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Dakbanwa sang Iloilo, bugal ko.

My city, my pride

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan

Volume I: Comprehensive Land Use Plan

December 2011
City Planning and Development Office
consultancy by Palafox Associates

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

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Foreword

Foreword
Citizen-supported short-term, medium-term and long-term plans and programs have been instrumental in regenerating
and transforming Iloilo City from a conservative and dilapidated port city into a knowledge-based economy. The vast
improvement of Iloilo City is largely attributed to its integrated and holistic approach to achieve economic, social and
physical transformations. Its emphasis on environmental clean-up, use of culture, internationalization and design, major
improvements to its infrastructure, as well as the restoration of its historic areas over some 100 years have successfully
rejuvenated the city. More significantly, the city was able to connect investment in infrastructure with social integration.
Iloilo River, which was once a physical and social barrier is now a hub for social and cultural integration and a center for
recreation, innovation and creativity.
The citizens are particularly optimistic with the preparation of the CLUP as an effective framework to align government,
business and the community towards a shared vision for the city. The CLUP is a testimony to the importance of strong
leadership and institutional processes in key decision-making and sustained implementation.
Iloilo City is also an exemplary city that continually re-invents and evolves itself amidst dynamic changes, and will serve
as an inspiration to cities worldwide. The experience of the CLUP as a comprehensive spatial development guide,
incrementally executed through various programs and projects over 10 years, has achieved a profound transformation of
the city. The city has improved its environment and quality of life significantly, strengthened its social cohesiveness and
cultural vibrancy and also increased its economic competitiveness.
It is noted that the key factors underlying the success of Iloilo Citys transformation is more than just the desire for the
Green City Hall or the beautiful Iloilo River Esplanade. It is not about achieving urban makeover and economic and
social vibrancy through a few iconic buildings or landmarks. Rather, Iloilo City has shown that strong leadership and a
commitment to a systematic and long-term plan, based on solid processes and supporting infrastructure, are key factors
to the success of a citys transformation.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

HON. JED PATRICK E. MABILOG


City Mayor

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Acknowledgement

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Acknowledgement
Iloilo City Congressman Jerry P. Treas, City Mayor Jed Patrick E. Mabilog, Vice-Mayor Jose Espinosa III, the Sangguniang Panlungsod and Palafox Associates would like to thank the following for their contributions
to the conceptualization and preparation of the 2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan and Zoning Ordinance:
Association of Barangay Captains

Students/Graduated Students

Barangay Captain Edita J. Castillo ABC President, Arevalo District


Barangay Captain Irene Ong ABC President, City Proper
Barangay Captain Jonas Bellosillo ABC President, Jaro District
Barangay Captain Carlos Guarin ABC President, La Paz District
Barangay Captain Ricky Mendoza, Jr. Mandurriao District
Barangay Captain Reland Hervias ABC President, Molo District
Barangay Captain Reynaldo L. Brito ABC President, Lapuz District
Barangay Captain Simplicio Subaldo, Jr. Barangay Lanit, Jaro
Barangay Captain Zoilo O. Rojo Barangay So-oc, Arevalo
Barangay Captain Rodrigo Dela Cruz Barangay South Fundidor, Molo

Prussian Bleau Arceo Western Visayas College of Science and Technology


Dinnah Joy Caduduan University of San Agustin
Rey John M. Lorca University of San Agustin
Jonathan A. Vega Western Visayas College of Science and Technology
William Fusin, Jr. University of San Agustin
Rubin Alaric F. Balida HVCST
Alpha Joy Jungco Western Visayas College of Science and Technology
Vhanisa Granada Western Visayas College of Science and Technology
Ian Estrada Western Visayas College of Science and Technology
Micah Jireh L .Provido Western Visayas College of Science and Technology
Algino A. Galeta Western Visayas College of Science and Technology
Emmanuel Torotoro Western Visayas College of Science and Technology

City Councilors
Hon. Joshua C. Alim
Hon. Lyndon V. Acap
Hon. Rodel F. Agado
Hon. Perla S. Zulueta
Hon. Edward C. Yee
Hon. Ely A. Estante, Jr.
Hon. Jeffrey P. Ganzon
Hon. David Raymund C. Jamora
Hon. R. Leone N. Gerochi
Hon. Jason R. Gonzales
Hon. Plaridel C. Nava II
Hon. Nielex C. Tupas
Hon. Eduardo L. Pearedondo
Hon. Roberto Divinagracia President, Liga ng mga Barangay
Hon. Sheen Marie S. Mabilog SK Federation President
Schools/Academe/Institutions
Arch. Gemar Montefrio Western Visayas College of Science and Technology
Dr. Teodoro C. Robles President, Central Philippine University
Fr. Joviel Howard H. Gico VP for Admin, CPU
Fr. Raul Marchan Rector, University of San Agustin Iloilo
Fr. Nelson Zerda DGS, University of San Agustin - Iloilo
Arch. Marian Cogil USA
Dr. Sonia Formacion Chancellor, University of the Philippines in the Visayas
Ms. Ma. Lydia Guzman Callano Planning Officer, UPV
Mr. Henry Funtevilla UP Visayas
Mr. Rene J. Lescano Senior Manager, PLDT
Mr. Kenneth Torre Junior Architect, MBT Architecture and Planning

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Private Sector
Dr. Kristin Treas Chairman, Iloilo City Cultural Heritage Council
Mr. Eugenio Jamerlan Iloilo City Cultural Heritage Council
Mr. Nonel Gemora - Iloilo City Cultural Heritage Council
Mr. Rex Drilon ILED
Mr. Florendo M. Besana+ President, CREBA
Mr. Domingo Garcia CREBA
Engr. Ely Bagrasus President, Rotary Club of Iloilo
Ms. Angela Abenir President, IHRRA
Mr. Alfonso C. Go, III President, Iloilo Bankers Association
Mr. Alfredo L. Tayo III VP, Iloilo Bankers Association
Mrs. Marilon Locsin Pres., Zonta Club of Iloilo City, Inc.
Mr. Romeo Villanueva Chairman, City Agricultural and Fishery Council
Mr. Noel Z. Zarate
Mr. Troy Camarista PR Officer, SM City - Iloilo
Ms. Carrie Leigh Sarabia Executive Assistant, ICVB
Ms. Heide Soliva Branch Manager, Mercury Drug Corp.
Mr. Mark How Project Manager, IVQ Landholdings, Inc.
Mr. Joseph L. Chan Henber Realty
Ms. Teresita Jacobilla Landheights Development Corporation
Mr. Carlos Miguel M. Borja PECO
Mr. Antonio S. Jon Chairman, Iloilo Business Club
Ms. Maria Lea Victoria Lara Iloilo Business Club/Economic Development Foundation
Mr. Herminio Maravilla Trustee, IBC
Ms. Ma. Luisa C. Segovia Iloilo Business Club
Ms. Joan S. Paradilla Robinsons Land Corporation
Mr. Jay H. Presaldo Assistant Project Manager, Canadian Urban Institute
Mr. Jose Marie C. Agriam President, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Iloilo, Inc
Dr. Rolando Uy President, Filipino Chinese Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Iloilo Inc.
Mr. Lorenzo Jamora
Mr. Winston Jesena
Mr. Bong Coo

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Acknowledgement

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)


Representatives of Peoples Organization and NGOs
Mr. Benfred Tacuyan President, Iloilo City Urban Poor Federation Inc.
Mr. Felino G. Katipunan Vice President, Iloilo City Urban Poor Federation, Inc.
Mr. Paterno Licuran President, Iloilo Federation of Community Association
Mr. Emmanuel C. Areo Program Director, ICODE NGOs, Inc.
Ms. Mary Jane R. Homena Coordinator, ICODE NGOs, Inc.
Ms. Belen R. Peaflor President, HPFP
Government Agencies
Mr. Edwin Trompeta Regional Director, Department of Tourism
Mr . Rony Firmeza Chairman, ICUPAO
Ms. Mary Ann Javellana DAR Region VI
Engr. Jose G. Papa Coordinator, Crisis/Disaster Management Center
Mr. Benito Jimena City Tourism Officer
Mr. Joenar Pueblo OIC, Iloilo Provincial Tourism Office
Ms. Vanessa P. Celis Executive Director, Iloilo Provincial Tourism Office
Mr. Renan Escoto Technical Assistant, City ENRO
Engr. Noen V. Gregorio Engineer IV, CEO
Mr. Butz Medina Support Staff
Mr. Evan Arias POIV, PPDO
Ms. Nelida L. Tayong Project Officer III, PPDO
Mr. John Ace A. Azarcon City Director, DILG
Mr. Ernesto Caberoy Office of the General Manager, MIWD
Mr. Giogenes A. Baares Well Driller, Supervisor III, MIWD
Mr. Jerry P. Guillergan OIC Operation Division, MIWD
Ms. Clarita V. Dignadice CSWD Officer
Ms. Ma. Victoria Calinawagan SWO I, CSWDO
Mr. Ludovico A. Navarra Jr. Photographer, CMO
Mr. Joselito Villasis PIO, CMO
Ms. Jeehan Fernandez PIO, CMO
Ms. Leny Foscablo Planning Staff, Iloilo City Department of Education
Ms. Salome P. Villamor GSO
Dr. Erlinda Gencaya Superintendent of City Schools Iloilo City
Mr. Felipe M. Peralta Representative, Boarding House Commission
P/Superintendent Eugenio Espejo Deputy Director, Iloilo City PNP
P/Sr. Superintendent Melvin Mongcal Iloilo City PNP

Ms. Rhodora M. Katipunan Project Development Officer II


Ms. Cora C. Edao Economist III
Mr. Eugenio G. Arceo Draftsman III
Ms. Janis Mae R. Sy Project Development Officer II
Ms. Judith A. Tahum Project Development Officer I
Mr. Roel A. Guillergan Project Development Officer I
Mr. Dean Tulio Statistician II
Mr. Franco Anthony P. Agudo Administrative Officer II
Ms. Maria Christie C. Animas Asst. Statistician
Ms. Josie Y. Hernia Economic Researcher
Mr. Jesus D. Palma, Jr. Administrative Assistant I
Mr. Ervin F. Larios Administrative Aide II
Mr. Francisco Sabido Automotive Equipment Inspector
Engr. Gerry Villarina Project Development Officer II
Mr. Alfredo A. Tarrazona Project Development Officer II
Ms. Christine Joy R. Jayme Support staff
Ms. Rose S. Sueta Support staff
Ms. Sherry Mae C. Tarrazona Support staff
Ms. Sheryll C. Llauderes Support staff
Mr. Monte A. Reyes Support staff
Mr. Rey Panique Support staff
Mr. Delfin Siodena, Jr. Support staff
Mr. Patrick Trespeces Support staff

National Government Offices


Engr. Manuel L. Ticao, Jr. District Engineer, DPWH
Mr. Severino A. Ruiz Project Engineer, DPWH
Mr. Jose Al V. Fruto Asst. Chief PDD, DPWH
Dir. Roan A. Bacal NEDA VI
Ms. Ma. Lourdes B. Miado Senior EDS, NEDA VI
Dir. Lormelyn F. Claudio Regional Executive Asst., DENR
Ms. Edna P. Locsin POV, DENR Region VI
Engr. Isagani J. Jalbuena Project Manager, NHA
Ms. Pilar J. Jamandre Regional Director, HLURB
Mr. Larry P. Nacionales Regional Executive Director, DA
Ms. Mira H. Hofilena Talabong PO III, DOA
Engr. Wilhelm M. Malones Provincial Director, DTI Iloilo City

City Planning and Development Office


Mr. Jose Roni SJ. Pealosa CPD Coordinator
Mr. Nathaniel P. Guillergan Asst. CPD Coordinator
Ms. Nancy Helen B. Pecaoco Project Development Officer IV
Ms. Lerma A. Cuison Project Development Officer IV
Ms. Beth S. Alparaque Project Development Officer III
Engr. Leonor Q. Delgado Project Development Officer III
Engr. Jose A. Tengco Project Evaluation Officer III
Engr. Bonifacio J. Baclagon Project Development Officer II
Ms. Marilyn A. Dacudao Statistician III
Ms. Claire De Lune P. Villanueva Project Evaluation Officer II

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

United Architects of the Philippines


Arch. Manuel B. Tingzon President, UAP Iloilo
Arch. Guillermo Hisancha FUAP
Arch Christine F. Narido UAP Marikudo Chapter
Arch. Ma. Regina P. Falconite UAP Hamiu Chapter
Arch. Ramon Teruel UAP Marikudo Chapter
Arch. Jomari Moleta Board of Director, UAP Marikudo Chapter
Arch Ryan Angelo N. Braga UAP Iloilo

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Top Ten (10) Taxpayers


Ms. Generosa T. Uygongco Philippine Foremost Milling Corp.
Mr. Luis Miguel A. Cacho PECO
Mr. Felipe A. Uygongco La Filipina Uygongco
Mr. Albert Uygongco La Filipina Uygongco
Ms. Leah Fanie Clarete Zuellig Pharma Corp.
Mandurriao Star, Inc. SM City Iloilo
Mr. Robert Uy Chong Lam Carlos Uy Corporation
Mr. Paul D. Que New Iloilo Supreme Marketing
Ms. Heide Soliva Branch Manager, Mercury Drug Corporation
Metro Manila Shopping Mecca SM Shoemart Delgado
Media and Visitors
Charisma M. Alagao Head Visayas, Pichay Company
GMA Network
Regi Adosto Reporter, ABS CBN
Raymund Villanueva Reporter, ABSCBN

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Acknowledgement

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Executive Summary

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Executive Summary

active network of ODA and foreign technical assistance agencies, and decisive political leaders and
legislators that are working closely together for common goals and aspirations.

Planning Period: 2011 to 2020

IV. Major Development Goals and Objectives

I. Vision: Iloilo City aims to become a Premiere City by 2015.

Public consultations and workshops were held in order to gather inputs from the citys stakeholders.
The workshops identified issues that needed to be addressed in order to encourage investors,
including financially capable Ilonggos, to invest in their city. Through the Goals Achievement Matrix
(GAM) it was agreed that the city should improve its provision of basic services to citizens, which
include housing and livelihood opportunities, improve utilities such as power and drainage system,
and be able to respond to the demands of the times to adapt to climate change and reduce disaster
risks, reduce reliance on motor vehicles, improve the air, water and land quality, and minimize its
impacts to the environment.

II. Brief Situationer


In order to achieve this vision, the local government shall formulate an updated Comprehensive Land
Use Plan for the year 2011 up to 2020. The Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan and Zoning
Ordinance is a document which would serve as a basis for strategically laying the foundation to the
direction of the Citys urban development. It would also serve as a reference where development
potentials are explored.
The scope of this document includes the Citys land area of 78.34 square kilometers as well as its
surroundings. The project involves a review of the 1998-2010 Iloilo City Land Use Plan and Zoning
Ordinance and update of its baseline data. The new development approaches are stated based on
these, together with the concerns and issues raised in the public consultations and workshops, and
the principles that Palafox Associates adheres to. This Comprehensive Land Use Plan and Zoning
Ordinance presents the Project Context, Profile of the City, the Proposed Land Use Plan and Zoning,
Sectoral Studies, and Priority Areas of Development.
Iloilo City is reputably one of the most accessible cities in the Philippines, a country located in
Southeast Asia, one of the fastest emerging economic regions in the world. The Country finds itself in
the strategic location of regional and international trade routes. Iloilo City is located in the middle of the
Philippine archipelago. It is the Provincial Center of Iloilo Province, the center for commerce, trade and
education of Metro-Iloilo Guimaras and the Regional Center of the Western Visayas Region. These
factors highlight the importance of Iloilo City in the context of local and international contexts.
Iloilo City is blessed with natural features and resources. It is a low-level plain traversed by numerous
rivers and surrounded by coastal waters. In terms of human resources, Iloilo City is predominantly
made of a young and highly able population that posses a high level of skills and educational
attainment. Currently, the land use trend is towards the creation of a highly built-up area which is
predominantly composed of residential dwelling units especially on the outskirts of the City. This trend,
if unabated, would draw development out of the City Proper.
III. Development Constraints and Opportunities
Public consultations, focus group discussions and workshops were held in order to gather inputs from
the citys stakeholders. Among the many things discussed with the stakeholders are the citys key
development weaknesses, constraints, threats and opportunities that are natural and man-made.
Foremost of the threats and weaknesses that were defined in the SWOT exercise were the citys
vulnerabilities to environmental disasters and risks, its limited financial resources, its inadequacy and
high cost of power and electricity, environmental quality degradation, informal settling along hazard
zones, and rapid increase in the demand of expensive urban basic services. The increased demand
for housing, expensive building construction technologies and the high cost of urban land for public
housing appear to be only one of the many challenges that the city administration face as it struggles
to serve and accommodate its ever-increasing city population.
The city however is also optimistic that such constraints and threats can be addressed through the
citys inherent strengths and opportunities. These can be overcome by the city governments strong
and determined bureaucracy, a confident business sector-partner, strong NGO-Civil Society linkage,

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

V. Preferred Development Thrusts and Spatial Strategy


The results of the public consultation signify that the stakeholders of Iloilo City would prefer to develop
the area into its traditional growth pattern where churches are the district centers and developing its
abundant waterfronts at the same time for commercial purposes. In addition, a ixed use development
shall be adopted and available land be optimized for residential expansion. Economically productive
agricultural lands shall continue to be protected to preserve the remaining green open spaces for the
city and contribute to its food security. A more compact type of development for Iloilo City, which
entails efficient use of land resources is desired.
VI. Proposed Land Uses and Zoning Plan
To be able to achieve this development pattern, several policies are proposed through the land use
plan and zoning ordinance such as:
- Mixed-use types of developments to design places of work closer to places of residences
- Establishing setbacks along the coastlines and rivers to move people into higher ground away
from risks such as natural disasters, reduce water pollution and at the same time, push for
development of the waterfronts.
- Providing for utilities that would reduce vehicular traffic. In addition, incentives shall also be
provided for developers and landowners who will develop land in accordance to the Citys
desired growth pattern, and allocating affordable housing units inside the City.
- Disaster risk-reducing and climate change-resilient development strategies
VII. Proposed Major Programs and Projects
Three priority development projects were proposed to be able to lead the city towards its desired
direction as expressed by its various stakeholders. These are the following:
- First is the construction of park-and-ride facilities to be able to reduce the motorists reliance on
private vehicles and make the public transport system more efficient.
- Second is the improvement of district parks and plazas which will reestablish its former role as
town centers, and encourage businesses to locate nearby.
- Third is the improvement of waterfronts through establishing no-build zones, and enacting policies
to encourage waterfront development.
All programs and projects herein shall help develop the city into a compact, public transport-oriented
city that is safe and economically progressive for its people to sustainably enjoy, live, learn, work,
worship and play in.

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Table of Contents

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Table of Contents
Volume 1

: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan

Foreword

Part 2

: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan

Chapter 4

: Vision and Mission (Charter Statement) 98 99


A. Vision 98
B. Mission (Charter Statement) 98 99

Acknowledgement
SP Resolution adopting the CLUP and enacting the ZO

Chapter 5

Executive Summary

A. Goals 100
B. Objectives 100
C. Strategies 100 101

List of Tables, Figures, Graphs and Maps

Part 1

: Brief Profile of Iloilo City

Chapter 1

: Brief History - 1 3
A. Origin of Name - 1
B. Key Historical Events - 1
D. Comprehensive Land Use Planning - 3

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 6

: Development Issues and Concerns 96 97


A. Weaknesses 96
B. Development Issues and Concerns 96 97

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

: The Concept / Structure Plan 102 113


A. Alternative Spatial Strategies 102 103
B. Preferred Spatial Strategy 103 113

Chapter 7

: The Land Use Plan 114 140


A. Proposed Land Use and Zoning 114 - 130
B. Land Use Policies 131 133
C. Special Regulatory Provisions 133 140

: The Planning Environment 4 95


A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions 4 14
B. Population and Settlements (with Functional Role and
Urban Character) 15 32
C. Physical Resources 33 40
D. Economy 41 - 53
E. Transportation and Access 54 62
F. Utilities 63 66
G. Income, Employment and Services Access 67 69
H. Human Resource 70 74
I. Existing Land Use and Trends 75 88
J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage 89 95

: Development Goals, Objectives and Strategies 100 101

Chapter 8

: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change


Adaptation 141 - 155
A. Assessment of Hazards 141 147
B. Location and Number of Vulnerable Population and SocioEconomic Infrastructure 148 151
C. Existing Mitigation / Adaptation Initiatives 152 153
D. Integration of Proposed Mitigation / Adaptation
Initiatives -153 155

Chapter 9

: Priority Programs and Projects 156 166


A. Planning Framework 156
B. Priority Programs and Projects 157 163
C. Other Related Masterplans, Studies and Programs 164 166

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Chapter 10

: Priority Areas for Development 167 191


A. Improvement of Park-and-Ride Facilities 167 170
B. Improvement of Six Plazas - 171 180
C. Waterfront Development 181 - 191

Chapter 11

: Plan Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation 192 199


A. Plan Implementation 192 195
B. Reviewing, Monitoring and Evaluation 195 199

Annexes

: 200 202
A. Glossary of Terms 200 201
B. Acronyms 202

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Table of Contents

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

List of Tables, Figures, Maps and Graphs

List of Tables, Figures, Maps and Graphs

Volume 1

: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan

Part 1

: Brief Profile of Iloilo City

Chapter 2

: The Planning Environment

Tables

Table 2A-1: Land Area and Percentage by Land Use, 10


Table 2A-2: Division of Barangays and City Districts, 10
Table 2B-1: Population and Density by District (2000 and 2010
Census),15
Table 2B-2: Comparison with the Philippines, Region VI, Iloilo
Province and Other Highly Urbanized Cities, 15
Table 2B-3: Comparison with Other Municipalities in Metro
Iloilo-Guimaras,15
Table 2B-4: Largest and Smallest Districts in Terms of
Population and Percentage Shared,15
Table 2B-5: Population of Iloilo City, Districts and Barangays
(based on 2000 and 2010 Census),16
Table 2B-6: Comparative Table on Key Population Statistics,
2010,17
Table 2B-7: Barangays with High Population Density that are
Higher than Iloilo Citys Density,17
Table 2B-8: Population and Density in Comparison with other
Highly Urbanized Cities,18
Table 2B-9: Comparative Population, Density and AGR by
District (2000, 2007 and 2010,18
Table 2B-10: Total Household Population by Age Group and
Sex, 2007,19
Table 2B-11: Household Population 10-Year old and over by
Age Group and Marital Status,19
Table 2B-12: Districts Growing Faster and slower than Iloilo
City, 20
Table 2B-13: Total Population of Iloilo City as of May 1, 2010
and Projections until 2020, 20
Table 2B-14: total Population by 10-year Increments by
District, 2010, 21

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Table 2C-1: Climatological and Meteorological Data, 2010, 33


Table 2C-2: Frequency of Extreme Events in 2020 and 2050
under Medium-Range Emission Scenario in Iloilo City and
Province, 36
Table 2D-1: Total Number of New Business Establishments by
Major Classifications by District and by Total Capitalization of
Iloilo City, January-December 2010, 41
Table 2D-2: Breakdown of Industry Sector Establishment and
Capitalization, 42
Table 2D-3: Total Number of Renewed Business
Establishments by Major Classifications, by District and by
Total Capitalization, Iloilo City, January-December, 2010, 42
Table 2D-4: classification of Industry by Size, JanuaryDecember, 2009, 42
Table 2D-5: Public Markets and their Locations, 43
Table 2D-6: Top Ten Business Establishments/Corporations
by Gross Sales, 2010, 43
Table 2D-7: Business Process Outsourcing, Call Centers and
Medical Transcription Companies, 2010, 43
Table 2D-8: Landholdings still to be covered under CARP, 44
Table 2D-9: Cultivated Lands for Rice Harvesting, 44
Table 2D-10: Livestock and Poultry Population, 2010, 44
Table 2D-11: Animals Slaughtered in Iloilo City, 2010, 45
Table 2D-12: Location of Fishpond Production Areas, 45
Table 2D-13: Number of Fishpond Areas and Fisherfolks, 45
Table 2D-14: Visitor Arrivals in Iloilo City, 47
Table 2D-15: DOT-Accredited hotel Accommodations, 2010, 49
Table 2D-16: Other Accommodations, 2010, 49
Table 2D-17: Occupancy Rates in Iloilo City, JanuaryDecember, 2010, 50
Table 2D-18: Accredited Restaurants, 50
Table 2D-19: Tourism Sites and Points of Interest by District, 51
Table 2D-20: Statement of Income and Expenditures for the
Period ending December 31, 2020, 51
Table 2D-21: Actual Income and Expenditures, 2011, 52
Table 2E-1: Total Number of Registered Motor Vehicles, Iloilo
City District Office, CY 2010-2011, 54
Table 2E-2: Total Number of Registered Tricycles and
Trisikads, CY 2011, 54
Table 2E-3: total Number of Authorized Public Utility Jeepneys
Intraroute, Iloilo City 2011, 54

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Table 2E-4: Local City Roads by District, Type and Length,


2010, 56
Table 2E-5: Barangay Roads by District and Length, 2010, 56
Table 2E-6: National Roads by Type and Length, 2010, 56
Table 2E-7: Local City Bridges by Type, Width and Length,
2010, 57
Table 2E-8: National Bridges by Type and Length, 58
Table 2E-9: Conversion of City Roads to National Roads, 58
Table 2F-1: Summary of Energy Delivered to PECO in
Megawatt-hour, 63
Table 2F-2: Areas Inundated by Storm Water, 64
Table 2G-1: Total Number of Families, Average Income and
Expenditures and Surplus, 67
Table 2G-2: Employment Status Rates for population 15 Years
old and over, 1998-2002, 68
Table 2G-3: Comparison of Employment Status Rates
between Iloilo City, Select Cities and the National Rates, April
2000, 68
Table 2G-4: Comparison of Employed and Unemployed Labor
Forces in Iloilo City and Region VI for Both Sexes, 68
Table 2G-5: Comparison of Employed and Unemployed Labor
Forces in Iloilo City and Region VI for Males, 68
Table 2G-6: Comparison of Employed and Unemployed Labor
Forces in Iloilo City and Region VI for Females, 68
Table 2H-1: City Government Officials, 70
Table 2H-2: Personnel Profile According to Eligibility and
Gender, 2010, 70
Table 2H-3: Punong Barangays of Iloilo City, 71
Table 2H-4: District Presidents of the Liga Ng Mga Barangays,
2010, 72
Table 2H-5: Number of Barangays with Less than 2,000
Inhabitants as of 2010, 73
Table 2I-1: Land Use Distribution by District, 1998-2010, 75
Table 2I-2: Five Largest and Smallest Barangays in Terms of
Area, 75
Table 2I-3: Existing Land Use Distribution (Actual Land Use), 75
Table 2I-4: Comparative Area and Percentage Distribution of
Land Uses (Actual Land Use vis--vis 1998-2010 Land Use), 78
Table 2I-5: Comparative Area and Percentage Distribution of
Land Uses (Existing 1998-2010 Land Use vis--vis Proposed
2011-2020 Land Use), 80

