cohort of 100 students
who enter grade one, only 36 will graduate from high school. Applying the national level cohort and
completion rates for tertiary education, there will only be approximately 13 college graduates of the
said cohort.

Quality
Another alarming concern is the performance of students in the National Achievement Test. The
Mean Percentage Scores (MPS) have remained very low over time, indicating that students are far
from achieving subject mastery. It is noted, however that in the last five years, MPS at the
elementary level have been steadily on the uptrend while that of the secondary level have been
erratic.
In SY 2008-2009, the MPS for the elementary and secondary levels are 64.73 percent and 47.5
percent, respectively. Among the subjects, elementary students scored the lowest in Science with a
mean percentage score of 57.53 percent, followed by English and HEKASI with 61.77 percent and
66.6 percent, respectively. Meanwhile, the secondary students scored lowest in Math (41.40%),
Filipino (44.79%) and Science (45.97%).
The shortages in teachers, classrooms, chairs and textbooks largely determined the quality of
education provided by the public education system. In addition to these are concerns on the quality
of the curriculum, level of teacher competency, and effectiveness of methods of instruction and
technologies used. These affected the extent of learning by the students, and the overall quality of
basic education.
The various shortages resulted from the insufficiency of development spending for such huge and
expanding sector. While the DepEd budget is one of the largest within the region, the budget has
never been enough to adequately provide the needs of the sector. Per capita (student) budget has
been declining, given a reenacted DepEd budget and a continually growing student population.

in the last five years, Mean Percentage Scores


at the elementary level have been steadily on the uptrend
while that of the secondary level have been erratic.

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Teacher needs as of SY 2009-2010 reached 2,953. Classroom and seating needs were estimated
at 2,156 and 209,286, respectively. Along curriculum content, it is deemed overcrowded and
cannot be covered within a school year. Moreover, there is clamor for continual curriculum
enrichment to integrate Islamic and IP values, sports, culture and traditions.
Clearly, a lot remains to be done to set the sector on track of its regional targets, as well as to the
MDG and EFA commitments. In a recent report of DepEd on the comparative performance of the 17
regions in the country, Region X is catching up in terms of elementary level net enrolment ratio,
completion rate and NAT MPS. However, it is falling behind in terms of dropout rate. At the
secondary level, the region is falling behind most of the regions in the country in terms of net
enrolment ratio, dropout rate and completion rate.
Meanwhile, in the ranking of all schools divisions in the country, three divisions in the region are in
the bottom 40 in terms of elementary level performance along NAT MPS, net enrolment ratio,
completion rate and dropout rate. These are the divisions of Lanao del Norte (bottom 19), Bukidnon
(24) and Misamis Occidental (38). The divisions of Lanao del Norte and Bukidnon are bottom 11
and 27 in terms of secondary level performance. Overall, Lanao del Norte and Bukidnon are in the
bottom 40 divisions in terms of both elementary and secondary level performance.

Technical Vocational Education and Training


The efforts of the TVET sector in the last five years focused in addressing the skills requirements of
the labor market, upgrading or developing new competencies to enhance employability, and
improving productivity to respond to the needs of the industry and of the growing economy.
Over the last five years (2004-2009), enrolment of school-based training program generally posted
good accomplishment. The highest accomplishment was in 2006 (304%) three times higher than
plan target. However, for center-based training, it posted a dismal accomplishment of 47.5 percent
in 2009 but, performance exceeded in 2004, 2005, and 2008. Meanwhile, the enterprise-based
TVET program registered remarkable performance which was three to four times higher than plan
targets. The decline in enrolment and graduates is due to the closure of TVET programs by
institutions which are non-compliant to standards or regulations of TESDA.
Along graduate referral/employment, a total of 25,186 skilled workers were employed and/or
deployed from 2005 to 2009. Part of the benefits afforded to these applicants is the provision of
livelihood packages especially for the displaced OFWs and jobseekers through launching of job fairs.
On Competency Assessment and Certification (CAC), to ensure that job-ready students/workers
obtain certification as an additional credential and to determine the level of qualification, 70,130
trainees underwent mandatory assessment of competency prior to graduation. On an annual basis,
the number of assessed trainees posted significant increases except in 2006, which was 12.4
percent short of plan target. On the other hand, performance quadrupled in 2009 (397%).
The number of programs registered continuously surpassed the plan targets over the last five years.
This implies increasing number of programs that are compliant to the TESDA requirements and
standards. Although, there was a fluctuating trend in the number of registered programs audited
due to the necessary upgrading of the training curricula, it still significantly surpassed plan targets.

