Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 158

CARIBBEAN YOUTH

ENVIRONMENT NETWORK
DELEGATION REPORT
Of the fifteenth Conference of the Parties (COP 15)
under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK
December 7th to 18th, 2009

BEVON CURRIE
Head of Delegation

MARIAMA BRANKER
Advisor and Logistics Coordinator
Government of Holland Government of Barbados Government of St. Lucia

Government of St. Vincent


- SPECIAL THANKS-

RENEE BOYCE-DRAKES
REGIONAL CHAIRPERSON
CARIBBEAN YOUTH ENVIRONMENT NETWORK

The Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) would like to extend special thanks to 350.org,
SUSTAINUS and the Government of Holland (facilitated by the European Youth Forum) for the
financial assistance provided to the CYEN youth delegation to Copenhagen..

CYEN also thanks the Governments of St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines as well as Barbados
for allowing youth representatives from the CYEN youth delegation to Copenhagen, to participate in
their official national delegations.

Special appreciation for the support provided by the Honourable Stephenson King, Prime Minister of
Saint Lucia and Lead Head of Government with Responsibility for Sustainable Development in the
Quasi-Cabinet of CARICOM Heads of Government for the Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth
Declaration and for the youth sector in the Caribbean.

CYEN would like to specially recognise the following persons, who provided invaluable words of
advice, guidance and support to the CYEN and the Caribbean youth delegation:

Mr. Crispin Dáuvergne, Chief Sustainable Development and Environment Officer, Ministry of
Physical Development, Environment and Housing, Sustainable Development and
Environment Section, ST. LUCIA
Dr. Hon. Dennis Lowe, Minister of the Environment, Water Resources and Drainage,
BARBADOS
H.E. Dr. Dessima Williams, Ambassador/Permanent Representative of Grenada to the
United Nations
Mr. Edmund Jackson, Director, Ministry of Health and the Environment, ST. VINCENT AND
THE GRENADINES
Dr. Hon. Ester Byer-Suckoo, Former Minister of Youth Affairs, Family and Sports, BARBADOS
Dr. June Soomer, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary with responsibility for the
OECS, CARICOM and Diaspora Affairs, Office of the Prime Minister, ST. LUCIA
Ms. Paula Mohamed, Programme Manager-Democratic Governance, UNITED NATIONS
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME BARBADOS AND THE OECS
Mr. Rickardo Ward, Project Manager, Ministry of Environment, Water Resources and
Drainage, BARBADOS
Ms. Reynette Royer, Programme Assistant-Democratic Governance, UNITED NATIONS
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME BARBADOS AND THE OECS.
Mr. Selwyn Hart, Secretary at the Permanent Mission to the United Nations
Senator Hon. Maxine Mclean, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, BARBADOS
Dr. Ulric Trotz, Science Advisor, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, BELIZE

The CYEN thanks all persons who were involved in any way in the delegation‟s participation at the
Ffifteenth Conference of the Parties (COP 15) under the United Nations Framework Convention on
Climate Change (UNFCCC); Copenhagen, Denmark, December 7th-18th, 2010.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 4


CYEN delegates to the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention and
fifth Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP15/COP/MOP5), Copenhagen,
Denmark, December 7-18, 2009

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 5


- TABLE OF CONTENTS-

SECTION PAGE
Background 7
Preparations for Cop15 8
Objectives of the Delegation 13
Media Mobilisation 26
Personal Growth and Development 28
Analysis of COP15 30
Limitations 37
Recommendations 38
Conclusion 40
Appendix I 41
Appendix II 44
Appendix III 50
Appendix IV 57
Annex A 59
Annex B 82
Annex C 100
Annex D 114
Annex E 118
Annex F 125
Annex G 132
Annex H 144
About 157
Contact Information 158

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 6


- BACKGROUND -

The Caribbean Youth Environment communications and emission inventories

Network (CYEN) with the assistance of submitted by Parties. This is done in order
for the Conference of Parties to assess the
the Government of St. Lucia, the Dutch
effects of the measures taken by Parties and
Government and Sustainable Markets
the progress made in achieving the ultimate
Foundation (SUSTAINUS) deployed an
objective of the Convention.
eleven member observer delegation to
participate in the fifteenth Conference of the
Parties (COP 15) under the United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change
(UNFCCC) in Copenhagen, Denmark from
December 7 - 18, 2009.

COP 15
The Conference of Parties (COP)
The COP 15 was intended to finalise the
The Conference of Parties is the highest
terms for the next commitment period given
body of the UNFCCC and consists of
the expiration of Kyoto Protocol, which was
environment ministers from 190 countries
negotiated in 1997 and comes to an end in
who meet once a year in December to
2012.
discuss the convention‟s developments.
COP is responsible for reviewing the
implementation of the Convention and
examines the commitments of Parties in
light of the Convention‟s objective, new
scientific findings and experience gained in
implementing climate change policies in
addition to reviewing the national

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 7


- PREPARATIONS FOR COP15 -
Preparations for COP 15 Including: campaign planning, international
The CYEN Fourth Biennial Caribbean Youth climate policy and the Road to Copenhagen, on-
Exchange was held under the theme “Your line tools, media training in the Caribbean
Planet Needs You - UNite to Combat Climate context and more.
Change” in the Dominican Republic from
August 8th-15th, 2009. The Workshop was held at the FUNGLODE
facility and was supported by the United
Nations Development Programme (UNDP) for
Barbados and the OECS as well as the
Fundación Global Democracia y Desarollo
The Exchange was aimed at bringing together
(FUNGLODE), the parent organisation of
some thirty (30) youth leaders from across the
InteRDom.
wider Caribbean to learn valuable new skills,
ideas, and tactics for making their voices heard
Other sponsors included the Pan American
on an issue that will significantly impact
Development Foundation (PADF), PLAN
their future well-being. Especially, in light of
International, Peace Corps, Brigadas Verdes,
the fact that the population of the region is one
Consorcio Ambiental Dominicano (CAD), as
of the most vulnerable in the world to the
well as the Inter-institutional Technical Group
negative effects of climate change.
of the Secretary of Environment and Natural
Resources of the Dominican Republic.

Workshop facilitators came from CYEN,


350.org, PANOS Caribbean, the Dominican
Republic National Council for Climate Change
and Clean Developmental Mechanism as well as
PADF.
CYEN participants with Mr. Marcos Herrera, Executive
Director of FUNGLODE (centre), after he accepted a
plaque from CYEN on behalf of Dr. Leonel Fernández,
President of the Dominican Republic

The Exchange encompassed a Youth Climate


Change Advocacy Training Workshop which
covered a number of topics related to the theme,

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 8


-The Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration on Climate Change-

The Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth The declaration also calls for greater private
Declaration on Climate Change (SDCYD) was sector support in achieving reductions in
conceptualised and created by the youth leaders greenhouse gas emissions and more importantly
at the Fourth Biennial Caribbean Youth greater engagement of the youth sector in
Exchange. climate change dialogue.

The declaration calls upon Caribbean This document was the main tool for promoting
Governments to “create an enabling the Caribbean youth voice and for lobbying
environment for climate change education and Caribbean governments to support youth in being
to support a global reduction in greenhouse gas integrated into the official government
emissions to below 350 parts per million as well delegations to Copenhagen.
as a reduction in global average temperatures to
below 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2015.” To date, the SDCYD has been signed and
attained support from over 1000 young people
across the Caribbean.

Dr. Hon. Ester Byer-Suckoo Members of CYEN-St. Lucia with the


Former Minister of Youth, Family and Sports Hon. Stephenson King, Prime Minister of St. Lucia
signing the after a meeting seeking his support for the
Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 9


-The Selection Process-

As part of preparations for the UNFCCC COP 4. Special Envoy


15 in Copenhagen, CARICOM, through the 5. Caribbean Regional Field Coordinator (ex
Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, officio)
agreed to support the appointment of a
The CYACCC was to be a talented group of
CARICOM Youth Ambassador on Climate
individuals who will work together and act as
Change as part of the Caribbean‟s efforts to give
ambassadors for the CYEN as
visibility to the region's concerns
well as for Caribbean youth.
about climate change in the
The Corps would work to
months leading up to Copenhagen.
enhance youth participation and
The youth ambassador‟s purpose
the participation of the general
was to, among other things, play
Caribbean citizenry in climate
an active role in taking the
change issues by acting as
Caribbean youth message to the
liaisons between all Caribbean
global community and to be a part
people and in particular the
of the regional advocacy platform
youth of the region. The Ambassadors would
at CHOGM and at COP 15 in Copenhagen.
have the opportunity to participate in relevant
CYEN was approached to nominate a
CYEN activities on a regular basis and be an
representative to act in the capacity of
important part of the Network‟s growth.
Ambassador.

A committee was established by the regional


Notwithstanding the above, due to the large secretariat to review this process. However, due
number of activities and events that the Network to limited funding and feedback from the
was involved in over the months leading up to CCCCC, this was abandoned.
the COP15, CYEN proposed to assemble the
Caribbean Youth Ambassadorial Corp on Attempts were then made to enlist a high profile
Climate Change (CYACCC). The proposed person to act in the capacity of the Climate
structure of the Corps was: Change Youth Ambassador (CCYA). The
1. Dean CYEN regional secretariat, along with the
2. Vice Dean CCCCC decided to appoint Usain Bolt,
3. Ambassador Extraordinary and Ambassador- at-large for Jamaica and three time
Plenipotentiary
Olympic gold medalist, in the position of

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 10


CCYA. We attempted to contact Ambassador The members of the CYEN COP15 delegation
Bolt through the Office of the Prime Minister of were selected on an open application basis and
Jamaica, Bruce Golding. However, a response selected based on certain criteria including age,
from the Prime Minister‟s office indicated that gender, past experience representing youth from
Ambassador Bolt had began his training the region and nationality. This was to ensure
schedule and would not be able to act in the widespread representation of youth from across
position. the region.

Subsequently, CYEN received funding for Ultimately the delegation consisted of eleven
youth from the Caribbean to attend Copenhagen delegates, five males and six females from
from a variety of sources. SUSTAINUS, the Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St.
Canadian Youth Delegation (CYD), and the Lucia, St. Vincent and Trinidad and Tobago.
350.org campaign, all North American youth-
led NGOs, came together to raise funds to help The youth representatives from St. Lucia, who
youth from around the world attend and were selected by the CYEN COP15 selection
participate in these important negotiations. committee, were sponsored by the Government
of St. Lucia and the CCCCC. Table 1 below
As 350.org´s partner, in the Caribbean, CYEN clearly delineates the sources of funding for the
managed the selection process for the region. members of the youth delegation.
CYEN also ran the selection process for youth
from the region to attend the COP15 through
funding provided by the Dutch Government.