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

List of Tables, Figures, Maps and Graphs

Figures

Figure 2A-1: International Setting of Iloilo City 4


Figure 2A-2: National Setting of Iloilo City 5
Figure 2A-3: Regional Setting of Iloilo City 6
Figure 2A-4: Provincial Setting of Iloilo City 6
Figure 2A-5: LGUs of Metro Iloilo-Guimaras Economic
Development Council (MIGEDC) 9
Figure 2H-1: Existing Organizational Structure of the City
Government of Iloilo, 74
Figure 2I-1: Expansion and Growth Towards the Provinces of
Iloilo and Guimaras, 84
Competitive Advantage and Development Potentials, 92

Maps

Connectivity Map by Land, 8


Territorial Map,12
District Boundaries Map,13
Barangay Map, 14
Total Population Per District (1990, 2000, 2010), 22
Location of Informal Settlers Map, 23
Population Density Map by District, 24
Population Density Map by Barangay, 25
Urban Character Analysis: City Proper, 27
Urban Character Analysis: Molo, 28
Urban Character Analysis: Arevalo, 29
Urban Character Analysis: Jaro, 30
Urban Character Analysis: La PPaz, 31
Urban Character Analysis: Mandurriao, 32
Soil Map, 34
River System Map, 35
Flood Hazard Map, 37
Recorded Floods Map, 38
Tsunami Wave Height and Inundation Hazard Map, 39
Active Faults and Liquefaction Map for Panay and Guimaras
Islands, 40
Average Daily Traffic Map, 55
Road Network Map, 60
Transport Terminals Map, 61

[Type a

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Map of Ports, 62
MIWD Water Distribution Map, 65
Communications Map, 66
Actual Land Use Map, 2009, 77
General Land Use Map, 1998-2010, 79
Zoning Map, 2011-2020, 81
General Land Use Map, 2011-2020, 82
Competitive Advantage and Development Potentials Map, 91
Location of Public Plazas and Adjacent Areas, 93
400 M Radius Walkability Analysis of Public Plazas, 94
Connectivity Map of District Plazas, 95

Graphs

Graph 2B-1: Age-Sex Structure, 19


Graph 2D-1: Number of New Business Establishments per
District, 2010, 41
Graph 2D-2: Major Business Establishments by Sector
Percentage to Total, 2010, 42
Graph 2D-3: Volume of Unloaded and Auctioned Fish in
Kilograms, 2010, 46
Graph 2D-4: Comparison Between 2009 and 2010 Visitor
Arrivals, 49
Graph 2D-5: Occupancy Rate in Iloilo Province, JanuaryDecember, 2010, 50
Graph 2D-6: Actual Revenues and Receipts, 2011 (Local
Taxes), 52
Graph 2D-7: Actual Revenues and Receipts, 2011 (General
Taxes), 52
Graph 2D-8: Actual Expenditures, 2011, 53
Graph 2G-1: Average Income Compared to Average
Expenditures from 1985 to 2000, 67
Graph 2G-2: Distribution of Total Family Expenditure by
Expenditure Group, 67
Graph 2H-1: Educational Attainment Profile of City Government
Personnel, 71
Graph 2H-2: Personnel Profile According to Status of
Appointment, 71

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

List of Tables, Figures, Maps and Graphs

Part II: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan


Chapter 4
Figures

: Vision and Mission


:

Figure 4B-1: LGUs that compose the Metro Iloilo-Guimaras


Economic Development Council (MIGEDC), 99

Chapter 6

: The Concept / Structure Plan

Tables
:
Table 6A-1: Summary of the Performance Indicator Analysis of
the GAM, 102
Table 6A-2: Selected Strategies by Groups, 103
Table 6A-3: Goals Achievement Matrix (GAM) Scores by
Participating Groups, 103
Table 6A-4: Varying Features of the Various Spatial Strategy
Options, 106
Maps

Chapter 7
Tables

:
Strategy 1: Do-Nothing Strategy, 109
Strategy 2: Core Development with Preservation of Central
Open Spaces, 110
Strategy 3: Growth Core and Waterfront Development
Corridor, 111
Strategy 4: Multi-Centered Urban Development, 112
Strategy 5: Waterfront and Multi-Centered Urban Development
(Preferred Framework),113
: The Land Use Plan
:
Table 7A-1: Area Tabulation (General Land Use Map of Iloilo
City) 2011-2020, 120
Table 7A-2: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of Iloilo City) 20112020,120
Table 7A-3: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of Molo District),123
Table 7A-4: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of Arevalo District),123

[Type a

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Maps

Chapter 8

Tables

Table 7A-5: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of City Proper


District), 123
Table 7A-6: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of Mandurriao
District), 123
Table 7A-7: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of Jaro District),124
Table 7A-8: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of Lapaz District),124
:
General Land Use Map 2011-2020, 121
Zoning Map 2011-2020, 122
Zoning Map 2011-2020 City Proper District, 125
Zoning Map 2011-2020 Molo District, 126
Zoning Map 2011-2020 Arevalo District, 127
Zoning Map 2011-2020 Mandurriao District, 128
Zoning Map 2011-2020 Jaro District, 129
Zoning Map 2011-2020 La Paz District, 130
Flood Overlay District Map, 136
Heritage Overlay District Map,137
Heritage Structures Map,138 & 139
Fireworks Manufacturing Overlay District Map, 140
: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate
Change Adaptation

List of Tables, Figures, Maps and Graphs

Maps

: Priority Programs and Projects

Tables

:
Table 9A-1: Priority Programs and Projects by Development
Sectors, City Proper District, 156
Table 9A-2: Priority Programs and Projects by Development
Sectors, Molo District, 157
Table 9A-3: Priority Programs and Projects by Development
Sectors, Arevalo District, 159
Table 9A-4: Priority Programs and Projects by Development
Sectors, Mandurriao District, 160
Table 9A-5: Priority Programs and Projects by Development
Sectors, Jaro District, 161
Table 9A-6: Priority Programs and Projects by Development
Sectors, Lapaz District, 163

Figures

:
Figure 9A-1: Planning Framework, 155

Chapter 10
Tables

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Flood Hazard Map, 144


Recorded Floods Map, 145
Tsunami Wave Height and Inundation Hazard Map, 146
Active Faults and Liquefaction Map for Panay and Guimaras
Islands, 147
Barangay Map, 151

Chapter 9

:
Table 8A-1: Tropical Cyclones, 2010, 141
Table 8A-2: Frequency of Extreme Events in 2020 and 2050
under Medium-Range emission Scenario in Iloilo City and
Province, 143
Table 8B-1: Number of Informal Settler-Households by
Location, 2010, 149
Table 8B-2: Informal Settlers on Private Properties (with
Ejectment Cases), 149
Table 8B-3: Integration of Proposed DRR/CCA Mitigation
and Adaptation Measures in the CLUP and Zoning
Ordinance, 153

: Priority Development Areas for Development


:

Table 10A-1: Budgetary Cost Estimates for Priority Area 1:


Park and Ride Facilities, 167
Table 10B-1: Budgetary Cost Estimates for Priority Area 2:
Improvement of District Plazas, 171
Table 10C-1: Budgetary Cost Estimates for Priority Area 3:
Waterfront Development, 186

[Type a

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

Maps

:
Transportation Map, 168

Figures
:
Figure 10A-1: Improvement of Park and Ride Facilities, 169
Figure 10B-1: Improvement of Plazas (Plaza Libertad), 173
Figure 10B-2: Improvement of Plazas (Molo Church Street
Pedestrianization), 174
Figure 10B-3: Improvement of Plazas (Molo Church Street
Pedestrianization and Commercial Development), 175
Figure 10B-4: Improvement of Plazas (Mandurriao Plaza), 176
Figure 10B-5: Improvement of Plazas (Jaro Church Street
Pedestrianization), 177
Figure 10B-6: Improvement of Plazas (Jaro Plaza ), 178
Figure 10B-7: Improvement of Plazas (La Paz Plaza), 179
Figure 10C-1: Waterfront Development (Proposed Parks and
Commercial Establishment on Iloilo Fishing Port Complex)
Night Perspective, 181
Figure 10C-2: Waterfront Development (Proposed Parks and
Commercial Establishment on Iloilo Fishing Port Complex) Day
Perspective, 182
Figure 10C-3: Waterfront Development (Proposed MoloArevalo Beachfront Resorts, Food Establishments and Coastal
Transport), 184
Figure 10C-4: Waterfront Development (Proposed Adaptive
Reuse of Derelict Ships and Warehouses) Day Perspective, 185
Figure 10C-5: Waterfront Development (Proposed Adaptive
Reuse of Derelict Ships and Warehouses) Night
Perspective,188
Figure 10C-6: Waterfront Development (Proposed Al Fresco
Dining and Tourism Boats along the Customs House),189
Figure 10C-7: Waterfront Development (Proposed Al Fresco
Dining along the Customs House) View from Muelle Loney,190
Chapter 11
Tables

: Plan Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation


:

Table 11A-1: Review of Organizational Structure and Support, 191


Table 11A-2: Conflict-Compatibility-Complementary Matrix,193

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

List of Tables, Figures, Maps and Graphs

Figures

:
Figure 11A-1: Flow Chart for Implementing the 2011-2020
Iloilo City CLUP/Zoning Ordinance, 194
Figure 11A-2: Flow Chart for Monitoring and Evaluating the
2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan, 196
Figure 11A-3: Revising or Updating the 2011-2020 Iloilo City
CLUP/Zoning Ordinance, 198

Volume 1: The Comprehensive Land Use


Plan
Part 1: Brief Profile of Iloilo City
Chapter 1: History
Chapter 2: The Planning Environment
A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions
B. Population and Settlements (Including Functional Role and Urban
Character)
C. Physical Resources
D. Economy
E. Transportation and Access
F. Utilities
G. Income, Employment and Services Access
H. Human Resources
I.

Existing Land Use and Trends

J. Comparative / Competitive Advantage

Chapter 3: Issues and Concerns

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 1: History
A. Origin of Name
The name Iloilo City was derived from irong-irong, a reference to the native word irong which
means nose. The name took after the nose-like configuration of the main settlement area during the
pre-Spanish period as so shaped by the Iloilo River. Chinese traders who frequent the area and who
mispronounce the r sounds with l sounds, soon popularized the term ilong-ilong which later
evolved into the current name Iloilo.

[Type a quote
Chapter 1: History

1650-1680
-

Sugar was the most sufficient resource of the Island during that time.
Rice was distributed to Iloilo from Panay.
After some conflicts with the parish priest of Arevalo, the church was given to the parish of
Parian (Molo).

1680-1740
-

Iloilo City was also referred to as the Most Loyal and Noble City or La Muy Leal Y Noble Ciuded de
Iloilo in Spanish. This is an inscription in the Coat of Arms from the Royal Decree of 1896 in
recognition of the local peoples loyalty to the Spanish crown.

B. Key Historical Events

Economic transformation took over the entire region and weaving became the primary
livelihood in Iloilo.
Two alcaldes mayors or provincial governors governed the two provinces in Panay Island,
Province of Oton and province of Panay.
Fernando de Valdes Tamon described the Iloilo fortress as a structure made of stonework,
and had an embankment, partly in the sea and partly on land, on tongue of land within the
port itself.
The Iloilo fortress lost its importance through the years and was kept to protect the people
against the attacks of the pirates, which infested those regions.

1560-1590
-

Spaniards Mateo del Saz and Juan de la Isla set foot in Panay
The City became the source of food supplies of Cebu during Spanish Colonial period.
Oton-Arevalo area became the nucleus of Spanish settlement headed by Miguel Lopez de
Legazpioi
Luis de la Haya came twice to Panay and piloted the frigate Espiritu Santo, accompanied by
thirty others and the Agustinian Fr. Martin de Rada who preached the gospel to the natives
along the Araut River
Legazpi wrote the Viceroy of Mexico that the new settlement in Panay was chosen as a
more suitable site, upon his return from Mexico
Legazpi transferred to Manila, leaving in Panay some people to build a gallery of soldiers.
Francisco de Sande, governor-general of the Islands, reported the work in progress at Oton
The town called Villa, founded by Gonzalo Ronquillo de Penalosa, third governor-general of
the Philippines
The residence of the alcalde mayor (provincial governor) was transferred to the newly
created Villa de Arevalo.
The former site in Arevalo was located in what is presently called Santa Cruz.
Forty Spaniards, twenty encomenderos and twenty soldiers, were settled in Arevalo.

1620-1650
-

The chaplaincy made by Don Alfonso Fajardo was turned over the Jesuits, who built a
wooden church in Estanzuela, by Juan Nini de Tavora
Pedro Murillo visited the fortress and judged it to be a very good fortress with strong
bulwarks, heavy artillery, ammunitions, and strorerooms over a tongue of water which was
not good when the waves beat against it
Trading of tobaccos and textiles were started by Panayanos.
The alcalde mayor resided in Iloilo.
Gov. Gen. Hurtado de Corcuera issued a decree in his expedition against Sultan Kudarat
asking the people of Arevalo and the Chinese of Parian (Molo) to move to Punta.
Few Spaniards who remained in Arevalo were asked by Gov. Gen. Alfonso Fajardo to move
to Iloilo.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

1740-1790
-

Tomas de Castro y Andrade was commissioned to repair both the port and the fortress of
Iloilo.
Arevalo became an independent town again after losing its importance.
The Jesuits ministered to Molo and all the people living along Molo to Punta when they were
expelled from the Islands by order of Carloss III.
The Dominicans were overseers.
D. Juan de Figueroa signed the canonical books as the parish priest of Iloilo, Guimaras
Island, and chaplain of the Fortress.

1790-1850
- The capital of the provinces from Cebu to Panay was officially transferred to Iloilo.
- Sugar production increased during the period.
- Filipino Propaganda Movement was initialized with Graciano Lopez Jaena undertaking the
Liberal Revolution.
- The earliest recorded direct foreign exportation from Iloilo port took place when the
Brigantine, a Portuguese ship, loaded some 500 piculs of sibucao (dye wood) for the
colony of Macau
- Fr. Francisco Perez helped in developing the textile industry.
- Chinese textiles were imported and accepted locally.
- The French scholar Mallat visited the place and wrote that it was poorly and thinly inhabited.
- Iloilo became the principal seaport of the region and seat of the government of the province.

1850-1870
-

Iloilo opened to foreign and non-Spanish commerce and transactions.


Iloilo port was opened to international trade.
The city was given the title La muy leal y noble ciudad de Iloilo
Iloilo begun its development.
The trade of Iloilo increased after it opened, being second to Manila.

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)
-

Pope Pius IX created a new diocese through the brief Qui ab Initio with the seat in Jaro
separating it from the one in Cebu.
- Jose Romero identified the presence of establishment that existed at that time such as the
Ker & Co. as he arrived in Iloilo.
- The capitan de barrio of Iloilo was opened by Gov. Manuel Iznart and Andres Arroyo, which
was registered as one of the three houses only established that time.
- The widening of Real Street was approved.

1870-1880
- The town of Iloilo was a grouping of irregular houses of nipa, among which some wooden or
stone houses with tiles for roofing could be seen.
- The house of Mr. Manuel Aldeguer blessed by Bishop Mariano Cuartero. Aldeguer Street was
named after him.
- A traveler from Manila described Iloilo as a prosperous town which, in the near future, would
become one of the leading cities in the Islands.
- Two iron and wooden bridges were constructed during the incumbency of Gov. Enrique
Fajardo.
- Permission was granted to Federico Luchsinger to construct a dock in the Iloilo River.
- The same permission was given to Mr. Cirilo Corteza who was allowed to build a warehouse
for his private use.
- The house of Loney and Co. was granted the same permission

1880-1890
-

Agricultural experimental station called La Granja established at La Paz.


The overseas minister Manuel Bacerra promulgated a law establishing the City Hall of Iloilo.
The Iloilo Ayuntamiento (City Hall) was established.
There were already some 15,000 inhabitants in Iloilo registered, many of them were laborers
coming from the nearby towns of Molo and Jaro.
The government of Manila approved the project to widen and improve the town of Iloilo in
accordance with the indicated recommendations of Junta Consultativa, and sanitize the
mangroves still existing within the town limits.
Gov. Gen. Valerio Weyler sent the Iloilo authorities a circular reminding them of the past
provisions about the houses of nipa within the main cask of the city.
There had been no repair on streets when Iznart, Real and Progreso were repaired at a cost
of 8,000 pesos since these were the perennial problem of the City Hall.
Spanish entrepreneur Don Jacobo Zobel de Zangronis was permitted to open a transportline
that would connect Iloilo with Molo and Jaro.
Dr. Jose Rizal, passing through Iloilo in his way from Dapitan to Manila, was much impressed
by the appearance of the city. He wrote: The entrance to Iloilo is beautiful. From afar can
be seen the white city set in water, a nymph of galvanized iron, a modern creation, poetic in
spirit of its iron uniform The liveliness of the Escolta [which he meant Calle Real] pleased
me.

Real Street, the main and most beautiful street of Iloilo City, was being urbanized day after
day as reported by El Eco de Panay.
- Junta asked for a loan to buy equipment for cleaning the Iloilos rivers.
- Don Antonio Domenech was commissioned to make a feasibility study of railway system of
the City to improve its transportation.

1900-1930
- The first Baptist Church known as Jaro Evangelical Church is established.
- The Central Philippine University ministered theological training among local schools.
- The Manila Daily Bulletin cited Iloilo City as the metropolis of the Visayan Islands, second
city importance in the archipelago and the greatest market for sugar in this part of the world.
- Philippine Railway Co. in Manila is authorized to connect as railway network to Panay known
as Panay Railways.
- Inception of the Arellano Plan.
- Commercial buildings enhanced the citys distinction in business and established first-class
infrastructure
- Structures are designed in the feminine, lacy Iloilo wedding-cake style

1930-1960
- Iloilo gained its cityhood status again after it was reverted into township by the Americans.
- Panays largest bus company, Panay Autobus Co. was established.
- Panay was conquered by the Japanese but the economy of Iloilo was still stable.
- The Jaro Plaza was used as an alternative detention area of Japanese Batallions during
World War II.
- Transportation networks advanced their linkages throughout Iloilo City.
- The Jaro Belfry was ruined by an earthquake.
- The Citys architecture started to be influenced by International styles.

1960-1980
- The construction of fish port, international sea port and other commercial establishments
made the City the regional center of Western VIsayas.
- Rice was distributed to Iloilo from Panay.
- Iloilo is known for being the Visayan region entry of commerce because of its ports.

1980-2000
- Restoration of old structures that have heritage value was initiated.
- Investment of business establishments increased more.
- The average annual family income percentage increased
- The Metro Iloilo Development Council composed of the city of Iloilo, and municipalities of
Leganes, Pavia, Oton and San Miguel was conceptualized..

1890-1900

2000-2011

The city was referred to as the Queen City of the South.


The Plaza de Alfonso XII was converted into a beautiful garden and park with trees,
pathways, and a monument in the middle.
A small house was established and later on occupied by Bazar Cosmopolita of Isidro de la
Rama and was burnt.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

[Type a quote
Chapter 1: History

The Comprehensive Land Use Plan and Zoning Ordinance of Iloilo is approved by the
Sangguniang Panlungsod and HLURB making the plan to be the first approved for the
Highly Urbanized City Category.

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)
-

The rehabilitation, development and sustainability of the Iloilo River is formulated by the Iloilo
Business Club in partnership with the Iloilo City Government, US-AEP, and The Asia
Foundation, consolidated by Mayor Jerry P. Treas.
The Jaro Floodway Channel was completed.
Typhoon Frank damages Iloilo City.
The Metro Iloilo-Guimaras Economic Development Council was institutionalized through
presidential Executive Order 559 s- 2006
The Iloilo City 2011-2020 Comprehensive Land Use Plan was prepared
Five presidential proclamations were issued for the establishment of on-site site upgrading
projects for the urban poor.
Another Presidential Proclamation was issued turning over the Parola site to the city
government of Iloilo.
The rehabilitation and development of the Iloilo-Batiano River was intensified under the
leadership of Mayor Jed Patrick Mabilog and Senator Frank Drilon.
The new Iloilo City Hall is constructed with green concepts
Other major infrastructure projects were initiated during the term of Mayor Jed Mabilog
through the help of Ilonggo Senator Franklin Drilon.

[Type a quote
Chapter 1: History

citys future growth and development and the preferred framework offered by Arch. Manuel Tingzon
which was agreed on by everyone during a special workshop. The Palafox study included a proposed
zoning ordinance that provided for more open spaces, wider easements, setbacks and spacious buffer
zones. He also introduced a flood protection level that sought to safeguard the city population from
perennial floods. The concepts of floor-to-area-ratio (FAR), percentage of lot occupancy (PLO),
transit-oriented development (TOD) and transfer development rights (TDR) among others, were also
initially introduced as new mechanisms in maintaining large open spaces in the city and as
applications of his advocacies on green urbanism and walkability.
During the public hearing and consultations that followed however, land owners and many
businessmen were not amenable to these new ideas which they felt was limiting their rights to
optimizing the value of land. They opted for a status quo on setbacks and easements maintained by
the existing zoning ordinance. The mixed-use, multi-use development concept that was being
introduced by Palafox was what the city stakeholders welcomed most.

C. Comprehensive Land Use Planning


Comprehensive Land Use Planning (1998-2010)
The city administration under then city mayor Mansueto Malabor issued Executive Order No. 6 (series
of 1998) creating the City Land Use Plan Executive Committee and the Technical Working Group. The
working group reconvened the original members of the Task Force on Updating of the Comprehensive
Urban Development Plan to revise the 1977 plan and to improve the 1993 plan. For this exercise the
city did not opt to engage with a consultant but instead relied on local professionals who represented
the various development sectors. A group of local architects led by Arch. Honorato Paloma, Arch.
Sergio Peasales, Arch. Lilio Velasco, Arch. Ramon Teruel, Arch. Padlan and Arch. Melvin Lataquin
led the environmental planning and land use planning aspects of the CLUP.
Guided by the HLURB guidelines that prescribed a sectoral approach to Comprehensive Land Use
Planning, a multi-sectoral planning body was formed for the revision preparations. The multi-sectoral
planning body included public and private citizens and professionals who identified and analyzed
issues, objectives, solutions, strategies, programs and projects defined under the Social Development
Sector, Economic Sector, Infrastructure and Utilities Sector and the Environment Sector. The resulting
1998-2010 Comprehensive Land Use Plan was then approved by HLURB in 2001 as the first Highly
Urbanized City CLUP.
Comprehensive Land Use Planning (2011-2020)
The revision of the 1998-2010 CLUP was initiated by then city mayor Jerry Treas who opted to hire a
consultant to study the existing Comprehensive Land Use Plan of the City in preparation for its
revision. Palafox Associates assisted the city in overseeing the initial preparations for the plan revision
through a series of consultations and focus group discussions with the city stakeholders and the City
Planning and Development Office.
In his report, Arch. Palafox highlighted the city stakeholders perceived issues and problems,
strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats and his own observations of the other urban issues.
He presented in the report many new concepts and ideas on climate change resiliency and disaster
risk reduction. The report contained four development frameworks that he perceived can guide the

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment


A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions (Districts and Barangays)
1. Location

Figure 2A-1: International Setting of Iloilo City

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

a. International Setting
Iloilo City is found in the Philippines, an archipelagic country located in Southeast Asia between the
Pacific Ocean and South China Sea. The Philippines is made up of 7,107 islands with a total area of
approximately 300,000 square meters Approximately 298,170 square kilometers is composed of land,
and the remaining 1,830 square kilometers is water. It lies 966 kilometers off the Southern Coast of
Asia. Its greatest length is 1,851 kilometers from north to south of the archipelago and its greatest
breadth if 1,107 kilometers from east to west. The Philippines is bounded by the South China Sea in
the west, by the Pacific Ocean in the east, by Sulu and Celebes Sea in the south and the Bashi
Channel in the north. Its neighbors include China and Australia, as well as the emerging economies in
Southeast Asia.
b. Regional Setting
Iloilo City is situated in Region VI, (the Western Visayas region) which has a land area of approximately
20,441 square kilometers. It is comprised of six provinces Aklan, Antique, Capiz, Iloilo, Negros
Occidental, and Guimaras. It has a population of 6,843,643 and a population density of 343 persons
per square meter*. It has the most number of cities among Philippine regions at 16. Iloilo City is the
center of the Western Visayas Region.
The main economic activities of Region VI are agricultural, agricultural-based industries, and tourism.
The region has several interesting cultural heritage sites and is rich in natural resources. Products of
Western Visayas include rice, coconut, fruits and sugar.
c. Provincial Setting
Iloilo City sits at the southwestern edge of the Province of Iloilo in the island of Panay. Iloilo Province
has a land area of 4,719.4 square kilometers and is bounded on the north by the Province of Capiz, on
the east by the Visayan Sea and Guimaras Strait, on the west by the Province of Antique, and on the
south by the Gulf of Panay and Iloilo Strait. It has a population of 1,925,002*. With the current
population growth rate, the population is projected to increase to 532,059 in 2020. It comprises six
congressional districts, 42 municipalities, 2 cities, and 1,901 barangays. Its economy is mainly
agricultural which include the production of major crops such as rice, coconut, fruits, cashew nuts, and
mangoes. Iloilo Province is also known as a major source of fish products with its rich marine and
aquatic resources. Aside from agriculture, the province also has other economic activities. It includes
manufacturing and crafts businesses such as textile, pottery, and furniture-making. Banking,
commerce, retail, service sectors, and schools are also present especially in urbanized areas.
Iloilo Province was the leading province during the Spanish Colonial Period. It is now known as tourism
destination for its historical importance. The province possesses old world literature architecture,
particularly churches built during the Spanish Era. These include the Church of Santo Tomas de
Villanueva off the Miag-ao Church which is included in the UNESCO World Heritage List.
Iloilo City is protected from the strong currents of the southern coastal waters by Guimaras Island. It is
located at coordinates 10 45 north latitude, 122 33 east longitudes. It is in the center of the
Philippine archipelago which is strategically located 283 statute miles from Manila through Antique
waters and about 337.6 nautical miles from Manila through Capiz waters. It is about 55 minutes to one
hour from Manila by plane and 18 hours by ship. From Cebu, it is about 12 hours by sea, and 25
minutes by air.