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Various scholarship programs were intensified during the plan period to ensure equity and access in
skills acquisition among the poor, but deserving students, as well as widen access to post secondary
education. Accomplishment in scholarship programs over the last five years reached a total of 4,204
scholars for PESFA, and a hefty 23,561 scholars under the Training for Work Scholarship Program
(TWSP) or the PGS/PGMA. The TWSP contributed significant level of achievement in terms of
promoting TVET programs and producing employable graduates both at the local and overseas
market. Other scholarships which include Iskolar ng Mahirap na Pamilya benefitted 2,503 scholars,
though this was implemented in years 2005-2007only.
On the overall, the TVET sector achieved significant performance along training, employment
generation and facilitation, and scholarship programs. This is due to the massive IEC program,
LGUs support, and increase in budgetary support for the sector. These highly contributed to the
acceptance and recognition of TVET among the youth and the workers including support from the
private sector.
Meanwhile, the positive performance on scholarships can be attributed to the strengthened
advocacy on TVET and the significant increase in funding of the continuing advocacy on blue collar
jobs. This continuously gained more popularity as more TVET graduates are hired overseas, while
others are employed through TESDAs job matching and referral programs.
Even with the modest achievements of the sector, the following challenges have to be continually
addressed in the plan period, namely: 1) promoting TVET as an attractive and viable career
opportunity; 2) improving labor market information addressing the labor demand and supply gaps
and matching problems; 3) institutionalizing the Philippine National Qualification Framework (PNQF)
and a system of skills/qualification progression and career shifts; 4) continuing quality
improvement in TVET provision; 5) expanding access and equity to TVET, especially for the poor and
vulnerable sectors; 6) strengthening industry-TVET linkage, including enterprise-based training; and
7) ensuring sustainable financing for TVET.

Higher Education
The higher education sector remains steadfast in achieving its set goals and objectives and in
putting primacy to quality education and accessible lifelong learning from early childhood
development, to primary, secondary, and tertiary learning, to include a ladderized interface between
vocational-technical and college education. This is to critically and strategically respond to the
human resource development challenges and ensure that post secondary and higher education are
in line with market demands.

Quality and Excellence


To ensure quality assurance and excellence, compliance to standards and adherence to guidelines
on higher education is constantly monitored. As such, CHED awarded seven Centers of Excellence to
State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) in various fields, while 16 Centers of Development were also
awarded to a few private and public institutions. These institutions have demonstrated the highest
degree or level of standard along the areas of instruction, and research and extension. In 2009,
CHED granted an Autonomous Status to two of the private universities in Cagayan de Oro (CDO) in
recognition of the institutions committed service through quality education. Likewise, to support and
value the significant role of higher education institutions and academic community and to ensure the
quality of standards of the schools, the CHED adopted the Institutional Monitoring and Evaluation for

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Quality Assurance (IQuAME). In 2009, CHED awarded one private university in CDO with A(t)
Category status, the second highest status to accredit higher education institutions (HEIs).

Relevance and Responsiveness


Vis--vis the growing number of tertiary age population and the increasing global market demands,
the region has now a total of 82 HEIs. While the number of HEIs increases, the higher education
sector continues to hurdle the various challenges in terms of its relevance and responsiveness in the
labor market. The number of graduates during the plan period posted a fluctuating trend. For the
first two school years (2004-2005 and 2005-2006), it exceeded its annual target. However, in the
succeeding school years, it barely met the targets. In SY 2008-2009, a total of 19,037 graduates
were registered of which Medical and Allied courses accounted for 27.5 percent, followed by
Business Administration (22%), and Education and Teacher Training (13%), Engineering and
Technology (11%), and IT (6%). Except in SY 2006-2007, enrolment at the tertiary level consistently
recorded an increasing trend during the plan period, but remained dramatically lower than plan
targets. For AY 2009-2010, enrolment increased by 3.6 percent compared with the previous year.
This was practically due to the increase of population in the BS in Hotel and Restaurant
Management/Hospitality Management program. Likewise, due to increasing global market
demands, Medical and allied courses consistently topped the list of preferred courses from 2004
until 2007. However, starting 2008, the trend of enrolment shifted to Business Education as the top
enrolled program followed by Medical and allied courses, Teacher Education, Engineering and
Information Technology.
As to geographical distribution, both in the number of graduates and enrolment, Cagayan de Oro
remained to have the biggest share, followed by Iligan and Bukidnon.

Access and Equity


Along broadening access and equity, there are a total of 16 scholarship programs offered in the
region. As of SY 2008-2009, there were 4,467 grantees under the Traditional and Congressional
Grant Programs with about PhP47 million funds support. This is an increase of 18 percent over the
number of grantees in SY 2007-2008, and a 57 percent augmentation in terms of funds support. A
new scholarship program called One Town One Scholar was implemented by CHED with 85
students awarded as Town Scholars for SY 2009-2010.
Although funds support continued to increase annually, scholarship slots dwindled over the last five
years due to limited fund scholarship scheme. The existing financial grant to scholars is not enough
to meet the increase in tuition and other school fees, and higher cost of living. Moreover, the
delayed transfer of funds from the CHED Central Office caused difficulties in terms of sustaining the
scholars/grantees basic economic needs. The situation affected the performance of scholars in
school, while the others were forced to drop out. Also the non-payment of Study Now-Pay Later
(SNPL) graduates to the government continued to shrink the already limited scholarship funds. Thus,
there is a need to intensively monitor the return of collections of SNPL. Also, there is a call on the
need to increase the budget and its timely release for scholarship programs to lessen incidence of
dropouts.

scholarship slots dwindled over the last five years


due to limited fund scholarship scheme.

