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Assessing Writing Using Scoring Rubrics

Tonja Root, Ed.D.


Department of Early Childhood and Reading Education
Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
Scoring Rubric
A scale that differentiates levels of student performance on a task or process
A guide to inform you (teacher) and students about evaluation criteria
Analytic rubrics assign a score for each attribute separately. Analytic rubrics are appropriate when
the teacher wants to mark errors and make comments regarding the individual attributes. Analytic
rubrics give students diagnostic feedback on an individual basis. The disadvantage of analytic
rubrics is that the descriptors (or attributes) may become too narrowly defined.
Uses for Scoring Rubrics
Convey teachers expectations for students work
Help teachers clarify what they want from students
Allow students to identify the qualities of excellent work
Help students monitor their own performance
Serve as scaffolds for students moving to a higher level of performance
Explain to others the teachers expectations for students work
Help teachers justify or validate grades
Lead to an overall improvement in the quality of students work
Assess students processes, products, and performances

Root, VSU

Evaluating Writing: Personal Narratives


Third Grade
Story Elements (5)

Ideas
(5)

Organization
(5)

Sentence
Structure (5)

Mechanics
(5)

All elements
developed:
1-when/where
(setting)
2-who (character)
3-what (problem &
events)
4-conclusion

Original
Stays on topic
4+ detailed
sentences

Beginning, middle &


ending sentence
Sequenced

Complete
sentences
Has 2 of 4
sentence types
Variety of sentence
beginnings (not
just I am)

Few or no errors:
Paragraph
indention
Capitalization
Ending punctuation

3 of 4 elements
developed:
1-when/where
(setting)
2-who (character)
3-what (problem &
events)
4-conclusion

Stays on topic
3+ detailed
sentences

Beginning sentence is
present
Missing ending
sentence
Most ideas connected

Most complete
sentences
Has 2 of 4
sentence types
Some variety of
sentence
beginnings (not
just I am)

Some errors:
Paragraph
indention
Capitalization
Ending punctuation

2 of 4 elements
developed:
1-when/where
(setting)
2-who (character)
3-what (problem &
events)
4-conclusion

Moves away from


topic
2+ detailed
sentences

Lacks 2-3
organizational
sentences
Not always sequenced
& logical

Some complete
sentences
Has 1 sentence
type
Little variety of
sentence
beginnings

Many errors:
Paragraph
indention
Capitalization
Ending punctuation

1 of 4 elements
developed:
1-when/where
(setting)
2-who (character)
3-what (problem &
events)
4-conclusion

Moves away from


topic
1+ detailed
sentences

Lacks beginning,
middle, end
Little sequence

Few complete
sentences
Has 1 sentence
type
No variety of
sentence
beginnings

Serious errors:
Paragraph
indention
Capitalization
Ending punctuation

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Developed by: Lehman, Pope, Joyner, Oliver, & Allen. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside Elementary
School.

Root, VSU

Developing Writers: Third Grade


Evaluating Writing: Imaginative Story
Story Elements (5)

Ideas (5)

Name______________________________
Date______________________
Organization (5)

Sentence
Structure (5)

Mechanics (5)

Most (4-5) elements


of narrative present;
some (2-3)
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Some fresh, original


Focuses on topic
Supporting details
4+ detailed sentences

Ideas connected
Good beginning,
middle, end
Most sequenced &
logical

Most sentences
clearly written
Complete
sentences
Compound/comp
lex sentences
Variety of
sentence length

Few:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commaslisting/series
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Most (3-4) elements


of narrative present;
few (1-2) developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Few original ideas


General focus on
topic
Some supporting
details
3+ detailed sentences

Some ideas
connected
Attempts
beginning, middle,
end
Some ideas
sequenced &
logical

Some sentences
clearly written
Most sentences
complete
Simple sentences
Some variety of
length

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Few (2-3) elements


of narrative present:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Moves away from


focus
Few supporting
details
2+ detailed sentences

Few ideas
connected
Attempts
beginning, middle,
end (2+)
Few ideas
sequenced &
logical

Few sentences
clearly written
Some run-on,
fragmented
sentences
Little variety of
length

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Few (1-2) elements


present; none
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Incomplete ideas
Unfocused
Lacks details
1 sentence

Ideas not connected


Lacks beginning,
middle, end
Little sequence &
logic

Sentences
unclear
Frequent
fragmented
sentences
No variety of
length

Serious errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Developed by: Oliver, Allen, Pope, Joyner, & Lehman. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside Elementary
School.