Name of participant Country Source of Funding


Arvis Mortimer Bahamas Dutch Government
Mariama Branker Barbados Sustainable Markets Foundation
Bevon Currie Guyana Dutch Government
Elon McCurdy Guyana Sustainable Markets Foundation
Aldrin Calixte Haiti Oxfam
Angela St. Denis St. Lucia St. Lucian Government

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 11


Nintus Magre St. Lucia St. Lucian Government- CCCCC
Shashion Thomas Jamaica Dutch Government
Roxanne Browne Trinidad and Tobago Dutch Government
Ryan Baseanoo Trinidad and Tobago Sustainable Markets Foundation
Yoland London St. Vincent Dutch Government

Table 1 Showing the Caribbean youth delegates and their source of funding

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 12


- OBJECTIVES -
On December 6th, 2009 the delegation held its first team meeting at the Bella Centre. The
meeting was purposed to identify the specific objectives of the delegation, identify
representatives to attend various events at the COP15 as well as to assign various roles and
responsibilities. Table 2 below identifies those roles and responsibilities designated to the
members of the youth delegation by the management team at COP15.

The specific objectives of the delegation were identified by the regional secretariat, the COP15
management team and the delegates. They are as follows:

1. To develop and strengthen linkages with NGO‟s, institutions


and donor agencies in an effort to mobilise financial and
technical support for the future work of CYEN

2. To represent the Caribbean youth voice and promote the


work of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN)
by participating in activities (including plenaries, side events
etc) to ensure that the Caribbean is represented

Name of participant Country Roles


Arvis Mortimer Bahamas Participant/ Youth Journalist
Mariama Branker Barbados CYEN Team Advisor and Logistics
Coordinator/350.org
Coordinator/Official Government
Delegate/ Media Coordinator
Bevon Currie Guyana Head of Delegation
Elon McCurdy Guyana Participant/Researcher
Aldrin Calixte Haiti Senior Team Advisor
Angela St. Denis St. Lucia Official Government delegate

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 13


Nintus Magre St. Lucia Official Government Delegate
Shashion Thomas Jamaica Participant/ Youth Journalist
Roxanne Browne Trinidad and Tobago Participant/ Researcher
Ryan Baseanoo Trinidad and Tobago Participant/Media Coordinator
Yoland London St. Vincent Official Government Delegate/CYEN
government liaison

Table 2 Showing the assigned roles of the Caribbean youth delegates

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 14


-MEETING OBJECTIVES -

To develop and strengthen linkages with NGO’s, institutions and


donor agencies in an effort to mobilise financial and technical
support for the future work of CYEN.

The Caribbean youth delegation met with both the Communication Director of Global Water
Partnership (GWP), Mr. Steven Downey and Executive Secretary Dr. Ania Grobicki.

-The Objectives of the GWP meetings -

1. To review the relationship between CYEN and GWP.


2. To emphasize the past work CYEN has done with the GWP
3. To explore the scope for future work between CYEN and GWP.

Members of the Caribbean youth delegation with Mr. Members of the Caribbean youth delegation with Dr.
Steven Downey (back row centre), Communications Ania Grobicki, (second from right) Executive
Director, Global Water Partnership Secretary, Global Water Partnership

-The Outcomes of the GWP meetings-

1. Representative of CYEN chosen to write an article on water for their magazine which is
to be published in February 2010.
2. Commitment to strengthen the partnership between the two organisations.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 15


The CYEN delegation also attended meetings with CYEN‟s partner 350.org. These meetings
included:
- Orientation meeting at the 350.org offices in the
VARTOV Centre..Thursday December 3rd, 2009.
Attendees: Mariama Branker and Ryan
Baseanoo
-Team meeting onboard the Noronna.
Tuesday, December 7th, 2009. Mariama Branker
- Team meeting onboard the Noronna Sunday,
December 13th, 2009. Mariama Branker
- Team meeting onboard the Noronna. Tuesday,
December 15th, 2009. Ryan Baseanoo
- Final Team meeting at the DanHostel. Sunday, Caribbean youth following 350.org meeting
th
December 20 , 2009. Mariama Branker

-Meeting Outcomes-

-Review of 350 strategic position at Copenhagen


-Review of side events of which 350.org would be
participating
-Determined the specific thematic areas such as
media and networking and develop strategies for
these specific areas
-The identification of specific team members for
the thematic areas.
-Review of logistical issues while in
Copenhagen and creation of feasible solutions to
these issues.
-Debriefing on COP15 process Caribbean youth delegation in solidarity with AOSIS

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 16


- PROJECT SURVIVAL PACIFIC -
Project Survival is made up of vibrant young 2. Share the views and opinions of Caribbean
volunteers, who live and work throughout youth on climate change via the
Australia and the Pacific. We have a wide presentation of the Santo Domingo
variety of personal and professional Caribbean Youth Delegations
backgrounds, but are united in our belief that 3. Create a declaration which reflects the
the world needs to listen to the voices of views and opinions of Pacific, Maldivean
those on the climate frontlines. Project and Caribbean youth on climate change
Survival objectives include: issues.
Assisting in setting up youth climate
networks in Pacific nations. The major outcome of the meeting with
Working on Pacific climate issues more Project Survival included the creation of the
regularly and comprehensively covered Small Island and Vulnerable States
in Australian, Pacific and world media. Declaration on Climate Change (SIVSD),
Attending the UN climate negotiations, available in APPENDIX IV of this report.
working to reframe the climate debate
around survival.

At the Conference of the Youth- Five


(COY-5), held between December 5th and
6th, meetings were held with Project
Survival-Pacific Youth.
The objectives of the meetings with Project
Survival were to:
1. Create an awareness of the work CYEN
has been doing in the region as it relates
to climate change.

Members of the CYEN delegation with


members of Project Survival-Pacific

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 17


- YOUNGO-
YOUNGO is an amalgamation of youth NGO‟s from around the globe, officially accredited
under the UNFCCC. The purpose of YOUNGO is to represent the youth voice at these
proceedings.

Constituencies have a functional role in the climate change processes a management tool The
constituency system contributes to enhance the participation of a myriad of individual
organisations by clustering them to allow more effective communication with the secretariat,
within each cluster, between clusters and with the Parties. Too many constituencies would
undermine that function. There are nine major stakeholder groups int he CSD process, based on
Agenda 21 categorizations. The main objectives of YOUNGO are to:
1. Designate focal point representatives for the global south and north.
2. Manage information dissemination (secretariat to youth networks), and to keep these
information channels updated..
3. Provide a unique feedback to secretariat (youth networks to secretariat, such as
nominations for participation to workshops…)
4. Respond to the secretariat requests and share information to facilitate the processes

Representatives of the Caribbean delegation attended some of the YOUNGO meetings.


Naturally, as there was no other Caribbean youth representation at the YOUNGO meetings,
CYEN was asked to fulfil this role. To explore the role of YOUNGO and determine the role that
the CYEN would within the YOUNGO organisation, a meeting was held with Mr. Aiden Abram
of YOUGO. The purpose of the meeting was to:
1. Determine the purpose and mandate of YOUNGO.
2. To determine how CYEN and YOUNGO could develop a mutually beneficial
relationship.
The outcomes of the meeting were:
1. Developing a relationship and a source for information exchange between YOUNGO
and the CYEN.
2. An informal agreement that CYEN would represent the Caribbean youth opinion at
YOUNGO meetings.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 18


3. Clarification of YOUNGO‟s role as a constituency and the determination that
affiliation with YOUNGO was not mandatory.

- MANY STONG VOICES -


Many Strong voices (MSV) is a programme being implemented by the Centre for International
Climate and Environmental Research – Oslo (CICERO). Their vision is to ensure the well-being,
security and sustainability of coastal communities in the Arctic and SIDS in response to climate
change.

-The Objectives of the Many Strong Voices programme -

1. To collaborate and build capacity in the Arctic and Small Island Developing States
so that people in these vulnerable regions have a stronger voice in:

o negotiating international and national measures to reduce greenhouse gas


emissions; and
o developing, strengthening and implementing adaptation strategies at the local,
national, regional and international levels.

2. To raise awareness about the effects of climate change on vulnerable regions in


general and on the Arctic and Small Island Developing States in particular:

o globally, to highlight the need for immediate mitigation action; and


o in the vulnerable regions, to empower people in these regions to respond to
climate change.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 19


3. To increase understanding of needs and solutions, and take practical measures on
adaptation by:

o developing community-driven comparative and integrated research on the socio-


economic and natural conditions that shape vulnerability and capacity to adapt to
climate change;
o undertaking practical, on-the-ground projects on adaptation in coastal
communities in the Arctic and Small Island Developing States;
o delivering targeted products to meet demands for information, and tools to assist
people in addressing climate change issues; and
o identifying and promoting mechanisms by which developed countries can provide
funds and resources to address the climate change adaptation needs of coastal
communities in the Small Island Developing States and some parts of the Arctic.

The MSV programme is developing along a number of parallel tracks, including research,
assessment, networking, support to regions and communities, communication and outreach, and
action on climate change mitigation.

MSV contacted the CYEN Executive Office requesting that the organisation make a presentation
on youth advocacy work in the region as it relates to climate change. Recognising the work
CYEN has done over the past few years on climate change, MSV asked that CYEN make a
presentation entitled “20 years of Inaction.” Ms. Roxanne Browne, was elected to make the
presentation on behalf of the group. The presentation was held on Thursday, December 17th
onboard the Noronna Symril ship.

In her presentation, Ms Browne, spoke about the work of CYEN in the Caribbean region in the
areas of education awareness and advocacy. She also outlined some of the activities the
organisation has embarked upon to counter the inaction over the years by leaders. A short poem
about 350ppm formed part of her presentation. A copy of the poem is available in APPENDIX
III of this document.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 20


In addition to the aforementioned networking initiatives, members of the delegation, collectively
and individually, sought to network and share information with organisations such as UNEP, The
Environmental Defence Fund, The Institute for Conservation and Sustainable Development of
the Amazonas, Natural Resources Defense Council, Climate Alliance as well as the Centre for
International Climate and Environmental Research. Information on other meetings can be found
in the member‟s delegation reports which are annexed to this report.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 21


To represent the Caribbean youth voice and promote the work
of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) by
participating in activities (including plenaries, side events etc)
to ensure that the Caribbean is represented

Each delegate was responsible for meeting with the


ministerial representatives of their respective country
delegations in an effort to build relationships and
strengthen those which already existed. During these
discussions the representatives were given an
overview of the organisation and the purpose of the
delegation‟s presence in Copenhagen and at the same
time presented with an information package of the
organisation.

Caribbean youth delegation with Mr. Edmund


The chief negotiator of the Bahamas briefed the Jackson (back row centre), Environment
Coordinator, Ministry of the Environment, St.
delegation on the history and intricacies of the Vincent and the Grenadines
negotiation process, as well as some of the
issues that were influencing the negotiations.