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Efficiency and Effectiveness


For tuition fee matters, for AY 2008-2009, there were 28 HEIs which applied for tuition fee increase
or 37 percent compared to 36 percent in the previous year. All applicants were private HEIs and
none applied from the public state, colleges and universities. For AY 2009-2010, there were only 13
HEIs that applied for tuition fee increase. Common compelling reasons for the increase are:
a) increase the salary and other benefits of the teaching and non-teaching personnel, and
b) improvement and modernization of facilities and equipment.
Other important milestones included the institutionalization of research or research culture to
provide scientific inputs in the implementation of programs, project monitoring and evaluation
activities. For SY 2009-2010, 18 research entries from various universities in the region for the
National Republika Awards competition were evaluated and two entries were also submitted for Best
Research Journal competition. For the CHED Outstanding Extension Program Award, the entry from
Capitol University of CDO won the first prize at the regional level and later won the third prize at the
national level. On the selection of Ten Outstanding Researches in the country sponsored by the
Philippine Association of Institutions for Research (PAIR), two of the awardees came from Liceo de
Cagayan University.
Another alternative mode of learning is delivered through the Expanded Tertiary Education
Equivalency and Accreditation Program (ETEEAP). Also, the institutionalization of the Ladderized
Education Program (LEP) which served as a mechanism that allows students and workers
progression between TVET and higher education though has been put in place, still requires a lot of
efforts for better appreciation and full acceptance among the HEIs.
Overall, improving access to higher education remains a continuous challenge along with the need to
improve the quality of graduates for a strong human capital responsive to labor market demands.
CHED and the HEIs, and partners particularly the industry sector must collectively work in ensuring
quality and relevant instruction, production, research and extension. Attracting students to priority
courses through direct assistance and scholarships shall likewise be carried out. Expanded
scholarships and other forms of student assistance shall be prioritized to broaden access to higher
education among the disadvantaged sectors. Institutions providing scholarships and other financial
assistance shall ensure equal opportunities for men and women, and for urban and rural
beneficiaries. LGUs shall be encouraged to continue with their existing scholarships and educational
assistance projects, particularly for those disadvantaged, but deserving constituents. Procedures
and eligibility requirements of various scholarships and financial assistance schemes administered
by national government agencies shall be widely disseminated to ensure wider coverage.

Youth Empowerment
The various efforts toward empowering children and the youth have yet to produce more pronounced
results. As discussed in the earlier sections and in the previous chapters, the youth are confronted
with issues along education, participation, employment, and health (Chapter 6), among others.
Youth participation in community and political activities remains low and receives less recognition.
The potential of youth involvement through the Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) and youth organizations
has not yet been fully realized and requires further strengthening. In addition, volunteerism remains
an area wanting wider youth participation.

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Meanwhile, the problem of juvenile delinquency needs to be dealt with before the problem worsens.
Petty crimes, such as theft, are becoming common offenses by the youth.
In terms of employment, a primary concern is the low labor market absorption of the youth members
of the labor force, both for skilled and unskilled employment. Other issues are along income levels,
benefits and working conditions. Child labor, while not rampant in the region, remains among the
largely undocumented/unreported issues confronting children, particularly in the agriculture and
mining sectors.
On health, while there is generally lack of information at the regional level, the latest Young Adult
Fertility and Sexuality Study (YAFSS) of 2002 showed the following findings at the national level: 47
percent of the youth have tried smoking; 67 percent have tried drinking alcohol; 11 percent or 1.8
million have tried illegal drugs; 12 percent have ever thought of suicide; and 23 percent have
engaged in premarital sex. These risks behaviors lead to unwanted, unsafe and accidental
pregnancies and five percent of ever pregnant adolescent have at least one abortion experience.
These point to the need to prioritize the provision of access to appropriate intervention and services
for the children and youth.

II. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


The overall goal of the entire education sector is to build human capacities that will translate to
empowerment at the individual level, and contribute to sustained economic growth and better
standard of living for all at the macro level. This is a highly desired outcome given the slow progress
towards attaining literacy targets, persistent high level of income inequality and incidence of poverty,
despite the regions being the biggest economy and one of the fastest growing in Mindanao.
Towards this end, there shall be stronger collaboration and coordination between and among the
different education sector duty bearers, both from the public and private sectors, with the DepEd,
TESDA and CHED together as lead.

Basic Education
Given that education is a basic human right, a major human capital forming sector and a critical
factor towards effective poverty reduction, the overall goal of the sector is to provide the regions
children, illiterates and out of school population with better and equitable access to quality basic
education. Consistent with the principle of inclusion under EFA 2015, the delivery of formal basic
education, from early childhood to elementary and high school, and alternative learning systems for
OSYs, adult learners and education for person with special needs will be strengthened and
expanded. In addition, emphasis will also be given to improving quality. This is to ensure that
graduates of the basic education system will acquire the basic skills and adequate preparation for
higher level of training and/or education. This will likewise guarantee the building up of the needed
human capital to realize greater productivity and economic growth.

the delivery of formal basic education, from early childhood


to elementary and high school, and alternative learning systems
will be strengthened and expanded.

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Towards this end, the following strategies will be vigorously pursued:

Access and Equity


Expand and advocate for participation to early childhood care and education;
Enhance access for children with special needs and children from IP groups;
Intensify the delivery and expand the coverage of the Alternative Learning System services
(including community-based programs designed to increase level of literacy of OSYs and
adults in remote and conflict-affected areas);
Forge partnerships (public-private, public-public) particularly in underdeveloped and
underserved areas to hasten the pace of providing education, both formal and non-formal;
Massive advocacy to parents and communities designed to increase school participation
among children; and
Improve physical accessibility of schools to communities.

Efficiency
Undertake continuing capacity building program for school administrators and teachers;
Provide incentives for students to perform well in school and to stay in school; and
Integrate health and education services to improve school participation and retention,
particularly in the poorest areas.