Root, VSU

Evaluating Writing: Responses to Literature


Third Grade
Story
Elements (5)

Ideas (5)

Organization (5)

Sentence Structure
(5)

Mechanics (5)

All elements
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (2+)
Conclusion

Fresh, original
Focuses on topic
Supporting details

Ideas connected
Strong beginning,
middle, end
Sequenced & logical

Clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex
sentences
Variety of sentence
length

Few or no errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Most (4)
elements
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (2+)
Conclusion

Some original
ideas
General focus on
topic
Most supporting
details included

Most ideas connected


Good beginning,
middle, end
Most ideas sequenced
& logical

Most sentences
clearly written
Most sentences
complete
Simple sentences
Some variety of
length

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Few (2-3)
elements
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (1+)
Conclusion

Few original ideas


Moves away from
focus
Few supporting
details

Some ideas connected


Attempts beginning,
middle, end
Not always sequenced
& logical

Some unclear
sentences
Some run-on,
fragmented
sentences
Little variety

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Lacks (only
1) elements:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (none)
Conclusion

Incomplete ideas
Unfocused
Lacks details

Few ideas connected


Lacks beginning,
middle, end
Little sequence & logic

Sentences not clear


Frequent fragmented
sentences
No variety

Serious errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Modified from: Batzle, J. (1992). Portfolio assessment and evaluation: Developing and using portfolios in the
K-6 classroom. Cypress, CA: Creative Teaching Press, Inc. Modified by: Allen, Pope, Joyner, Lehman, &
Oliver. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside Elementary School.

Root, VSU

Developing Writers: Fourth Grade


Evaluating Writing: Imaginative Story
Story Elements
(5)

Ideas (5)

Name_____________________________
Date______________________
Organization (5)

Sentence Structure
(5)

Mechanics (5)

Most (4-5)
present; some
(2-3)
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Fresh, original
Focuses on topic
Supporting details

Ideas connected
Good beginning,
middle, end
Most sequenced &
logical

Most sentences
clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex
sentences
Variety of sentence
length

Few or no errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Most (3-4)
present; few (12) developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Some original
ideas
General focus on
topic
Some supporting
details

Some ideas connected


Attempts beginning,
middle, end
Some ideas sequenced
& logical

Some sentences
clearly written
Most sentences
complete
Simple sentences
Some variety of
length

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Few (2-3)
present:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Moves away from


focus
Few supporting
details
Few original ideas

Few ideas connected


Attempts beginning,
middle, end (2+)
Few ideas sequenced
& logical

Few sentences
clearly written
Some run-on,
fragmented
sentences
Little variety of
length

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Few (1-2)
present; none
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Incomplete ideas
Unfocused
Lacks details

Ideas not connected


Lacks beginning,
middle, end
Little sequence & logic

Sentences unclear
Frequent
fragmented
sentences
No variety of length

Serious errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Modified from: Batzle, J. (1992). Portfolio assessment and evaluation: Developing and using portfolios in the
K-6 classroom. Cypress, CA: Creative Teaching Press, Inc. Modified by: Gainey, P., Harrell, S., Cook, LA.,
Dyke, G., & Helms, L. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside Elementary School.

Root, VSU

Evaluating Writing: How To _______________


Fourth Grade
Ideas (6)

Organization (6)

Sentence Structure (6)

Mechanics (6)

Original topic or focuses


on given topic
Clear steps of procedure
Develops all of elements
of how to:
Materials needed
Introduction
Steps
Conclusion

Strong introduction,
steps, conclusion
Excellent sequence &
logical

Clearly written
Complete sentences
Variety of sentences

Few or no errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Some focus on given


topic
Many details included
Develops most of
elements of how to:
Materials needed
Introduction
Steps
Conclusion

Good introduction,
steps, conclusion
Most ideas in
sequential order

Most sentences clearly


written
Most sentences
complete
Simple sentences
Some variety of length

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Few original ideas


Moves away from focus
Few details included
Develops some of
elements of how to:
Materials needed
Introduction
Steps
Conclusion

Attempts
introduction, steps,
conclusion
Not always in
sequential order

Some unclear sentences


Some run-on,
fragmented sentences
Little variety

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Lacks development of
element of how to:
Materials needed
Introduction
Steps
Conclusion

Lacks introduction,
steps, conclusion
Steps not in
sequential order

Sentences not clear


Frequent fragmented
sentences
No variety

Serious errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Written by: Gainey, P., Harrell, S., Cook, L.A., Dyke, G., & Helms, L. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside
Elementary School.