Figure 2A-2: National Setting of Iloilo City

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Figure 2A-3: Regional Setting of Iloilo City

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

Figure 2A-4: Provincial Setting of Iloilo City

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

d. Domestic Flight Routes


Being an archipelago, domestic routes are possible through air and sea. The domestic route by air
touches 40 cities and towns outside Metro Manila. There is an average of 170 flights daily with about
11,000 passengers and 170 tons of cargo.
Situated between the Municipalities of Cabatuan and Santa Barbara, the new Iloilo International Airport
has replaced the old airport in Mandurriao, in Iloilo City. Four airline companies serve daily domestic
flights to and from Iloilo. These companies are Philippine Airlines (PAL), which have flights from Manila;
Air Philippines, which fly from Cebu and Manila; Cebu Pacific, which fly from Cebu, Manila, and Davao;
and Zest Airways, which have flights from Manila.
The Iloilo International Airport currently does not cater flights to and from international destinations
despite the inclusion of International in its name. However, the airport is designed with standards to
cater to international flights. Proposals to include international flights from similar destinations as Cebu
are currently in progress. According to the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines, the Iloilo
International Airport is a Class 1 Principal (Domestic) Airport and is rated as the fourth busiest airport in
the country.
e. Domestic Sea Routes
Currently, there are three (3) major ports in Iloilo City: Fort San Pedro Port, Iloilo River Wharf (IRW),
and the International Commercial Port Complex (ICPC). The Philippine Ports Authority, Port
Management OfficeIloilo operates and maintains all three (3) ports located within the City Proper. Fort
San Pedro Port is situated beside the historical Fort San Pedro landmark, Iloilo River Wharfs two (2)
kilometer stretch starts from the Parola area inwards to Custom Building at the Muelle Loney Street,
and the ICPC located at Barangay Loboc. Shipping companies such as 2GO Group Incorporation,
Montenegro, Milagrosa, Trans-Asia Shipping provide trips to Manila, Palawan, Cebu and Mindanao.
There are also numerous boat and ferry terminals within the city proper. The boat terminal in Ortiz
Street serves as jump-off point to Guimaras, wherein boats carry passengers going to the Municipality
of Jordan, the provincial capital. The other boat terminal, located at Parola, also serves passengers
traveling to another particular town in Guimaras, the town of Buenavista.
Numerous ferryboat terminals along Muelle Loney accommodate passengers going to Bacolod City
and other cities in the Visayas. There are at least eight daily trips to Bacolod City.
f. Land Connectivity with Metro Iloilo-Guimaras Towns
As the center of the Metropolitan Iloilo-Guimaras Iloilo City is a convergence center of commerce,
trade, industry, education, and governance. As its metro-capital Iloilo plays a most crucial role in the
urbanization of the Metro Iloilo Guimaras Economic Development Council established through
presidential Executive Order No. 559 in August 2006 for local economic development and tourism. The
city supports and complements the functional roles and other socio-economic activities of the
neighboring MIGEDC municipalities of Oton, San Miguel, Sta. Barbara, Leganes, Pavia and the Island
Province of Guimaras. (See Figure 2A-5 and Connectivity Map).

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Connectivity Map
by Land

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

San Miguel
- Population : 23,804
- Strategically located in the central
western part of Iloilo Province
- Abundant green, open spaces
- 12 kilometers away from Iloilo City
- Major Industries include furniture
making, ceramics, concrete

Santa Barabara
- Population : 51, 075
- 15.7 km northwest of Iloilo City
- Industries: inland freshwater aquaculture, agriculture, bamboo furnituremaking
- Birthplace of Gen. Martin Teofilo Delgado
- Town where Philippine Revolutionary Government of the Visayas was

Pavia
- Population : 39,275
- Regional agro-industrial center of the Western Visayas
Region
- Major Industries: food processing, beverages, medical
and industrial gasses, and poultry feeds

Oton
- Population : 77,621
- Predominantly residential
area with agricultural areas
as well
- Existence of beach resorts

Leganes
-

Iloilo City
-

Population : 418,710
Highly urbanized city
Dubbed as the Heart of the Philippines
Educational center (colleges, universities, and
medical schools)
- One of the major economic centers in the

Buenavista
-

Jordan
- Population : 32,524
- Numerous caves and beach resorts
- Mainly agricultural Southern Orchard, 2nd largest
mango plantation in Guimaras
- Balaan Bukid shrine, where a large cross and chapel
is constructed on top of

Nueva Valencia
- Population : 35,026
- Numerous beach resorts
and dive sites
- Main industry: aquaculture
farms
- Guisi Lighthouse in

Population : 27,357
11 km from Iloilo City
Third smallest town in the province
Industries: fish ponds, salt beds, and the
prime producer of high quality salt

Population : 151, 238


Existing airstrip in Barangay McLain
Presence of numerous beaches
Numerous mango plantations
Location of Punta Blanco and Camp
Jossman Target Range and Military

San Lorenzo

Sibunag
- Population : 17,552
- Main Industry: aquaculture
farms and numerous citrus
farms, and nurseries
- Location of the Guimaras Bee

- Population : 22,319
- Industries: calamansi farms and
salt farms in Barangay Sebario
- Tourism attractions: Tumalintinan
Point dive site and numerous
beaches
Figure 2A-5: LGUs of Metro Iloilo-Guimaras Economic
Development Council (MIGEDC)

2. Land Area

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Iloilo City has a total of 7,834 hectares as established in November 2007 through an approved Base
Map prepared by the DENR Land Management Bureau (LMB), Manila. The survey made by the
DENR LMB was for the purpose of defining the citys Foreshore Delimitation Zone where about 8,000
hectares of tidal flats were identified and added to the citys estimated land hectarage.
As can be seen from the Table below, the citys residential zone occupies the largest area of the city at
57.35% with its total hectarage of 4,027. This is followed by the Commercial Zone at 8.21% with a
total land area of 576.22 hectares. The third largest area is the Park and Open Space at 5.50% with
386.53 hectares. The rest of the land area distribution is as follows:

Table 2A-1: Land Area and Percentage by Land Use


Land Use (Actual)*
Area (has.)*
Percentage (%)
Residential
4,027.80
57.35
Agricultural
307.00
4.37
Commercial
576.22
8.21
Industrial
235.71
3.36
Institutional
335.52
4.78
Park and Open Space
386.53
5.50
Fishpond
281.90
4.01
Planned Unit Development
261.27
3.72
Proposed Highway
258.86
3.70
Transport Facility
142.75
2.03
Mangrove
95.00
1.36
Floodway
42.30
0.60
Cemetery
40.08
0.57
Waste Landfill
20.50
0.29
S-I (Special Institutional)
9.88
0.14
I/U (Infra and Utilities)
1.68
0.02
TOTAL
*Based on the approved Comprehensive Land Use Plan of Iloilo City 1998-2010

3. Political Subdivisions
Iloilo City is the gateway to Panay Island and the Western Visayas Region. As of November 2007, Iloilo
has an updated/amended land area of 78.34 square kilometers based on the approved Base Map
evaluated by the DENR Land Management Bureau. The city is bounded on the northeast by the
Municipalities of Leganes and Pavia, on the northwest by the Municipalities of Pavia and San Miguel,
on the south by the Iloilo Strait. Within the city lies six districts within which 180 barangays are
situated. Considered entirely urban, these barangays are herein reflected in Table 2.92 showing their
distribution by city districts as reflected in the 2007 Census of Population.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)
Table 2A-2: Division of Barangays and City Districts
Barangay per District
AREVALO
1. Bonifacio
6. San Jose
10. Sto. Nio Norte
2. Calaparan
7. Sta. Cruz
11. Sto. Nio Sur
3. Dulonan
8. Sta. Felomina
12. Sooc
4. Mohon
9. Sto. Domingo
13. Yulo Drive
5. Quezon
MANDURRIAO
1. Airport
7. Guzman-Jesena
13. Hibao-an Norte (San Isidro)
2. Bakhaw
8. Hibao-an SUr (Tacas)
14. San Rafael
3. Bolilao
9. Navais
15. Sta. Rosa
4. Buhang Taft North
10. Oate de Leon
16. Tabucan
5. Calahunan
11. PHHC Block 17
17. Abeto Mirasol Taft South (Quirino Abeto)
6. Dungon
12. PHHC Block 22 NHA
18. Pale Benedicto Rizal
CITY PROPER
1. Arsenal-Aduana
16. Kahirupan
30. Rizal-Estanzuela
2. Baybay-Tanza
17. Kauswagan
31. Rizal Ibarra
3. Monica-Blumentritt
18. Legaspi-De la Rama
32. Rizal-Pala-Pala
4. Bonifacio-Tanza
19. Liberation
33. Rizal-Pala-Pala II
5. Concepcion-Montes
20. Mabolo-Delgado
34. Roxas Village
6. Danao
21. Magsaysay
35. Sampaguita
7. Delgado-Jalandoni Bagumbayan 22. Malipayon-Delgado
36. San Agustin
8. Ed-Ganzon
23. Ma. Clara
37. San Felix
9. Esperanza-Tanza
24. Muelle Loney-Montes
38. San Jose
10. Flores
25. Nonoy
39. Sto. Rosario Duran
11. Gen. Hughes-Montes
26. Ortiz
40. Timawa Tanza I
12. Gloria
27. Osmea
41. Timawa Tanza II
13. Hipodromo
28. Pres. Roxas
42. Veterans Village
14. Inday
29. Rima-Rizal
43. Villa Anita
15. Jalandoni-Wilson
16. Kahirupan
44. Yulo Arroyo
JARO
1. Arguelles
15. Dungon B
29. Quintin Salas
2. Balabago*
16. Fajardo
30. Sambag
3. Balantang
17. M.V. Hechanova
31. San Isidro
4. Benedicto
18. Javellana
32. San Jose
5. Bito-on
19. Calubihan
33. San Pedro
6. Buhang**
20. Lanit
34. San Roque
7. Buntatala
21. Libertad-Sta. Isabel
35. San Vicente
8. Camalig
22. Lopez Jaena
36. Semenario (Burgos Jalandoni)
9. El 98 Catilla (Claudio Lopez)
23. Luna
37. Simon Ledesma
10. Cuartero
24. M.H. Del Pilar
38. Tabuc Suba
11. Cubay
25. Ma. Cristina
39. Tacas
12. Democracia
26. Montinola
40. Tagbac
13. Desamparados
27. Our Lady of Fatima
41. Taytay Zone II
14. Dungon A
28. Our Lady of Lourdes
42. Ungka
LA PAZ
1. Aguinaldo
14. Jalandoni-Estate Lapuz
27. Mansaya-Lapuz
2. Alalasan
15. Jereos
28. Nabitasan
3. Baldoza
16. Laguda
29. Obrero-Lapuz

10

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

4. Sinikway
5. Bantud
6. Banuyao
7. Burgos-Mabini-Plaza
8. Caingin
9. Divinagracia
10. Don Esteban-Lapuz
11. Gustilo
12. Hinactacan
13. Ingore
MOLO
1. North Avancea
2. Calumpang
3. Cochero
4. Compania
5. East-Baluarte
6. East-Timawa
7. Habog-Habog Salvacion
8. West Habog-Habog
9. Infante
Source: 2007 Census of Populatio

17. Lapuz Norte


18. Lapuz Sur
19. Libertad-Lapuz
20. Loboc Lapuz
21. Lopez Jaena Norte
22. Lopez Jaena Sur
23. Luna
24. MacArthur
25. Magdalo
26. Magsaysay Village

30. Progreso-Lapuz
31. Punong-Lapuz
32. Railway
33. Rizal
34. San Isidro
35. San Nicholas
36. Tabuc Suba
37. Ticud

10. Kasing-Kasing
11. Katilingban
12. Molo Boulevard
13. North-Baluarte
14. North-Fundidor
15. North San Jose
16. Poblacion
17. San Antonio
18. San Juan

19. San Pedro


20. South-Baluarte (Baybay)
21. South Fundidor
22. South San Jose
23. Ta-al
24. Tap-oc
25. West Timawa

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

11

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Territorial Map
Boundary

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

12

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

District Boundaries

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

13

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (A. Location, Land Area and Political Subdivisions)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Barangay Map

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

14

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

B. Population and Settlements (Including Functional Role and Urban Character)


1. Population
Size and Distribution
Based on the Table 2B-1 below, Iloilo City has a population of 424,619 and contributes 5.98% to the regions
population of 7,102,438. This figure is 58,228 higher than 366,391 census in 2000. Table 2B-2 compares Iloilo
City to selected Highly Urbanized Cities in the Philippines like Cebu, Bacolod and Davao. The table shows that
compared to the selected cities, Iloilo City has a relatively smaller population than Davao and Cebu which are
large metropolitan cities. Iloilo City is relatively of the same population as Bacolod, a sister city in Western
Visayas.

District
Iloilo City
Arevalo
City Proper
Jaro
La Paz
Mandurriao
Molo

Table 2B-1: Population and Density By District (2000 and 2010 Census)
Population
Density/Sq.km.
Area in sq.km.
2000*
2010**
2000*
2010**
366,391
424,619
78.34
4,677
5,420
36,449
49,776
6.64
5,489
7,496
51,663
55,135
4.40
11,741
12,530
97,179
113,039
30.40
3,196
3,718
73,273
81,972
15.53
4,718
5,278
44,615
54,379
15.23
2,929
3,570
63,212
70,318
6.14
10,295
11,452

% Share to
Region VI
5.98
0.70
0.78
1.59
1.15
0.77
0.99

*NSO Official Results as of May 1, 2000 Census of Population and Housing, and August 1, 2007 Census
** NSO Official Results of 2010 National Census, May 2010

Table 2B-2: Comparison with the Philippines, Region VI, Iloilo Province and Other Highly
Urbanized Cities (HUCs)*
Country/Region/ Province/Highly
Area
Total Population
Population
Average Annual
Urbanized Cities
(Sq. Kms.)
Density
Growth Rate
(Sq. Kms.)
Philippines
300,000.00
88,574,614
295
2.04
Region VI
20,157.70
6,843,643
339
1,35
(7,102,438)**
Province of Iloilo
4,663.00
1,691,878
363
1.13
Iloilo City
78.34
418,710
5,345
1.86
Bacolod City
162.70
449,497
2,760
1.39
Cebu City
315.00
798,809
2,536
1.46
Davao City
2,211.30
1,363,337
617
2.41
Source: NSO, Region VI; SEP, PPDO, Iloilo Province & CPDO, Iloilo City
* as of May 1, 2000 Census of Population & Housing and August 1, 2007 Census of Population
** based 2010 survey

Table 2B-3 compares the population and density of Iloilo City with its neighboring municipalities in Metro-Iloilo
Guimaras based on 2010 projected population. It can be noticed that Iloilo City is not only the most populated,
but is also the most crowded among the local government units of Metro-Iloilo Guimaras. Iloilo City is the area
of convergence for more residents who go to work or attend school. According to the 2010 Iloilo City SocioEconomic Profile, the floating population of the City is estimated to number to more than 150,000 which are
mostly students. Majority of them come from the neighboring municipalities. It is observed that these students
are out during the summer break.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)
Table 2B-3: Comparison with Other Municipalities in Metro-Iloilo Guimaras
Land Area (sq. km.)
Population
Population Density
HUC/Municipalities
(2010)
(person per sq. km.)
Iloilo City
78.34
424,619
5,420
San Miguel
31.97
24,221
758
Oton
90.73
76.294
841
Santa Barbara
131.96
53,772
407
Pavia
27.03
38,307
1,417
Leganes
32.18
27,396
851
Guimaras
604.57
179,836
297
Source: MIGEDC Flyer

Based on the 2010 census and of the six districts of the city, the district of Jaro is the most populated with its
113,039 population. It assumes a 26.62% of the total city population. This is followed by the district of Lapaz
with a population of 81,972 which shares 19.31 of the total population. The third most populated district is Molo
with its 70,318 population that is 16.56% of the total population. The district of City Proper comes fourth with its
55,135 population that makes up 12.98% of the total. The second least populated district is Mandurriao with its
54,379 population which assumes a 12.81% share. The least populated is the District of Arevalo with a census
of only 49,776 and sharing only 11.72% of the total city population.
The district with the highest annual population growth rate in the 2010 census is Arevalo at 3.16% while the
lowest is the district of City Proper with a 0.65% annual population growth rate.
The densest district is the district of City Proper with a population density of 17.130 persons/sq.km. The second
densest is the district of Molo with a population density of 15,912 persons/sq.km. Of the six districts, Mandurriao
is the least dense with only a 3,896 persons/sq.km. of population density. The densest barangay is Brgy. Palapala I in the district of City Proper with a population density of 327.90 persons/sq.km. The least dense is Brgy.
Loboc of the district of La Paz with a population density of 359 persons/sq.km
Of the 180 barangays covered in the 2010 National Census, the coastal barangay of Brgy. Calumpang of the
District of Molo is the most thickly populated with a 11,113 population that shares 2.62% of the total city
population. This is followed by its immediate neighbor Brgy. San Juan, Molo with 9,840 people sharing 2.32% of
the total, Brgy. Balabago, Jaro with a population of 8,596 and sharing 2.02%, Brgy. Tabuc Suba, Jaro with 8,450
and sharing 1.99% and Brgy. Calaparan, also a coastal barangay in Arevalo with 7,986 and sharing 1.88%.
The least populated barangay is Brgy. Roxas Village in the City Proper District where the population is only 93
and making up only 0.02% of the total city population. This is followed by Brgy. Osmena, City Proper with 132
population sharing 0.03%, Brgy. Laguda,La Paz with 145 and sharing 0.03% of the total, Brgy. El 98 Castella,
Jaro with 210 and sharing 0.05%. The fifth least populated barangay in the city is Brgy. Semenario with a
population of 233 and making up 0.05% of the total city population.
Table 2B-4: Largest and Smallest Districts In Terms of Population and Percentage Shared
Ranking
District
Population
% Share to city population
Iloilo City
1
Jaro
113,039
26.62%
2
La Paz
81,972
19.31%
3
Molo
70,318
16.56%
4
City Proper
55,135
12.98%
5
Mandurriao
54.379
12.81%
6
Arevalo
49.776
11.72%
Source: CPDO

15

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Table 2B-5: Population of Iloilo City, Districts and Barangays (based on 2000 and 2010 Census)

35. San Agustin


36. San Felix
37. San Jose
38. Sto. Rosario Duran
39. Tanza Esperanza
40. Timawa Tanza I
41. Timawa Tanza II
42. Veterans Village
43. Villa Anita
44. Yulo Arroyo
45. Zamora-Melliza
III. JARO
1. Arguelles
2. Balabago
3. Balantang
4. Benedicto
5. Bito-on
6. Buhang
7. Buntatala
8. Burgos-SeminarioJalandoni
9. Calubihan
10. Camalig
11. Caludio Castilla/EI 98
12. Cuartero
13. Cubay
14. Democracia
15. Desamparados
16. Dungon A
17. Dungon B
18. Fajardo
19. Javellana
20. Lanit
21. Libertad Sta Isabel
22. Lopez Jaena
23. Luna
24. M.H. Del Pilar
25. M.V. Hechanova
26. Maria Cristina
27. Montinola
28. Our Lady of Fatima
29. Our lady of Lourdes
30. Quintin Salas
31. Sambag
32. San Isidro
33. San Jose
34. San Pedro
35. San Roque
36. San Vicente
37. Simon Ledesma
38. Tabuc Suba
39. Tacas
40. Tagbac
41. Taytay Zone II
42. Ungka
IV. LA PAZ
1. Aguinaldo
2. Alalasan

POP 2010
% SHARE
TO TOTAL

APGR
20002010

CITY/ DISTRICT/
BARANGAY

POP
2000

POP
2010

ILOILO CITY
I. AREVALO
1. Bonifacio
2. Calaparan
3. Dulonan
4. Mohon
5. Quezon
6. San Jose
7. Sta. Cruz
8. Sta. Felomina
9. Sto. Domingo
10. Sto. Nio Norte
11. Sto. Nio Sur
12. Sooc
13. Yulo Drive
II. CITY PROPER
1.Arsenal-Aduana
2. Baybay-Tanza
3. Blumentritt-Monica
4. Bonifacio-Tanza
5. Concepcion-Montes
6. Danao
7. Delgado-Jalandoni
Bagumbayan
8. Ed-Ganzon
9. Flores
10. Gen. Hughes-Montes
11. Gloria
12. Hipodromo
13. Inday
14. Jalandoni-Wilson
15. Kahirup
16. Kauswagan
17. Legaspi-Dela Rama
18. Liberation
19. Mabolo-Delgado
20. Magsaysay
21. Malipayon-Delgado
22. Ma. Clara
23. Muelle Loney-Montes
24. Nonoy
25. Ortiz
26. Osmea
27. Pres. Roxas
28. Rima-Rizal
29. Rizal-Estanzuela
30. Rizal Ibarra
31. Rizal Pala-Pala I
32. Rizal Pala-Pala II
33. Roxas Village
34. Sampaguita

366,391
36,449
1777
7127
4120
1318
2042
1759
2585
2074
1775
2762
5361
1649
2118
51.663
251
2309
1452
2777
3450
456

424,619
49,776
1903
7986
4673
1373
2149
2108
3050
2712
1980
3454
7248
7869
3271
55.135
300
2357
1637
2799
3610
450

3.16
11.72
0.45
1.88
1.10
0.32
0.51
0.50
0.72
0.64
0.47
0.81
1.70
1.85
0.77
12.98
0.07
0.56
0.39
0.66
0.85
0.11

1.49
3.15
0.69
1.14
1.27
0.41
0.60
1.83
1.67
2.72
1.10
2.26
3.06
16.91
4.44
0.65
1.80
0.21
1.21
0.08
0.45
-0.13

276

275

0.06

508
563
1880
218
931
375
909
447
466
923
508
945
639
599
466
1185
476
1399
114
609
600
3024
777
1982
1981
35
399

462
583
2019
251
771
414
898
465
470
1067
633
950
580
493
467
1210
530
1440
132
253
855
3319
728
2379
2349
93
615

0.11
0.14
-0.08
0,06
0.18
0.10
0.21
0.11
0.11
0.25
0.15
0.22
0.14
0.12
0.11
0.28
0.12
0.34
0.03
0.06
0.20
0.78
0.17
0.56
0.55
0.02
0.14

POPULATION
SHARED BY
BARANGAY/ 2000-2010 AREA
% CHANGE (km2)
DISTRICT

2000

2010

DENSITY

AREA %
SHARE

2000

2010

5,740
4,038
101,814
5,493
10,983
10,747
3,449
4,535
23,044
4,797
17,262
6,092
1,043
3,996
16,044
6,275
20,990
48,400
25,245
28,750
4,145

7,838
4,325
114,085
6,230
11,441
11,310
4,133
5,350
30,133
5,351
21,587
8,236
4,980
6,171
17,122
7,500
21,425
54,566
25,445
30,083
4,090

0.49
4.47
2.81
5.37
6.68
0.88

0.54
4.27
2.97
5.08
6.55
0.82

0.05
-0.20
0.16
-0.29
-0.13
-0.06

6.35
0.44
0.07
0.75
0.12
0.19
0.51
0.57
0.09
0.37
0.16
0.88
1.58
053
3.22
0.04
0.11
0.03
0.11
0.12
0.11

-0.04

0.53

0.50

-0.03

0.20

1,380

1,375

0.28

-0.94
0.35
0.72
1.42
-1.87
0.99
-0.12
0.39
0.08
1.46
2.22
0.05
-0.96
-1.93
0.02
0.21
1.08
0.29
1.48
-8.41
3.60
0.93
-0.65
1.84
1.72
10.26
4.42

0.98
1.09
3.64
0.42
1.80
0.73
1.76
0.87
0.90
1.79
0.98
1.83
1.24
1.16
0.90
2.29
0.92
2.71
0.22
1.18
1.16
5.85
1.50
3.84
3.84
0.07
0.77

0.84
1.06
3.66
0.46
1.40
0.75
1.63
0.84
0.85
1.94
1.15
1.72
1.05
0.89
0.85
2.19
0.96
2.61
0.24
0.46
1.55
6.02
1.32
4.32
4.26
0.17
1.12

-0.14
-0.03
0.02
0.04
-0.40
0.02
-0.13
-0.03
-0.05
0.15
0.17
-0.11
-0.19
-0.27
-0.05
-0.10
0.04
-0.10
0.02
-0.72
0.39
0.17
-0.18
0.48
0.42
0.10
0.35

0.07
0.03
0.07
0.02
0.04
0.08
0.06
0.03
0.04
0.10
0.07
0.03
0.08
0.01
0.05
0.10
0.06
0.08
0.02
0.15
0.01
0.04
0.06
0.01
0.01
0.03
0.11

7,257
18,766
26,857
10,900
23,275
4,687
15,150
14,900
11,650
9,230
7,257
31,500
7,987
59,900
9,320
11,850
7,933
17,487
5,700
4,060
60,000
75,600
12,950
198,200
198,100
1,166
3,627

6,600
19,433
28,842
12,550
19,275
5,175
14,966
15,500
11,750
10,670
9,042
31,666
7,250
49,300
9,340
12,100
8,833
18,000
6,600
1,686
85,500
82,975
12,133
237,900
234,900
3,100
5,590

0.09
0.05
0.09
0.03
0.06
0.11
0.09
0.04
0.05
0.14
0.09
0.04
0.11
0.02
0.07
0.13
0.09
0.11
0.03
0.20
0.02
0.05
0.08
0.01
0.01
0.04
0.15

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

4.88 3.82
1.55 16.04
11.30 9.39
3.62 2.76
5.55 4.32
4.83 4.23
7.09 6.13
5.69 5.45
4.87 3.98
7.58 6.94
14.71 14.56
4.52 15.81
5.81 6.57

-1.06
-3.51
-1.91
-0.86
-1.23
-0.60
-0.96
-0.24
-0.69
-0.64
-0.15
11.29
0.76

8.66
0.61
0.09
1.02
0.17
0.25
0.70
0.90
0.13
0.51
0.21
1.20
2.15
0.72
4.39
0.06
0.16
0.04
0.15
0.16
0.15

744
1279
245
1819
1912
647
1531
5023
1831
366
2337
97,179
925
6748
3002
2990
3744
3194
1814

888
1230
377
1908
2277
700
2005
5459
1560
366
2511
113,039
901
8596
3136
2827
5679
2744
3676

0.21
0.29
0.09
0.45
0.54
0.16
0.47
1.28
0.37
0.09
0.59
26.62
0.21
2.02
0.74
0.67
1.34
0.65
0.87

1.78
-0.39
4.40
0.48
1.76
0.79
2.73
0.83
-1.59
0
0.72
1.52
-0.26
2.45
0.44
-0.56
4.25
-1.51
7.32

1.44
2.48
0.47
3.52
3.70
1.25
2.96
9.72
3.55
0.71
4.52

1.61
2.23
0.68
3.46
4.13
1.27
3.64
9.90
2.83
0.66
4.55

0.17
-0.25
0.21
-0.06
0.43
0.02
0.68
0.18
-0.72
-0.05
0.03

0.95 0.80
6.94 7.60
3.09 2.77
3.08 2.50
3.85 5.002
3.29 2.43
1.87 3.25

0.15
0.66
-0.32
-0.58
1.17
-0.86
1.38

0.15
0.09
0.02
0.08
0.05
0.02
0.06
0.29
0.09
0.03
0.14
25.88
0.34
3.59
1.56
0.16
1.68
1.41
1.41

161

233

0.05

3.76

0.17

1275
1776
156
2911
2804
1597
920
1702
2165
1107
313
1251
486
629
309
3744
3967
1226
1036
1320
2468
4281
5129
3920
518
2586
1680
1704
2103
8053
4806
3326
1065
2268
73,273
1152
1938

1353
2185
210
2956
6715
1660
1022
1510
3086
990
391
2658
636
740
420
3895
4181
1005
1155
1305
2180
4296
5830
6268
375
1100
1579
1332
2120
8450
5204
4450
1100
2890
81,972
1229
2001

0.32
0.51
0.05
0.70
1.58
0.39
0.24
0.36
0.73
0.23
0.09
0.63
0.15
0.17
0.10
0.92
0.98
0.24
0.27
0.31
0.51
1.01
1.37
1.48
0.09
0.26
0.37
0.31
0.50
1.99
1.22
1.05
0.26
0.68
19.31
0.29
0.47