Quality
Lengthen basic education to address overall quality issues;
Increase the investment in basic education through higher DepEd budget; more infusion of
local, senatorial, congressional funds;
Better targeting to benefit poorest and where shortages in physical facilities, teachers, and
instructional materials are most evident;
Maximize the contribution from local government units;
Accelerate provision of critical school resources deemed crucial in improving learning
outcomes (teachers, classroom, chairs, textbooks, and other instructional materials);
Ensure the sanctity of contact time and limit disruptions to classes;
Regular review and updating/ enrichment of curriculum;
Require every school to continuously perform better; enhance instructional supervisory skills
among school heads;
Intensify remedial interventions to improve teacher and student performance;
Expand/revitalize technical vocational education in high school;
Intensify and enhance ICT programs both at the elementary and secondary levels; and
Strengthen the implementation of RA 9165, otherwise known as the Comprehensive
Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002.

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Below are the corresponding major development targets.


Table 41. Basic Education Targets
Region X: SY 2011-2012 to SY 2015-2016
Indicator

SY 20112012

SY 20122013

SY 20132014

SY 20142015

SY 20152016

Projected Enrolment
Elementary

641,413

654,241

667,326

680,672

694,286

Secondary

229,016

233,596

238,268

243,033

247,894

84
58

86
60

88
62

90
64

92
66

Elementary

69

71

73

75

77

Secondary

74

76

78

80

82

Elementary

65

67

69

71

73

Secondary

69

71

73

75

77

9
11

8.5
10.5

8
10

7.5
9.5

7
9

Elementary

1.8 : 1

1.6 : 1

1.4 : 1

1.2 : 1

1:1

Secondary

1.1 : 1

1:1

1:1

1:1

1:1

Participation Rate*
Elementary
Secondary
Cohort Survival Rate*

Completion Rate*

Dropout Rate
Elementary
Secondary
Textbook - Pupil/Student Ratio

Gender Parity Index


Elementary
Secondary
Classroom - Pupil/Student Ratio

1
1

Elementary

1:39

1:39

1:39

1:39

1:39

Secondary

1:49

1:47

1:46

1:45

1:45

Projected Classroom Needs


Elementary
Secondary
Construction of Classroom
Elementary
Secondary

559

878

1,202

1,532

1,867

1,279

1,377

1,480

1,584

1,690

150

153

157

161

164

98

100

102

104

106

*MDG target for 2015 is 100%

Technical Vocational Education and Training


The TVET sector shall respond to the current and emerging local, national and global development
trends. The National Summit on Labor and Employment (NSLE) held in Davao City (October 2010)
identified the challenges of the Human Resource Development sector in the next five years.

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Responsiveness of the sector is crucial in view of trade liberalization that brings about freer
movement of human capital and bigger investment inflows which opened the door to wider
employment opportunities and increased competition among the workforce.
Given the above-indicated scenario, the workforce has to be competent and equipped with the
necessary skills to be able to compete and be gainfully employed. The specific set of characteristics
of a workforce aptly called 21st century skills shall be adopted to reinforce employability. Thus, the
NSLE laid down key thematic approaches where TVET policies and programs should be aligned:
a) inclusive education and training; b) generic and higher order thinking skills; c) public-private,
community and social partnership; d) education for sustainable development; e) modularized
education system (MES), livelihood and entrepreneurship development; f) demand-driven education
and training and labor market information system; g) ICT-enabled system for education and
training; and h) quality management system and accreditation, and licensing and certification.
These priorities requires the TVET sector to translate and align its policies, programs and services
towards addressing its challenges to be able to significantly contribute to the high and sustained
economic growth of the region. In the plan period, the sector objectives/outcomes shall be attained
with the corresponding strategies:
1) Improved competence and employability of TVET graduates
Institutionalize Labor Market Information System (LMIs) as an active instrument of labor
market policy;
Organize labor market network for TVET as data providers on updated market information
and employment prospects, and as a recommending body on labor market concerns; and
Require TVET providers to monitor the employment status of their graduates.
2) Compliance to TESDAs requirements/standards to ensure continuing quality improvement in
TVET provision
Monitor compliance of TVIs with the minimum requirements as prescribed under the
promulgated training regulation;
Encourage TVIs to offer relevant courses that are responsive to the local and global labor
market demands;
Encourage TVIs to adopt Ladderized Education program (LEP); and
Work out Equivalency Program between TVIs and higher institutions to provide interface
between tech-voc and higher degree courses not only as means of attracting enrolees, but
also providing opportunities for higher learning.
3) Improved quality provision to TVET through strengthened Industry TVET LGU linkage, including
enterprise-based training
Encourage entrepreneurship and strongly support enterprise development through the
provision of post training services as access to microcredit facilities; and development of
marketing strategies; and
Intensify strategic alliances and collaborative efforts with the various TVET stakeholders in
the region.

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4) Intensified competency assessment and certification


Institutionalize competency assessment and certification among TVET stakeholders
5) Improved equity and access for TVET beneficiaries21
Inclusive Education: Massive training (school-based, center-based, community-based,
enterprise-based);
Establish an integrated scholarship scheme to improve equity and access to TVET
opportunities;
Generate funds and optimize the use of available financing resources for scholarship that
will ensure immediate employment;
Embed generic and HOT skills into basic and common competencies of the Training
Regulations (TR);
Advocate and secure effective public-private community and social partnerships;
Embed on the training regulations safety practices compliant to international protocols and
conventions;
Modularized Education System (MES) Livelihood and Entrepreneurship Development;
Demand-driven education and training;
ICT-enabled system for education and training; and
Quality Management and Accreditation and Licensing and Certification.
6) Increased awareness of TVET programs and ensure matching of skills and jobs
Widen access to career profiling for greater job fit.