Root, VSU

Evaluating Writing: Narratives


Story
Elements (5)

Ideas (5)

Organization (5)

Sentence Structure
(5)

Mechanics (5)

All elements
of narrative
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Fresh, original
Focuses on topic
Supporting details
Varied language

Ideas connected
Strong beginning,
middle, end
Sequenced & logical

Clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex
sentences
Variety of sentence
length
Correct grammar

Few or no errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling
________________
________________

Most
elements of
narrative
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Some original
ideas
General focus on
topic
Most supporting
details included
Experiments with
varied language

Most ideas connected


Good beginning,
middle, end
Most ideas sequenced
& logical

Most sentences
clearly written
Most sentences
complete
Simple sentences
Some variety of
length
Few grammatical
errors

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling
________________
________________

Few elements
of narrative
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Few original ideas


Moves away from
focus
Few supporting
details
Minimal variety of
vocabulary

Some ideas connected


Attempts beginning,
middle, end
Not always sequenced
& logical

Some unclear
sentences
Some run-on,
fragmented
sentences
Little variety
Several grammatical
errors

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling
________________
________________

Lacks
development
of elements of
narratives:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Incomplete ideas
Unfocused
Lacks details
Simple word
choice

Few ideas connected


Lacks beginning,
middle, end
Little sequence & logic

Sentences not clear


Frequent fragmented
sentences
No variety
Many grammatical
errors

Serious errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling
________________
________________

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Modified from: Batzle, J. (1992). Portfolio assessment and evaluation: Developing and using portfolios in the
K-6 classroom. Cypress, CA: Creative Teaching Press, Inc. by Gainey, P., Harrell, S., Cook, L.A., Dyke, G., &
Helms, L. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside Elementary School.

Root, VSU

Evaluating Writing: Character Study


Fourth Grade
Elements of Character
Study (5)

Ideas (5)

Organization (5)

Sentence Structure
(5)

Mechanics (5)

Most elements of
character developed:
Description
Feelings
Actions
_________________
_________________
_________________

Fresh, original
Focuses on topic
Supporting details

Ideas connected
Sequenced &
logical

Clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex
sentences
Variety of sentence
length

Few or no
errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Some elements of
character developed:
Description
Feelings
Actions
_________________
_________________
_________________

General focus on
topic
Most supporting
details included

Most ideas
connected
Most ideas
sequenced &
logical

Most sentences
clearly written
Most sentences
complete
Simple sentences
Some variety of
length

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Few elements of
character developed:
Description
Feelings
Actions
_________________
_________________
_________________

Moves away from


focus
Few supporting
details

Some ideas
connected
Not always
sequenced &
logical

Some unclear
sentences
Some run-on,
fragmented
sentences
Little variety

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Lacks development of
elements of character:
Description
Feelings
Actions
_________________
_________________
_________________

Unfocused
Lacks details

Few ideas
connected
Little sequence &
logic

Sentences not clear


Frequent fragmented
sentences
No variety

Serious errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Written by: Gainey, P., Harrell, S., Cook, L.A., Dyke, G., & Helms, L. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside
Elementary School.

Root, VSU

Evaluating Fifth Grade Writing: Generic


Organization ( ____ or 6)

Sentence Structure ( ____ or 6)

Mechanics ( ____ or 6)

Most of these:
Ideas connected to topic
Strong beginning/middle/ end
Logical
Sequenced
Main idea developed
Details included
____________________
____________________
____________________

Most of these:
Sentences clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex sentences
Variety of sentence lengths
Variety of sentence beginnings
Descriptive words
Phrases
Subject-verb agreement

_____ errors:
Spelling
Ending punctuation
Paragraphs indented
Capitalization
Writes legibly
__________________
__________________
__________________

Many of these:
Ideas connected to topic
Strong beginning/middle/ end
Logical
Sequenced
Main idea developed
Details included
____________________
____________________
____________________