0.59
2.09
3.02
0.15
9.12
0.39
1.06
-1.19
3.61
-1.11
2.25
7.83
2.73
1.64
3.12
0.40
0.53
-1.97
1.09
-0.11
-1.23
0.03
1.29
4.80
-3.18
-8.19
-0.62
-2.43
0.08
0.48
0.80
2.95
0.32
2.45
1.13
0.65
0.32

1.31
1.83
0.16
2.99
2.89
1.64
0.95
1.75
2.23
1.14
0.32
1.29
0.50
0.65
0.32
3.85
4.08
1.26
1.07
1.36
2.54
4.41
5.28
4.03
0.53
2.66
1.73
1.75
2.16
8.29
4.95
3.42
1.09
2.33

0.21

0.04

0.06

1.20
1.93
0.18
2.62
5.94
1.47
0.90
1.34
2.73
0.88
0.35
2.35
0.56
0.65
0.37
3.45
3.70
0.89
1.02
1.15
1.93
3.80
5.16
5.54
0.33
0.97
1.40
1.18
1.88
7.48
4.60
3.94
0.97
2.56

-0.11
0.10
0.02
-0.37
3.05
-0.17
-0.05
-0.41
0.50
-0.26
0.03
1.06
0.06
0
0.05
-0.04
-0.38
-0.37
-0.05
0.21
-0.61
-0.60
-0.12
1.51
-0.20
-1.69
0.03
-0.57
-0.28
-0.81
-0.35
0.52
-0.12
0.23

1.50
2.44

-0.07
-0.02

0.02
1.08
0.01
0.30
1.05
0.07
0.04
0.34
0.31
0.05
0.02
0.99
0.04
0.03
0.03
0.30
1.06
0.05
0.12
0.15
0.22
0.79
1.34
1.66
0.04
0.07
0.09
0.11
0.06
1.41
3.24
0.10
0.05
0.42
19.48
0.02
0.11

1.57
2.64

4,960
14,211
12,250
22,737
38,240
32,350
25,516
17,320
20,344
12,200
16,692
3,754
2,720
1,879
1,924
18,687
2,228
2,265
1,286

5,920
13,666
18,850
23,850
45,540
35,000
33,416
18,824
17,333
12,200
17,935
4,367
2,650
2,394
2,010
17,668
3,380
1,946
2,607

0.21
0.12
0.13
0.11
0.07
0.03
0.08
0.39
0.12
0.04
0.19
35.31
0.46
4.90
2.14
0.23
2.30
1.93
1.93

2,683

3,883

0.09

63,750
1,644
15,600
9,703
2,670
22,814
23,000
5,005
6,983
22,140
15,650
1,263
12,150
20,966
10,300
12,480
3,742
24,520
8,633
8,800
11,218
5,418
3,827
2,361
12,950
36,942
18,666
15,490
35,050
5,711
1,483
32,260
21,300
5,400
3,761
57,600
17,618

66,650
2,023
21,000
9,853
6,395
23,714
25,550
4,441
9,954
19800
19,550
2,684
15,900
24,666
14,000
12,983
3,944
20,100
9,625
8,700
9,909
5,437
4,350
3,775
9,375
15,714
17,544
12,109
35,333
5,992
1,606
44,500
22,000
6,880
4,208
61,450
18,190

0.02
1.47
0.01
0.41
1.43
0.10
0.06
0.46
0.42
0.06
0.03
1.35
0.05
0.04
0.05
0.41
1.45
0.07
0.16
0.21
0.30
1.07
1.82
2.27
0.05
0.09
0.12
0.15
0.08
1.92
4.42
0.14
0.07
0.57
26.57
0.03
0.16

16

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)
3. Baldoza
4. Bantud
5. Banuyao
6. Burgos-Mabini-Plaza
7. Caingin
8. Divingracia
9. Don Esteban Lapuz
10. Gustilo
11. Hinactacan
12. Ingore
13. Jalandoni-Estate
14. Jereos
15. Laguda
16. Lapuz Norte
17. Lapuz Sur
18. Libertad
19. Loboc
20. Lopez Jaena Norte
21. Lopez Jaena Sur
22. Luna
23. MacArthur
24. Magdalo
25. Magsaysay Village
26. Mansaya
27. Nabitasan
28. Bo. Obrero
29. Progreso
30. Punong
31. Railway
32. Rizal
33. San Isidro
34. San Nicholas
35. Sinikway
36. Tabuc Suba
37. Ticud
V. MANDURRIAO
1. Airport
2. Bakhaw
3. Benedicto Pali
4. Bolilao
5. Buhang Taft North
6. Calahunan
7. Dungon C
8. Guzman-Jesena
9. HIbao-an Norte
10. Hibao-an Sur
11. Navais
12. Oate de Leon
13. PHHC Block 17
14. PHHC Block 22
15. Abeto Mirasol
16. San Rafael
17. Sta. Rosa
18. Tabucan
VI. MOLO
1. Avancea-North
2. Calumpang

5510
516
913
2119
3327
954
2622
2891
466
2388
2108
3329
243
2059
2010
847
2141
1943
1247
443
877
710
1424
2963
2588
6532
1163
1621
1406
2003
2791
1215
3551
1129
2134
44,615
4376
5317
1801
4524
1698
1861
1510
4397
1910
1912
2675
3203
1588
1402
2059
1045
798
2539
63,212
816
9773

6214
524
1230
1920
3848
1380
2899
2670
510
3256
2170
4139
145
2515
1806
1037
2616
2100
1500
450
1011
721
1630
3620
2196
6592
1134
1387
1320
1519
3650
1465
3886
3120
2562
54,379
3374
5829
2733
6481
2723
3356
2519
5250
2168
2220
4020
4106
1529
1407
2277
1260
775
2352
70,318
732
11,113

1.46
0.12
0.29
0.45
0.91
0.33
0.68
0.63
0.12
0.77
0.51
0.98
0.03
0.59
0.43
0.24
0.62
0.49
0.35
0.11
0.24
0.17
0.38
0.85
0.52
1.55
0.27
0.33
0.31
0.36
0.86
0.35
0.92
0.73
0.60
12.81
0.80
1.37
0.64
1.53
0.64
0.79
0.59
1.24
0.51
0.52
0.95
0.97
0.36
0.33
0.54
0.30
0.18
0.55
16.56
0.17
2.62

1.21
0.15
3.02
-0.98
1.46
3.76
1.01
-0.79
0.91
3.15
0.29
2.20
-5.03
2.02
-1.06
2.04
2.02
0.78
1.86
0.16
1.43
0.15
1.36
2.02
-1.63
0.09
-0.25
-1.55
-0.63
-2.73
2.72
1.89
0.90
10.70
1.84
2.00
-2.57
0.92
4.26
3.66
4.84
6.07
5.25
1.79
1.27
1.50
4.16
2.51
-0.04
0.03
1.01
1.89
-0.29
-0.76
1.07
-1.08
1.29

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

7.52
0.70
1.25
2.89
4.54
1.30
3.58
3.95
0.64
3.26
2.88
4.54
0.33
2.81
2.74
1.16
2.92
2.65
1.70
0.60
1.20
0.97
1.94
4.04
3.53
8.92
1.59
2.21
1.92
2.74
3.81
1.66
4.85
1.54
2.91

7.58
0.64
1.50
2.34
4.69
1.68
3.54
3.26
0.62
3.97
2.65
5.05
0.18
3.07
2.20
1.27
3.19
2.56
1.83
0.55
1.23
0.88
1.99
4.42
2.68
8.04
1.38
1.69
1.61
1.85
4.45
1.79
4.74
3.81
3.13

0.06
-0.06
0.25
-0.55
0.15
0.38
-0.04
-0.69
-0.02
0.71
-0.23
0.51
-0.15
0.26
-0.54
0.11
0.27
-0.09
0.13
-0.05
0.03
-0.09
0.05
0.38
-0.85
-0.88
-0.21
-0.52
-0.31
-0.89
0.64
0.13
-0.11
2.27
0.21

9.81 6.20
11.92 10.72
4.04 5.02
10.14 11.92
3.81 5.01
4.17 6.17
3.38 4.63
9.86 9.65
4. 28 3.99
4.28 4.08
5.99 7.39
7.18 7.55
3.56 2.81
3.14 2.59
4.62 4.19
2.34 2.32
1.79 1.43
5.69 4.33

-3.61
-1.20
0.98
1.78
1.20
2.00
1.25
-0.21
-0.29
-0.20
1.40
0.37
-0.75
-0.55
-0.43
-0.02
-0.36
-1.36

1.29 1.04
15.46 15.80

-0.25
0.34

0.68
0.11
0.82
0.14
0.21
0.09
0.24
0.11
1.24
2.22
0.11
0.19
0.03
0.39
0.10
0.06
7.27
0.12
0.19
0.13
0.05
0.03
0.37
0.46
0.44
0.54
015
0.08
0.08
0.07
0.37
0.20
0.13
0.87
0.94
13.96
1.11
0.29
0.33
0.65
0.49
1.73
0.86
1.34
0.55
1.69
1.53
0.62
0.13
0.14
0.68
1.13
0.31
0.35
4.42
0.09
0.74

8,102
4,690
912
15,135
15,842
10,600
10,925
26,281
375
1,075
19,163
17,521
8,100
5,279
20,100
14,166
294
16,191
6,563
3,407
17,540
23,6666
3,848
6,441
5,881
12,096
7,753
20,262
17,575
28,614
7,543
6,075
27,315
1,297
2,270
3,195
3,942
18,334
5,457
6,960
3,465
1,075
1,755
3,281
3,472
1,131
1,748
5,166
12,215
10,014
3,027
924
2,574
7,254
14,301
9,066
13,206

9,138
4,763
1,500
13,714
18,323
15,3333
12,079
24,272
411
1,466
19,727
21,784
4,833
6,448
18,060
17,283
359
17,500
7,894
3,461
20,220
24,033
4,405
7,869
4,990
12,207
7,560
17,337
16,500
21,700
9,864
7,325
29,892
3,586
2,725
3,895
3,039
20,100
8,281
9,970
5,557
1,939
2,929
3,917
3,941
1,313
2,627
6,622
11,761
10,050
3,348
1,115
2,500
6,720
15,909
8,133
15,017

0.93
0.15
1.12
0.19
0.29
0.13
0.32
0.15
1.70
3.03
0.16
0.26
0.04
0.54
0.14
0.08
9.92
0.16
0.26
0.18
0.07
0.04
0.51
0.63
0.61
0.81
0.21
0.11
0.11
0.10
0.51
0.27
0.17
1.19
1.29
19.04
1.52
0.40
0.47
0.89
0.67
2.36
1.18
1.83
0.75
2.31
2.08
0.85
0.18
0.19
0.92
1.54
0.42
0.48
6.03
0.13
1.01

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)
3. Cochero
4. Compania-Central
5. East-Baluarte
6. East-Timawa
7. Salvacion Habog-Habog
8. Infante
9. Kasing-Kasing
10. Katilingban
11. Molo Boulevrad
12. North Baluarte
13. North Fundidor
14. North San Jose
15. Poblacion
16. San Antonio
17. San Juan
18. San Pedro
19. South Baluarte
20. South Fundidor
21. South San Jose
22. Ta-al
23. Tap-oc
24. West Habog-Habog
25. West Timawa
Source: CPDO

904
3132
1680
1190
1891
1274
2391
1097
6002
2366
3327
1320
887
2066
8728
1826
1029
3228
2142
1660
1103
1774
1678

1088
3717
1745
1279
2117
1380
2601
1142
7600
4136
2042
1503
820
2080
9840
2780
1403
3190
2301
940
600
2219
1950

0.26
0.88
0.41
0.30
0.50
0.33
0.61
0.27
1.79
0.97
0.48
0.35
0.19
0.49
2.32
0.66
0.33
0.75
0.54
0.22
0.14
0.52
0.46

1.87
1.73
0.82
0.72
1.13
0.80
0.84
0.40
2.39
5.74
-4.76
1.31
-0.78
0.07
1.21
4.29
3.15
-0.12
0.72
-5.53
-5.91
2.26
1.51

1.43 1.55
4.95 5.29
2.54 2.48
1.88 1.82
2.99 3.01
2.02 1.96
3.78 3.70
1.74 1.62
9.50 10.81
3.74 5.88
5.26 2.90
2.09 2.14
1.40 1.17
3.27 2.96
13.81 13.99
2.89 3.95
1.63 2.00
5.11 4.54
3.39 3.27
2.63 1.34
1.74 0.85
2.81 3.16
2.65 2.77

0.12
0.34
-0.06
-0.06
0.02
-0.06
-0.08
-0.12
1.31
2.14
-2.36
0.05
-0.23
-0.31
0.81
1.06
0.37
-0.57
-0.12
-1.29
-0.89
0.35
0.12

0.07
0.27
0.11
0.08
0.11
0.09
0.08
0.05
0.12
0.07
0.36
0.10
0.08
0.18
0.29
0.17
0.03
0.65
0.24
0.29
0.04
0.02
0.07

12,914
11,600
15,272
14,875
17,190
14,155
29,887
21,940
50,016
33,800
9,241
13,200
11,087
11,477
30,096
10,741
34,300
4,966
8,925
5,724
27,575
88,700
23,971

15,542
13,766
15,863
15,987
19,245
15,333
32,512
22,840
63,333
59,085
5,672
15,030
10,250
11,555
33,931
16,352
46,766
4,907
9,587
3,241
15,000
110,950
27,857

0.10
0.37
0.15
0.11
0.15
0.13
0.11
0.07
0.16
0.09
0.49
0.14
0.11
0.25
0.39
0.23
0.04
0.89
0.33
0.40
0.06
0.02
0.10

Density and Urbanization


Based on the recent 2010 National Census the population density of Iloilo City was at 5,420 persons per square
kilometer, which is 743 higher than its 4,677 population density in 2000. Annual Population Growth Rate 20002010 is at 1.49%. Comparative Table 2B-5 shows that the citys population density is higher than the national,
regional, and provincial average. This is an indicator that Iloilo City is considered a highly urbanized area, and is
a place where a massive number of people converge.
Table 2B-6: Comparative Table on Key Population Statistics 2010
Key Province/Highly
Urbanized Cities (HUCS)

Population
Number of
Density/ *2000
Households*
(Sq. Kms)
Philippines
300,000.00
88,574,614
295
15,274,579
Region VI
20,157.70
6,843,643
339
1,211,762
Province of Iloilo
4,663.00
1,691,878
363
298,593
Iloilo City
78.34
418,710
5,345
85,518
Source: NSO Reg. VI, as of May 1, 2000 Census of Population & Housing & August 1, 2007 Census of Population

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Area
(Sq. Kms)

Total
Population*

Average Annual
Growth Rate
2.04
1,35
1.13
1.86

Table 2B-7: Barangays with High Population Density that are higher than Iloilo Citys Density
Arevalo
City Proper
Jaro
Calaparan
1. Aduana Arsenal
1. Benedicto
Dulonan
2. Bay-Bay Tanza
2. Calubihan
Mohon
3. Blumentritt Monica
3. EL 98
Quezon
4. Bonifacio Tanza
4. Cuartero
Sta. Felomina
5. Concepcion Montes
5. Cubay
Sto. Nio Norte
6. Ed Ganzon
6. Democracia
Sto. Nio Sur
7. Flores
7. Desamparados
Yulo Drive
8. Gen Hughes Montes
8. Dungon B
9. Gloria
9. Fajardo
10. Hipodromo
10. Javellana
11. Jalandoni-Wilson
11. Liberta Sta. Isabel
12. Kahirupan
12. Lopez Jaena

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Lapaz
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.

Aguinaldo
Alalasan
Baldoza
Burgos Mabini Plaza
Caingin
Divingracia
Don Esteban
Gustilo
Jalandoni Estate
Jereos
Lapuz Norte
Lapuz Sur
Libertad
Lopez Jaena Norte
Lopez Jaena Sur
Mac Arthur
Magdalo
Mansaya
Bo. Obrero
Progreso
Punong
Railway
Rizal
San Isidro
San Nicholas
Sinikway

13. Kauswagan
14. Legaspi-Dela Rama
15. Mabolo-Delgado
16. Magsaysay
17. Malipayon Delgado
18. Maria Clara
19. Muelle Loney
20. Nonoy
21. Ortiz
22. Osmea
23. Rima Rizal
24. Rizal Estanzuela
25. Rizal Ibarra
26. Rizal Pala Pala I
27. Rizal Pala Pala II
28. San Agustin
29. San Felix
30. San Jose
31. Sto. Rosario Duran
32. Tanza Esperanza
33. Timawa Tanza I
34. Timawa Tanza II
35. Veterans Village
36. Villa Anita
37. Yulo Arroyo
38. Zamora Melliza
Mandurriao
1. Bakhaw
2. Benedicto Pali
3. Bolilao
4. Oate De Leon
5. PHHC Block 17
6. PHHC Block 22
7. Tabucan

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.

Luna
M.H. Del Pilar
Ma. Cristina
Montinola
Our Lady of Fatima
Our Lady of Lourdes
San Jose
San Pedro
San Roque
Simon Ledesma
Tabuc Suba
Tagbac
Taytay Zone II
Ungka

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Table 2B-8 compares Iloilo City to selected Highly Urbanized Cities in the Philippines. The table shows that
compared to the selected cities, Iloilo City has the highest population density. Compared nationally, Iloilo City is
the 18th most populous city, and seventh most populous city outside of Metro Manila. In the Western Visayas
Region, it is the second most populous city, next to Bacolod City. It leads the region in terms of population
density. These comparative figures reinforce the status of the city as one of the leading cities in the country in
terms of human resources. At the same time, this situation poses a challenge to provide more for the basic
needs and social services of the population.
Table 2B-8: Comparison With Other Highly Urbanized Cities (HUCs)
Key Province/ Highly
Area
Total Population
Population Density
Average Annual
Urbanized Cities
(Sq. Kms.)
(Sq. Kms.)
Growth Rate
Iloilo City
78.34
418,710
5,345
1.86
Bacolod City
162.70
449,497
2,760
1.39
Cebu City
315.00
798,809
2,536
1.46
Davao City
2,211.30
1,363,337
617
2.41
Makati City
18.30
510,383
27,588
1.91
Manila City
25.00
1,660,714
66,428
0.68
Quezon City
171.70
2,679,450
15,605
2.93
Source: NSO, Region VI; SEP, PPDO, Iloilo Province & CPDO, Iloilo City
* as of May 1, 2000 Census of Population & Housing and August 1, 2007 Census of Population; ** based 2010 SEP o f Iloilo City

Molo
1. Avancea
2. Calumpang
3. Cochero
4. Compania Central
5. East Baluarte
6. East Timawa
7. Salvacion Habog Habog
8. Infante
9. Kasing-Kasing
10. Katilingban
11. Molo Boulevard
12. North Baluarte
13. North San Jose
14. Poblacion
15. San Antonio
16. San Juan
17. San Pedro
18. South Baluarte
19. South San Jose
20. Tap-oc
21. West habog-Habog
22. West Timawa

Table 2B-9: Population and Density By District (as of May 1, 2010 Census of Population)
Average Annual
District
Population
Area
Density /Sq.Km.
Growth Rate
km
2000*
2007*
2010*
2000
2007
2010*
1995- 200020002000
2007
2010
Iloilo City
366,391
418,710
424,619
78.34
4,677
5,348
5,420
1.97
1.86
1.49
Arevalo
36,449
45,921
49,776
6.6417
5,488
6,914
7,496
5.62
3.24
3.16
City Proper
51,663
54,539
55,135
4.3977
11,748
12,402
12,530
-1.45
0.75
0.65
Jaro
97,179
111,976
113,039
30.4037
3,196
3,683
3,718
2.18
1.97
1.52
La Paz
73,273
82,344
81,972
15.5303
4,718
5,302
5,278
1.38
1.62
1.13
Mandurriao
44,615
53,857
54,379
15.2297
2,929
3,536
3,570
3.62
2.63
2.00
Molo
63,212
70,073
70,318
6.1371
10,300
11,418
11,452
2.36
1.43
1.07
*NSO Official Results as of May 1, 2000 Census of Population and Housing, and August 1, 2007 Census and May 1, 2010 Census

Age-Sex Structure
The city age-sex structure can be seen in Table 2B-10 and Graph 2B-1. As can be seen in the table, there is a
sex ratio of 94.1 males for every 100 females. This data is consistent with the national population trend which
illustrates the majority of the population are mostly composed of females. Furthermore, it is perceived that Iloilo
City is a young population. The figures also explain that among all age groups, the most number belong to the
15-19 years old bracket with 44,646 followed by the 5-9 years old and the 10-14 years old with 40,195 and
39,196 respectively.

Source: CPDO

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

18

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Any plans or policies for Iloilo City should take these age groups into consideration, as all of them will be
considered as part of Iloilo Citys workforce by the end of 2020. Majority of the population, 65.67%% (15-64
years old) projected is the working age group and Iloilo City has dependency ratio of 34.33% with the age
group bracket of below 14 yrs. old and below and 65 yrs old and above.

Table 2B-10: Total Household Population By Age Group And Sex, Iloilo City: 2007
ALL
Both Sexes
Male
Female
AGES
414,747
201,019
213,728
Under 1
8,404
4,377
4,027
1-4
32,012
16,423
15,589
5-9
40,195
20,795
19,400
10-14
39,196
19,917
19,279
15-19
44,646
21,128
23,518
20-24
42,459
20,116
22,343
25-29
37,200
18,274
18,926
30-34
30,291
15,179
15,112
35-39
27,821
13,720
14,101
40-44
24,856
12,145
12,711
45-49
22,520
10,719
11,801
50-54
19,051
9,098
9,953
55-59
14,484
6,755
7,729
60-64
9,820
4,241
5,579
65-69
7,890
3,278
4,612
70-74
5,882
2,246
3,636
75-79
3,939
1,399
2,540
80 and Over
4,081
1,209
2,872

Graph 2B-1: Age-Sex Structure

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Household Population
Table 2B-11 shows the Household Population 10 Years Old & Over By Age Group and Marital Status of Iloilo
City. As of 2007, there are 334,136 households population with 48% single, 43% legally married, 5%
widower, 1% divorced, and 2.8% live-in.
Other noticeable trends in this table are the following: the most number of legally married household are
within the bracket of 35-39 with 20,546, 30-34 with 20,092 and 40-44 with 19,084. This shows that the
population of Iloilo City prefers to get married at a later age due to various factors such as the perceived high
costs involved in wedding and maintaining a married life, like paying for houses, paying for bills, and raising
children. The people also give higher priority to their careers during the earlier stages of their lives.
This analysis is supported by the number of people considered as living in, which is highest at the age group
of 20-24 years old. The number of live-ins decrease in number as the age group goes higher.

Table 2B-11: Household Population 10 Years Old & Over By Age Group & Marital Status
Iloilo City: 2007
Household
Age Group
Population 10
Legally
Separated/
Common
Years Old and
Single
Married
Widowed
Divorced
Law/ Live-in Unknown
Over
BOTH
334,136
158,935
144,864
16,870
3,496
9,311
660
SEXES
Below 20
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80 & Over

83,842
42,459
37,200
30,291
27,821
24,856
22,520
19,051
14,484
9,820
7,890
5,882
3,939
4,081

81,352
32,277
17,654
8,343
5,447
3,848
2,860
2,164
1,519
1,048
888
583
446
506

1,261
7,411
16,872
20,092
20,546
19,084
17,525
14,489
10,609
6,580
4,700
3,020
1,617
1,058

56
49
114
235
435
754
1,133
1,626
1,854
1,949
2,166
2,196
1,823
2,480

42
199
306
421
481
498
529
406
302
139
80
45
27
21

854
2,414
2,181
1,151
880
644
452
351
185
96
51
29
17
6

277
109
73
49
32
28
21
15
15
8
5
9
9
10

Source: 2010 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile

Source: 2000 Census of Population (August 1, 2007) NSO, Iloilo City


City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

19

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Growth Rate
Based on the 2010 census, three of the six districts of the city are growing at a faster rate than the citys current
rate at 1.42%. These include the District of Arevalo which rates the highest at 3.16%, followed by the District of
Mandurriao at 2.00% and the District of Jaro at 1.52%. (See Table 2B-12 below) The fast growth in these areas is
mainly due to the large population of migrants and new city residents who have settled in the new residential
subdivisions that have now mushroomed. The wide vacant lands in these urban fringes and its relatively lower lot
acquisition costs have contributed much to the establishment of new subdivisions where migrant families and
residents from the neighboring provinces and towns in Panay Island and Guimaras have settled in.
The three other districts on the other hand, have registered the lowest growth rates compared to the citys overall
growth rate of 1.49%. Of the three, the City Proper is the slowest growing with a 0.65% rate and followed by the
district of Molo with its 1.07% rate. The third slowest growing district is the district of Lapaz with its 1.13%
population growth rate. (See Table 2B-12 below) The slow growth is attributed to the dominance of the
commercial and institutional land uses in these areas where only a margin of the citys population have settled in.
Especially in the City Proper where more than half is occupied by the citys existing Central Business District and
another substantial percentage by government institutions, residential growth have been sparse and only
concentrated on informal settlements along the coastlines and within idle private and government lands. Land
prices are also high in the City Proper and its immediate environs hence, the avoidance by investors in
developing areas for subdivisions.
Table 2B-12: Districts Growing Faster and Slower then Iloilo City
Districts Growing Faster than the City (Iloilo City-1.49%)
District Growing Slower than the City (Iloilo City-1.49%)
Annual Population
Annual Population
District
District
Growth Rate
Growth Rate
Arevalo
3.16% City Proper
0.65%
Mandurriao
2.00% Molo
1.07%
Jaro
1.52% La Paz
1.13%
Source: CPDO

Based on the Table 2B-5 the following barangays with high and low densities are seen to either grow fast or slow:
Barangay with High Density and Fast Growing
1. Rizal Pala-Pala I, City Proper
2. Rizal Pala-Pala II, City Proper
3. West Habog Habog, Molo
4. Rima Rizal, City Proper
5. Molo Boulevard, Molo
6. North Baluarte, Molo
7. South Baluarte, Molo
8. Tanza Esperanza, City Proper
9. Tagbac, Jaro
10. Timawa Tanza II, City Proper
Barangay with Low Density and Fast Growing
1. Loboc, La Paz
2. San Rafael, Mandurriao
3. Hibao-an Sur, Mandurriao
4. Roxas Village, City Proper
5. Ingore, La Paz
6. Banuyao, La Paz
7. Calubihan, Jaro

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)
8. Camalig, Jaro
9. Balabago, Jaro
10. Buntatala, Jaro
Barangay with High Density and Slow Growing
1. Calumpang, Molo
2. Rizal Estanzuela, City Proper
3. Calubihan, Jaro
4. Blumentritt Nonica, City Proper
5. Aguinaldo, La Paz
6. Malipayon Delgado, City Proper
7. Mabolo Delgado, City Proper
8. Simon Ledesma, Jaro
9. San Juan, Molo
10. Kasin-Kasing, Molo
Barangay with Low Density and Slow Growing
1. Hinactacan, La Paz
2. Delgado-Jalandoni-Bagumbayan
3. Tacas, Jaro
4. President Roxas, City Proper
5. Buhang, Jaro
6. Balantang, Jaro
7. Sta. Rosa, Mandurriao
8. Arguelles, Jaro
9. Airport, Mandurriao
10. Taal, Molo
Given the current growth rate of the city and with the rapid urbanization it is currently experiencing it can be
assumed that the citys projected population of 492,302 by year 2020 is apparent. Since land is not growing any
bigger, the population density by then would be a little tighter at 6,284 persons/sq,km. (See Table 2B-13 below).
The increased density shall impact on the allocation of land and other natural resources in the city as well as the
distribution of basic urban services by the city government. These statistics rationalize the need to regulate land
use in the city and manage spatial expansion and urban development more carefully.
Table 2B-13: Total Population of Iloilo City as of May 1, 2010 and Projection until 2020
Year
Population (Projected)
2007
418,710
2008
426,498
2009
434,430
2010
424,619
2011
430,945
2012
437,366
2013
443,883
2014
450,797
2015
457,209
2016
464,022
2017
470,936
2018
477,953
2019
485,074
2020
492,302
Source: 2010 Census of Population

20

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

2. Settlements
Iloilo City is an old city that was built out of the trading and commercial activities during the Pre-Spanish period.
The city was a port city that thrived on the daily trading between visiting foreign merchants that brought in silk,
porcelain, spices, and other trade ware from both the east and west. Iloilo port was busy with the movement of
sugar and hand-woven cotton from Panay Island too. Exposed to these daily activities at the port area along
Iloilo River, the early town situated its settlements and barangays close to the river and the business houses that
brokered for foreign traders. With the Catholic Church seemingly dictating the layout of town plans, Iloilo was no
exempt when it laid out the surrounding barangays of the Iloilo port very close to the San Jose Church fronting
Plaza Alfonso Trese (now known as Plaza Libertad). Town plans during the old days placed the church and the
plaza at the middle of residential and commercial buildings that were built close to the riverfront. This pattern
can still be seen in the way the barangays of the waterfront area are defined with closely packed residential
clusters. The waterfront near the Iloilo River mouth has the most concentrations of government offices.
Other similar settlements mushroomed close to riverports and where economic activities was flourishing. The
towns of Arevalo and Molo soon followed the same layout as the City Propers. Jaro also had the same layout
and was similarly served by the Jaro River. The two other districts, Mandurriao and Lapaz also adopted the
plaza-centered town plan and this time, the gridiron pattern of streets and alleys was introduced.
With carefully laid out roads that connected such towns, in-filling between towns and along these connecting
roads then started. Residential subdivisions were being built all over the city in all of the districts. Built up areas
started from where the roads were, slowly advancing outwards to the open fields and farms. The shorelines of
Arevalo, Molo and the City Proper soon started giving way to informal settlers. These settlements remain today
and have expanded to one of the citys most dense areas.
Table 2B-14 below shows the increasing patterns the population of all barangays and districts except the City
Proper. Jaro shows the greatest increases from 79,829 in 1990 to 97,245 in 2000 and to 113,139 in 2010.
Another big jump was Molos increase from 64,273 in 2000 to 80,318 in 2010.