Higher Education
Access to quality higher education must be afforded to all Filipinos as a basic human right. The
government shall continue to provide an enabling environment and exercise efficient resource
allocation for the effective management of the higher education system. Hence, the higher
education sector shall continue to be proactive in mobilizing knowledge to directly contribute to the
development of human resource and productivity. It will continue to formulate policies, standards,
and procedures supportive to the four pillars of the sector, namely: a) quality and excellence;
b) relevance and responsiveness; c) access and equity; and d) efficiency and effectiveness. For the
next six years, efforts will be directed to the following priority strategies:

Quality and Excellence


Improve the quality of HEIs programs and graduates to match the demands of domestic and
global markets; and

21 Based on the HRD Framework, 2011-2016

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Strict enforcement of standards and evaluation of HEIs through rigorous and transparent
system for autonomous and deregulated status, COEs and CODs programs.

Relevance and Responsiveness


Expand alternative learning systems/modalities of higher learning; and
Strengthen research and extension activities in SUCs and HEIs.

Access and Equity


Broaden the access of economically and socially disadvantaged groups to higher education
and rechanneling some public resources directly to students to promote greater purchasing
power and freedom of choice of educational opportunities.

Efficiency and Effectiveness


Rationalize governance and financing higher education in a manner that would unleash
institutional creativity and entrepreneurship.
Please refer to Annex for Key Employment Generators and the strategic framework and REMM of
the regions State Universities and Colleges (SUCs)

Youth Empowerment
In order to optimize the contribution of the youth in nation building, both as current citizens and
future workers and/or leaders, the region will endeavor to empower them and inculcate in them a
great sense of pride for country and culture. This requires synergistic efforts of the home, the school
and the community in molding the youth and in drawing out their capacities.
The corresponding strategic priority actions will be focused on protecting those who are at risk,
developing those who have the potentials, providing opportunities, and instilling Filipino values and
social responsibility. In addition to the strategies along education, which are either directly or
indirectly contributory to children and youth empowerment, and to the sectoral strategies indicated
in the earlier chapters, the following strategies will likewise be pursued:
Strengthen the youths capacity to actively participate in community and nation building;
Conduct a wide information dissemination of youth programs and projects;
Strengthen the role of academe, media and LGUs (communities) in the promotion of history,
culture and sports;
Provide enabling policy environment for youth development and participation;
Promote general health and development among the youth through friendly- health programs
and services;
Develop models for adolescent-friendly health services and environment; and
Reduce the proportion of unplanned pregnancies and unmet need for family planning among
young people.

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III. RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING


MATRIX

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208

Chapter 9: Science and Technology


Hastening progress towards greater productivity, competitiveness,
job creation and economic growth
Given that Science and Technology (S&T) is key in bringing forth greater productivity
and competitiveness, job creation and economic growth, the region puts it as one of the
major regional development agenda in the next six years. As such, the sector will take a
more proactive role in contributing to various regional development efforts. This is expected
to instigate the mobilization of technological knowledge and capacities in the creation,
development and production of new, diversified, competitive, and high-value applications,
such as inventions and innovations, which are of importance to economic life.

I. ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES


The S&T sector continued to contribute to the socio-economic development of the region, particularly
in micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) development. The upgrading and improvement of
MSMEs was achieved through technology transfer and commercialization efforts and provision of
scientific and technological services, spearheaded by the Department of Science and Technology
(DOST-X). The Small Enterprise Technology Upgrading (SET-UP) program is among the interventions
that assisted the local MSMEs in implementing technological innovations and improvements in their
operations. Assistance to MSMEs also covered developing designs and upgrading facilities for
packaging, enhancing their manpower capability to deliver highest quality of services; installing state
of the art information technology service on packaging trends, standards, regulations, patents, and
technical journals/references; and widening of external linkages.
The Regional Standards and Testing Laboratories (RSTL) of Region X has been instrumental in
enabling the government to be in the forefront of providing scientific and technological services. It
features laboratories for calibration services, microbiological testing, chemical testing, metal testing
and accelerated shelf-life testing. These laboratories assisted manufacturers in maintaining high
quality products standards; assist consumers in ensuring the quality of goods; assist government
agencies in their regulatory functions; and assist researchers in their R&D activities.
Despite the foregoing accomplishments, the sector will have to address the following challenges to
be an effective contributor to productivity, competitiveness, economic growth and job creation.

The Small Enterprise Technology Upgrading Program (SET-UP)


is among the interventions that assisted the local MSMEs in
implementing technological innovations and improvements in
their operations.