The chief negotiator of St Vincent and the Grenadines


created the avenue for the CYEN delegates to have
access to the AOSIS group as well as to meet and
discuss periodically with the group on a wide range of
issues. He also arranged for a representative from the
delegation to make a three minutes presentation at an
AOSIS plenary. However, given the restrictions placed
on the Bella Centre this did not materialize.
Caribbean delegation in conference with chief
negotiator from the Bahamas (front right)

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 22


During the delegation‟s effort to promote the
Caribbean youth opinion, the members of
the CYEN team held discussions with the
members of the negotiating team of the
Caribbean Community Climate Change
Centre (CCCCC) and with the Grenada
Permanent Representative to the United
Nations Ambassador and Chairperson of the
AOSIS group H.E. Dr. Dessima Williams.
On December 11th, 2009 during a press

Members of the Caribbean youth delegation


briefing Ambassador Williams publicly
presenting the Santo Domingo Declaration to Hon.
recognised the organisation and commended
Tillman Thomas, Prime Minister of Grenada
it for its climate change advocacy work.

Ambassador Williams requested that


members of the delegation provide periodic
logistical support to the AOSIS secretariat
for the remaining of the conference. The
delegation readily acceded to Ambassador
William‟s request.

This engagement though short lived gave us


the opportunity to interact with Mr. Angus
Friday from the World Bank and the lead
negotiators of the AOSIS. It was also

instrumental in the delegation meeting and


Members of the Caribbean youth delegation
meeting with Hon. Bharrat Jagdeo, President of
delivering its information package to several
Guyana
Prime Ministers.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 23


A meeting was held with Executive Minister of St Lucia, Hon. Mr. Stephenson
Secretary of the UNFCCC, Mr. Yvo de Boer King. as well as CARICOM Secretary
and a CYEN member who briefly General, H.E. Mr. Edwin Carrington;
introduced the organisation to the Secretary CARICOM Assistant Secretary-General
and outlined the purpose of the delegation at Human and Social Development, Dr Edward
the Conference. Greene; St Lucia's Ambassador
Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary with
responsibility for the OECS, CARICOM and
Diaspora Affairs, Office of the Prime
Minister and Public Relation, Dr June
Soomer, Officer of AOSIS Mr. Michael
Bascombe. CYEN was represented by Ms.
Mariama Branker, Mr. Nintus Magre, Ms.
Angela St. Denis and Ms. Yoland London.

Member of Caribbean youth delegation


and Yvo de Boer, UNFCCC Secretary
General

By the end of the conference all of the


CARICOM Head of Governments present at
the conference, high level technocrats
received copies of the CYEN information The meeting focused on the role CYEN can
package.1 play in environmental projects and activities
These efforts were augmented by a special within the Caribbean Community in general
meeting which delegation, courtesy of Prime with specific emphasis on the partnership
between CYEN – St Lucia and the St Lucian
1
The CYEN package included the Santo Domingo Government.
Caribbean Youth Declaration, CYEN contact
information and a brief of CYEN‟s work over three
years on climate change education and advocacy.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network - 24 -


Both the Secretary General and the Deputy organisation to be a part of the preparatory
Secretary General, expressed great interest work, drafting documentation and compiling
in working with CYEN in the future and existing documents on climate change and
their desire to see more young people youth for the summit.
involved in environmental matters especially
at the level of the CARICOM Youth He also spoke about getting youth
Ambassadorial Corps. throughout the region to speak to their
parliamentarians on the importance of taking
The Deputy Secretary General took the action against climate change. The meeting
opportunity to brief the CYEN culminated with the ceremonial handing
representatives on the over of the signatures
CARICOM Youth Summit collected from youth around
scheduled for January the region, in support of the
2010 in Suriname and to SDCYD, to Prime Minister
extend an invitation to the King.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network - 25


-
- MEDIA MOBILISATION-

Members of the Caribbean youth delegation being interviewed by Indi Mclymont-Lafayette,


PANOS Caribbean and Petre Williams-Raynor, Jamaica Observer

Throughout the delegation‟s stay in Copenhagen the various members participated in several
media engagements, aimed at promoting the Caribbean youth voice. Table 3 below highlights the
media sessions conducted by the CYEN delegation.

Name of Media House Date of Interview CYEN Representative

Copenhagen Television December 6th, 2009 Arvis, Shashion, Yoland and


Roxanne
CNN December 8th, 2009 Bevon , Roxanne

PANOS December 9th, 2009 Arvis, Bevon, Mariama,


Ryan, Elon, Shashion, Yoland
and Roxanne
Jamaica Observer December 9th, 2009 Arvis, Bevon, Mariama,
Ryan, Elon, Shashion, Yoland
and Roxanne
Global Observatory December 10th, 2009 Bevon

COP15 Newspaper December 15th, 2009 Ryan

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 26


UN Radio December 16th, 2009 Mariama, Angela and Nintus

MSV magazine December 17th, 2009 Roxanne, Mariama

French Television Station December 17th, 2009 Bevon, Yoland

Kaieteur News Paper January 4th, 2010 Bevon

Table 3. Showing media sessions conducted with Caribbean youth in Copenhagen

To enhance its effort to gain maximum publicity, the delegation in collaboration with the
Sustainable Markets Foundation and Project Survival held a joint press conference on December
15th 2009. A copy of the press statement is available in APPENDIX I. This press conference
was broadcast live on the UNFCCC website and resulted in an interview with UNRadio the
following day.

Caribbean Youth Delegation at the joint press conference with Project Survival Pacific
representative Raj Subhashini (second from left)

The purpose of the press conference was to publicly announce the Caribbean youth‟s support for
the AOSIS proposal, and the Liliendaal Declaration on Sustainable Development. The press
conference was also conducted to demonstrate support for the leadership demonstrated by
Caribbean leaders and to highlight the SDCYD as well as the SIVSD.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 27


- PERSONAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT -
The activities which the delegation The delegation also had access to a wide
participated in created tremendous volume of environmental literature which
opportunities for personal growth and will inform their intervention at the national
development for every and regional levels.
member of the delegation.
It also provided an opportunity
for them to view motion pictures
Members were given the
on environment related projects
opportunity to observe the
and programmes around the
negotiation process,
world as well as to see where
participate and formulate
training and educational
advocacy positions with their
opportunities are available.
peers, listen to presentations
and best practices of what
This exposure created the environment for
other non-governmental organisations, inter-
members to use the information received to
governmental organisations and
strengthen their respective CYEN chapter as
governments are doing in climate change.
well as the CYEN regional body.

-The Conference of Youth Five -

The Conference of Youth (COY) was held from December 5th to 6th at the
University of Copenhagen, City Campus. COY is a youth lead and youth
focused event which for the past five years has preceded the Conference of
Parties.

The COY5 was planned and implemented by youth from YOUNGO. It


included key note speeches as well as capacity and skill building workshops
in areas such as new media development, facilitation skills etc.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 28


The COY5 was an avenue to meet and interact with youth involved in climate change advocacy
from around the world. At the COY5, youth from the Small Island Developing States- the
Maldives, Pacific and Caribbean created the Small Island and Vulnerable States Youth
Declaration.

The document was fully supportive of the goals of the AOSIS shared vision document, the
Lilliendaal Declaration on Sustainable Development, the Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth
Declaration, the Pasifika Youth declaration and the Maldivian Youth declaration
on Climate Change

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 29


- ANALYSIS OF COP15 -
The UN Climate Change Conference in delegation attended the COP 15 negotiations
Copenhagen was, in many ways, an historic recognizing that our Caribbean leaders were
event. It marked the culmination of two clearly committed to the development of a
years of intensive negotiations under the legally binding agreement that would clearly
United Nations Framework Convention on outline specific targets to lower global
Climate Change (UNFCCC). It was also the carbon emission levels to below 350ppm
largest climate change conference, which and a reduction in global temperature rise to
saw over twenty thousand participants levels to no more the 1.5C.
including one hundred and fifteen (115)
heads of government in attendance. -The Copenhagen Accord-

However, feelings about the outcome of the However this did not materialize, instead a
COP 15 process are, at best, mixed and non-legally binding agreement termed
some even consider the Conference to be a “The Copenhagen Accord” was created in
failure. the final days of the conference by
representatives of the United States, China,
For the Caribbean Youth Environment Brazil, India and South Africa. The
Network‟s delegation it was a bitter sweet document was then officially accepted by
experience. The Caribbean Youth the UNFCCC as the outcome document of
Environment Network the COP15.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 30


Some of the major points of the Copenhagen these provisions ignores the urgency of
accord include: the climate change risk to the
o The provision of US$30 billion for the Caribbean‟s economy, food security
period 2010-2012 for adaption for and the health, wellbeing and safety of
Small Island and vulnerable states. the present. and future generations.
Long-term financing of a further
US$100 billion a year by 2020 will be By virtue of its very definition the accord is
mobilized from a variety of sources. simply a harmony of ideas of some of our
global heads of government. This document
o The establishment of four new bodies: a in our respective view has many short
mechanism on REDD- comings in that it does not
plus, a High-Level Panel specify any quantifiable
under the COP to study emission reduction objectives
the implementation of which in our view is a death
financing provisions, the sentence to Vulnerable
Copenhagen Green Islands and States.
Climate Fund and a
Technology Mechanism. Some critiques of the accord
include:

o A final statement of a o The lack of a clear

possibility to changing the operational mechanism for

long-term goal of how countries can access the

reducing global funds

temperature rise to levels of no more o No clear statement on how soon funds

the 1.5C. A position ardently argued by will be made available so that the

the Caribbean region and indeed all region can begin its mitigation and

small island states. The absence of adaptation programmes.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 31


Ultimately, the Caribbean needs a firm decision to be made on the climate change debate to be
made by the COP16 if we are to try to avoid the catastrophic impacts of climate change. We
cannot continue to have long negotiations without clear and legally enforceable outcomes.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 32


Specifically for the Caribbean region , COP 15 was successful for the following reasons:

i. The establishment of the sustainable ii. The creation of REDD plus


energy initiative fund- SIDS-Dock initiatives
Caribbean governments, along with the
REDD, or reduced emissions from
Pacific and Mediterranean countries
deforestation and forest degradation, is one
launched an initiative at the COP15 to
of the most controversial issues in the
reduce emissions and pursue low carbon
climate change debate. The basic concept is
development. SIDS-Dock is an institutional
simple: governments, companies or forest
mechanism which will allow small island
owners in the South should be rewarded for
nations to transition into clean energy
keeping their forests instead of cutting them
economies.
down. The idea of making payments to
discourage deforestation and forest
degradation was discussed in the
negotiations leading to the Kyoto Protocol,
but it was ultimately rejected.