District
Jaro
Mandurriao
Lapaz
Arevalo
Molo
City Proper

Table 2B-14: Total Population by 10-Year Increments by District 2010


Population
1990
2000
79,829
97,245
29,869
42,703
65,234
73,273
25,109
36,449
51,527
64,273
56,326
51,663

2010
113,139
52,159
82,498
49,776
80,318
55,135

There are two main land use classifications that make up the built areas and barangays of the city the
residential land use and the commercial land use. The commercial areas are mainly concentrated at the city
proper where the Central Business District is well-defined from the Mabini Street edge stretching eastward to the
Iloilo River. Areas around the plazas have mushroomed into commercial areas too together with the main
thoroughfares that connect the districts. A new and a much wider Central Business District can be found at the
heart of the Mandurriao District where the shopping malls are located. Brgy. San Rafael of Mandurriao District
is now considered the Midtown Central Business District as is Downtown Calle Real is known as the Downtown
Central Business District. A smaller Central Business District can be found in the Metropolis area in Jaro
District. Ghis is seen to progress into a full commercial center once the Circumferential Road 1 shall have finally
been established and well-accommodating increased traffic from Arevalo and Oton Districts.
The main thoroughfares that connect the districts together also currently house the concentrations of
commercial establishments that make Iloilo City a very vibrant city. These areas have now expanded outwards
from the said thoroughfares and extending the built up areas with building structures that are mix-used. In
between these road stretches institutional uses can also be found, schools, hospitals, government offices, etc.
Residential areas are spread out all over the six districts and one hundred eighty barangays of the city and
enveloping the district plazas and the main thoroughfares that connect them. Residential subdivisions abound
in Jaro, Molo, Lapaz and Mandurriao. Arevalo is now also showing signs of congestion because of these
subdivisions. It should be noted that informal settlements also abound in the city. The vast majority of these
can be found along the Arevalo-Molo and City Proper coastlines. There are also those that occupy riverbanks
and creeks as is the case in Lapaz and Jaro. The waterfront in the City Proper has these concentrations as
well. The maps below show the locations of these areas and barangays.

Source: CPDO, Iloilo City

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Total Population
Per District
(1990,2000,2010)

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Location of
Informal Settlers
Map
SOURCE: CPDO Maps

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Population Density
Map by District

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

24

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Population Density
Map by Barangay

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

25

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

3. Functional Role and Urban Character

a. Functional Role
Iloilo City will remain as the residential, commercial, financial, governance and educational hub not only for
Guimaras Island and the six satellite municipalities but also for the entire Western Visayas.

Iloilo City
- Highly urbanized city
- Dubbed as the Heart of the Philippines
- Educational center (colleges, universities, and medical
schools)
- One of the major economic centers in the Philippines
- Gateway of the Western Visayas Region
- Seat of Regional Government

b. Urban Character
The following diagrams and illustrations show the varying urban character of the citys six districts: Arevalo, Jaro,
Lapaz, Mandurriao, Molo and City Proper.

Figure 2B-1: Location of Iloilo City in the Metro Iloilo-Guimaras Area

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Urban Character
Analysis:
City Proper

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

27

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Urban Character
Analysis: Molo

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by:

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Palafox Associates

28

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Urban Character
Analysis: Arevalo

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

29

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Urban Character
Analysis: Jaro

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

30

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Urban Character
Analysis: La Paz

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (B. Population and Settlements including Functional Role and Urban Character)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Urban Character
Analysis:
Mandurriao

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

32

Data Source: License and Permits Division, CMO

Source: DTI, Iloilo City

Source: 2010 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile

Source: Office of the City Treasurer, Iloilo City

Source: DTI, Reg. VI, Iloilo City

Source: City Agriculture Office (2010)

Source: Department of Agrarian Reforms 6

Source: City Veterinarians Office

Source: BAS, Reg. 6, Iloilo City


Source: 2010 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile

Source: City Agriculturist Office, Iloilo City

Source: 2010 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile

Domestic

Source: 2010 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile

Source: Department of Tourism, Region VI, Iloilo City

Source: DOT 6

Source: DOT 6

Source: DOT Region VI, Iloilo City

Source: 2010 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile

* Subject of House Bill No. 5495: Declaration of Heritage and Tourist Spots

* Includes National Taxes


Source: City Treasurers Office

Source: City Treasurers Office

Source: City Treasurers Office

Source: City Treasurers Office

Source: City Treasurers Office

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

E. Transportation and Access


1. Internal Linkage
Land Transport
Iloilo City is a very busy metropolis that currently faces a growing problem on vehicular traffic
congestion. Seventy percent (70%) of the citys dai ly traffic volume can likely be found in the District of
Jaro while 30% passes through Molo and Mandurriao. This is primarily because the most number of
public utility vehicles come from rural areas outside the city. There are 51,337 motor vehicles registered
in Iloilo City for 2010. The highest total number of Registered Motor Vehicles in Iloilo City is Utility
Vehicles composed primarily of jeepneys, tricycles and private cars respectively. Iloilos traffic con dition
is expected to be excessive due to insufficient road networks compared to the volume in the area.
There are presently seven (7) bus-and jeepney terminals in the city. Six are privately established and
operated while one is city-owned but privately-operated. These include the Mohon Terminal in Brgy.
Mohon, Arevalo, the Mandurriao Terminal in Brgy. Hibao-an, Mandurriao, San Pedro Terminal in Brgy.
San Pedro, Molo, Tagbak and Joroshelly Terminals in Brgy. Takbac, Jaro, Lapaz Terminal in Lapaz
and the Ungka Terminal in Brgy. Ungka, Jaro. Except for the Lapaz and the Molo terminals, all of the
five other terminals are situated at the perimeters and boundaries of the city as part of the initiative to
restrict the entrance of provincial busses and jeepneys into the citys narrow and congested internal
road network. The plan is to relocate these two terminals in their proper placement within the planning
period. Other transport terminals are shown in the Transport Terminals Map.
Table 2E-1: Total Number of Registered Motor Vehicles Iloilo City District Office CY 2010-2011
Deno/Class
Private
Government
For-Hire
Total
%
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011 Increase
Cars
8,229
8,452
27
26
876
886
9,132
9,364
2.54
SUVs
2,745
3,130
16
20
2,761
3,150 14.09
Utility Vehicles
18,925
18,609
500
487
5,565
5,638
24,990
24,734
-1.03
Buses
45
46
1
208
137
254
183 -38.80
Trucks
4,454
4,392
129
119
199
255
4,782
4,766
-0.33
Motorcycles/Tri
15,548
16,905
65
96
3,641
3,651
19,254
20,652
7.26
cylces
Trailers
150
147
1
1
13
13
164
161
1.86
Total
50,096
51,681
739
749
10,502
10,580
61,337
63,010
2.73
Source: LTO 6

Table 2E-2 Total Numbers Of Registered Tricycle And Trisikad CY 2011


Number
TRICYCLE
TRISIKAD
Jaro
215
556
Arevalo
107
388
Molo
0
183
Mandurriao
227
172
Lapaz
282
500
City proper
175
102
Total
1,006
1,901
DISTRICTS

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and Access)
[Type(E.aTransportation
quote
Table 2E-3: Total Number of Authorized Public Utility Jeepneys Intraroute, Iloilo City: 2011
Intraroute
No. of Authorized Units
of PUJ
Iloilo City Bo. Obrero
117
Iloilo City Calumpang Villa Beach
182
Iloilo City Calumpang
12
Iloilo City Jaro Cpu
514
Iloilo City Jaro Liko- Nfa
201
Iloilo City Jaro Liko TagbakTerminal
216
Iloilo City La Paz
1
Iloilo City- Lapaz La Granja
215
Iloilo City Lapaz Ticud Terminal
51
Iloilo City- Lapaz- Baldoza Terminal
1
Iloilo City La Puz
67
Iloilo City Mandurriao
3
Iloilo City Mandurriao Via Airport- Aquino Avenue
101
Iloilo City Mandurriao Hibao-An (Pavia) Via Tabucan
3
Iloilo City Leganes
52
Iloilo City- Mandurriao (Hibaoan) Via Tabucan-San Rafael
8
Iloilo City-Hibao-An Via Mandurriao
17
Iloilo City Jaro Liko
1
Iloilo City Mandurriao Hibao-An Via Tabucan
144
Iloilo City-Hibao-An-Pavia Via Mandurriao
27
Iloilo City Molo Via Baluarte
208
Iloilo City Molo Via City High
7
Iloilo City Molo Via Timawa
119
Iloilo City Molo- Timawa- 1 Compania Fundidor
72
Iloilo City Parola -Supermarket
31
Iloilo City Ungka Ui
6
Iloilo City- Ungka- (Itgsi)
100
Iloilo City- Ungka(Itgsi) Via Cpu
318
Iloilo City- Ungka Ui (Pavia)
27
Iloilo City- Ungka Ui (Pavia Terminal) Via Cpu
36
Iloilo City Villa (Arevalo)
320
Iloilo City- (Villa) Arevalo-MohonTerminal
68
Jaro Balagago Bito-On
26
Jaro Plaza Mandurriao
40
Jaro Plaza-Manduriao- Hibao-An Terminal
21
Sm City Arrastre Via City Proper
86
Ungka Pavia Terminal Aquino Avenue Tanza
13
Ungka (Itgsi)-Aquino Avenue-Tanza
33
Iloilo City- Leganes Via Aquino Avenue
296
Iloilo CityLeganes Lapaz
110
Iloilo City Oton- Derecho
100
Iloilo City Oton- Anhawan
152
Total
3,992
Source: LTFRB, Reg. 6, Iloilo City

Source: Permits and License Division, CMO, Iloilo City


City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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[Type(E.aTransportation
quote

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Average Daily
Traffic Map
SOURCE: CPDO Maps

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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quote

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

9. Iznart- Ledesma- Molo Road


10.Mandurriao-Pakiad Road
11.Lapaz- Jaro Road
12. Lapaz- Lapuz Road
13. Iloilo Capiz Road (New Route)
14. Iloilo Airport Direct Road
15. Iloilo Capiz Road (Old Route)
16. Lapaz- La Granja Road
17. North Marginal Wharf Road
18. Iloilo-Jaro Diversion Road
19. Airport Spur Road
20. Jaro Spur Road
21. Muelle Loney Marginal Wharf Road
22. J.M. Basa- Gen. Hughes-Fort San Pedro
23. De la Rama Street
24. Duran Street,Iloilo Cadre Road
25. Blumentritt Street
26. Arroyo Street
27. Molo by Pass Road
28. Arevalo by Pass Road
29. Iloilo City-Leganes-Dumangas Coastal Road
30. Iloilo City Flyover
TOTAL

Roads
As stated in the 2010 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile, 206,483 kilometers of concrete, asphalt, and
gravel roads facilitate land transport in Iloilo City, with 68.58 kilometers under national roads, and
151,903 kilometers city/barangay roads. Road networks in Iloilo City are made up of only radial roads,
all of which originates from the City Proper of Iloilo City. The City Government however has proposed
the Iloilo Circumferential Road (C1) to alleviate heavy traffic. The most efficient solution, however, is
proper traffic management.
Table 2E-4: Local City Roads by District, Type and Length 2010
Length of Road (in kms.)

District

Concrete
13.78
5.19
11.45
3.56
5.33
4.82
44.13

1.City Proper
2. Lapaz
3. Jaro
4. Mandurriao
5. Molo
6. Arevalo
Total

Asphalt
4.02
0.93
1.11
0.72
0.33
0.88
8.06

Total Length (in kms.)


2010
17.81
6.13
12.55
4.34
5.66
5.70
52.19

2011
18.16
6.74
18.50
8.49
6.53
16.03
74.45

Source: City Engineers Office, 2010

0.208

3.233
0.429
0.618
4.745
0.294
6.152
0.903
0.550
6.150
1.476
0.570
0.689
0.994
0.703
1.141
3.765
0.301
47.157

0.314
1.194
1.595
0.949
1.294
1.450
0.586
0.257
0.020
2.166
1.164
0.858
0.519
0.386
0.201
2.023
21.215

3.547
1.623
2.213
0.949
6.039
1.744
6.738
1.160
0.570
6.150
1.476
0.570
2.855
2.158
0.858
0.519
0.386
0.201
0.703
1.141
5.788
0.301
68.580

Source: City Engineers Office, 2011

District
1. Mandurriao
2. City Proper
3. Lapuz
4. Jaro
5. Molo
6. Arevalo
7. Lapaz
Total

Table 2E-5: Barangay Roads by District and Length (2010)


Length (KM)
Concrete
Gravel
28.228
12.497
11.093
25.318
20.073
5.145
6.45
5.75
0.70
27.990
26.715
1.275
8.703
4.668
4.23
5.30
5.30
14.937
9.447
3.215
116.926
84.45
24.518

Asphalt
4.638
0.10

0.05
2.275
7.958

Source: City Engineers Office, 2010

Table 2E-6: National Roads by Type and Length (2010)


Type of Road Construction
Name of Roads
Unpaved
Bitumin
Concrete
1. Iloilo Antique Road
10.519
2. Mandurriao- San Miguel Road
3.589
3. Mandurriao- Jaro Road
0.208
2.347
0.287
4. Oton-Pakiad-Mandurriao Road
0.110
5. Molo-Mandurriao Road
1.138
1.807
6.West Avenue Road
0.211
7. Mandurriao-Emergency Road
0.229
8. Mandurriao- Airport Road
0.446
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Most of the roads in Iloilo are narrow, which cause traffic congestion during rush hour on week days.
As stated in the 2010 Iloilo City Socio-economic Profile, a total of 200.483 kilometers of concrete,
asphalt, and gravel roads facilitate land transport in Iloilo City, with 68.58 kilometers under national
roads, and 131.903 kilometers city/barangay roads. The road network is made up of only radial roads,
all of which pioneered from the City Proper of Iloilo. Urbanized areas are linked with the City Proper by
radial roads that connect the said urbanized areas. To eradicate heavy traffic, the City Government of
Iloilo has proposed the Iloilo Circumferential Road (C1). According to the Department of Public Works
and Highways (DPWH), the following issues and challenges will remain without the improved road
networks:

Heavy traffic will take place on roads not only inside the Iloilo City but also within the radius of 10
km between Oton, Pavia, Leganes and Iloilo City

Oton-Santa Barbara Road and Leganes-Santa Barbara Road will attract heavy traffic ranging
from 12,000 to 15,000 pcu per day. Both roads will function as circumferential roads

Inside Iloilo City, all radial roads will exceed their traffic capacity, most of which have slight to no
possibility of widening.

Inside the Iloilo City Proper, most roads except four-lane divided roads, will exceed their capacity
and level of service will be aggravated to D, E or F. However, further widening of such roads is
extremely difficult.

Total
10.519
3.589
2.842
0.110
2.945
0.211
0.229
0.446

56

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)

Considering that road widening cannot be an option for most built-up areas in Iloilo City, traffic
management is the best solution. Incentives and penalties can be put in place to affect travel patterns
of people from Iloilo City and other towns of the province. Aside from having insufficient road networks,
the presence of illegal structures, proliferation of permanent and temporary road obstruction and
inadequate road signs adds to downbeat effect of Iloilos traffic condition.

C-2
-

Examples include traffic congestion charging, incentives for carpooling and cycling. Furthermore, a
park and ride system can be effective as proven by the jeepney terminals already in place in key points
of entry of the city. Cars from outside the city can park at those terminals and the drivers/passengers
can take special buses to enter the city.

To provide direct linkage between the following town propers- San Miguel-PaviaLeganes or Oton-Pavia-Leganes
To distribute radial road traffic to its optimum route for access to a destination and
also to avoid unnecessary traffic to pass though Iloilo City, particularly new airport
related traffic
To provide easy access to industrial zone in Pavia and to enhance international
and domestic investment.

C-3
Basic Needs for Road Network Improvement Plan in Iloilo City
Source: Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)
Basic Concepts for development of road network configuration were established as follows:
Inside the City Proper area and its adjacent areas

Traffic management measures other than road development are recommended. These
include:
- Control of further development. Urbanization should target outside this area.
- Efficient traffic Management
- Modal shift from jeepney to bus
Outside the City Proper area and its adjacent areas
- A radial and circumferential road network is to be formed.
- Existing inter-city roads for widening and further improvement:
R-1: Iloilo-Antique Road (Iloilo-Oton-Tigbauan Section)
R-2: Iloilo-San Miguel Road (Molo-Mandurriao-San Miguel Section)
R-3: Iloilo-Roxas Road (City Proper-Jaro-City Boundary Section, Pavia Section,
Santa Barbara Section, Santa Barbara Bypass Section, Cabatuan Section,
Janiuay Section)
R-4: Iloilo Coastal Road (Iloilo Junction-Roxas Road)
R-5: Iloilo Coastal Road (Iloilo River Bridge-International Port Access Road SectionStudy Area Boundary Section)
- In due consideration of distribution of municipal urban centers or town proper, a
circumferential road is planned at the following radius from Iloilo City Proper:
C-1:
C-2:
C-3:
C-4:

about 5 kilometers (or Iloilo City boundary)


about 10 km.
about 15 km.
between 20 to 25 kilometers

Major functions of Circumferential and radial road


C- 1
-

To guide planned and urban development


To distribute radial road traffic to its optimum route for access to a destination and
also to avoid unnecessary traffic to pass through Iloilo City urbanized areas.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

To provide direct linkage between the following town propers-San Miguel, Santa
Barbara, and Zarraga

To provide direct linkage between the town propers of Tigbauan and New Lucena.

C-4

Bridges
Based on the 2011 annual report of the City Engineers Office a total of fourteen (14) local city brid ges
were listed. Of these eight (8) are concrete bridges and six (6) are of wooden construction. The
bridges widths vary from 1.20 meters in width (as the case for wooden bridges) to 8.90 meters (as the
case for concrete bridges). The length varies from 23.00 meters of wooden bridges to 180 meters of
concrete bridges. The smallest bridge constructed by the city is found at Brgy. Habog-habog which is
a 1.90m. x 26.70 m. wooden bridge that crosses the Batiano River in Molo and which only serves
pedestrians, bicycles, motorcycles and tri-sikads. The biggest bridge constructed by the city is a 8.90
m. x 137.00 m. concrete bridge found in Brgy. Rizal crossing the Iloilo River.
Table 2E-7: Local City Bridges by Type, Width and Length
Name of Bridges
Concrete Bridges
1. Compania Central Bridge
2. Drilon- Rizal Bridge
3. Batiano (Yulo, Arevalo)
4. Batiano (Sta. Cruz, Arevalo)
5. Batiano (Molo Boulevard)
6. Rizal Lapuz
Wooden Bridges
7. Jalandoni- Nabitasan
8. Ticud - Lapaz
9. West Habog-Habog
10. Banga Bianing
11. Sambag Zone IV
12. Ungka II
13. San Isidro Bridge
14. Sta. Rosa Bridge

Types of Bridges

Width (L.M.)

concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete

8.60
8.90
8.50
8.70
8.80
7.50

concrete
concrete
wooden
wooden
wooden
wooden
wooden
wooden

8.70
8.70
1.90
2.50
2.00
1.20
3.10
3.00

Length (L.M.)
550.10
30.10
137.00
38.20
38.10
25.00
20.80
224.40
180.00
80.90
26.70
26.00
24.20
65.00
59.30
23.20

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 1 Brief Profile)
Source: City Engineers Office, 2011

recognized as Class 1 by the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines. The airport complex consists of
a Class A Passenger Terminal Building with a pre-departure terminal, arrival terminal and cargo
terminal, Class A control tower, Class A sewerage treatment plant, and Class A fireshed.

Table 2E-8: National Bridges by Type and Length


Name of Bridges
1. Calajunan Bridge
2. Buntatala Bridge
3. Montinola Bridge
4. Forbes Bridge
5. Iloilo Bridge
6. Dungon Bridge 4
7. Dungon Bridge 3
8. Dungon Bridge 2
9. Dungon Bridge 1
10. Carpenters Bridge
11. Dungon Bridge 5
12. Dungon Bridge
13. Quirino-Lopez Bridge
14. Jaro Bridge
15. Iloilo City Flyover
16.Ticud Bridge
17. Bitoon Bridge
TOTAL

Types of Bridges
Concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
concrete
steel
concrete
concrete

Length (L.M.)
18.00
19.40
89.00
127.23
147.00
41.50
18.55
26.50
26.19
114.80
27.11
33.02
109.64
99.48
237.28
71.00
81.60
1,287.30

Source: City Engineers Office, 2011

The Panay Railway is the first railway system in the Philippines. It is a 117- kilometer railway transit
from Iloilo City to Roxas City, Capiz. Towards the end of the 1980s the railways started to become a
less efficient mode of land transportation in the island and the improvement of roads and busses
started to win the travellers patronage. It is al so believed that lack of adequate funds for its
maintenance as well as the preference for private cars since the Post-War Period pushed the Panay
Railway to stop its operation. Today, the site where the tracks of Panay Railway once laid are now
barangay roads that serve many of the citys reside ntial neighborhoods.
Although there is now a plan by the national government to revive the railway system to now serve a
Roxas City-Caticlan route, its implementation is still not certain. Should such plan be pushed through
however, the city looks at the citys direct access ibility to the Iloilo International Airport in Cabatuan
through the Municipality of Pavia as a priority.

On November 8, 2012 the airport will finally operate as an international airport with the first international
flights to and from Singapore and Hongkong. Regular flights will soon be an addition to the many daily
flights that the airport is currently serving.
Sea Transport
Iloilo City has a third largest port in the country after Manila and Cebu. Its ports serve as a facility to
transport goods and passengers in and out of Iloilo City and Panay Island. The fine natural harbor has
three entry points, one of which was utilized for international and domestic cargo operations and other
two are used for inter-island cargo and passenger operations. There is the Iloilo River Wharf which has
a total length of 2 kilometers winding through the heart of the city, Fort San Pedro Port (former Old
Foreign Pier) consisting of a 634-meters quay with a domestic passengers terminal, and Iloilo
Commercial Port Complex with a 22.20 hectares land area and 526-meters quay catering an average
of three (3) foreign vessels per month and two (2) domestic vessels per day.
Access to Guimaras Island by way of wooden pumpboats (outtriggers) is through two other smaller
wharves in Brgy. Ortiz and Parola in Brgy. Concepcion in the District of the City Proper. Through the
Cities Development Initiatives for Asia (CDIA) Program initiated by the ADB and GTZ, a pre-feasibility
study was conducted to prepare the rehabilitation of the Parola Port through a PPP arrangement. The
DOTC has now also allocated funds for the separate redevelopment of a portion of the port, the public
park facing the Guimaras Strait. This port serves travellers and cargoes going to the port of Buenavista
in Guimaras. The Ortiz Wharf on the other hand is a less-invested facility that is equally in need of
immediate rehabilitation. This wharf is being used for the transfer of goods and passengers to and
from the port of Jordan in Guimaras. This particular wharf is inoperable during the Habagat season
when huge waves prevent safe take-offs from this wharf. During such periods, travellers use the Parola
Port instead where its safer location at the mouth of the Iloilo River make passenger embarkments and
departures of wooden pumpboats relatively safer.

The PPAs current development program includes the transfer of the Iloilo River Wharf from its present
location along Muelle Loney at the City Proper to the opposite side of Iloilo River in Brgy. Progreso,
Lapuz,Lapaz District. Not far away from this new site, a new Roll-On, Roll-Off Terminal shall also be
constructed to expand the citys accessibility.
The Office of Congressman Jerry P. Treas meanwhileis sponsoring bills for the following local roads
to be converted to national roads which transfers the maintenance obligations of such roads to the
national government where funds are better allocated. Table 2E-9 below lists down these roads.