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Inadequate S&T Human Resource Capability Building


This issue is reflected in the low passing rates of applicants for scholarships for S&T high school and
undergraduate programs, as well as poor performance of public and private elementary and high
school students in national achievement tests (NATs) along Mathematics, Science, and English.
In the case of Region X, of the 1,899 graduating elementary pupils for SY 2009-2010, only 74 (or
4%) qualified for the Philippine Science High School scholarships qualified. This was equivalent to
82 percent availment rate given the 90 scholarship slots available for Region X. Similar poor
performance is observed in the application for DOSTs undergraduate scholarships under its RA
7687 and Merit Programs. For school years 2004-2005 to 2007-2008, of the 5,175 examinees (or
an average of 1,294 examinees yearly) vying to avail of the said scholarships, only 675 (or 13%)
qualified.
Performance of grade six and 2nd year high school students of both public and private schools in
NAT in Mathematics, Science and English is also alarming. For SY 2009-2010, the grade six pupils
rated very poor in NAT; the second year high school students rated poor. If the foregoing will not be
addressed, the region will not be able to contribute in alleviating the countrys lack of critical S&T
human resources particularly in R&D. In 2005, the Philippines, as reported by UNESCO, had only 81
Full-time Equivalent (FTE) researchers per million populations, which is way below the 1980 UN
target of 380 FTE for developing Asian countries22. Moreover, there is also a need to continually
improve the capability of S&T workers to leverage knowledge and skills for greater productivity and
competitiveness.

Underinvestment in R&D and Underutilization of Its funds


Inadequate funding support from the national government for R&D activities in the region is a
challenge faced by some of the R&D agencies in the region. For instance, DA-X reported that during
the last planning period (2004-2010), only 196 research projects or half of the target for the period
was accomplished because of inadequate funds for research activities. This confirmed UNESCO
report that in 2005, the Philippines had only a gross expenditures on R&D (GERD) to gross domestic
product (GDP) ratio of only 0.12 percent, which is below the 0.5 percent GERD:GDP benchmark that
had been set as a 1980 target for developing countries23. Studies would show that the bulk of R&D
expenditures in the country come from the public sector.
Another concern is the inability of some R&D institutions (RDIs) in the region to fully access available
R&D funds. Difficulty in accessing funds from PCARRD, CHED and other funding sources had been
experienced by NOMCARRD and other R&D consortia in the region. Accessing these funds is
influenced by factors like capability of the RDIs to efficiently prepare proposals, their capability to
conduct particular researches, and the project proposal approval process and setup. Approval of
R&D projects, especially those big ones, is mostly done at the national level, which further lengthen
processing time.

22 Scientific and Technological Capabilities and Economic Catch-Up by Roger D. Posadas as published Philippine Management Review 2009,
Vol. 16, pp. 131-153.
23 Ibid

210

Science and Technology

The situation in the region might be an indication that the country is yet to improve its spending on
R&D. There is a need to increase expenditure level and increase absorptive capacity or improve
efficiency in the use of R&D funds.

Low Share in the Number of Internationally Recognized Research Publications


While information on the contribution of the region to the countrys share in internationally
recognized or ISI research publications is not yet available, the state of contribution could be gauged
based on the countrys performance. Based on the Citation Database of the Institute for Scientific
Information-Web of Science, in 2005 the Philippines had only 520 ISI publications, which was only
0.04 percent of the entire world-wide ISI publications that year and gave the country a world ranking
of 72nd 24. Of the ASEAN-5 countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand), the
country had the lowest cumulative total of ISI publications during the period 1999-200525.

Slow Adoption of Commercially-Ready Technologies


This state could be attributed to wait-and-see attitude, unwillingness to innovate, and poor financial
capacity of the would-be users of commercially-ready technologies, as well as, weak linkage between
suppliers and users of technologies. Availability and access to information on commercially-ready
technologies is also a related concern that needs to be attended to. Meanwhile, mature technologies
supportive to entrepreneurship has to be prioritized for adoption.

The Need to Address Concerns on Improving Competitiveness and Resiliency


of the Regional Economy in the Face of Globalization and Climate Change
The increasing globalization trend as illustrated by trade and investment liberalization and economic
integration of countries opens the local industries to competition both at the local and global scenes.
Another concern that has social, economic and ecological implications is climate change. As
reported, ADB predicted that climate change could do more damage than the 2009 worldwide
financial crisis. ADB warned that the South-East Asian nations are the most vulnerable. It foresees
agriculture, especially rice production, will decline because of climate change, threatening food
security, while rising sea levels will force the relocation of millions of residents in coastal
communities and islands, as more people are likely to die from thermal stress, malaria, dengue and
other diseases.

The Need to Establish S&T Infrastructure and Facilities


To help promote development of technology-based enterprises, some infrastructures need to be
established or improved. The region does not have yet a technology business incubator that could
nurture and provide entrepreneurs with basic support services and resources to help them grow and
survive during the start-up period. Another facility that needs to be established in the region is the
packaging R&D center that will help develop sustainable and world-class packaging technology
designs to enhance global competitiveness and prolong shelf-life of the regions food products. A
facility to assist entities in securing copyright and patents for their creative works is also needed to

24 Ibid
25 Ibid

211

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

be established in the region. This is in support to the recognition by the State of the significance of
an effective intellectual and industrial property right system for the development of domestic and
creative activity, facilitates transfer of technology, attracts foreign investments, and ensures market
access for our products.

The Need to Widen Dissemination of and Popularize S&T Knowledge and


Information
The spread of S&T knowledge across a wide spectrum of sectors of the country is acknowledged as
an important factor in increasing productivity of the people especially those in the rural areas. It can
contribute to the development of science consciousness and culture of innovation of the people that,
in turn, will lead toward development of the society and the countys economy. While various S&T
and R&D symposia are held regularly, the knowledge and information being disseminated during
those events may not have spread as wide as possible among the public and worse less understood
or appreciated by them. Another related concern is on expanding the use of ICT in the sector to
strengthen mechanism for knowledge retrieval/exchange and dissemination.

II. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK


Aligning itself with the national S&T roadmap which is anchored on national development goals, the
regions S&T sector shall continue in strengthening and mobilizing science and technology and
knowledge toward improved productivity, competitiveness, economic growth and job creation by
adopting the following strategies:
Developing S&T human resources: Specifically, strengthening Science and Mathematics
education; align vocational, technical and skills development programs to the requirements
of local industries to make them globally competitive; fully developing the potentials of locally
available S&T expertise, as well as, maximizing the contributions of foreign-based Filipino
S&T professionals;
Increasing access and availment of R&D funds/investments from various sources (such as,
national government, official development assistance, state colleges and universities, and
industry/private sector) and accelerating access to national government R&D funds by
enhancing capability of the research project proponents in effective and efficient preparation
of proposals and lobbying for regionalized approval of proposals;
Identifying and implementing measures to accelerate the increase in the contribution of the
region to the inventory of internationally recognized research publications;
Strengthening existing scientific research institutions, as well as government-industryacademe-civil society and international linkages, specifically by breaking down the barriers to
partnerships and networks;
Providing support to the industry, particularly MSMEs, by ensuring a broadened access to
available technologies and technological services; conducting climate change vulnerability
and impact assessments to provide basis for the development of science-based strategies
for adaptation and mitigation;
Establishing, building and upgrading S&T infrastructures particularly in strategic areas in the
region to facilitate enhancement of regional and local S&T capabilities, as well as enable the
private sector/industry to undertake technological innovation and related activities;

212

Science and Technology

Accelerating technology transfer and utilization, which could be done through maintenance
of inventory of available technologies and their sources, and providing incentives to
encourage the transfer and commercialization of these technologies, and extensive
collaboration between academe and industry; the recent release of the implementing rules
and regulations of the Philippine Technology Transfer Act of 2009 would hopefully facilitate
implementation of this strategy;
Improving S&T governance (accountability, transparency and performance) as a means of
enhancing the performance and monitoring of the S&T sector;
Promoting and popularizing S&T to impress upon the people its relevance and necessity. This
may involve, among others, dissemination of S&T information through the use of laymans
language and promotion of culture of innovation; and
Niching and clustering as a way of prioritizing S&T interventions based on market niches and
industry clusters.
26

S&T development in the region shall be aligned with the countrys 12 priority sectors as follows:
1) agriculture, forestry and natural resources; 2) health/medical sciences; 3) biotechnology;
4) information and communications technology; 5) microelectronics; 6) earth and marine science;
7) fisheries and aquaculture; 8) environment; 9) natural disaster mitigation; 10) energy; 11)
manufacturing and process engineering; and 12) material science and engineering.
For the agriculture, forestry and natural resources sector, the R&D activities shall focus on the
following priority themes: a) food security and poverty reduction; b) natural resource management
and sustainable development; c) frontier and cutting edge science; d) global competitiveness; and,
e) support to allied agricultural/forestry services.
Public health and environment shall be the priority areas of the R&D activities of the health sector.
Meanwhile, the focus of the R&D activities of the industry and energy sector shall be toward the
development of indigenous and alternative energy sources such as rivers, solar, ocean, biomass,
wind and geothermal; upgrading of the capacity and efficiency of existing energy supply systems;
and, development of technology-based business enterprises.

26 National S&T Plan, 2002-2020

213

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

III. Results Evaluation and Monitoring Matrix

214

Science and Technology

215

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

216

Science and Technology

217

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

218

Annexes

Annex 1: Key Employment Generators (KEGs)


In addressing the domestic and international labor market opportunities, the higher education and
the employment sector will expand the provision of education and training in the identified Key
Employment Generators (KEGs) in the next ten years with corresponding skills requirement, as
follows:
KEGs

Cyberservices

Hotel and Restaurant

Medical Tourism

Health Services

Agri-business

Skills Requirement
Animators
Software Developers
Computer Programmers
Computer Hardware Technicians
Visual Graphic Designers
Customer Service Representative/Call Center Agents
Medical Transcriptions
Bakers
Baristas
Bartenders
Butlers
Chefs
Cooks
Food and Beverage Attendants
Cosmetic/Reconstruction Surgeons
Herbologists
Medical Doctors
Massage Therapists
Nurses
Spa Therapist/Physical Therapists
Surgeons
Training Nurses
Medical Doctors
Medical Technologists
Nurses
Optometrists
Opticians
Pharmacists
Agricultural Engineers
Animal Husbandry
Aquacultures
Agricultures
Agriculture Crops Production Personnel
Slaughterers
Plant Maintenance Technicians
Food Processors

219

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

Annex 2: State Universities and Colleges


I. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK
The State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) continue to align their programs with the emerging global
and domestic demands. Emphasis is geared towards improvements in quality and efficiency,
relevance and responsiveness, efficiency, and equitable access to quality education especially for
the disadvantaged or under-resourced groups. Hence, focus shall be directed along the following
strategies:

Quality and Excellence


Continuing upgrading of existing COEs/CODs through the improvement of academic
capabilities/ programs;
Continuing institutionalization of faculty development programs through the provision of
scholarship programs among qualified faculty and staff to further develop highly competent
faculty/teaching force; and
Strengthen the review sessions of the graduates to increase licensure examination passing
rates.