It provides an opportunity for small islands


to access new technologies as well as
increased financing for mitigation efforts,
from public and private sources in the EU
and US carbon trade markets.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 33


REDD developed from a proposal in 2005 The above paragraph (paragraph 1b(iii)) is
by a group of countries calling themselves referred to as “REDD-plus,”it is the only
the Coalition for Rainforest Nations. Two agreed text we have on REDD.
years later, the proposal was taken up at the
Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC in For Caribbean countries, with large forests
Bali (COP-13). An agreement on REDD such as Guyana, Suriname and Belize.
was to be made at COP-15. REDD-plus presents a sustainable way of
developing their economies while preserving
In 2007 at the COP 13, „The Bali Road the natural environments.
Map” was created. It included “The Bali
Action Plan” which identified a two-track
process (Convention and Kyoto Protocol)
aimed at the identification of a post-2012
global climate system, which was to be
adopted by COP15. The Bali Action Plan
called for “Policy approaches and positive
incentives on issues related to reducing
emissions from deforestation and forest
degradation in developing countries; and the Guyana so far has been leading this
role of conservation, sustainable initiative in the region with the development
management of forests and enhancement of of tits Low Carbon Development Strategy.
forest carbon stocks in developing (http://www.lcds.gov.gy/images/stories/Doc
countries”. uments/second%20draft%20for%20review
%20-
%20guyana%20low%20carbon%20develop
ment%20strategy.pdf)
The Copenhagen Accord acknowledges the
importance of REDD-plus. REDD plus will
ensure that rain forest countries like Guyana
benefit from rainforest protection incentives,
which were not accessible to them under the

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 34


Kyoto protocol. However, in the the foundations for a relationship between
development of REDD-plus the role of the their national CYEN chapter and their
indigenous peoples, whose depend on the respective governments.
forest for their livelihoods, must be carefully Those CYEN team members who were
considered. members of their national delegations were
able to get the Caribbean and indeed Small
iii. Development of the relationship Island Developing States (SIDS) youth
between Caribbean youth and
opinion directly to our leaders.
our governments

One of the major goals of the Caribbean


iv. Building relationships with
youth delegation was to have us integrated
other civil society organisations
into our respective national delegations, to
ensure access to the negotiation process and To us the greatest success of COP 15

to sessions which would normally be was the provision of a platform, for

restricted to high level technocrats, greater activism and collaboration by

presidents and prime ministers. members of civil society on the need to


address the issue of climate change. It

Despite the fact that this was not the case for provided the opportunity for the

all the members of the team, the negotiations development and strengthening of

provided an avenue for CYEN youth to lay networks for youth and civil society.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 35


The success of the delegation can be measured by the outcomes and outputs of the work done by
the delegation members in Copenhagen.

1. The members of the Caribbean


3. As a result of the work of the delegation
Community Climate Change
influential organisation all sought
negotiation team, President of Guyana,
audience with the delegation to get a
Prime Minister of St Lucia, Belize,
better understanding of the work of the
Bahamas and heads of delegation for all
organisation and to explore possibilities
Caribbean member states received the
of future collaborations.
information packet, which outlined the
work of the organisation and its
position on climate change.

2. The Chairperson and lead negotiators of


the AOSIS were informed about the
organisation and its work which the
publicly commended in their press
conference to present the group‟s
position paper- the AOSIS protocol2.

2
(http://www.slideshare.net/ecopreneur/aosis-
proposal-for-kp-survival-and-new-copenhagen-
protocol-final).

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 36


- LIMITATIONS -
While, the Caribbean youth delegation was successful in achieving some of its goals and
objectives, it is of critical importance to highlight that there were also several limitations which
prevented the team from operating to its fullest. These issues included:

1. Non-governmental organisations were not 3. No response was received from


allowed access to the Bella Centre in the regional media houses when contacted
final week of negotiations. This meant to provide updated information on the
that networking and other important tasks COP15 process. This meant that the
could not have been conducted by all Caribbean public could not be updated
members of the organisation This was on the state of the COP 15 process,
further compounded by the especially from the perspective of
implementation of secondary high level Caribbean youth.
passes which prevented some members of
the delegation from participating in the 4. In some instances team members
final negotiations. reported hostility and indifference when
approaching their government leaders
2. Due to the team receiving sponsorship on being integrated into the official
from various sources, the delegation was delegations to the COP15. This speaks
booked in different locations for to some government representatives not
accommodations. This hindered the team fully understanding the importance of
from engaging in team-building activities incorporating youth in the climate
and conducting necessary meetings. change process. However, we do
recognise that as youth we must
develop the relationship with our
governments and demonstrate clear
commitment to the cause to ensure
integration into the process.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network


37
- RECOMMENDATIONS-

The following list of recommendations is intended to enhance any further Caribbean youth
presence at the COP negotiations. These include:

1. Networking 2. Media Mobilisation


o Establishing and building o To build upon public awareness and

connections with youth from the education programmes on climate

international youth climate change and COP15 process, it is

movement with the view of important for the media to be

exchanging ideas and understanding involved. The media play a very

the priorities of all regions. These important role in getting information

connections will provide the to the general public and to young

opportunity to share technical people. Caribbean governments

capacity among youth organisations. should include a journalist or media


correspondent in their delegations.

o Every effort should be made to Their role would be to provide

continue to build relationships with updates on the process at

Caribbean government leaders. It is Copenhagen.

of critical importance that youth be .

accredited as part of their official


delegations, to ensure that Caribbean o Alternatively, national CYEN

youth can fully participate in the chapters should receive daily

COP process. reports from any future COP


delegations so that up-to-date
o A task force should be established in information can be dispersed to
CYEN to identify funding, local media houses. This will help
collaboration and project to build the awareness of the COP
opportunities with the aim of negotiations with the general public
prioritising for future COPs and at a national level. Where possible
climate change programming. these connections with the media

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 38


should be made prior to the 4. Capacity Building
departure of the CYEN team. o National chapters should host

o Greater use should be made of training workshops on working

social media (Facebook, Ning) to effectively with the media as well

get information to the public. as on the UNFCCC process and


climate policy. This will help to

3. Selection Process build on training received at

o Participants who apply to attend regional and international levels.

the COP should have participated


in local or regional media training
as well as should demonstrate clear
understanding of the UNFCCC
process and outcomes of previous
negotiations.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 39


- CONCLUSION -
The UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen was, in many ways, an historic event. It
marked the culmination of two years of intensive negotiations under the United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The high-level segment brought
together 115 Heads of State and Government, and was widely reported as one of the largest high-
level gathering outside New York.

Although the results derived from the conference were not as expected, it provided a wealth of
opportunities for CYEN as a movement. It created a pool of exposed and knowledgeable human
resources with the capacity to strengthen the movement as well as an opportunity for the
organisation to access information and networks that will boost its work in the future.

The views and perspectives of the CYEN delegation to the COP15 are important to allow for a
comprehensive review of the entire process leading up to and at the COP. As a result the reports
of the members of the delegation have been annexed to this document for review.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 40


APPENDIX I

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 41


Caribbean Youth Environment Network

PRESS RELEASE
December 15, 2009

December 15, 2009, Copenhagen, Denmark. Today the Caribbean Youth Environment
Network joins forces with our colleagues from Sustainable Marketing – 350.org, Project
Survival, Youth from the Pacific and the Maldives to announce our unequivocal support for the
AOSIS proposal for the survival of the Kyoto Protocol and a Copenhagen Protocol to enhance
the implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The
content of this document illustrates a comprehensive approach toward ensuring the survival of
our small islands and vulnerable states. This document details the mitigation and adaptation
measures needed to ensure the survival of our small island territories that make up the Pacific
and Caribbean regions. These proposals embodied in this document are not only reasonable but
achievable all that is required is a demonstration of leadership and political will.

In this regard, we wish to publicly commend the astute leadership of Ambassador, Dr. Dessima
Williams and the vision, unity and “stick-to-itiveness and singleness of purpose” demonstrated
by the leaders and negotiators, of the two regions throughout the negotiation process.

As this historic conference come closer to the end, it is our hope that the AOSIS proposal serves
as the impetus for the remaining negotiations, and that our leaders will deliver a legally binding
agreement that commits to the reduction of support CO2 emissions to below 350 parts per
million (ppm) and a global temperature level of not more than1.5 degrees Celsius to ensure our
survive on December 18th 2009.
The Caribbean Youth Environment Network, as a regional youth organisation, has-been
consistent in both words and deeds in its contribution to the regional and global climate change
debate and programme. Thus, at our just concluded, 4th biennial youth Exchange in the
Dominican Republic in August of this year, youths from around the region conceptualized and
affix their signatures to the Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration on Climate Change. A
document which outlines; the vision of the Caribbean youths, supports the CARICOM

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 42


governments position on climate change as stated in the Lilliendaal Declaration on Sustainable
Development and the AOSIS shared vision document.

In keeping with our continuous path of advocacy, the CYEN joined forces with Project Pacific, a non
governmental organisation from the Pacific to address the global developmental challenge of climate
change. The collaboration has been developed out of a common goal and purpose by youth from both
regions to ensure the survival of their vulnerable island homes. In demonstration of civil society
support in both regions, the Caribbean and Pacific youth crafted “The Small Islands and Vulnerable
States Declaration on Climate Change” . The document lobbies global government leaders to deliver
a legally binding agreement that commits to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to below 350
parts per million (ppm) and an increase in global temperatures to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius.

It is the hope of the Caribbean and Pacific youth that the same spirit of camaraderie, passion and
commitment to consensus that dominate the atmosphere of the youth discussions will transient into the
negotiation rooms and create the environment for leaders to seal the deal on December 18, 2009

For more information on the Caribbean Youth Environment Network and the Small Island and
Vulnerable States Declaration please contact: Bevon Currie, Caribbean Delegation Head-
bevon_currie@yahoo.com and or Mariama Branker, Caribbean Delegation Advisor cfc@cyen.org ;
Te#: 4376055/56

CYEN is the largest youth environmental network in the Caribbean and spans over 17 territories. The
organisation holds a distinguished track record of youth lead environmental and sustainable development
advocacy. This year CYEN is focusing on the issues of climate change as well as the promotion of sustainable
livelihoods through education and awareness of young Caribbean people. 350.org is an international
grassroots campaign on climate change. Its primary goals are to raise awareness and build a movement
around the need for a global treaty that puts the planet back on track to 350ppm CO2, the agreed-upon safe
level of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere.
###

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 43


APPENDIX II

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 44


Draft decision -/CP.15
Proposal by the President
Copenhagen Accord

The Heads of State, Heads of Government, Ministers, and other heads of delegation present
at the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009 in Copenhagen, In pursuit of the
ultimate objective of the Convention as stated in its Article 2, Being guided by the
principles and provisions of the Convention, Noting the results of work done by the two Ad
hoc Working Groups, Endorsing decision x/CP.15 on the Ad hoc Working Group on Long-
term Cooperative Action and decision x/CMP.5 that requests the Ad hoc Working Group
on Further Commitments of Annex I Parties under the Kyoto Protocol to continue its
work, Have agreed on this Copenhagen Accord which is operational immediately.

1. We underline that climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time. We emphasise
our strong political will to urgently combat climate change in accordance with the principle of
common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. To achieve the ultimate
objective of the Convention to stabilize greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere at a
level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system, we shall,
recognizing the scientific view that the increase in global temperature should be below 2 degrees
Celsius, on the basis of equity and in the context of sustainable development, enhance our long-
term cooperative action to combat climate change. We recognize the critical impacts of climate
change and the potential impacts of response measures on countries particularly vulnerable to its
adverse effects and stress the need to establish a comprehensive adaptation programme including
international support. GE.09-71523

2. We agree that deep cuts in global emissions are required according to science, and as
documented by the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report with a view to reduce global emissions so as
to hold the increase in global temperature below 2 degrees Celsius, and take action to meet this
objective consistent with science and on the basis of equity. We should cooperate in achieving
the peaking of global and national emissions as soon as possible, recognizing that the time frame
for peaking will be longer in developing countries and bearing in mind that social and economic

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 45


development and poverty eradication are the first and overriding priorities of developing
countries and that a low-emission development strategy is indispensable to sustainable
development.

3. Adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change and the potential impacts of response
measures is a challenge faced by all countries. Enhanced action and international cooperation on
adaptation is urgently required to ensure the implementation of the Convention by enabling and
supporting the implementation of adaptation actions aimed at reducing vulnerability and building
resilience in developing countries, especially in those that are particularly vulnerable, especially
least developed countries, small island developing States and Africa. We agree that developed
countries shall provide adequate, predictable and sustainable financial resources, technology and
capacity-building to support the implementation of adaptation action in developing countries.

4. Annex I Parties commit to implement individually or jointly the quantified economy-wide


emissions targets for 2020, to be submitted in the format given in Appendix I by Annex I Parties
to the secretariat by 31 January 2010 for compilation in an INF document. Annex I Parties that
are Party to the Kyoto Protocol will thereby further strengthen the emissions reductions initiated
by the Kyoto Protocol. Delivery of reductions and financing by developed countries will be
measured, reported and verified in accordance with existing and any further guidelines adopted
by the Conference of the Parties, and will ensure that accounting of such targets and finance is
rigorous, robust and transparent.

5. Non-Annex I Parties to the Convention will implement mitigation actions, including those to
be submitted to the secretariat by non-Annex I Parties in the format given in Appendix II by 31
January 2010, for compilation in an INF document, consistent with Article 4.1 and Article 4.7
and in the context of sustainable development. Least developed countries and small island
developing States may undertake actions voluntarily and on the basis of support. Mitigation
actions subsequently taken and envisaged by Non-Annex I Parties, including national inventory
reports, shall be communicated through national communications consistent with Article 12.1(b)
every two years on the basis of guidelines to be adopted by the Conference of the Parties. Those
mitigation actions in national communications or otherwise communicated to the Secretariat will
be added to the list in appendix II. Mitigation actions taken by Non-Annex I Parties will be

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 46


subject to their domestic measurement, reporting and verification the result of which will be
reported through their national communications every two years. Non-Annex I Parties will
communicate information on the implementation of their actions through National
Communications, with provisions for international consultations and analysis under clearly
defined guidelines that will ensure that national sovereignty is respected. Nationally appropriate
mitigation actions seeking international support will be recorded in a registry along with relevant
technology, finance and capacity building support. Those actions supported will be added to the
list in appendix II. These supported nationally appropriate mitigation actions will be subject to
international measurement, reporting and verification in accordance with guidelines adopted by
the Conference of the Parties.

6. We recognize the crucial role of reducing emission from deforestation and forest degradation
and the need to enhance removals of greenhouse gas emission by forests and agree on the need to
provide positive incentives to such actions through the immediate establishment of a mechanism
including REDD-plus, to enable the mobilization of financial resources from developed
countries.

7. We decide to pursue various approaches, including opportunities to use markets, to enhance


the cost-effectiveness of, and to promote mitigation actions. Developing countries, especially
those with low emitting economies should be provided incentives to continue to develop on a
low emission pathway.

8. Scaled up, new and additional, predictable and adequate funding as well as improved access
shall be provided to developing countries, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the
Convention, to enable and support enhanced action on mitigation, including substantial finance
to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD-plus), adaptation,
technology development and transfer and capacity-building, for enhanced implementation of the
Convention. The collective commitment by developed countries is to provide new and additional
resources, including forestry and investments through international institutions, approaching
USD 30 billion for the period 2010 . 2012 with balanced allocation between adaptation and
mitigation. Funding for adaptation will be prioritized for the most vulnerable developing
countries, such as the least developed countries, small island developing States and Africa. In the

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 47


context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation, developed
countries commit to a goal of mobilizing jointly USD 100 billion dollars a year by 2020 to
address the needs of developing countries. This funding will come from a wide variety of
sources, public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including alternative sources of finance.
New multilateral funding for adaptation will be delivered through effective and efficient fund
arrangements, with a governance structure providing for equal representation of developed and
developing countries. A significant portion of such funding should flow through the Copenhagen
Green Climate Fund.

9. To this end, a High Level Panel will be established under the guidance of and accountable to
the Conference of the Parties to study the contribution of the potential sources of revenue,
including alternative sources of finance, towards meeting this goal.

10. We decide that the Copenhagen Green Climate Fund shall be established as an operating
entity of the financial mechanism of the Convention to support projects, programme, policies and
other activities in developing countries related to mitigation including REDD-plus, adaptation,
capacity-building, technology development and transfer.

11. In order to enhance action on development and transfer of technology we decide to establish
a Technology Mechanism to accelerate technology development and transfer in support of action
on adaptation and mitigation that will be guided by a country-driven approach and be based on
national circumstances and priorities.

12. We call for an assessment of the implementation of this Accord to be completed by 2015,
including in light of the Convention.s ultimate objective. This would include consideration of
strengthening the long-term goal referencing various matters presented by the science, including
in relation to temperature rises of 1.5 degrees Celsius.

APPENDIX I
Quantified economy-wide emissions targets for 2020
Annex I Parties Quantified economy-wide emissions targets for 2020 Emissions reduction in
2020 Base year

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 48


APPENDIX II
Nationally appropriate mitigation actions of developing country Parties
Non-Annex I Actions

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 49


APPENDIX III

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 50


ROXANNE BROWN

Good afternoon to one and all. Today I present to you, an opportunity of a life time. I present to
you…a unique specie…I present to you Me! A representative of an endangered specie, an
endangered Caribbean people… an endangered Caribbean youth…an endangered Caribbean
culture…living on endangered Caribbean lands…located in an endangered Caribbean
Region…just because of 20 years of inaction. My dear audience, those of you not from the
Arctic and other Small Island Developing States, you are seated among cultures and people who
are at risk and whose presence you are privileged to be in now, for if things are to continue as
they were for the past 20 years, these precious cultures in another twenty years represented here
today, may be no more.

Year one…a cry went out…greater damage is occurring simultaneously…the cries are
heard…nothing is done.
Year two…the cries continue…additional damage is occurring…the cries are heard…nothing is
done.
Year three…the cries continue to ring out…unfortunately ignored…the damage increases…but
nothing is done…
Year 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,9, 10 the cries continue but they fall upon deaf ears, year
`11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20…December 17, 2009…the cries are still being heard…are they
still being ignored…the damage will be exacerbated…something must be done…the inaction
must cease.

Twenty years ago I was 5 years old when calls were being made by many to take some action to
curtail the problems that are now facing us head on. I was not old enough to defend myself or the
land that I still depend on for my sustenance, but I relied on the voices of those who cared about
my health and well being who were crying out for something to be done. It is 20 years later, and
I am old enough to speak, but unfortunately, the cries of those who went on before me and those
who are here with us today, instead of being used for praising the world‟s community on a job
well done in curbing the issue of climate change, our voices are being used as a warning alarm to
show the world that something needs to be done now by the perpetrators of climate injustice. We

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 51


do not want the type of so-called action that they have been doing for the past 20 years, but we
want the action that will take responsibility, stop any contribution to climate change and begin to
act on correcting the damage done.

When my people, first began noticing the effects of climate change, we did not have the
compilation of the data collected by the brilliant scientists that put down the figures purported by
the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change. But what we did have and continue to have are
eyes that observed what was taking place around us and the basic common sense, which showed
us that something eerie was occurring, that was different from what we heard from the stories
told by our ancestors. Dead reefs, dying oceans, drying lands, destroyed beaches, changing
seasons, hotter days, .… nothing was done when we spoke out before because we don‟t have the
strings to pull on in the economic corridors. But our lands are on the brink of total devastation,
the lands that we depend on heavily for our survival is in danger to sea level rise…our countries
are susceptible to more frequent and more intense hurricanes, our health is at risk because of
disease carrying vectors…and hundreds of lives have been lost and are still in danger of being
lost…yet 20years of inaction has lapsed on by…and those that did the most harm, and have
brought on this climatic war, have put us, the more susceptible and innocent ones, at the
forefront of the battlefield.

Because we are a people who have survived during devastating times, my organisation the
Caribbean Youth Environment Network, to whom I can attribute my presence today at the
COP15, designed a climate change advocacy and awareness programme on climate change. The
programme was called the Caribbean Youth Programme for Action on Climate Change
(CARYPACC), the idea was to have projects which were conducted around the region which
dealt with mitigation and adaptation on climate change. We have committed to act, though we do
not have the commitment from those guilty of endangering my future and the future of those who
I represent.

The CYEN‟s biennial exchange was held in Guyana during August 2007 under the
theme of "Save our Climate! Save our Earth! Youth can make a difference!!" The event

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 52


which focused on environmental impacts brought about by climate change, attracted the
participation of twenty youth from four Caribbean territories and Argentina

From July to October of 2008 CYEN conducted an on-line course on the Introduction to
Ecology, Environment and Development. Over 40 youth and youth leaders participated
in this project. It was designed to expand the knowledge of CYEN members in various
areas including: Energy and Cycles; Biodiversity; Land degradation; Water resources;
Climate Change; Pollution; Alternative energy; Waste management and Disaster
management. The course was carried out by university trained members of CYEN who
had the experience and knowledge in the particular subject areas. It was a clear example
of the transference of information within the Network.

On April 21st, in celebration of Earth Day, CYEN was contracted by the UNDP to
facilitate a national focus group consultation to discuss energy and sustainable
development in the Caribbean. The outcomes of the process will assist and support Small
Island Developing States (SIDS) in the identification of venues and practices that can
help improve their energy security and access to sustainable energy services. This project
will also provide support encouraging changes and cooperation within and between the
countries of the region in order to facilitate more effective and successful provision of
sustainable energy services and progress toward attainment of energy security.

These are just a few of the actions we have taken to do our part in this battle. We make a
call for below 350ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere and no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius rise in
temperate. We support the CARICOM (Caribbean Community‟s call for reduction in emissions
expressed in the Lilliendaal Declaration, Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration on
climate change, the AOSIS stand and we support those who are committed to see a fair, and
Legally Binding document agreed upon at COP 15.

I reiterate the major objectives being put forward by the Many Strong Voices Group.
1) To reduce global emissions to avoid
catastrophic warming while recognizing common but differentiated

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 53


responsibilities between nations;
2) To ensure adequate adaptation measures are
taken in areas facing the adverse impacts of climate change now and in the
future; and
3) To include human rights protections in the final agreement.
I would like to end with the reading of this poem written.

350, 1.5 and Me!

I see the thick dark smoke reaching for the skies


The smell
The view
I‟m coughing too
Who knew that mankind‟s goals of success
Would lead the world into one big mess
Uh hmmm…
But yet you ask me,
“What does 350 and 1.5 have to do with me?”