2. External Access
Air Transport
The Iloilo Airport in Mandurriao, Iloilo City became unable to support the increasing passenger and
cargo requirements for the locality. The national government built the New Iloilo International Airport in
Barangay Duyan-Duyan Cabatuan which is 20 to 30 minutes away from Iloilo City. It is classified as the
fourth busiest airport in the country in terms of its passenger and cargo traffic, after the top three
International Airports-Ninoy Aquino International Airport, Mactan-Cebu International Airport and Davao
International Airport. The New Iloilo International Airport was built in International Standards and was
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

House Bill
HB 03211
HB03212
HB03213
HB03214
HB03215

Table 2E-9: Conversion of City Roads to National Roads


Title of Project
An act converting Rizal street in Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting San Rafael road to Tabucan road in Mandurriao, Iloilo City into a national road and
appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Timawa Avenue in Molo, Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Jereos street in Lapaz,Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Cubay road to Balabago road in Jaro, iIoilo City into a national, road and appropriating

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HB03216
HB03217
HB03245
HB03246
HB03247
HB03296
HB03297
HB03298
HB03347
HB03348
HB03414
HB5346
HB 5347
HB5348
HB 5349
HB 5350
HB 5351
HB 5352
HB 5353
HB 5354
HB 5355

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment


and Access)
[Type(E.aTransportation
quote

funds therefor
An act converting Sto. Rosario-Duran road in Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds
therefor
An act converting Delgado road in Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Jalandoni street in Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Tacas road from Quintin Salas to Pavia boundary in Iloilo City into a national road and
appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Molo Boulevard in Molo, IIoilo City into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Rizal street in Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting the Lapaz Deep Sea Water Port road (Loboc to PPA) in Iloilo City into a national road
and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting the Yulo Drive in Arevalo district, Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds
therefor
An act converting Arevalo So-oc Mandurriao road (Gloryville to So-oc) in Iloilo City into a national road and
appropriating funds therefor
An act converting the Bonifacio drive in Arevalo, Iloilo City into a national road and appropriating funds
therefor
An act converting the road from Carpenters bridge to diversion road and from Jalandoni bridge to Forbes
bridge known as Efrain b. Treas boulevard into a national road and appropriating funds therefor
An act converting Mabini street into a national road
An act converting Arguelles street into a national road
An act converting Iznart street to Rizal street into a national road
An act converting Fuentes street into a national road
An act converting converting General Luna to Ledesma road (Jalandoni street) into a national road
An act converting Democracia street into a national road
An act converting Loboc to la Garanja road (barangay Baldoza) into a national road
An act converting Valeria street into a national road
An act converting Cuartero street into a national road
An act converting Quezon street into a national road

Source: Office of Congressman Jerry P. Treas

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage
1. Environment and Natural Resources
The City is gifted with a long coastline, ports, harbors, and rivers. To develop these resources, the
informal settlers should be relocated from the buffer zone, the coastline and rivers rehabilitated for
tourism, and the ports and harbors improved for international services and standards. Preserved
district plazas, improved city conditions, self-supported agricultural and aquamarine products,
improved traffic condition, and reduced disaster vulnerability are also seen as development potentials.
Strategies recommended by the workshop participants include the rehabilitation of Iloilo River, strict
implementation of easements and building ordinances, retaining of remaining agricultural areas and
industrial fishponds, and provision of adequate agricultural services like irrigation, post harvest
facilities, storage and food terminals. Other recommended strategies include the construction of radial
or circumferential roads, revival of the railway system, development of roads, bridges and sidewalks,
establishment of traffic signals, signages and road markings throughout the city, establishment of
economic zones and a free-port, and provision of comprehensive drainage system are added to the
strategies.
A pollution-free Iloilo City is also a positive point raised including a clean, flood-free, green, diseasefree and safe city. Water resources of Guimaras Island can be tapped to supply Iloilo City. Good
quality roads and the completion of flood control projects, enhancement of green spaces, practice of
urban agriculture, and proper solid and liquid waste management will also pose a good image for the
City. In line with these potentials, effective education and advocacy on sustainable development,
proper coordination of government officials and the water management board, massive EIC, strict
compliance of the Clean Air Act and of land transportation regulations and imposition of polluters fee
to individuals and establishments are recommended as strategies. Lastly but certainly not the least, the
concern for a reduced risks from natural and man-made disasters also became an important priority.
This and the issue on the citys need for climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies were also
raised. Because of the limited data and information at hand, it was suggested that a more in-depth risk
analysis should be conducted. It was also suggested that a review of concerned agencies existing and
emerging literature, studies, baseline information and available maps on the matter should also be
pursued. Subsequent to this, a more comprehensive and strategic plan on city-wide disaster
management should then be prepared.

2. Government, Laws and Governance


A proactive local government that demonstrates transparency, efficiency, participation and gendersensitivity is seen as a potential for Iloilo City. With an efficient and transparent local government, there
will be less red tape, speedy transactions, accessibility, updated information system, honest and
committed governance, effective government and private partnership, and good evaluation by national
and international bodies. Strategies identified are the strict implementation of laws and ordinances,
stronger political will, demolition of political dynasties, reorientation of values, and the computerization
of transactions.

3. Infrastructure and Utilities


Potentials identified for infrastructure and utilities are the completed flood control project, abundant
water supply, and an efficient transportation network.

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage)

roads, all of which originates from the City Proper of Iloilo City. The City Government has also
proposed the Iloilo Circumferential Road (C1) to further alleviate traffic congestion.
There is presently the new Iloilo International Airport in Barangay Duyan-Duyan Cabatuan which is 20
to 30 minutes away from Iloilo City. It is classified as the fourth busiest airport in the country in terms of
its passenger and cargo traffic, after the top three International Airports-Ninoy Aquino International
Airport, Mactan-Cebu International Airport and Davao International Airport. The New Iloilo International
Airport was built with International Standards and was recognized as Class 1 by the Civil Aviation
Authority of the Philippines. The airport complex consists of a Class A Passenger Terminal Building
with a pre-departure terminal, arrival terminal and cargo terminal, Class A control tower, Class A
sewerage treatment plant, and Class A fireshed. The airport will fly its first international flight on
November 8, 2012.
Iloilo City has the third largest port in the country after Manila and Cebu. Its ports serve as a facility to
transport goods and passengers in and out of Iloilo City and Panay Island. The fine natural harbor has
three entry points, one of which was utilized for international and domestic cargo operations and other
two are used for inter-island cargo and passenger operations. There is the Iloilo River Wharf which has
a total length of 2 kilometers winding through the heart of the city, Fort San Pedro Port (former Old
Foreign Pier) consisting of a 634-meters quay with a domestic passengers terminal, and Iloilo
Commercial Port Complex with a 22.20 hectares land area and 526-meters quay catering an average
of three (3) foreign vessels per month and two (2) domestic vessels per day.
The existing water source can be reinforced with an integrated water supply and distribution systems.
On the other hand, identified strategies to increase power sources are the construction of a 162
megawatt coal-fired power plant and tapping alternative sources such as solar energy.
Telecommunication facilities are also abundant in the city. Internet cafes are adequately distributed at
all districts of the city with some offering 24 hour services.

4. Social Sector
Identified potentials for the Citys social sector are:
a) For housing, the creation of a city housing office and provision of a relocation site for informal
settlers.
b) For safety and security, low criminal rates and disciplined and law-abiding citizens.
c) Iloilo City as the center of excellence for education, culture and sports.
These can be achieved by:
a) Institutionalizing the ICUPAO as the permanent housing office, land banking and
implementing RA9729 which mandates barangays to control squatter proliferation.
b) Values reorientation, livelihood and functional education and gender and development
advocacy programs.
c) Affordable dormitories and provision of instructional facilities such as laboratories.
Iloilo City, the Queen City of the South, has been blessed with numerous historic sites and structures.
Heritage areas serve as linkage to the flourishing culture and history of Iloilo City. Heritage areas are
part of what makes Iloilo City unique among many other cities found in the Philippines.

As stated in the 2007 Iloilo City Socio-Economic Profile, 209.81 kilometers of concrete, asphalt, and
gravel roads facilitate land transport in Iloilo City. Road networks in Iloilo City are made up of only radial
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Iloilo City towards the push for preservation and protection of heritage areas has enumerated heritage
conservation buildings along J.M. Basa Street and Iznart Street. Heritage areas in Iloilo City are
situated in the City Proper wherein it totals to 26 heritage buildings.
Cultural and heritage tourism can also be one of the major economic generators of the province. The
heritage areas identified in Iloilo are not just there to represent the culture and history of Iloilo City but
are also expressions of human creativity and impressive artistic achievements even before present
development and modernization.

5. Economic Sector
Iloilo City is one of the countrys major economic powerhouses. The city is complete with port facilities,
an advanced telecommunications, infrastructure, retail and trading, business process outsourcing, a
robust banking and financial sector. The Philippine Standard Industrial Classification categorizes the
economy from primary (production economies: agriculture, fisheries and livestock), secondary
(extractive and manufacturing economies: mining construction and product industries), and tertiary
economy which is composed of less tangible outputs such as customer service, manual labor and
consulting. Wholesale and retail industry topped all business classifications from the years 1990,1995,
1996 and 1997.
Iloilo City is not just the center for agricultural products of Iloilo Province and Panay Island but also the
center for seafood trade in the Western Visayas Region. Commercial fishing has revealed a greater
yield when it comes to production.
May is the month with the highest volume of unloaded and auctioned fish at 2,645,510 kilograms, while
November becomes the slowest month with 1,578,990 kilograms of unloaded and auctioned fish. Iloilo
Citys seafood exports lead to about 60% of the countrys total seafood exports.

Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage)

festivals in Iloilo is the Paraw Regatta, which showcases a race of colorful outrigger boats in the Iloilo
Strait.
Iloilo City is also known for its various restaurants and specialty cuisine; hence it has a great potential
for gastronomic tourism. Native delicacies such as the La Paz batchoy, Molo soup, pinasugba, chicken
binacol, chicken inasal and pastries such as biscocho, barquillos, baadas, broas, galletas, hojaldres,
rosquillos are very common in Iloilo City. Aside from native delicacies, Iloilo City takes pride in its many
specialty handicrafts such as bamboo crafts, native wood crafts, sinamay weaving and pottery-making
in Hibao-an. These products are cultural symbols that exemplify the skills passed down from many
generations and are currently in the threat of being lost.
Potentials identified for the economic sector are:
a)
b)
c)
d)

An LGU investment promotion program


High employment and entrepreneurship
Self-production of renewable power
Low cost of doing business

These can be attained with strategies such as:


a) Upgrading the local investment ordinance and partnering with financial institutions to
facilitate investors
b) Establishing science and technology parks and IT business parks, and strict implementation
of labor laws
c) Encouraging investment with affordable rates for electricity, water, rent and human
resources.

The services sector is the predominating type of industry in Iloilo City in terms of quantity and
capitalization. This is reflected on the number of employed persons by industry type in 2002, which is
more than double the number of workers in agriculture and industry (manufacturing). Statistics from
April 2003 of the National Statistic Office (NSO) reveals that 82% of the labor force is engaged in the
service sector, while 14% for industry, and 4% for agriculture. This shows that the service sector is the
industry type that employs the highest number of workers. In 2003, Iloilo Citys labor force participation
rate (LFPR) was registered at 66%, which means that 66% of the population is within the age range
and capacity to work. The labor participation rate of Iloilo City however, is less than the national
average by approximately 8.1%.
Heritage and cultural tourism is the citys unique selling point as centuries-old structures such as
churches, cathedrals, buildings, and homes with varying architectural designs, degrees of antiquity, and
historical significance made its mark as the citys best tourist attractions. Foreign tourists visit Iloilo the
most during January as well at 6,989 visitors. Both domestic and international tourists generate about
more than Php 7 billion in tourist receipts. Iloilo City has adequate tourism infrastructure to
accommodate tourists. There are 16 accredited hotels, one pension house, one inn, one resort, and 20
other accommodation types.
Peak visitation by domestic tourists is during January likely due to the time of the Dinagyang Festival at
32,810 visitors. The popular Dinagyang Festival, which is celebrated every fourth weekend of January,
is held with street dances and parades in honor of the Seor Santo Nio. Held every 2nd of February,
the Feast of Our Lady of Candles is one of the largest religious festivals in Western Visayas. It
showcases cock derbies, carnivals, garden shows, and agro-industrial exhibits. Also unique among the

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Competitive
Advantage and
Development
Potentials

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Competitive
Advantage and
Development
Potentials

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage)

Republic of the
Philippines
Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Location of Public
Plazas and
Adjacent Areas

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

400 M Radius
Walkability Analysis
of Public Plazas

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 2: The Planning Environment (J. Comparative/Competitive Advantage)

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Connectivity of
District Plazas

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 3: Development Issues and Concerns

5. Jaro

Chapter 3: Development Issues and Concerns


The identification of weaknesses, priority development issues and concerns were made through
consultation with the various city departments, barangay officials, civil society, NGOs, NGAs and other
public and private sector work partners. These were facilitated through Workshop 3 of the Palafox
Associates-initiated consultation and the 2011-2020 CLUP Public Hearing in August 5, 2011.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

lack of commercial districts


lack of attractions or tourism destinations
insufficient road network
insufficient flood control structures
absence of a sewer system

6. Lapaz

A. Weaknesses
1. City Proper
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.

narrow roads
insufficient road networks
lack of places to reside
obsolete drainage system
lack of parks and open spaces
lack of pedestrian networks
lack of parking areas
absence of a sewer system

2. Molo
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.

informal settlers
no defined commercial districts
lack of tourist destinations and attractions
poor solid waste management
inadequate drainage system
insufficient road network
lack of parks and open spaces
shortage of water supply
absence of a sewer system

3. Arevalo
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.

informal settlers
lack of defined commercial districts
undeveloped tourist destinations and attractions
insufficient solid waste management collection
inadequate drainage system
undeveloped road network
lack of parks and open spaces
absence of a sewer system

4. Mandurriao
a. presence of Calajunan Dumpsite
b. traffic congestion especially during rush hours
c. absence of a sewer system

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

a.
b.
c.
d.

pollution
lack of business establishments in the middle portion of the district
presence of oil depot
absence of a sewer system

B. Development Issues and Concerns


The weaknesses, priority issues and concerns were identified by the city stakeholders during the
conduct of Workshop 3: Identification of Problems, Issues and Challenges that was facilitated by the
Palafox Associates. The citys most pressing issues include the sectors on Economic Development,
Social Development, Infrastructure and Utilities, Environmental Management and Governance and
Administration that affect the urban growth and development of the City at present.
Foremost of the Economic Development challenges in the city is on commerce, trade and industry,
which are currently affected by the interplay of high production costs and market prices. Stakeholders
also see the need to revitalize the downtown cores dwindling economy. The establishment of the
midtown and uptown Central Business Districts in Mandurriao and Jaro respectively are seen as most
welcome growth initiatives that will help decongest the old city center and open up new growth areas
that will consequently expand economic productivity toward the city fringes. Symbiosis between the
two CBDs on business complementation is further seen to benefit the city when PEZA Zones (like the
54 hectare Megaworld property) or Tourism Investment Economic Zone Areas shall have also been
introduced.
Infrastructure and utilities also contribute much to the citys Economic Development challenges and is
presented here not as a separate sector but as an allied concern of the Economic Development sector.
Unreliable and high electrical power rates, inadequacy and quality of roads, bridges, potable water and
drainage/sewer system appear to be a priority for the city government and its national government and
private sector partners. Developing a power generating plant through the Built-Operate-Transfer (BOT)
scheme and similarly establishing renewable power sources are the initial solutions to the felt issue on
electricity. Inadequacy of good roads and bridges that help decongest traffic and avoid delays in travel
time and movement of goods and services were also identified as key issues.
Also mentioned was the special concern on the inadequacy and poor quality of potable water that is
currently being distributed by the Metro Iloilo Water District. Another key issue on Infrastructure is the
citys old drainage system, which is currently seen as incapable of handling the increased volumes of
stormwater and surface water run-off from the citys paved streets and built-up areas. Its combined
service as sewerage further contributes to other adverse results. The absence of a separate sewer
line is an urgent need of the city as well.
Foremost of the environmental issues discussed by the stakeholders were the poor state of the citys
natural resources such as the Iloilo and Batiano Rivers, the rest of the citys waterbodies mangroves
and groundwater whose extraction should be regulated The stakeholders agreed that there is a need
for the city to establish a treatment system for wastewater discharges from domestic, commercial,

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institutional and industrial establishments which eventually find their way to the citys waterbodies.
Many believed that treated wastewater could be recycled or reused. DENR suggested that as one of
its long-term development strategies, the city should incorporate sewerage treatment in its
comprehensive drainage master plan or a separate plan. For a short term strategy the city can opt for
a septage management program which the Clean Water Act is prescribing LGUs to undertake.

c.
d.
e.
f.

Chapter 3: Development Issues and Concerns

depleting mangrove forest


high volume of garbage and the need to establish a sanitary landfill
poor quality of groundwater
absence of sewerage and need for a septage management program

3. Social Development
A major challenge identified was the occurrence of natural calamities that destroy millions worth of
structures, vegetation and crops, and threaten the safety of citizens. This was evident during the last
major calamity, Typhoon Frank which was said to have been caused by illegal logging and
deforestation. The citys vulnerability to other disasters and climate change, high volumes of garbage
and the lack of sewerage and wastewater treatment systems were also similarly discussed.
The key Social Development issue that was identified was on housing, particularly on the aspect of the
inadequacy of land for settlements. Stakeholders said that there is a problem on the poor
implementation of the city shelter plan and other local housing development programs, which are now
being undertaken in partnership with the national government. Special concerns for the relocation of
informal settlers along danger zones, the need for quality relocation sites, rapid in-migration, and
issues of unemployment and rising criminality were also identified.
Governance and Administration issues were focused on the need to complete the new city hall inorder
for the city bureaucracy to better undertake its mandated functions and services which include
development planning, tax collection and revenue generation, policy formulation, fiscal management
and services delivery. There was also a special concern on the need to improve barangay facilities.

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.

inadequacy of land for housing and settlements


informal settlers along danger zones and idle lands
poor quality of socialized housing sites
inadequacy of facilities for health, nutrition, public safety and protection and other social
welfare needs
inadequacy of classrooms and school facilities
unemployment
rising criminality, drug and substance abuse
gradual loss of heritage structures, landmarks
lack of parks and open spaces for leisure, recreation and sports

4. Governance and Administration


a.
b.

completion of the New City Hall


poor quality and inadequacy of barangay governance facilities

Shor-term, medium-term and long-term strategies on these issues and concerns were identified and
are reflected in Chapter 11 of this Plan.
The following priority issues and concerns were identified and grouped in accordance with the
following development sectors:

1. Economic Development
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

lack of PEZA zones and other special economic zones


lack of facilities for urban agriculture and fisheries
poor quality of tourism support facilities and amenities
poor layout of commercial areas at city districts
congestion at the downtown core
uncontrolled development at the district centers and urban fringes
inadequacy and poor quality of infrastructure and utilities

brown outs and expensive power costs


inadequate and poor quality of potable water (including inefficient non-revenue water)
poor quality of roads and bridges
poor drainage system
poor transport facilities
poor quality of pedestrian walkways
inadequate flood control structures

2. Environmental Management
a.
b.

poor state of the Iloilo-Batiano River and other waterbodies


vulnerability to disasters and climate change

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

A. Proposed Land Use and Zoning


1. Residential Zone
City Proper

retantion of the existing area for the residential land zone


adoption of a mixed use development for residential areas
adaptive reuse of heritage buildings along the Downtown Heritage Zone for residential housing
site upgrading of residential areas at the waterfront (along Muelle Loney and City Proper
Coastline) and the surrounding environs of the Central Business District
ensuring a good residential land use mix through the enforcement of the zoning ordinance
provision on the provision of dwelling units equivalent to thirty (30) percent of the commercial
floor area at commercial-mixed use zones such as but not limited to the Downtown CBD
seeking presidential proclamations or city and national government interventions for on-site
development of government idle lands currently occupied by informal settlers
seeking city or national government interventions for the relocation of informal settlers along
the City Proper Coastline, Iloilo River and other danger zones to socialized or relocation sites
allocation of available land for low cost or medium rise housing for the urban poor such as the
Central Bank site fronting Fort San Pedro
allocation of land for transit-oriented facilities proximate to residential zones
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas through the treatment
of wastewater from high rise, high density residential buildings and dense residential
subdivisions before being discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo River and the City
Proper Coastline through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants
(WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas also by establishing
where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for all high rise
residential establishments and even medium to high end subdivisions

reduction of residential lands around the Molo Plaza Complex and along major roads to give
way to commercial and institutional uses
adoption of a mixed use development for residential areas
safeguarding the residential areas by the retention of fishponds and saltbeds at the
Mandurriao SAFDZ as catchment areas for flooding and overflow of Iloilo River
intensification of residential land by upgrading Medium-Density Residential (R-2) Zones
between Avancea Street and Molo-Arevalo Boulevard into High-Density Residential Zones
ensuring a good residential land use mix through the enforcement of the zoning ordinance
provision on the provision of dwelling units equivalent to thirty (30) percent of the commercial
floor area at commercial-mixed use zones such as at the Molo Plaza Complex and along
major roads
seeking presidential proclamations or city and national government interventions for on-site
development of government idle lands currently occupied by informal settlers

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

seeking city or national government interventions for the relocation of informal settlers along
the City Proper Coastline, Iloilo-Batiano River and other danger zones to socialized or
relocation sites
improvement of existing site development program areas, socialized housing sites, urban poor
relocation sites and other similar housing sites through city and national government
intervention programs
allocation of available land for low cost or medium rise housing for the urban poor such as the
city government lot at Brgy. San Pedro
allocation of land for transit-oriented facilities proximate to residential zones
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas through the treatment
of wastewater from high rise, high density residential buildings and dense residential
subdivisions before being discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo-Batiano River and the
Molo Coastline through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP)
and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas also by establishing
where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for all high rise
residential establishments and even medium to high end subdivisions
ensuring good quality residential subdivision development through careful technical review
and approval system by the city government in adherence to existing subdivision laws and
regulations

Arevalo

Molo

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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

reduction of residential lands around the Arevalo Plaza Complex and along the Osmea
Street, Crispino Melocoton Avenue, and Along Molo-Arevalo Boulevard to give way for
commercial and institutional development
adoption of a mixed use development of residential areas
upgrading of Medium-Density Residential(R-2) Zones located south of Osmea Strreet,
Crispino Melocoton Avenue, east of Guanco Street, north of Molo-Arevalo Boulevard and west
of the Molo-Arevalo boundary into High-Density Residential Zones
retention of fishponds and saltbeds at the Mandurriao SAFDZ as catchment areas that can
safeguard residential areas against flooding and overflow of the Iloilo River
ensuring a good residential land use mix through the enforcement of the zoning ordinance
provision on the provision of dwelling units equivalent to thirty (30) percent of the commercial
floor area at commercial-mixed use zones such as at the Arevalo Plaza Complex and along
major roads
seeking presidential proclamations or city and national government interventions for on-site
development of government idle lands currently occupied by informal settlers
seeking city or national government interventions for the relocation of informal settlers along
the City Proper Coastline, Iloilo-Batiano River and other danger zones to socialized or
relocation sites
improvement of existing site development program areas, socialized housing sites, urban poor
relocation sites and other similar housing sites through city and national government
intervention programs
allocation of available land for low cost or medium rise housing for the urban poor
allocation of land for transit-oriented facilities proximate to residential zones and where
existing, improve transport terminal facilities through strict city government regulation
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas through the treatment
of wastewater from high rise or high density residential buildings and dense residential
subdivisions before being discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo-Batiano River and the

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Villa Beach through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and
systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas also by establishing
where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for all high rise
or high density residential areas and even medium to high end subdivisions
ensuring good quality residential subdivision development through careful technical review
and approval system by the city government in adherence to existing subdivision laws and
regulations

Jaro

Mandurriao

reduction of residential lands around the Mandurriao Plaza Complex and along GuzmanJesena Street, Taft North, and R. Mapa to give way to commercial and institutional
development
intensification of Medium-Density Residential Zones at the triangular residential land area
located south of Taft Street and northeast of R. Mapa Street by its upgrading into a HighDensity Residential (R-3) Zone
adoption of a mixed use development of residential areas
safeguarding neighboring residential areas against flooding and overflow of the Iloilo River and
Calajunan Creek by the retention of fishponds and saltbeds at the Mandurriao SAFDZ as
catchment areas
ensuring a good residential land use mix through the enforcement of the zoning ordinance
provision on the provision of dwelling units equivalent to thirty (30) percent of the commercial
floor area at commercial-mixed use zones such as at the Mandurriao Plaza Complex and
along major roads
seeking presidential proclamations or city and national government interventions for on-site
development of government idle lands currently occupied by informal settlers
seeking city or national government interventions for the relocation of informal settlers along
the Iloilo River, Calajunan Creek, Dungon Creek and other danger zones to socialized or
relocation sites
improvement of existing site development program areas, socialized housing sites, urban poor
relocation sites and other similar housing sites through city and national government
intervention programs
allocation of available land for low cost or medium rise housing for the urban poor
allocation of land for transit-oriented facilities proximate to residential zones and where
existing, improve transport terminal facilities through strict city government regulation
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas through the treatment
of wastewater from high rise or high-density residential buildings and dense residential
subdivisions before being discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo River and the
Calajunan Creek through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants
(WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas also by establishing
where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for all high rise
or high density residential areas and even medium to high end subdivisions
ensuring good quality residential subdivision development through careful technical review
and approval system by the city government in adherence to existing subdivision laws and
regulations

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

reduction of residential lands especially at around the Jaro Plaza Complex and along major
roads to give way to commercial and institutional developments
Low-Density Residential (R-1) Zones will be retained but will no longer be expanded
adoption of a mixed use development of residential areas except at R-1 zone
conversion or reclassification of agricultural lands into residential purposes shall be carefully
undertaken in close coordination with the DAR, DA, NIA and other concerned local and
national government agencies and offices
ensuring a good residential land use mix through the enforcement of the zoning ordinance
provision on the provision of dwelling units equivalent to thirty (30) percent of the commercial
floor area at commercial-mixed use zones such as at the Jaro Plaza Complex and along major
roads
requesting the passage of presidential proclamation or implementation of city and national
government interventions for on-site development of government idle lands currently occupied
by informal settlers
implementation of city or national government programs for the relocation of informal settlers
along the Jaro River, Dungon Creek and other danger zones to socialized or relocation sites
improvement of existing site development program areas, socialized housing sites, urban poor
relocation sites and other similar housing sites through city and national government
intervention programs
allocation of available land for low cost or medium rise housing for the urban poor
allocation of land for transit-oriented facilities proximate to residential zones and where
existing, improve transport terminal facilities through strict city government regulation
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas through the treatment
of wastewater from high rise or high density residential buildings and dense residential
subdivisions before being discharged into such waterbodies as the Jaro River, Buntatala
River, Dungon Creek, Ingore Creek and the Iloilo Strait through DENR-accredited and
monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas also by establishing
where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for all high rise
or high density residential areas and even medium to high end subdivisions
providing for good quality residential subdivision development through careful technical review
and approval system by the city government in adherence to existing subdivision laws and
regulations

La Paz

reduction of residential lands around the Lapaz Plaza Complex and along major roads to give
way to commercial and institutional development
retention of low density residential (R-1) zone
adoption of a mixed use development at residential areas except at R-1 zones
adoption of a good residential land use mix through the enforcement of the zoning ordinance
provision on the provision of dwelling units equivalent to thirty (30) percent of the commercial
floor area at commercial-mixed use zones such as at the Lapaz Plaza Complex and along
major roads
facilitating for the passage of presidential proclamation or implementation of city and national
government interventions for on-site development of government idle lands currently occupied
by informal settlers