Relevance and Responsiveness


Continuous updating of curricula through periodic evaluation and revision;
Offering of new technological, technical and vocational courses to support government
thrusts;
Promote and strengthen research and extension to increase number of highly productive and
competent faculty, as well as contribute to the research needs of both the government and
private sector; and
Strengthen complementation and productive partnerships between and among public and
private HEIs, and between education and other sectors.

Access and Equity


Intensify scholarship programs and increase access to higher education among the poor and
the disadvantaged sectors of society, as well as provision of grants in aid to cultural
minorities, varsities and socio-cultural performers.

Efficiency and Effectiveness


Improve personnel program and continuing upgrading of facilities through periodic
monitoring and evaluation of SUCs.

220

Annex

II. RESULTS EVALUATION AND MONITORING


MATRIX

221

Regional Development Plan, 2011-2016

222

Annex

223

Annex

225

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL OF NORTHERN MINDANAO (REGION X)


Officers for Term 2010-2013
HON. LAWRENCE LL. CRUZ
Chairperson, RDC-X
Mayor, City of Iligan

MR. ARSENIO L. SEBASTIAN III


Co-Chairperson, RDC-X
RDC-X PSR
ENGR. LEON M. DACANAY, JR.
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X
Regional Director, NEDA-X
ENGR. ALAN L. OLAVIDES
Secretary, RDC-X
OIC-ARD, NEDA-X

MACRO AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION


COMMITTEE
HON. PHILIP T. TAN
Chairperson, RDC-X MacroCom
Mayor, City of Tangub
MR. RAYMUND M. PARAS
Co-Chairperson, RDC-X MacroCom
RDC-X PSR

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE


HON. LEANDRO JOSE H. CATARATA
Chairperson, RDC-X EDC
Mayor, City of Valencia
MS. EMMA A. NIEVA
Co-Chairperson, RDC-X EDC
RDC-X PSR

DIR. LORETO T. BHAGWANI


Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X MacroCom
Regional Director, DILG-X
MS. IMELDA G. MANGINSAY
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X MacroCom
RDC-X PSR

DIR. CATALINO E. CHAN III


Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X EDC
Regional Director, DOT-X
MS. ROSALINA S. HUERBANA, PhD
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X EDC
RDC-X PSR

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE


HON. MARIA LUISA D. ROMUALDO
Chairperson, RDC-X SDC
Mayor, Municipality of Mambajao
President, LMP Camiguin
MR. JORDAN IAN G. APAT
Co-Chairperson , RDC-X SDC
RDC-X PSR
DIR. ALAN M. MACARAYA
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X SDC
Regional Director, DOLE-X
MS. MERLITA F. ADAZA, PhD
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X SDC
RDC-X PSR

INFRASTRUCTURE and UTILITIES DEVELOPMENT


COMMITTEE
HON. NOVA PRINCESS E. PAROJINOG-ECHAVEZ
Chairperson, RDC-X InfraCom
Mayor, City of Ozamiz
ENGR. MODESTO C. BABAYLAN, PhD
Co-Chairperson, RDC-X InfraCom
RDC-X PSR
DIR. MANDANGAN P. DARIMBANG
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X InfraCom
Chairperson, DOTC-RMC
Regional Director, LTFRB-X
MR. GERVACIO I. PIATOR, DM
Vice-Chairperson, RDC-X InfraCom
RDC-X PSR

226

Regional Development Plan (RDP, 2011-2016)


NEDA REGIONAL OFFICE X
Office/Division Staff
Office of the Regional Director
RD Leon M. Dacanay, Jr., CESO III
OIC-ARD Alan L. Olavides
Rosalyn R. Yparraguirre
Yvonne R. Evasco
Rodolfo T. Serrano, Jr.
Plan and Policy Formulation Division
Leonila G. Cajarte
Catherine Marie V. de la Rita
Rio C. Yonson
AlGemregy B. Cuerquez
April Ann D. Tigulo

Inputs Provided/Tasks Undertaken


Overall Directions and Guidance

Overall Consolidation/Review/Editing
Chapters
Well-being and Improved Welfare
Education and Youth Empowerment

Knowledge Management Division


Cecilo Y. Clarete
Agnes A. Garcia
Peleta B. Abejo
Wendel T. Abejo
Candido B. Balaba
Marina A. Betacura
Project Development Investment Programming, and
Budgeting Division
Nestor A. Lisondra
Ramir M. Balquin
Elsa B. Silfavan
Cleoffe L. Dequito
Ma. Estrella Luz R. Pealoza
Mezlaine Jay S. Pacana

Overall Layout/Final Packaging

Project Monitoring and Evaluation Division


Jaime H. Pacampara
Rosann S. Dime
Elsa M. Maquiling
Archimedes C. Lazaro
Operations Division
Myrna L. Banaag
- Personnel Services
- Financial Services
- General Services

Chapters:
Access, Logistics and Other Infrastructure Services

Chapters:
Macroeconomic Development Framework Good
Governance and Peace and Order

Chapters:
Trade, Industry and Tourism
Environment and Sustainable Development
Agriculture and Fishery
Science and Technology

Logistical support

National Economic and Development Authority-10


Regional Development Council Building
Capistrano-Echem Streets Cagayan de Oro City
Telephone/Fax Nos. (08822) 723436; 728072,726161 & (088) 8581920
Email: nedardc10@yahoo.com
Website: www.norminet.org.ph