Ice melting
Rivers drying
Deserts growing
Forests slowing
Tides rising
Islands sinking
People relocating
Yet we keep polluting

Yes
Cause
Pockets are filling

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 54


Money is making
Houses expanding
But the environment is dying
Industries growing
But who cares…keep going
The environment is dying
Our environment is dying.
And still you ask me
“What does 350 and 1.5 have to do with me?”

The same polluting


The same contribution
To our atmosphere is causing
Ozone depletion
That money you make
It‟s killing our children
It‟s killing our future
It‟s killing our nation
And you still ask me
“What does 350 and 1.5 have to do with me?”

Stop the polluting


Stop the abusing
Stop the raping
Of our forests and resources
Sustainable use
Should be your only excuse
For using God‟s blessing
Of this Earth we depend on.

Alternative energy though costly at first

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 55


Is cheaper in the long run
Than repairing a damaged Earth
350ppm of CO2
1.5 degrees Celsius
Is what we are demanding you to do
Cause if we continue with this
Is overcoming Earth with death‟s destructive kiss.

We have done and are doing our part…I call on those who are responsible for this human rights
issue, to do theirs. The Caribbean Youth Environment Network thanks you for allowing us to be
part of this session.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 56


APPENDIX IV

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 57


Small Island and vulnerable States Youth Declaration on COP15
Negotiations.
Copenhagen, Denmark, 2009.
We the youth of the Small Island and vulnerable states support the AOSIS declaration on climate
change (2009), Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration on climate change (2009), and
Pasifika Youth Declaration on climate (2009) and urge world leaders to adopt the
recommendations included in these documents. It is our plea that the outcome of the negotiations
ensures the survival of vulnerable islands and states against the effects of climate change.

We the small island and vulnerable states are already facing serious environmental, economic
and social consequences as a direct result of climate change such as, cultural extinction due to
forced migration, increased propagation of disease such as dengue fever and malaria, threat to
our biodiversity, lack of food security and fresh water scarcity. We the youth of the Small Island
and vulnerable states feel that it is a great injustice that although our nations do not contribute
largely to global emissions, we are the ones paying the greatest price.

As the generation that will have to deal with the consequences of the decisions that global
leaders make at COP15 we demand that these decision makers recognise the importance and
urgency of creating legally binding agreements which will secure the survival of our Small
Island and vulnerable states.
We now need world leaders to commit and take responsibility and develop a fair, transparent and
equitable agreement that will ensure timely and sustainable access to financial and technical
resources for climate change mitigation and adaptation.
The time to act is now. The fact is we need to reduce green house gas emissions to 350 parts per
million to ensure our survival. 2 Degrees is too high, 1.5 to survive.
We are only asking for what is due to us, our right to our environment, our right to our homes,
our right to our cultures, our right to identities and our right to exist. Do not deny us, seal the
deal because survival is not negotiable.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 58


Disclaimer Note:
The views/opinions expressed in the Annexes of this report, belong to
the delegates of the COP15 youth delegation; and do not necessarily
reflect those of the CYEN Caribbean Secretariat.

ANNEX A

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 59


CARIBBEAN
YOUTH
ENVIRONMENT
NETWORK
TRAVEL REPORT FORM

Mariama Branker
3/1/2010

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 60


1.1 Name and position MARIAMA BRANKER
ADVISOR AND LOGISTICS COORDINATOR FOR THE
CARIBBEAN YOUTH DELEGATION
1.2 Places visited Copenhagen, DENMARK
1.3 Duration December 3rd-21st
1.4 Date of Report March 1st

1. PURPOSE OF TRIP

15th Conference of the Parties-United Nations Framework


Convention on Climate Change, December 7-18

5th Conference of Youth, December 5-6, 2009

2. SUMMARY OF WORK CARRIED OUT:


Caribbean Youth delegation advisor and logistics coordinator
Providing guidance and assistance to the members of the Caribbean
youth delegation.
Liasing with the executive team of the Caribbean youth delegation.
Marketing the Caribbean youth environment network with the
media, Caribbean member country representatives

Youth participant registered under the Sustainable Markets


Foundation
Attending youth meetings throughout the conference
Gaining experience on the United Nations process, specifically the
UNFCCC

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 61


Country delegate- representative of Barbados
Highlighting youth issues on climate change to the official Barbados
delegation
Establishing and forging relationships with the members of the official
UNFCCC Barbados delegation

3. FUNDING
Sponsorship for the participants was provided by the Sustainable Markets
Foundation in addition to the Dutch government. The following table
provides a list of the participants in addition to the source of funding for their
trip.

Participants who were sponsored by the Sustainable Markets Foundation


were fully funded their accommodation and airfare costs and a modest
stipend was given for food and incidentals while in Copenhagen.

However those persons who were funded by the Dutch and St. Lucian
governments were provided with a Daily Subsistence Allowance (DSA)
where they were expected to pay for their accommodation, food and other
incidental costs. Airfare costs were also fully funded for these participants.

Name of participant Country Source of Funding


Arvis Mortimer Bahamas Dutch Government
Mariama Branker Barbados Sustainable Markets Foundation
Bevon Currie Guyana Dutch Government
Elon McCurdy Guyana Sustainable Markets Foundation
Angela St. Denis St. Lucia St. Lucian Government
Nintus Magre St. Lucia St. Lucian Government- CCCCC
Shashion Thomas Jamaica Dutch Government

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 62


Yoland London St. Vincent Dutch Government
Roxanne Browne Trinidad and Tobago Dutch Government
Ryan Baseanoo Trinidad and Tobago Sustainable Markets Foundation

Table 1 Showing the members of the Caribbean youth delegation and the
source of funding

4. DETAILS OF ACTIVITIES:

4.1 Details of Presentation (if applicable)

CYEN participated in the Many Strong Voices side event which was held on
the 18th of December at the Noronna Symril Line. The theme for the event
was 20 years of Inaction. The initiative was hosted by the Many Strong
Voices-Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research- Oslo.
The representative for the presentation was Roxanne Brown, member of the
CYEN Trinidad and Tobago chapter.

She spoke passionately about government’s action/inaction within the


Caribbean region on the issue of climate change. She also spoke of the work
that CYEN has been doing over the past five (5) years on climate change,
workshops, educational activities and advocacy.

Ms. Brown finished the presentation with a poem about 350ppm and how a
reduction in greenhouse gases to this limit will benefit the Caribbean.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 63


4.2 Details of Meetings attended
As the Caribbean Field Coordinator for CYEN and 350.org, where possible I
attended some of the 350.org meetings. The purpose of which were to:
Determine and assign the specific roles that members of 350.org
would play in the actions in Copenhagen.
Outline the advocacy work within each region on climate change.
To provide attendees with a summary on the progress of the COP15
negotiations.

I also attended meetings with the Hon. Stephenson King and the St. Lucia
delegation. The meeting was held in the Bella Centre in the final week when
there were restrictions on access for civil society members. As a result only
those of us accredited under our national delegations (namely Ms. London,
Mr. Magre, Ms. St. Denis and myself) were able to attend the meetings.

4.3 Highlights of conference sessions, workshops and field trips

The Conference of Youth 5

The Conference of Youth (COY) was held from


December 5th to 6th at the University of Copenhagen,
City Campus.

COY is a youth lead and youth focused event which for


the past five years has preceded the Conference of Parties.

The COY5 was planned and implemented by youth from around the world. It
included key note speeches as well as capacity and skill building workshops
in areas such as new media development, facilitation skills etc.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 64


The COY5 is an avenue to meet and interact with youth involved in climate change
advocacy from around the world. The agenda for the Conference of Youth is
attached to this document in Appendix 1.

At the last COY, youth from the Small Island Developing States- the Maldives, Pacific
and Caribbean created the Small Island and Vulnerable States Youth Declaration –

The document was fully supportive of the goals of the AOSIS shared vision
document, the Lilliendaal declaration on sustainable development, the Santo
Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration, the Pacifica youth declaration and the
Maldivian youth declaration on climate change

The Conference of Parties 15

The Conference of Parties 15 (COP15) was held from December 7th-18th, 2009 at
the Bella Centre in Copenhagen, Denmark. Since 1995, member states have been
meeting annually in Conferences of the Parties (COP) to assess progress in dealing
with climate change, as well as, to negotiate the Kyoto Protocol to establish legally
binding obligations for developed countries to reduce their greenhouse gas
emissions.

Country delegates, scientists, international organisations and civil society


organisations gathered from around the world to create what was to be a
monumental decision on the climate change debate. The COP15 was expected to
produce a fair and equitable deal, which would replace the Kyoto protocol which is
to expire in 2012.

The document was expected to contain a clear framework on financing for


adaptation and mitigation in developing countries. It was also set to establish clear
parameters for reducing global greenhouse gas emissions in developing and
developed countries.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 65


In the first week of negotiations a document termed “The Danish Text” was
circulated to specific member states, international organisations and the
international press. The document was said to have been created by the prime
minister of Denmark along with other member countries of the Global North.
Tuvalu and the African Nations protested against the use of the text at the COP15 as
its creation was outside of the legal framework of the Convention on Climate
Change.
For developing countries, the Danish Text was problematic for the following
reasons:

Developing countries would be responsible for double the emission cuts (per
capita) of industrial nations
Developing countries would be forced to adopt broad per-capita emission
cuts.
The UN would not be able to administer climate change programs, including
finance, measurement, and reporting.
Developing countries would be split into two groups: "the most vulnerable"
and those who can afford some or all of their disaster management needs.
This would separate the lobbying efforts of emerging powers like China from
the interests of poorer nations like South Africa.
The text included a goal of reducing global average temperatures to below 2
degrees Celsius.
The document had several blank spaces in areas such as provision for
financing and dates for collective emission peaks.

AOSIS
This is the negotiating bloc for small island developing states within the COP
negotiations. The body is made up of members from the Caribbean, Pacific and
Mediterranean Islands. The countries recognising the need for a clear, concise
document which represented the needs of the most vulnerable developing nations,
created the AOSIS proposal.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 66


The AOSIS proposal established the main target for the reduction of global
greenhouse gas emissions, a clear provision for financing for developing countries
based on the principle of common but differentiated responsibility. The document
built on the foundations of the Kyoto protocol and even included amendments to
the Kyoto document. The document seeks to develop frameworks for
implementation for capacity building, technology transfer and financing. It also
acknowledges the important role of stakeholder participation to achieve its goals.

The ‘Copenhagen Accord’ was the final document produced from the COP15. It was
drafted on the final day of the negotiations by United States, China, Brazil, India and
South Africa. The document was then formally adopted by the UNFCCC as the
outcome document of the COP15.

The accord is not a legally binding document, but rather an important first step
towards the development of a fully-ratifiable and legally binding treaty. However,
the document does not state a deadline for the creation of this strong agreement.

In terms of mitigation actions scientific evidence indicates the currently stated goal
of a necessary reduction by Annex 1 countries of ‘5% below 1990 levels’ will not
realistically achieve a reduction of global temperatures to the Accord stated 2
degrees Celsius. Scientific evidence has also indicated that the goal of 2 degrees
Celsius is inadequate to reducing the impacts of climate change.