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adoption of city or national government programs for the relocation of informal settlers along
the Jaro River, Rizal Creek, Mansaya Creek, Ingore Creek, Iloilo Strait and other danger zones
to socialized or relocation sites
improvement of existing site development program areas, socialized housing sites, urban poor
relocation sites and other similar housing sites through city and national government
intervention programs
allocation of available land for low cost or medium rise housing for the urban poor
allocation of land for transit-oriented facilities proximate to residential zones and where
existing, improve transport terminal facilities through strict city government regulation
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas through the treatment
of wastewater from high rise or high density residential buildings and dense residential
subdivisions before being discharged into such waterbodies as the Jaro River, Rizal Creek,
Dungon Creek, Mansaya Creek, Ingore Creek and the Iloilo Strait through DENR-accredited
and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies at residential areas also by establishing
where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for all high rise
residential establishments and even medium to high end subdivisions
providing for good quality residential subdivision development through careful technical review
and approval system by the city government in adherence to existing subdivision laws and
regulations

2. Commercial Zone

establishment of commercial sub-centers are to be established near the boundaries of Iloilo


City to complement the inner growth areas and provide for a dispersed development pattern
across hinterland barangays or barangays located in the edge of the city

City Proper

establishment of the existing Central Business District as a commercial mixed use zone of light
to medium intensity
maintenance of a 70%-30% commercial-residential mixed use for the downtown CBD
conversion or reclassification of the existing Iloilo Fishing Port Complex as a commercial mixed
use development area
intensification of the Plaza Libertad Complex Area and along major roads into commercial
mixed use development
adoption of a mixed use residential development that can allow small and medium-scale
commercial activities
relocation of the existing Iloilo River Wharf to Lapuz, Lapaz in order to expand the commercial
zone of the City Proper along the Iloilo River
adoption of commercial activities at the downtown CBD that provide for 24 hour business
operations (i.e. call centers, BPOs, etc.)
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas through the
treatment of wastewater from high rise, high intensity use commercial buildings before being
discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo River and the City Proper Coastline through
DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas also by
establishing where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for
all high rise or high intensity commercial establishments

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

Molo

increase of commercial land areas around the Molo Plaza Complex, along Avancea Street,
Timawa Avenue, Compania Street and west side of the Ynfante Avenue
maintenance of a 70%-30% commercial-residential mixed use
adoption of a mixed use residential development that can allow small and medium-scale
commercial activities
adoption of commercial activities at the Molo Plaza Complex that provide for 24 hour business
operations (i.e. call centers, BPOs, etc.)
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas through the
treatment of wastewater from high rise, high intensity use commercial buildings before being
discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo-Batiano River and the Molo Coastline through
DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas also by
establishing where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for
all high rise or high intensity commercial establishments

Arevalo

increase of commercial land areas around the Arevalo Plaza Complex, along the Crispino
Melocoton Avenue, Quezon Street, Osmena Street, Yulo Drive and northern side of the MoloArevalo Boulevard
retention of allowable commercial activities along the Molo-Arevalo boulevard especially those
that are supportive of tourism development
maintenance of a 70%-30% commercial-residential mixed use
adoption of a mixed use residential development that can allow small and medium-scale
commercial activities
adoption of commercial activities at the Arevalo Plaza Complex that provide for 24 hour
business operations (i.e. call centers, BPOs, etc.)
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas through the
treatment of wastewater from high rise or high intensity use commercial buildings before being
discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo-Batiano River and the Arevalo Coastline
through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas also by
establishing where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for
all high rise or high intensity commercial establishments including the citys proposal for an
elevated walkway cum sewerage system along the Villa Beach

Mandurriao

increase of commercial land areas around the Mandurriao Plaza Complex, along the GuzmanJesena Road, Taft Street, R. Mapa Street and along the northern embankments of the Iloilo
River and western embankments of the Dungon Creek
development of the Megaworld into a planned unit development area that will host mixed
commercial uses, BPOs, call centers, medical tourism, retail stores, hotels, entertainment, etc.
development of the Gaisano, Smallville, Po and Pison Properties into mixed use commercial
areas
retention of allowable high intensity commercial activities along the Sen. Benigno Aquino
corridor and the northern embankments of the Iloilo River as the New Iloilo City Business
Center especially those that are supportive of tourism development and commercial expansion

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maintenance of a 70%-30% commercial-residential mixed use


adoption of a mixed use residential development that can allow small and medium-scale
commercial activities
adoption of commercial activities at the Mandurriao Plaza Complex that provide for 24 hour
business operations (i.e. call centers, BPOs, etc.)
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas through the
treatment of wastewater from high rise or high intensity use commercial buildings before being
discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo River, Dungon Creek and the Calajunan Creek
through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas also by
establishing where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for
all high rise or high intensity commercial establishments

3. Industrial Zone

Jaro
retention and expansion of commercial land areas around the Jaro Plaza Complex, along the
Jaro-Leganes Road, Lopez-Jaena Street, Arguelles Street, Benigno Aquino Avenue, and the
major access road inside the Metropolis Subdivision
maintenance of a 70%-30% commercial-residential mixed use
adoption of a mixed use residential development that can allow small and medium-scale
commercial activities
adoption of commercial activities at the Jaro Plaza Complex that provide for 24 hour business
operations (i.e. call centers, BPOs, etc.)
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas through the
treatment of wastewater from high rise or high intensity use commercial buildings before being
discharged into such waterbodies as the Jaro Floodway Channel, Jaro River, Dungon Creek
and the Iloilo Strait through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants
(WTP) and systems
establishment of an Agropolis Center that allows related commercial activities

[Type
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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

retention of an Industrial Zone I land use classification at areas along the Iloilo River in Brgy.
Progreso, Jalandoni Estate, Libertad, Railway Lapuz North and a portion of Bo. Obrero as well
as in Brgys. Mansaya, Loboc and a small portion of Ingore
retention of an Industrial Zone II land use classification at the bigger part of Brgy. Ingore
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting industrial zones through the
treatment of wastewater from such zones before being discharged into the Iloilo River,
Mansaya Creek, Jaro River and the Iloilo Strait through DENR-accredited and monitored
wastewater treatment plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies adjacent to industrial zones also by
establishing where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for
industrial establishments
safeguarding the industrial zones against sea level rise, storm surges, flooding and tsunamis
by constructing elevated seawalls, breakwaters and other similar infrastructure

4. Institutional Zone

adoption of institutional mixed use zones at all districts of the city that shall be primarily used
for government, religious, cultural, educational, medical, civic, residential and, supporting
commercial and service uses
implementation of the University Town Program which can contribute to the improvement of
the institutional mixed use land uses
adoption of special institutional zones at all districts in the city that shall be used principally for
particular types of institutional establishments such as welfare homes, orphanages, home for
the aged, rehabilitation and training centers (military camps/reservation/bases/training
grounds, etc.) and which allows projects like rehabilitation and vocational training center for exconvicts, drug addicts, unwed mothers, physically, mentally and emotionally handicapped, exsanitaria inmates, penitentiary, correctional institutions and similar establishments
careful siting of proposed new institutions that must consider walkability within residential
zones

La Paz

increase of commercial land areas around the Lapaz Plaza Complex, along Burgos Street,
Rizal Street and along the northern embankments of the Iloilo River
development of new commercial strips at the Prime Estates development area at Brgy.
Nabitasan
maintenance of a 70%-30% commercial-residential mixed use
adoption of a mixed use residential development that can allow small and medium-scale
commercial activities
adoption of commercial activities at the Lapaz Plaza Complex that provide for 24 hour
business operations (i.e. call centers, BPOs, etc.)
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas through the
treatment of wastewater from high rise or high intensity use commercial buildings before being
discharged into such waterbodies as the Iloilo River, Dungon Creek, Rizal Creek, Mansaya
Creek and the Ingore Creek through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment
plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies fronting commercial areas also by
establishing where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment Facilities for
all high rise or high intensity commercial establishments

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

5. Water Zone

water zones in the city shall be maintained with a three (3) meter easement from its mean
high water line (for rivers, estuaries, streams and creeks) and a twenty (20) meter easement
from the highest mean sea level (for marine waters)
utilization of the water zones for domestic and industrial use shall be allowed in consonance
with the development regulations of DENR, provisions of the water code, fishery laws and the
revised forestry code of the Philippines
utilization and exploitation of water resources for such use should be subjected to an
environmental impact assessment prior to the approval of its use
utilization of water resources for other uses like recreation, fishing and related activities,
floatage/transportation and mining (e.g. off shore oil exploration) shall also be allowed
provided it is in consonance with the provisions of the water code, fishery laws and the revised
forestry code of the Philippines, as amended
development of a water zoning regulations in accordance to Iloilo Rivers existing zonal
assignments: Zone 1 as Economic Zone, Zone 2 as Recreational Zone, Zone 3 and 4 as
Production and Protection Zones

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exploring the potential of Iloilo River as a tourism attraction and as a transportation channel
ensuring the health, safety and protection of water zones from untreated wastewater
discharges and pollutive effluents from residential, commercial, institutional and industrial
establishments through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP)
and systems

6. Agricultural Zone

careful conversion and reclassification of agricultural lands into non-agricultural uses by private
landowners through close coordination with the DA, DAR, NIA, DNR and other local and
national government agencies and offices
retention of the agricultural lands and the SAFDZ in accordance with its best economic value
and in compliance with the national and local laws and policies on land conversion and
reclassification
ensuring good environmental quality of waterbodies adjacent to the agricultural zone through
the minimized use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides by urban farmers
ensuring the quality of irrigation water that service agricultural zones by regular monitoring of
wastewater discharges of neighboring commercial establishments and plants
establishment of feeder and farm-to-market-roads within the agricultural zone

7. Mangrove Zone

adoption of mangrove zones along the Iloilo-Batiano River, Dungon Creek, Buntatala River,
Calajunan Creek, Baluarte Coastal waters, north and southern embankments of the Jaro
River mouth and certain parts of the eastern coastline of Jaro
regulation of developments at mangrove zones through the strict enforcement of the zoning
ordinance which provides for the requirement of a permit, clearance or license from
appropriate bureaus or offices of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources
(DENR)
ensuring the health, safety and protection of mangrove zones from untreated wastewater
discharges and pollutive effluents from residential, commercial, institutional and industrial
establishments through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment plants (WTP)
and systems
establishment of a wetland and bird sanctuary site within the mangrove zone at Brgy. Ingore
for eco-tourism through private-public partnership
mengrove reforestation at critical mangrove zones by the City ENRO and through the DENRCENRO
establishment of an education and research and eco-tourism program at the mangrove zone
along Iloilo River as based on UPV Professor Re Sadabas earlier studies on the rivers
mangroves (study revealed that of the thirty five (35) species of mangroves in the Philippines,
twenty two (22) are found along the Iloilo River together with a rare mangrove specie called
Sonneratia Ovata (rare in the region) and a rare shrimp specie called Metapenaues Insolitus
(rare in the country)
study for the declaration of a protection zone for mangroves at certain areas of Zones 3 and 4
of the Iloilo River

retention and where feasible, expansion of existing cemetery zones in all districts of the city
regulation of uses of the cemetery zone through the strict enforcement of the Zoning
Ordinance which allows: customary ancillary uses such as cemetery administration, service,

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

and maintenance facilities, crematorium, columbarium, place of religious worship, mausoleum,


park, playground, garden, aviary, zoo and other nature center (and accessory uses such as
parking structures, fire/security station, utility installation for use of zone/lot occupants and
public utility facilities)
exemption from the imposition of height regulations at the cemetery zone of such structures
as monuments, obelisks, and other commemorative structures, as well as church, utility and
other structures not covered by the height regulations of the National Building Code and/or the
CAAP

9. Fishponds and Saltbeds Zone

retention and improvement of existing fishponds and saltbeds at the Mandurriao SAFDZ
specially those that act as catchbasins for floodwaters overflowing from the Iloilo River (all
other fishpond areas shall also be retained for food security and fish self-sufficiency concerns
of the city)
careful redevelopment, conversion, reclassification of fishponds situated within the SAFDZ
through close consultation with the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, DA, DAR and
other concerned local and national government agencies
utilization of fishponds situated within the Fireworks Manufacturing Overlay District for
fireworks manufacturing through compliance of existing national and local government
regulations
ensuring the health, safety and protection of fishponds and saltbeds zones from untreated
wastewater discharges and pollutive effluents from residential, commercial, institutional and
industrial establishments through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment
plants (WTP) and systems
increasing the productivity of the existing fishpond area estimated at 281 has to maximize use
of resources
provision of support to small-scale fishpond owners operating in the city to increase their
productivity.

10. Planned Unit Development Zone

establishment of a planned unit development zone covering the 54-hectare Megaworld


property that will take on a mixed use development with the following project components:
Phase 1 - ongoing construction of the 6-lane main road
Phase 2 - ongoing construction of the 12-storey Richmonde Hotel and other 4-storey
buildings for BPOs
Phase 3 - Institutional
Phase 4
Phase 5
Phase 6

regulation of the Megaworld planned unit development with the conduct of a traffic impact
assessment, formulation of a traffic management plan, consultation with the DPWH for the link
and bend at the corner of Sen. Benigno Aquino Avenue, development contribution (an off-site
development project that Megaworld should be working out for the city and which could be a
drainage, road, flood mitigation or any development project), preparation of a Masterplan that
should consider inputs from the city, preparation of an Environmental Management Plan
establishment of a planned unit development zone covering the entire proposed land
reclamation fronting the City Proper Coastline from the eastern perimeters of the Ioilo Fishing

8. Cemetery Zone

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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

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Port to the Fort San Pedro area which was earlier proposed in the 1998-2010 CLUP (and
which takes on a multi-use, mixed use development that will facilitate the expansion of the
existing port activities of the Philippine Ports Authority or the commercial and business
activities of the Downtown CBD)
possible implementation of the land reclamation PUD through a Public-Private Partnership
(PPP) arrangement that provides for a long term partnership agreement with a private
developer-investor that is identified through a competitive bidding

11. Parks and Open Spaces

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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

establishment of tree parks, linear parks, road medians, sidewalk plant strips, community
parks, and other similar greenery as parks and open spaces that help provide for the sports,
leisure, recreation, wellness and physical fitness activities of the city population

12. Sanitary Landfill Zone

conversion of the 23-hectare Calajunan Dumpsite into a sanitary landfill zone


provision of infrastructure and other engineering measures to mitigate the impacts of the
sanitary landfill site to the neighboring waterbodies and areas

13. Transportation and Utilities


allocation of areas at all districts of the city which are designed for diversion/ amusements and
for the maintenance of ecological balance of the community
conversion of the Trenas Boulevard into a linear park
redevelopment of the Rotary Park in Parola, City Proper into a city park
maintenance of parks and open spaces at the eastern coastlines of Jaro beside the IloiloDumangas Coastal Road
retention of the Iloilo City Park (as defined by the Caram Law for the Molo-Arevalo coastline)
as parks and open spaces
regulation of developments and utilization of the parks and open space zones for such
allowable uses as: parks/playground, garden, aviary, zoo and other nature center (with
customary park structures such as park office, gazebo, clubhouse), resort areas (e.g.
beaches, including accessory uses), open air or outdoor sports activities and support facilities,
including low rise stadiums, gyms, amphitheaters and swimming pools, golf courses, ball
courts, race tracks and similar uses, memorial/shrines monuments, kiosks and other park
structures, specialty school/training facility, dance/voice/music, other specialty studio,
underground
parking
structures/facilities,
club/multi-purpose
hall/room,
health
center/clinic/club, gym and accessory uses ( such as: community/village association office,
fire/security station, place of religious worship, multi-purpose hall/room, sports/recreation
facility, day care center, utility installation for use of zone/lot occupants, public utility facility,
auditorium, theater, performance/civic center, library, museum, exhibit area, art gallery,
sporting goods/souvenir shop, restaurant, canteen, other food-serving establishment, personal
service/repair, massage/sauna/bathhouse facility, parking structure)
exempted from the imposition of height regulations at the parks and open spaces zone of
church structures, covered courts, utility and other structures not covered by the height
regulations of the National Building Code and/or the Air Transportation Office
retention of all district plazas as parks and open spaces
ensuring good environmental quality of coastal waters adjacent to the parks and open spaces
along the Molo-Arevalo Boulevard and along the Coastal Road in the district of Jaro through
the treatment of wastewater from high rise or high intensity use residential, commercial,
institutional and industrial buildings before being discharged into such waterbodies as the
Guimaras and Iloilo Straits through DENR-accredited and monitored wastewater treatment
plants (WTP) and systems
ensuring good environmental quality of coastal waters adjacent to the parks and open spaces
also by establishing where needed and found practical, centralized Sewerage Treatment
Facilities for all high rise or high intensity residential, commercial, institutional and industrial
establishments
ensuring the good coastal water quality adjacent to the parks and open spaces at the Villa
Beach through the implementation by the city government of a sewerage system that treats
wastewater from commercial establishments
construction of elevated seawalls and breakwaters where needed, at parks and open spaces
along the city coastlines

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

adoption of transport and utilities zones at all districts of the city that include transit-oriented
facilities that make the city easy to move around in and do business
retention of private sector-built and operated perimeter boundary land transport terminals at
the boundaries of the city and improvement of its facilities in accordance with local and
national guidelines and policies
relocation of the land transport terminals in Brgy. San Pedro, Molo and Brgy Baldoza, Lapaz
to more convenient location at the boundaries of the city and in compliance with the perimeter
boundary terminal ordinance
allocation of transport and utilities zones for the establishment of the new Iloilo River
Passenger Terminal for Bacolod-bound seacrafts and the Rolll-On, Roll-Off terminal in Brgy.
Progreso, Lapuz in the district of Lapaz
adoption of the following allowable projects and uses at the transport and utilities zone: public
utility facility, utility installation for use of zone/lot occupants, parking structure, passenger
terminal/transit station/depot, transportation infrastructure with the following passenger
convenience amenities/facilities (seating/lounge area, comfort room facilities, foodstalls), park,
playground, garden, aviary, zoo and other nature center, accessory uses (petrol filling kiosk
(also for gasoline, diesel, LPG) with no other retail/service activity, which shall be allowed only
within parking area/ structures, fire/security/emergency response station, tourism information
and assistance center)
establishment of transit-oriented facilities that helps improve internal and external accessibility
of the city

14. Foreshore Land Delimitation

establishment of the foreshore land delimitation zone as surveyed and defined by the DENR
in 2004 as the portion of the citys coastline that is made up of tidalflats and wetlands that is
said to have resulted from years of erosion from the citys beaches and foreshore lands
definition by the zoning ordinance of the area as a land area as determined by the DENR
submerged in water during occurrences of high tide and is visible during low tide and which
may have been caused by siltation
large area in Lapaz and Jaro was more of the result of heavy siltation that was washed down
by water currents of the Jaro River and which was deposited at the river mouth in Brgy.
Nabitasan and Brgy. Ingore. A similar build-up is also seen at the mouth of Batiano River in
Brgy. Baluarte in the district of Molo as the estuary also carried silt and eroded soil from the
district of Molo and from as far as the district of Arevalo. The Foreshore Land Delimitation
Zone was estimated to be about 8.11 sq.km. or 811 hectares and stretches from the district of
Arevalo westward to the City Proper and northwards to the district of Jaro.
adoption of the foreshore delimitation zone as an expanded easement for the citys coastlines

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regulation of the use and development of the foreshore delimitation zone in consonance with
the development regulations of DENR, provisions of the water code, fishery laws and the
revised forestry code of the Philippines
regulation and development of the foreshore land delimitation zone subject to an
environmental impact assessment prior to the approval of its use
regulated use and development of the foreshore delimitation zone for recreation, fishing and
related activities, floatage/transportation and mining (e.g. off shore oil exploration) also in
consonance with the provisions of the water code, fishery laws and the revised forestry code of
the Philippines
further study and careful planning for the protection of the foreshore land delimitation zone
fronting the location of the Panay Energy Development Corporations coal-fired power plant
except for the area defined for the future land reclamation project along the southern coastline
the Foreshore Land Delimitation Zone is a no-build zone that shall act as a buffer zone
regulation of any construction, obstructions, etc. at portions of the foreshore land delimitation
zone that adjoins the mouths of rivers, estuaries and floodway channels for it to be left free to
flow directly to the Iloilo and Guimaras Straits

Tables 7A-1 and 7A-2 present the distribution of the areas and percentage composition of the citys
various proposed land uses and zones:
Table 7A-1: Area Tabulation (General Land Use Map of Iloilo City) 2011-2020
AREA
PERCENTAGE
LAND USE/ZONE CLASSIFICATION
Sq. Km.
Hectares
(%)
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
AGRICULTURAL
INSTITUTIONAL
INDUSTRIAL
PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT (PUD)
PARKS AND OPEN SPACES (including buffer zone)
CEMETERY
FISHPONDS AND SALTBEDS
WATER (Creeks and Rivers)
TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES (including wharves)
INFRASTRUCTURE / UTILITIES (including roads, bridges)
FORESHORE LAND DELIMITATION
MANGROVE
FLOODWAY
SANITARY LANDFILL
TOTAL

40.26
9.96
0.90
3.27
3.80
0.54
2.59
0.42
2.88
2.60
0.47
3.71
8.11
1.59
0.67
0.21
81.98

4,025.91
996.48
90.15
326.56
380.00
54.00
259.41
42.39
287.82
259.96
46.70
371.42
811.00
158.67
67.13
21.11
8,198.70

C-3/ MXD
AGRICULTURAL
INSTITUTIONAL MIXED-USE
SPECIAL INSTITUTIONAL
INDUSTRIAL
I-1
I-2
PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT (PUD)
PARKS AND OPEN SPACES (including buffer zone)
CEMETERY
FISHPONDS AND SALTBEDS
WATER (Creeks and Rivers)
TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITIES (including wharves)
INFRASTRUCTURE (including roads and bridges)
FORESHORE LAND DELIMITATION
MANGROVE
FLOODWAY
SANITARY LANDFILL
TOTAL

1.31
0.90
3.12
0.15
3.80
2.21
1.59
0.54
2.59
0.42
2.88
2.60
0.47
3.71
8.11
1.59
0.67
0.21
81.98

131.02
90.15
312.10
14.46
380.00
221.28
158.72
54.00
259.41
42.39
287.82
259.91
46.70
371.42
811.00
158.67
67.13
21.11
8,198.70

1.60
1.10
3.81
0.18
4.64
2.70
1.94
0.66
3.16
0.51
3.51
3.17
0.57
4.53
9.89
1.94
0.82
0.26
100.00

NOTE: Figures for areas were based on CAD and subject to change upon verification of a Geodetic Engineer, surveyor or from any certified document of land areas.

49.10
12.15
1.10
3.81
3.99
0.66
3.16
0.51
3.51
3.17
0.57
4.53
9.89
1.94
0.82
0.26
100.00

NOTE: Figures for areas were based on CAD and subject to change upon verification of a Geodetic Engineer, surveyor or from any certified document of land areas.

Table 7A-2: Area Tabulation (Zoning Map of Iloilo City) 2011-2020


AREA
PERCENTAGE
LAND USE/ZONE CLASSIFICATION
Sq. Km.
Hectares
(%)
RESIDENTIAL MIXED USE
R-1
R-2/ MXD
R-3/ MXD
SHZ/ MXD
COMMERCIAL MIXED-USE
C-1/ MXD
C-2/ MXD

40.26
3.34
7.96
25.44
3.51
9.96
3.28
5.37

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

4,025.91
334.16
796.31
2,544.11
351.33
996.48
328.02
537.44

49.10
4.08
9.71
31.03
4.28
12.15
4.00
6.55

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Chapter 7: The Land Use Plan

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Fireworks
Manufacturing
Overlay District

City Planning and Development


Office consultancy by: Palafox

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate


Change Adaptation

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

A. Assessment of Hazards
1. Natural Hazards

Introduction

Typhoons

Disasters can cause the destruction of barangays and communities, death of thousands and collapse
of the Ilonggos livelihoods. Disasters leave inde lible impacts on physical landscapes and on peoples
minds. In development terms, disasters can mean serious economic impact on the city, barangays
and communities, and households. For a fast growing city like Iloilo, disasters also pose major hurdles
for the achievement of its share at helping the country realize its targets for the Millennium
Development Goals (MDG).

Iloilo City is vulnerable to both natural and human-induced hazards that impact on the citys populati on
and urban ecosystem. Foremost of these natural hazards is the regular visits by typhoons or tropical
cyclones that is due in part to the citys geograph ical location. In 2010 alone, 11 typhoons have passed
by Iloilo City and registering maximum wind velocities and gustiness of about 55 kph to 225 kph. Table
8A-1 shows a list of typhoons that entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility in 2010.

Aside from natural causes, Iloilo City also experiences human-induced disasters. These are brought
about by hazards that are of political and socio-economic origins and inappropriate and ill-applied
technologies. Many are forced to evacuate during the aftermath of fires. The health of citizens is
severely affected because of industrial and domestic waste that pollutes water, land and air.
Hazards become disasters only if vulnerable people and resources are exposed to them. People who
live in poverty and adverse socio-economic conditions are highly vulnerable to disasters. The most
vulnerable sectors include the poor, the sick, the differently-abled, the elderly, women and children.
Although many people may be affected, these vulnerable sectors will have the least capacity to
recover from the impact of a disaster.
It is in this context that the 2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan was prepared, with
special concern for capacitating its vulnerable sectors= so that they cease to be victims of disasters
and will become agents of change for meaningful development of the city and its people.
In the absence of a more detailed HLURB guideline on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Climate
Change Adaptation (CCA) and because of the current inadequacy of more accurate and updated data
on Iloilo Citys hazards, exposure and vulnerabilit ies, this Chapter shall not present a Disaster Risk
Reduction and Management (DRRM) Plan and shall only present a simplified mechanism with which
the city shall mainstream DRR and CCA in land use planning and management.
In the absence of a carefully prepared Risk Assessment Survey, this chapter shall use available data,
maps and other information that have been provided by the PHIVOLCS, PAGASA, Mines and GeoSciences Bureau of the DENR and other concerned NGAs.
The herein mechanisms takes on the transformation of the Philippines disaster management system
from disaster relief and response towards risk reduction that the new law, Republic Act No. 10121
(Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010).