Many of these:
Sentences clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex sentences
Variety of sentence lengths
Variety of sentence beginnings
Descriptive words
Phrases
Subject-verb agreement

_____ errors:
Spelling
Ending punctuation
Paragraphs indented
Capitalization
Writes legibly
__________________
__________________
__________________

Some of these:
Ideas connected to topic
Strong beginning/middle/ end
Logical
Sequenced
Main idea developed
Details included
____________________
____________________
____________________

Some of these:
Sentences clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex sentences
Variety of sentence lengths
Variety of sentence beginnings
Descriptive words
Phrases
Subject-verb agreement

_____ errors:
Spelling
Ending punctuation
Paragraphs indented
Capitalization
Writes legibly
__________________
__________________
__________________

Few of these:
Ideas connected to topic
Strong beginning/middle/ end
Logical
Sequenced
Main idea developed
Details included
____________________
____________________
____________________

Few of these:
Sentences clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex sentences
Variety of sentence lengths
Variety of sentence beginnings
Descriptive words
Phrases
Subject-verb agreement

_____ errors:
Spelling
Ending punctuation
Paragraphs indented
Capitalization
Writes legibly
__________________
__________________
__________________

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Written by: Bogan, A., Butler, D., Davis, E., West, R., & Womble, E. (August 1998). Cairo, GA: Southside
Elementary School.
Root, VSU

Evaluating Oral Report

Visual Display (7)


Picture
Prop
Original
Original
Eye catching
Eye catching
Clear message
Clear message

Delivery (9)
Captures attention of
audience
Speaks clearly, loudly,
distinctively
Uses good posture

Attractive
Related to topic
Serious effort

Attractive
Related to topic
Serious effort

Speaks clearly, loudly,


distinctively
Uses good posture

Not topic
oriented

Not topic
oriented

Some difficulty
understanding speech
Inconsistency in using
good posture

Scribbles
No direction

No structure
Unattractive

Poor quality of speech;


much difficulty
understanding speech
Poor quality of overall
presentation/posture

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Elements of Report (9)


Contains 4+ elements:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion
Follows logical & sequential
order
Contains 3+ elements:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion
Follows logical & sequential
order
Contains 2+ elements:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion
Follows logical & sequential
order
Contains 1+ element:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion
Follows logical & sequential
order
No attempt

Developed by McDonald, P. (Bacon Co.), & Redding, D. (Colquitt Co.) (Summer 1998). Valdosta, GA:
Valdosta State University, RDE 761, Dr. Tonja Root (instructor).

Root, VSU

10

Evaluating Story (Re)Telling: Kindergarten


3

Visual (16)
Clear message
Illustration depicts event in story

Somewhat clear message with student


explanation
Illustration depicts event in story

Unclear message
Illustration does not reflect event in story

No attempt

Elements of Story (16)


Identifies all elements of story:
Setting
Main character/other characters
Problem/solution
Sequential order (beginning, middle, end)
Identifies 3+ elements of story:
Setting
Main character/other characters
Problem/solution
Sequential order (beginning, middle, end)
Identifies 1+ element of story:
Setting
Main character/other characters
Problem/solution
Sequential order (beginning, middle, end)
No attempt

Developed by Norman, C. (Norman Park Elem., Colquitt Co.), Miles, B. (Jeff Davis Prim., Jeff Davis Co.), &
Horne, H. (Cox Elem., Colquitt Co.). (Summer 1998). Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University, RDE 761, Dr.
Tonja Root (instructor).

Root, VSU

11

Evaluating Writing: Narratives of First Graders


Story Elements (5)

Content Organization
(10)
Fresh ideas connected
with a strong beginning,
middle, & end

Fully developed character


& problem

Partially developed
character problem

Some ideas with good


beginning, middle, & end

Development of only 1
element

Few original ideas with


only attempts at
beginning, middle, & end

Lacks development of
character and problem

Incomplete ideas
Lacks beginning, middle,
& end

No attempt

No attempt

Sentence Structure &


Mechanics (10)
Complete sentences
Capital letter at the
beginning
Period at the end
Most sentences complete
Some errors in
capitalization & ending
punctuation
Some unclear, run-on
sentences
Many errors in beginning
capitalization & ending
punctuation
Sentences not clear
Serious errors in
capitalization & ending
punctuation
No attempt

Developed by Coleman, S. (Jeff Davis Prim., Jeff Davis Co.), Cox, N. (Stringfellow Elem., Colquitt Co.),
Gladden, R. (Len Lastinger Elem., Tift Co.), & Kitchens, J. (Omega Elem., Tift Co.). (Summer 1998). Valdosta,
GA: Valdosta State University, RDE 761, Dr. Tonja Root (instructor).