The Copenhagen Accord also mentions the establishment of the REDD framework.
However, it currently does not mention indigenous people (or other civil society
stakeholders) and the impact the adoption of REDD-plus will have on their
livelihoods.

The good news about the Accord is that major emitting developing countries must
now commit to mitigation actions under the Accord. The Accord also recognises the
need for the provision of immediate financing by developed countries for

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 67


adaptation for the least developed countries and small island developing states.

The ‘silver lining’ for small island developing states such as those in the Caribbean
is the below phrase from the Copenhagen Accord.

“…consideration of strengthening the long-term goal referencing various matters


presented by the science, including in relation to temperature rises of 1.5 degrees Celsius.”
The Copenhagen Accord, 2009

This clause provides hope that the future legally-binding treaty on climate change
could include a goal of 1.5 degrees Celsius. However, this would mean that the
stated mitigation actions would need to be drastically adjusted, given that they are
already inadequate to achieving 2 degrees Celsius.

Table 2 presents some of the major points from the Danish text, the Copenhagen
Accord and AOSIS proposal.. It gives an indication on the main points on financing,
mitigation and REDD plus from these documents.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 68


The Danish Text The Copenhagen Accord Caribbean/AOSIS proposal

Financing The Parties share the view that the strengthened -30 billion dollars for developing nations over -at least 1% of rich country GDP spent on
financial architecture should be able to handle the period 2010-2012 "climate-inflicted damage est. 300 billion
gradually scaled up international public support. dollars.
International public finance support to -100 billion dollars by 2020 to be jointly
developing countries [should/shall] reach the mobilised by developing countries drawing on a -Financial support for planning and
order of [X] billion USD in 2020 on the basis of variety of sources: "public and private, bilateral implementing adaptation actions that
appropriate increases in mitigation and address loss and damage in developing
and multilateral, including alternative sources of
adaptation efforts by developing countries. countries shall be provided by developed
finance."
countries through the adaptation and
- Developed country parties commit to deliver insurance windows of the Multilateral Fund
A green climate fund will also be established
upfront public financing for 2010-201[2] on Climate Change
corresponding on average to [10] billion USD under the deal. It will support projects in
annually for early action, capacity building, developing countries related to mitigation,
technology and strengthening adaptation and adaptation, "capacity building" and technology
mitigation readiness in developing countries as transfer.
set forth in Attachment C;

Temperature Rise -A limit global average temperature rise to a A view to reduce global emissions so as to hold -A limit global average temperatures to well
maximum of 2 degrees above pre-industrial the increase in global temperature below 2 below 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-
levels. degrees Celsius, and take action to meet this industrial levels and to long term
-Support the goal of a peak of global emissions as objective consistent with science and on the stabilization of greenhouse gas
soon as possible, but no later than
basis of equity. concentrations in the atmosphere to well
[2020],
below 350 parts per million of carbon

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 69


- Support the goal of a reduction of global annual -Annex I shall reduce their overall emissions of dioxide.
emissions in 2050 by at least 50 percent ghg’s by at least 5 per cent below 1990 levels in
versus 1990 annual emissions, equivalent to at - Parties agree that reductions in global
the commitment period 2008 to 2012.
least 58 percent versus 2005 annual emissions. greenhouse gas emissions by more than 85%
below 1990 levels by 2050
The Parties contributions towards the goal
should take into account common but different - Annex I parties to the UNFCCC to reduce
responsibility and respective capabilities and a their collective GHG emissions by more
long term convergence of per capita emissions. than 45% below 1990 levels by 2020, and
more than 95% below 1990 levels by
2050, given their historical responsibility

REDD (Reducing Reducing emissions from deforestation and We recognize the crucial role of reducing All Parties shall aim to halt forest cover loss
Emissions from forest degradation is an important aspect of the in developing countries by 2030 at the
emission from deforestation and forest
Deforestation and necessary response to climate change. latest and reduce gross deforestation in
Developing countries should contribute to degradation and the need to enhance removals developing countries by at least 50 per cent
Degradation)
enhanced mitigation actions through reducing by 2020 compared to current levels.
of greenhouse gas emission by forests and agree
emissions from deforestation and forest
degradation, maintaining existing and enhancing on the need to provide positive incentives to All Parties shall undertake policy approaches
carbon stocks, and enhancing removals by and positive incentives on issues relating to
such actions through the immediate
increasing forest cover. reducing emissions from deforestation and
establishment of a mechanism including REDD- forest degradation (REDD) in developing
Parties underline the importance of enhanced countries; and the role of conservation,
plus, to enable the mobilization of financial
and sustained financial resources and positive sustainable management of forests and
incentives for developing countries to, through a resources from developed countries. enhancement of forest carbon stocks in
series of phases, build capacity and undertake developing countries.
actions that result in measurable, reportable and
We decide to pursue various approaches,
verifiable greenhouse gas emission reductions
and removal and changes in forest carbon stocks including opportunities to use markets, to

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 70


in relation to reference emission levels. enhance the cost-effectiveness of, and to
promote mitigation actions. Developing
Parties collectively endorse the framework in
Decision X/CP.15, with the aim of stabilizing countries, especially those with low emitting
forest cover in developing countries by [X] and
economies should be provided incentives to
reducing gross deforestation in developing
countries by at least [XX]% by [2020] compared continue to develop on a low emission pathway.
to current levels.

Carbon markets
An effective mitigation response requires a well
functioning carbon market. Carbon markets have
the potential to deliver significant mutual
benefits to developed and developing countries
in terms of both on-the-ground investment and
environmental and energy security co-benefits.

The Parties will work towards an effective and


orderly transition from project based to more
comprehensive approaches. They will also
improve the existing project based carbon
market mechanism in order to ensure the
environmental integrity and further underpin a
broad and liquid carbon market. [In this regard,
the Parties endorse decision X3/CP.15 and
X2/CMP.5.]

TABLE 2 HIGHLIGHTING THE MAIN POINTS FROM THE DANISH TEXT, THE COPENHAGEN ACCORD AND THE AOSIS PROPOSAL

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 71


YOUNGO
YOUNGO is the representative body of the youth at the COP15. All individual youth and
youth groups must seek approval from YOUNGO to coordinate any actions at any future
COPs, having been awarded what is known as constituency status from the UNFCCC.

The constituency is currently in a probationary period with this status, and it will be
formalized prior to COP17 in 2011Constituency status legitimizes organisations as
stakeholders in the UNFCCC process.

The rationale for the establishment of YOUNGO was, for youth:


To be seen as a more legitimate player in the negotiations. To gain greater access
to meetings, resources and information
To improve our ability to be effective within the UNFCCC process.
To be a direct channel of communication with the UNFCCC secretariat
To be included in ongoing discussions with other civil society constituencies –
Labour, Gender, Indigenous Peoples, ENGOs, BINGOs, etc
To be allowed time for plenary statements
To be permitted representation at workshops leading up to future Conferences of
Parties.
To be assisted with representation at any restricted activity (things like high level
VIP events)
To be able to book rooms at COP for meetings, press conference, etc
To access information such as deadlines, logistics developments, etc

It is important to note that YOUNGO was established and is operated by youth from the
Global North. Additionally, the Caribbean does not currently hold as has never been
invited to hold a position on the Bottomlining Team (BLT). The BLT is the executive body
of the YOUNGO organisation.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 72


4.4 PR and Media links

The youth delegation participated in a variety of public relations initiatives. The list below
represents the initiatives in which I participated.
i. Interview with PANOS Caribbean
ii. Press Conference with Pacific Island Youth
iii. Radio Interview with UNRadio
iv. Interview with CICERO-Many Strong Voices journalist

It must also be stated that the interview with UNRadio received circulation on radio
stations around the Caribbean for two weeks in the month of January via BBC Caribbean.

A concise list of all of the press events attended by the Caribbean youth delegation
and dates is provided in the overall delegation report.

4.5 Networking

The Caribbean youth delegation had the following networking objectives:

To strengthen the relationship with CYEN partner and affiliate organisations

To forge relationships with other non-governmental organisations and


agencies to foster cooperation and to mobilize resources to enhance the
work of CYEN.

To forge relationships with Caribbean governments to highlight the


Caribbean youth opinion on climate change and the work of CYEN.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 73


I was able to meet and interact with high level technocrats from Belize, Barbados,
Grenada and St. Vincent. I also spoke with representatives of civil society organisations
such as Project Survival, Many Strong Voices and YOUNGO. In all cases I was able to
effectively speak on the work of the CYEN in the Caribbean on climate change.
Additionally, expressing the interests of the organisation to continue to work on climate
change advocacy and education..

A full list of contacts and contact information was presented to the CYEN office of the
Executive Coordinator.

CONCLUSION

The work done by the members of the CYEN as part of the Caribbean Climate Change
Programme for Action laid the foundation for Caribbean youth to be present at the COP15.

The Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration, along with the information provided by
the regional office prior to the Conference of Parties provided the delegates at the COP15
on the past work of CYEN on climate change.

The Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration was also important as it demonstrated
the commitment of Caribbean youth to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions and
their support for the position of our Caribbean government leaders.

Despite severe climatic conditions and logistical constraints, I believe that the impact of
the youth delegation was felt at COP15. I hope that any future delegations can build upon
our experiences to ensure that they take full advantage of available resources and
avenues to promote CYEN and the Caribbean youth position on COP15.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 74


APPENDIX 1
TRACK 1: UNDERSTANDING COP15

COP overview and orientation


Update on climate science
What's at stake? Climate impacts and climate justice
What's at stake? Climate impacts and climate justice (Español)
What's at stake? Climate impacts and climate justice (Français)
Youth at COP + YOUNGO -- Sebastien Duyck
Utilizing a day at the COP effectively

COP policy nuts and bolts


The Process of the UNFCCC 1 -- Thomas SPENCER
The Process of the UNFCCC 2 (advanced session) -- Thomas SPENCER
Specific AWG-LCA, AWG-KP policies -- Matt Maiorana
Adaptation
Carbon trading, CDM, and REDD - Josh Kahn Russell and Gemma Tillack
Finance + Technology Transfer

TRACK 2: BUILDING A GLOBAL MOVEMENT FOR COP AND BEYOND

Storytelling 1 - Phil Aroneanu and Casper Ter Kuile


Storytelling 2 - Phil Aroneanu and Casper Ter Kuile
New media - reporting out from the COP - blogging, video, photo, social media - Project
Survival Media
Traditional media - writing press releases, media advisories - Jamie Henn and Landry
Ninteretse
Talking to the Media
Talking to the Media (Español)
Talking to the Media (Français)

Local campaign tactics and best practices (for COP and for home)
Actions and stunts - action factory folks, Josh Kahn Russell

Strategy 101
Goals, targets, tactics - with COP as our case example - Whit, Phil, etc., Aussies
Campaign nuts and bolts - fundraising, networking, lobbying, event organizing, etc...
Group facilitation and running good meetings –Ibraheem Ceesay/Madeleine Gardner

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 75


APPENDIX 2

Small Islands and Vulnerable States Youth Declaration on


COP15 Negotiations.
Copenhagen, Denmark, 2009.
We the youth of the Small Island and vulnerable states support the AOSIS declaration on
climate change (2009), Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration on climate change
(2009), and Pasifika Youth Declaration on climate (2009) and urge world leaders to adopt the
recommendations included in these documents. It is our plea that the outcome of the
negotiations ensures the survival of vulnerable islands and states against the effects of climate
change.