Name of Storm/ Typhoon


T.S. Agaton
Typ. Basyang
T.S. Caloy
T.S. Domeng
T.S. Estearthquakeer
T.D. Florita
Typ. Glenda
T.S. Henry
Typ. Inday
Typ Juan Megi (1013)
Typ. Katring Chaba (1014)

Table 8A-1: Tropical Cyclones, 2010


Public
Date Occurred within
Storm
the Phil. Area of
Maximum Wind Velocity/Gustiness (kph)
Signal
Responsibility (PAR)
Issued
March 24-27, 2010
None
65 Initial - 11:00 AM, Final - 5:00 PM
July 11-14, 2010
None
120 Initial - 5:00 AM, Final - 11:00 PM
July 19-20, 2010
None
65 Initial 5:00 AM, Final 5:00 AM
August 3-5, 2010
None
65 Initial 5:00 PM, Final 11:00 AM
August 7-9, 2010
None
95 Initial 12:30 AM, Final 10:30 AM
August 27-28, 2010
None
55 Initial 5:00 PM, Final 5:00 PM
August 29-31, 2010
None
120 Initial 5:00 PM, Final 11:00AM
Sept. 2-4, 2010
None
65 Initial 2:00 AM, Final 5:00 PM
Sept. 15-19, 2010
None
160 Initial 11:00 AM, Final 11:00 PM
October 16-21, 2010
None
225 Initial 5:00 AM, Final 5:00 AM
October 23-28, 2010
None
150 Initial 5:00AM, Final - 10:45 PM

Source: PAGASA, Iloilo Sports Complex, Iloilo City

The most devastating typhoon that ever hit the city happened in June 18-23, 2008 with Typhoon Frank
where flashfloods devastated almost the entire district of Jaro, Classified as Public Storm Signal
Number 3, the typhoon damaged millions worth of properties and claimed hundreds of lives as the
floods washed away homes, possessions, and drowned residents in the low lying areas. The Flood
Hazard Map shows the extent of flooding in the city caused by Typhoon Frank. This particular hazard
is considered high.
Storm Surges

The 2011-2020 Iloilo Comprehensive Land Use Plan herein adopts mechanisms for DRR and CCA
adaptation and mitigation which like the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA), are aimed at the
following:
1.

building the resilience of the city and its barangays to disasters

2.

reducing the citys vulnerabilities and risks to hazards

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Storm surges are also another form of natural hazards of the city. Caused in part by tropical cyclones,
storm surges are known to have impacted and have caused more devastations on communities and
barangays situated along the citys coastlines. Hi gh waves during these storms have been
continuously destroying makeshift housing structures and informal settlements especially along the
shores of Arevalo, Molo, City Proper, Lapaz and some parts in Jaro districts. This particular hazard Is
considered medium.

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Floods

Tsunami

Flooding is also a perennial problem in the city. These are worsened whenever flashfloods find their
way to and overflowing the citys rivers and other natural waterways. Ever since the construction of the
Jaro Floodway Channel however, Jaro River no longer overflows like it use to and have since become
less prone to overflows during typhoons and extended rainfall events. Poor solid waste management,
particularly the indiscriminate disposal of such wastes at curbsides, roadways, footwalks, canals and
drainage systems also contribute greatly to flooding. The high rate of waste generation estimated at 8
kgs/capita/day or about 300 tons per day endangers the citys drainage system with the peoples
wanton disregard for proper waste disposal.

The citys proximity to the trench and fault also m akes the city vulnerable to earthquake-induced
tsunamis. A Map of Active Faults and Liquefaction of Panay Island marks their location and their
proximity to Iloilo City. The areas located along the coastlines are exposed to tsunami hazards. A
recent study done by PHIVOLCS and DOST in 2007 marks the areas of the City which can be
engulfed by tsunamis during a worst-case scenario, as shown in The Tsunami Hazard Map. Based on
computer modeling results using REDAS Software, a tsunami may reach as high as three meters in
height during a shallow magnitude 8.2 earthquake with the movement of the Negros Trench. The first
wave would arrive in the shoreline of Iloilo City 20-30 minutes after the earthquake. This particular
hazard is considered low.

The Recorded Floods Map below shows the extent of flooding in Iloilo City during some of its stronger
typhoon events. The map illustrates the high susceptibility of flooding in parts of Iloilo City, particularly
in the northern districts of Jaro and La Paz, the southwestern portions, in Molo and Arevalo, and
generally in the areas along the Jaro River. This particular hazard is considered high.
The Flood Hazard Map generated from PAGASA was used in defining the citys Flood Overlay District
which is basically the area that PAGASA found to be with High Susceptibility to flooding. The Flood
Overlay District has been mapped out in order to define the boundaries within which land uses and
development projects shall be regulated. The concept of a Flood Protection Elevation shall also be
adopted as a mechanism at further protecting people from the hazards and risks of flooding. Reckoned
against the elevation of the 50-year return floods upon which the Jaro Floodway Channel was
designed, the Flood Protection Elevation shall be the basis for a required minimum elevation with
which the establishment of sleeping quarters or habitable areas shall be allowed.

Liquefaction
The Active Faults and Liquefaction Map for Panay and Guimaras Island below also shows that the
whole Iloilo City is prone to liquefaction. Almost the entire city of Iloilo is covered by this vulnerability
where during intensity 7 earthquakes, the soil becomes unstable due to their relatively soft properties.
Theoretically, in the event of strong earthquakes, high-rise buildings using normal foundation
techniques are at risk of collapsing if they are grounded on soil types found in Iloilo City. The citys
existing short buildingscape is due in part to this limiting factor. It is understood however, that
technology can mitigate this problem and huge private sector investments on new and innovative
construction technologies are gradually now gradually changing the city skyline with taller buildings.
This particular hazard is high.
Sea Level Rise

Inundation and ponding on the other hand and as differentiated from river overflow-induced flooding, is
very much prevalent in the city and recurring more frequently nowadays. As shown in the Flood
Hazard Map below, most of the inundated areas are found at the City Proper where most of the city
drainage pipelines are small, broken, stucked with debris and failing to carry increased stormwater
runoff from the dense built-up areas that host wide roofed buildings and large paved areas. Such
areas bring stormwater directly to the old dilapidated pipes of the city streets. Inundation is worsened
when heavy rainfall events occur during high tides when the low lying city copes with the difficulty of
bringing storwater as fast as it could to the drainage outfalls through these antiquated drainage lines.
It can be noted from the Flood Hazard Map that the Downtown areas Mabini Street, Quezon Street,
Ledesma Street, Mapa Street, Rizal Street, Delgado Street De Leon Street and some intersections
along General Luna Street are prone to inundation. The same holds true for the Timawa Avenue in
the District of Molo. Inundation and flooding is also evident in Jaro District particularly along the
northern embankments of the Jaro River which occasionally overflows during heavy rainfall events.
Earthquake
Another vulnerability of the city is the earthquake and seismic tremors. These natural events are due
mainly to the citys precarious location near the N egros Trench and the West Panay Fault where even
the slightest of subterranean and submarine movement of plates can readily cause substantial lateral
movements in the city metropolis. The citys worst earthquake experience was in 1949 during the
Lady Caycay quake where the worst hit were the ci tys tall stone and concrete structures at that tim e
which included the Jaro belfry. This particular hazard is considered low.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

A more recent revelation on the citys vulnerabilit ies are what seems to be indications of sea level rise.
These have been reported by fishpond operators in Molo and Arevalo where the citys older fishponds
are situated. Operators say that markers at their ponds for 2,00 meter high water level are now
surpassed by current high tide levels and that some of their fishpond dikes are no longer able to hold
the high tide water level. The City Engineers Offi ce have also been recently coping with what is also
believed to be an indication of sea level rise. Certain roads in the city now experience flooding during
high tides even during the summer season and the City Engineers Office is left with no recourse but t o
elevate road surfaces to mitigate the problem. The sea level rise is believed to be either a
manifestation of sea level rise or soil subsidence. For a more reliable data on this particular hazard in
Iloilo City, a scientific assessment and survey will still have to be conducted. This particular hazard is
considered low.
Climate Change
Based on a study entitled Climate Change in the Philippines prepared in February 2011 by PAGASA,
Adaptayo and MDG Achievement Fund, Iloilo City and the rest of Iloilo Province will experience 1,431
days with maximum temperatures greater than 35 degrees centigrade during the 2006-2035 period
(centered at 2020). The city is also projected to have 5,227 dry days during the same period also
centered at 2020. Iloilo City is also projected to experience during the same period 3 days of rainfall
that is more than 300 mm.

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation
Table 8A-2: Frequency of Extreme Events in 2020 and 2050 under Medium-Range
Tanza, City Proper was one of the largest that the city has experienced since the big conflagration in
Emission Scenario in Iloilo City and Province
Brgy. Danao, City Proper in the 1960s. This parti cular hazard is considered low.
No. of Days w/ Rainfall >
No. of Days w/ Tmax > 35 degrees C
No. of Dry Days
Basic Needs for Road Network Improvement Plan in Iloilo City
200 mm
Source: Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)
OBS
2020
2050
OBS
2020
2050
OBS
2020
2050
(1971-2000)
Basic Concepts for development of road network configuration were established as follows:
460
1,431
3,076
7,839
5,227
5,226
4
5
4
Source: Climate Change in the Philippines Report, February 2011, PAGASA, ADAPTAYO, MDG Development Fund

2. Human-Induced Hazards
Saltwater Intrusion
Based on feedbacks from coastal barangays and communities in the poorer residential neighborhoods
in the city, groundwater at these areas is now contaminated with saltwater. Personal accounts by
homeowners reveal that individual and public dugwells (shallow and deep wells) now taste with salty
compared to previous years. Many describe it as ma tayam and not fit for drinking. Although no one
can pinpoint the real causes of such saltwater intrusion, many suspect that the over-extraction of
groundwater by commercial water dealers in the city contribute to the hazard.
Such was the complaints by residents in a Mandurriao barangay against a commercial water dealer
whose excessive pumping activities was subsequently stopped by the city government authorities. It is
believed that when the rate of the extraction is greater than the rate at which underground streams are
able to replenish itself a resulting negative pressure forces saltwater to be sucked in, hence the
saltwater intrusion. This particular hazard is considered medium.
Groundwater Contamination
Groundwater can also be contaminated with harmful chemicals and heavy metals from even the
simplest of household consumer products from hair dyes, paints, batteries, insecticides, etc. that when
poorly disposed, percolate the ground and mange to seep down to underground water tables.
Agricultural run-off that carry chemical-based fertilizers and pesticides similarly contaminate these
underground resources too.

Inside the City Proper area and its adjacent areas

Traffic management measures other than road development are recommended. These
include:
- Control of further development. Urbanization should target outside this area.
- Efficient traffic Management
- Modal shift from jeepney to bus
Outside the City Proper area and its adjacent areas
- A radial and circumferential road network is to be formed.
- Existing inter-city roads for widening and further improvement:
R-1: Iloilo-Antique Road (Iloilo-Oton-Tigbauan Section)
R-2: Iloilo-San Miguel Road (Molo-Mandurriao-San Miguel Section)
R-3: Iloilo-Roxas Road (City Proper-Jaro-City Boundary Section, Pavia Section,
Santa Barbara Section, Santa Barbara Bypass Section, Cabatuan Section,
Janiuay Section)
R-4: Iloilo Coastal Road (Iloilo Junction-Roxas Road)
R-5: Iloilo Coastal Road (Iloilo River Bridge-International Port Access Road SectionStudy Area Boundary Section)
- In due consideration of distribution of municipal urban centers or town proper, a
circumferential road is planned at the following radius from Iloilo City Proper:
C-1:
C-2:
C-3:
C-4:

about 5 kilometers (or Iloilo City boundary)


about 10 km.
about 15 km.
between 20 to 25 kilometers

A study made on the deepwells located around the Calajunan Dumpsite in Mandurriao in 1998 (as a
requirement for the issuance of a DENR Environmental Compliance Certificate for the Calajunan
Sanitary Landfill Project) revealed traces of heavy metals in several of the wells. This particular
hazard is considered high.
Fire
Another vulnerability of the city is fire. Historical accounts reveal that the most affected areas are
usually the densely-packed communities of informal settlers whose housing structures are largely
made up of scrap wood, bamboo, nipa and other combustible materials. These light materials are
quick to catch fire especially during the dry months of summer. Poor neighborhoods that rely partly on
candles and gas-fed and kerosene lamps have been known to experience fires caused by households
that poorly handled these fire-inducing lamps.
Narrow roads and obstructed alleys that are common at densely populated areas further increased the
vulnerabilities of these communities and barangays to fire. The fire that occurred this year in Brgy.

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Area in red shall also be known as the


Flood Overlay District

Flood Hazard Map


Source: PAGASA

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Recorded Floods Map


SOURCES: CPDO & PAGASA

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Republic of the Philippines


Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Tsunami Wave Height


and Inundation Hazard
Map
SOURCES: PHIVOLCS AND DOST, 2007

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates
City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Republic of the
Philippines
Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Active Faults and


Liquefaction Map for
Panay and Guimaras
Islands
Source: PHIVOLCS

City Planning and Development Office


consultancy by: Palafox Associates

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation
overflowed to the flood plains of Jaro. The unfinished Jaro Floodway did little in alleviating the surge
B. Location and Number of Vulnerable Population and Socio-Economic
as huge volumes of flood waters swept across in uncontrolled directions and intensities.

Infrastructure

1. Vulnerable Population
The segment of the city population that is most vulnerable and at high risk to most of the citys natu ral
and human-induced hazards and risks is the urban poor. They are the citys low-income group that fall
below the poverty threshold and whose households c ombined family incomes could barely afford the
high costs attributed to emergency preparedness and response, as well as rehabilitation and recovery.
Most of these households are situated at economically depressed barangays and living under slum
conditions that have little or nearly no protection at all from the hazards and risks.
Table 8B-1 below shows the number of informal settlers in Iloilo City at 11,049 as per available data at
the Iloilo City Urban Poor Affairs Office. The table shows that of these number, about 5,100
households are located at the shoreline facing the Guimaras Strait and along Batiano River in the
Districts of Molo and Arevalo. The next largest concentration of informal settlers are those of 2,004
households that are with ejectment cases and which are located on private properties all over the city.
This is followed by 1,662 households that are on public domain or government-owned properties and
which are affected by the proposed development of the Iloilo and Jaro Rivers. The fourth largest
concentrations are found on government owned lands or on lands subject to government
infrastructure projects, numbering around 1,381 households. The fifth largest concentration is found
along both sides of the Molo-Arevalo Boulevard and which number around 789 households. The sixth
largest concentrations on record is found on the along the public domain or government-owned land
adjacent to both sides of national roads covered by DPWH Department Order No. 52.
It should be noted however that the previously-mentioned informal settlements, their particular
ownership, location and number as defined in Table 8B-2 is in no way an exclusive listing. There are
many other households in the city that are similarly-exposed and vulnerable. They may have not been
properly documented by the Iloilo City Urban Poor Affairs Office at the moment pending a more
exhaustive inventory as provided for by the Urban Development and Housing Act (PD 7279). These
informal settlements are similarly prone to the negative effects of earthquakes, typhoons, storm
surges, sea level rise and tsunamis as these hazards easily destroy and blow away light materials that
are used for housing. Such tightly packed communities and settlements are also prone to fires
especially during the dry summer season when poorly handled candles and kerosene lamps cause
conflagrations that similarly take a toll on these light housing materials.
Vulnerability to Typhoons, Storm Surges, Sea Level Rise, Tsunami
Densely populated barangays along the citys coastl ines are most prone to typhoons, storm surges,
sea level rise and tsunamis. These include the barangays of Sto. Nino Sur, Sto. Nino Norte and
Calaparan in Arevalo District, Calumpang, San Juan, South Baluarte and North Baluarte in Molo
District, Tanza, Rizal Estanzuela, Rizal Pala-pala I and II, Rima Rizal, Ma. Clara, Ortiz, Gen. Hughes,
and Concepcion in City Proper, Bo. Obrero, Mansaya, Ingore, Hinactacan and Loboc in Lapaz,
barangays Hinactacan, Balabago, San Isidro and Banuyao in Jaro District.
Vulnerability to Flooding and Inundation
About 80% of the District of Jaro was flooded during Typhoon Frank in 2008. Almost all of the
districts population were adversely affected as fl ood waters from the watershed in Maasin surged
their way through the Aganan River and Tigum River and finding their way to Jaro River which

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Both the poor and the rich communities became victims of the floods and as the Recorded Flood
Maps would show, Typhoon Franks coverage was by fa r the citys widest. Based on the citys
records, the floods also registered the highest resulting casualties and damages.
Inundation and ponding is a recurring phenomenon at certain parts of the city during heavy rainfall
events. The inundation is further aggravated when they occur during high tide as many of the citys ol d
and constricted drainage systems fail in discharging water to outfalls at bigger quantities and at faster
rates. The low lying City Proper streets of Mabini, Delgado, Ledesma, Tanza, and Jalandoni are the
most affected. The Timawa Avenue in Molo, and parts of Lopez Street, Jereos, commission Civil, and
areas around the Lapaz Plaza in the District of Lapaz are similarly inundated as well. The El 98, E.
Lopez, Democracia and the streets surrounding the Jaro Plaza also experience inundation and
ponding as broken and heavily-silted drainage canals ceased to function and convey stormwater to
Jaro River and Dungon Creek. Areas affected by flooding and inundation are shown in the Flood
Hazard Map below.
Vulnerability to Liquefaction
As can be seen from the MGBs map the entire city i s vulnerable to liquefaction hence, care should be
given in designing and constructing tall buildings anywhere in the city.
Vulnerability to Earthquakes
The presence of the Negros Trench, the West Panay Fault and the proximity of Panay Island to
Negros Island where Mount Kanlaon, an active volcano is located, makes Iloilo City vulnerable to
ground shaking and earthquakes. These may also cause the occurrence of earthquakes-induced
tsunamis. Areas along the coastline are exposed to tsunami hazards and the most vulnerable are the
informal settlers living close to the foreshores. The districts of Molo, Arevalo and the City Proper will
be the most affected districts.
Vulnerability to Saltwater Intrusion
There are presently signs of saltwater intrusion in some parts of Arevalo and Molo Districts especially
along the San Juan Boulevard Corridor. It is also possible however that if the indiscriminate extraction
of groundwater by erring commercial water dealers are left unchecked, even the interior part of the city
shall also be affected. Informal settlers along the coastlines are the most vulnerable to saltwatert
intrusion.
Vulnerability to Groundwater Contamination
Badly constructed dugwells and drainage lines have contributed greatly to the contamination of the
groundwater. The indiscriminate dumping of solid wastes that include leaking liquids from household
detergents, medicine bottles, paints, and even batteries have been found to have caused the
contamination of many of the wells of urban poor neighborhoods. Again the poor are the most affected
as much of their daily water needs are sourced from these wells.
Vulnerability to Fires
Densely populated and congested slum communities whose housing structures are made up mostly
out of salvaged light materials like old plywood, lumber, bamboo, nipa and tarpaulin are the most

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Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation
vulnerable to fires. The risk is also apparent due to the fact that these communities have households
21. Alipato, Emmanuel
Bolilao, Mandurriao
1
that use kerosene lamps and candles in the evening and during brownouts. Narrow roads and
22. Satana, Conchita
Boulevard, Molo
1
congested alleys akin to these types of settlements also worsen the situation during fires as fire trucks
23. Mrs. Villarete
R. Mapa St., Mandurriao
12
are prevented by such constricted roads from entering and fighting the fie.
24. Jardeleza, Azucena
Guzman Jesena, Mandurriao
16
Table 8B-1: Number of Informal Settler-Households by Location, 2010
Number of Households
Public Domain/Government Owned
Private
At
Along Iloilo City
At Danger
At Iloilo Jaro Road Widening Properties (with
ejectment
Infrastructure
National Road
Areas
River Develop- (Molo-Arevalo
cases)
Project Areas
(DPWH D.O. 52)
ment
Boulevard)
1,381
113
5,100
1,662
789
2,004

Total

11,049

Source: ICUPAO, HUDCC, 2010

The present condition of the city reveals that many real estate developments are sprawling in the six
districts of City Proper, La Paz, Jaro, Villa, Molo, and Mandurriao. In search of greener pastures,
these informal settlers generally depend on inform al sector activities such as vending, small-scale
labor intensive production activities or stevedoring. Some informal settlers even resort to scavenging
or begging for their livelihood. In most cases, household members involved in these activities include
women and children.

Table 8B-2: Informal Settlers on Private Properties (w/ejectment cases)


Property Owner
A. Informal Settlers on Private Properties
1. Montinola Property
2. Macairan Property
3. Ligaya Roque Property
4. Ana Arquillo Property
5. Montero Property
6. Veterans Bank
7. Caresmeat Food Corporation
8. Gaisano Property
9. Kenneth Ng Property
10. Corinthian Subd. (Henry Tiu Property)
11. Ana Rose Subd. (Carabao Trail)
12. Imperial Subd. (Henry Tiu Property)
13. Montano Property
14. Leon Gellada Property
15. Leon Gellada Property
16. Asia Brewery
17. Cecelia Abad
18. Alfonso Tan
19. Paciano Villavieja
20. Del Rosario, Annie Montinola

Barangay/Location

Brgy. Baldoza, Lapaz


South Fundidor, Molo
South Fundidor, Molo
Compania Central
Taft North, Mandurriao
Jereos, Lapaz
Sto. Nio Sur, Arevalo
Lapuz Norte
Punong, Lapuz
Hibao-an, Mandurriao
Hibao-an, Mandurriao
Lanit Jaro
Yulo Drive, Arevalo
Taft North, Mandurriao
Cuartero, Jaro
Legaspi, City Proper
Ingore, La Paz
Infante/Cochero, Molo
San Isidro, Jaro
Baldoza, La Paz

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

No. of
Households
Affected
2,004
208
2
5
10
9
11
12
11
24
24
34
34
7
16
8
33
45
296
39
20

25. Sayno, Honorato Jr.


Taal, Molo
26. Heirs of Julia Rodriguez-Salas
Compania Central, Molo
27. Heirs of Saturnino Escarilla/ Leda E. Cabral
Hibao-an (Amys Ville Subdivision)
28. Gandilo, Elsa Abecino
Bolilao, Mandurriao
29. Jurilla, Arletta
Ticud, La Paz
30. Villarete
Cochero, Molo
31.Yusay Property
Sto. Nio Norte
32. UP Iloilo City Property
Infante, Timawa 1&2
B. Informal Settlers on Government Properties/Government Infrastructure Projects
1. Dungon Creek IFCP (3 mtrs easement)
(Cuartero , Calubihan,
* Iloilo River Devt. Project
Desamparados, San Vicente, Our
Lady of Lourdes Jaro, Bakhaw,
Bolilao, Sta. Rosa Mand., Taft North
Mandurriao & Magsaysay La Paz )
2. Rehabilitation of the Iloilo River Wharf (PPA)
Fort San Pedro, Lapuz Libertad
3. Iloilo River Development Project
North San Jose, Molo
4. Mansaya Bo. Obrero Creek (IFCP)
Mansaya, Lapuz Norte, Don
* Iloilo River Devt. Project
Esteban, Sinikway Lapuz
5. Budburan Creek
San Nicolas, Alalasan, Railway &
* Iloilo River Devt. Project
Aguinaldo La Paz
6. Rizal Creek (Iloilo River Devt. Project)
Rizal La Paz
7. Proposed Marina School
Rizal Lapuz Sur
8. Construction of Lying-in Clinic
San Jose, Arevalo
9. Road Widening (Panay Railway)
Muelle Loney, City Proper
10. Dep Ed Property
Nabitasan La Paz
11. Maintenance Road IFCP
Ticud La Paz
12. Perimeter Fence (Dep Ed)
Sto. Rosario Duran, City Proper
13. National Road -Covered by City Ord. #14
Muelle Loney dela Rama, City
Proper
14. Dungon Bridge Expansion
Dungon-A Jaro
15. Dungon Bridge Expansion
Sambag, Jaro
C. Informal Settlers along Iloilo City National Road (DPWH Dept. Order No. 52)
1. Jaro-Mandurriao Road
EL 98/Desamparados
2. Iloilo-Diversion Road
Taft North, Mandurriao
3. Iloilo-Diversion Road
Brgy. Ungka Jaro
4. Iloilo-Diversion Road
Brgy. Sambag Jaro
5. Iloilo-Capiz Road
Tabuc Suba to Buntatala Jaro
D. Informal Settlers in Danger Areas
1. Public Domain/Government-Owned Property along Batiano
Sto. Nio Sur, Arevalo
River (Creeks/Riverbanks)
Sto. Nio Norte, Arevalo
Calaparan, Molo
Calumpang, Molo
San Juan, Molo
Boulevard, Molo
West Habog-habog, Molo
Salvacion Habog-habog, Molo

7
1
1
1
9
7
800
300
1,381
398

23
79
357
128
41
24
13
41
134
9
13
70
10
41
113
33
42
2
7
29
5,100
133
291
165
237
420
318
422
124

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2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 2 - The CLUP)
Salvacion Habog-habog (Bunot),
Molo
Sta. Cruz, Arevalo
Yulo Drive, Arevalo
Bonifacio, Arevalo
Compania Central, Molo
2, Public Domain/Government Properrty along the Shoreline
Sto. Nio Sur, Arevalo
facing Guimaras Strait
Sto. Nio Norte, Arevalo
Calaparan, Molo
Calumpang, Molo
San Juan, Molo
Boulevard, Molo
South Baluarte
North Baluarte
West Habog-habog, Molo
Salvacion Habog-habog, Molo
Bitoon (zone 1&2), Jaro
Gen. Hughes & Ortiz, CP
E. Informal Settlers affected by Proposed Road Widening (from West Habog-habog, Molo to Sto.
Nino, Arevalo)
1. Public Domain/Government-owned Property (Right Side of
West Habog-habog, Molo
Molo-Arevalo Boulevard)
Boulevard, Molo
San Juan, Molo
Calumpang, Molo
Calaparan Arevalo
Sto. Nio Norte, Arevalo
2. Public Domain/Government-owned Property (Left Side of
South Baluarte, Molo
Molo-Arevalo Boulevard)
Boulevard, Molo
San Juan, Molo
Calumpang, Molo
Calaparan, Arevalo
Sto. Nio Norte, Arevalo
F. Informal Settlers affected by Jaro River Improvement
Tacas, Jaro
Ungka, Jaro
Sambag, Jaro
San Isidro, Jaro
San Roque, Jaro
Lopez Jaena, Jaro
Simon Ledesma, Jaro
Democracia, Jaro
Tabuc Suba, Jaro
Benedicto, Jaro
Cubay, Jaro
M. H. del Pilar, Jaro

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

74
59
12
15
55
734
55
262
131
314
117
195
617
none
none
120
230
789
18
38
57
135
86
62
28
23
172
43
66
61
1,662
14
38
38
125
65
8
79
6
244
158
251
46

San Pedro, Jaro


Jereos, Lapaz
Tabuc Suba, Lapaz
Gustilo, Lapaz
Caingin, Lapaz
Ticud, Lapaz
Baldoza, Lapaz
Ingore, Lapaz
TOTAL

24
96
61
43
173
33
122
38
11,049

Source: ICUPAO, 2010

2. Vulnerable Socio-Economic Infrastructure


Given the vulnerabilities previously mentioned the city finds the following socio-economic
infrastructures that are similarly situated within the same danger areas as equally threatened and at
high risk:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.

Roads
Schools and Educational Institutions
Hospitals and Medical Clinics
District and Barangay Health Stations
Barangay Gymnasiums
Barangay Halls and Day Care Centers
Wooden Bridges
Barangay Footwalks and Alleys

150

2011-2020 Iloilo City Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) Volume I: The Comprehensive Land Use Plan (Part 2 - The CLUP)

[Type a quote

Chapter 8: Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation

Republic of the
Philippines
Iloilo City
COMPREHENSIVE LAND
USE PLAN

Barangay

City Planning and Development


Office consultancy by: Palafox

City Planning and Development Office, Iloilo City, Philippines

151

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