Root, VSU

12

Developing Writers: Fourth Grade


Evaluating Writing: Imaginative Story
Story Elements
(5)

Ideas (5)

Most (4-5)
elements of
narrative present;
some (2-3)
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Some fresh,
original
Focuses on
topic
Supporting
details

Most (3-4)
elements of
narrative present;
few (1-2)
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Name______________________________
Date______________________
Organization (5)

Sentence Structure
(5)

Mechanics (5)

Ideas connected
Good beginning,
middle, end
Most sequenced &
logical

Most sentences
clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex
sentences
Variety of sentence
length

Few or no errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Few original
ideas
General focus
on topic
Some
supporting
details

Someideas connected
Attempts beginning,
middle, end
Some ideas sequenced
& logical

Somesentences
clearly written
Most sentences
complete
Simple sentences
Some variety of
length

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Few (2-3)
elements of
narrative present:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Moves away
from focus
Few supporting
details

Few ideas connected


Attempts beginning,
middle, end (2+)
Few ideas sequenced &
logical

Few sentences
clearly written
Some run-on,
fragmented
sentences
Little variety of
length

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

Few (1-2)
elements present;
none developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events
Conclusion

Incomplete
ideas
Unfocused
Lacks details

Ideas not connected


Lacks beginning,
middle, end
Little sequence & logic

Sentences unclear
Frequent fragmented
sentences
No variety of length

Serious errors:
Capitalization
Ending
punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs
indented
Spelling

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Modified from: Batzle, J. (1992). Portfolio assessment and evaluation: Developing and using portfolios in the
K-6 classroom. Cypress, CA: Creative Teaching Press, Inc. by Wall, E., Motley, M. Jones, D. Hiers, C., Chafin,
J., Hargett, T., & McCoy, J. (1998). Quitman, GA: Quitman Elementary School.
Root, VSU

13

Fifth Grade
Evaluating Writing: Narratives (Published Piece)
Story
Elements (5)

Ideas (5)

Name_____________________________
Date_____________________

Organization (5)

Sentence Structure
(5)

Mechanics (5)

All elements
of narrative
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (3+)
Conclusion

Fresh, original
Focuses on topic
Supporting details

Ideas connected
Strong beginning,
middle, end
Sequenced & logical

Clearly written
Complete sentences
Compound/complex
sentences
Variety of sentence
length

No errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Most (4)
elements of
narrative
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (2-3)
Conclusion

Some original
ideas
General focus on
topic
Most supporting
details included

Most ideas connected


Good beginning,
middle, end
Most ideas sequenced
& logical

Most sentences
clearly written
Complete sentences
Simple sentences
Some variety of
length

Few errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Few (2-3)
elements of
narrative
developed:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (2)
Conclusion

Few original ideas


Moves away from
focus
Few supporting
details

Some ideas connected


Attempts beginning,
middle, end
Some ideas sequenced
& logical

Some unclear
sentences
Most sentences
complete
Little variety

Some errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

Lacks (1)
development
of elements of
narratives:
Setting
Characters
Problem
Events (1)
Conclusion

Incomplete ideas
Unfocused
Lacks details

Few ideas connected


Lacks beginning,
middle, end
Little sequence & logic

Sentences not clear


Few fragmented or
run-on sentences
No variety

Many errors:
Capitalization
Ending punctuation
Commas
Paragraphs indented
Spelling

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

No attempt

Modified from: Batzle, J. (1992). Portfolio assessment and evaluation: Developing and using portfolios in the
K-6 classroom. Cypress, CA: Creative Teaching Press, Inc. by Moss, T., Edmondson, C., Kerestan, J., Hill, M.,
Marable, M., Price, M., Andrews, P., Webb, S., & Zipperer, D. (1998). Quitman, GA: Quitman Elementary
School.
Root, VSU

14

Root, VSU

15