We the small island and vulnerable states are already facing serious environmental, economic
and social consequences as a direct result of climate change such as, cultural extinction due to
forced migration, increased propagation of disease such as dengue fever and malaria, threat to
our biodiversity, lack of food security and fresh water scarcity. We the youth of the Small
islands and vulnerable states feel that it is a great injustice that although our nations do not
contribute largely to global emissions, we are the ones paying the greatest price.

As the generation that will have to deal with the consequences of the decisions that global
leaders make at COP15 we demand that these decision makers recognise the importance and
urgency of creating legally binding agreements which will secure the survival of our Small
Island and vulnerable states.
We now need world leaders to commit and take responsibility and develop a fair, transparent
and equitable agreement that will ensure timely and sustainable access to financial and
technical resources for climate change mitigation and adaptation.
The time to act is now. The fact is we need to reduce green house gas emissions to 350 parts
per million to ensure our survival. 2 Degrees is too high, 1.5 to survive.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 76


We are only asking for what is due to us, our right to our environment, our right to our homes,
our right to our cultures, our right to identities and our right to exist. Do not deny us, seal the
deal because survival is not negotiable.

APPENDIX 3

Draft decision -/CP.15


Proposal by the President
Copenhagen Accord

The Heads of State, Heads of Government, Ministers, and other heads of delegation
present at the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009 in Copenhagen, In
pursuit of the ultimate objective of the Convention as stated in its Article 2, Being guided
by the principles and provisions of the Convention, Noting the results of work done by the
two Ad hoc Working Groups, Endorsing decision x/CP.15 on the Ad hoc Working Group
on Long-term Cooperative Action and decision x/CMP.5 that requests the Ad hoc
Working Group on Further Commitments of Annex I Parties under the Kyoto Protocol to
continue its work, Have agreed on this Copenhagen Accord which is operational
immediately.

1. We underline that climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time. We
emphasise our strong political will to urgently combat climate change in accordance
with the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective
capabilities. To achieve the ultimate objective of the Convention to stabilize greenhouse
gas concentration in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous
anthropogenic interference with the climate system, we shall, recognizing the scientific
view that the increase in global temperature should be below 2 degrees Celsius, on the
basis of equity and in the context of sustainable development, enhance our long-term
cooperative action to combat climate change. We recognize the critical impacts of
climate change and the potential impacts of response measures on countries particularly

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 77


vulnerable to its adverse effects and stress the need to establish a comprehensive
adaptation programme including international support.
2. We agree that deep cuts in global emissions are required according to science, and as
documented by the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report with a view to reduce global
emissions so as to hold the increase in global temperature below 2 degrees Celsius, and
take action to meet this objective consistent with science and on the basis of equity. We
should cooperate in achieving the peaking of global and national emissions as soon as
possible, recognizing that the time frame for peaking will be longer in developing
countries and bearing in mind that social and economic development and poverty
eradication are the first and overriding priorities of developing countries and that a low-
emission development strategy is indispensable to sustainable development.

3. Adaptation to the adverse effects of climate change and the potential impacts of
response measures is a challenge faced by all countries. Enhanced action and
international cooperation on adaptation is urgently required to ensure the
implementation of the Convention by enabling and supporting the implementation of
adaptation actions aimed at reducing vulnerability and building resilience in developing
countries, especially in those that are particularly vulnerable, especially least developed
countries, small island developing States and Africa. We agree that developed countries
shall provide adequate, predictable and sustainable financial resources, technology and
capacity-building to support the implementation of adaptation action in developing
countries.

4. Annex I Parties commit to implement individually or jointly the quantified economy-


wide emissions targets for 2020, to be submitted in the format given in Appendix I by
Annex I Parties to the secretariat by 31 January 2010 for compilation in an INF
document. Annex I Parties that are Party to the Kyoto Protocol will thereby further
strengthen the emissions reductions initiated by the Kyoto Protocol. Delivery of
reductions and financing by developed countries will be measured, reported and verified
in accordance with existing and any further guidelines adopted by the Conference of the
Parties, and will ensure that accounting of such targets and finance is rigorous, robust
and transparent.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 78


5. Non-Annex I Parties to the Convention will implement mitigation actions, including
those to be submitted to the secretariat by non-Annex I Parties in the format given in
Appendix II by 31 January 2010, for compilation in an INF document, consistent with
Article 4.1 and Article 4.7 and in the context of sustainable development. Least
developed countries and small island developing States may undertake actions
voluntarily and on the basis of support. Mitigation actions subsequently taken and
envisaged by Non-Annex I Parties, including national inventory reports, shall be
communicated through national communications consistent with Article 12.1(b) every
two years on the basis of guidelines to be adopted by the Conference of the Parties.

Those mitigation actions in national communications or otherwise communicated to the


Secretariat will be added to the list in appendix II. Mitigation actions taken by Non-
Annex I Parties will be subject to their domestic measurement, reporting and
verification the result of which will be reported through their national communications
every two years. Non-Annex I Parties will communicate information on the
implementation of their actions through National Communications, with provisions for
international consultations and analysis under clearly defined guidelines that will ensure
that national sovereignty is respected. Nationally appropriate mitigation actions seeking
international support will be recorded in a registry along with relevant technology,
finance and capacity building support.

Those actions supported will be added to the list in appendix II. These supported
nationally appropriate mitigation actions will be subject to international measurement,
reporting and verification in accordance with guidelines adopted by the Conference of
the Parties.

6. We recognize the crucial role of reducing emission from deforestation and forest
degradation and the need to enhance removals of greenhouse gas emission by forests
and agree on the need to provide positive incentives to such actions through the
immediate establishment of a mechanism including REDD-plus, to enable the
mobilization of financial resources from developed countries.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 79


7. We decide to pursue various approaches, including opportunities to use markets, to
enhance the cost-effectiveness of, and to promote mitigation actions. Developing
countries, especially those with low emitting economies should be provided incentives
to continue to develop on a low emission pathway.

8. Scaled up, new and additional, predictable and adequate funding as well as improved
access shall be provided to developing countries, in accordance with the relevant
provisions of the Convention, to enable and support enhanced action on mitigation,
including substantial finance to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest
degradation (REDD-plus), adaptation, technology development and transfer and
capacity-building, for enhanced implementation of the Convention. The collective
commitment by developed countries is to provide new and additional resources,
including forestry and investments through international institutions, approaching USD
30 billion for the period 2010-2012 with balanced allocation between adaptation and
mitigation. Funding for adaptation will be prioritized for the most vulnerable
developing countries, such as the least developed countries, small island developing
States and Africa.

In the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation,


developed countries commit to a goal of mobilizing jointly USD 100 billion dollars a
year by 2020 to address the needs of developing countries. This funding will come from
a wide variety of sources, public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including
alternative sources of finance. New multilateral funding for adaptation will be delivered
through effective and efficient fund arrangements, with a governance structure
providing for equal representation of developed and developing countries. A significant
portion of such funding should flow through the Copenhagen Green Climate Fund.

9. To this end, a High Level Panel will be established under the guidance of and
accountable to the Conference of the Parties to study the contribution of the potential
sources of revenue, including alternative sources of finance, towards meeting this goal.

10. We decide that the Copenhagen Green Climate Fund shall be established as an
operating entity of the financial mechanism of the Convention to support projects,

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 80


programme, policies and other activities in developing countries related to mitigation
including REDD-plus, adaptation, capacity-building, technology development and
transfer.

11. In order to enhance action on development and transfer of technology we decide to


establish a Technology Mechanism to accelerate technology development and transfer
in support of action on adaptation and mitigation that will be guided by a country-driven
approach and be based on national circumstances and priorities.

12. We call for an assessment of the implementation of this Accord to be completed by


2015, including in light of the Convention.s ultimate objective. This would include
consideration of strengthening the long-term goal referencing various matters presented
by the science, including in relation to temperature rises of 1.5 degrees Celsius.

APPENDIX I
Quantified economy-wide emissions targets for 2020
Annex I Parties Quantified economy-wide emissions targets for 2020 Emissions reduction in
2020 Base year

APPENDIX II
Nationally appropriate mitigation actions of developing country Parties
Non-Annex I Actions

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 81


ANNEX B

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 82


NAME: Roxanne J Brown

CHAPTER: CYEN Trinidad and Tobago

EVENT: COY5 and COP15

LOCATION: Copenhagen, Denmark

DURATION OF EVENT: December 5-18th, 2009

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 83


My name is Roxanne J Brown, and I am 25 years old. I had the opportunity to represent the

Trinidad and Tobago chapter of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network in Copenhagen,

Denmark, at the COP15 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climatic Changes

(UNFCCC).

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 84


I believe the statement made by Mahatma Gandhi accurately revealed why the result of

COP15 was as it was.

“The earth provides for every man‟s need, not every man‟s greed.”

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 85


Conference of the Youth (COY 5)

A session on Clean Development Mechanisms

Attending the COY sessions that were held before the COP was quite informative and

educational. I was able to gain insight into issues that were critical to the decision making

process and understand the implications that these issues would hold in the outcome. I was

especially fascinated by the discussion about the lengthy process by which persons who wanted

to obtain resources for clean technology projects would have to go through, and the difficulties

that these small groups would face in getting the attention from the powers that be.

It was my initiation and introduction to the fact that the fight against climate change

was not merely a fight against sea level rise, or increasing temperatures, but it was a fight

against the hearts of men who were greedy for economic gain. It was very disconcerting to

realize that persons had my future held hostage based on their determination of whether or not

there would be any financial benefits from releasing the clean technology on the market. My

future was in the hands of many individuals who thought that survival was negotiable when it is

clear that nature does not negotiate but acts according to what we have done with it or to it.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 86


A banner hung with a message of survival.

I was very impressed with the passion of the youth who were well informed and also

ready to collaborate with each other and their leaders to bring positive change to the process.

A highlight of the COY for me was the speech delivered by the International Executive

Director of Greenpeace, Kumi Naidoo. It was amazing to see this man, who was a symbol of

hope and encouragement for the youth, speak passionately about the urgency with which we

must act in ensuring that our leaders recognize that we, the youth, would be the ones who will

have to deal problems due to the mismanagement of the environment. He alluded to the fact

that those who are promoting the destruction of the environment directly or indirectly, by not

taking action to stop the contributions to climate change, would not be around to be affected by

the destruction, so we must take positive actions now. The passion displayed by the youths was

remarkable.

I believe as a member of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network, it was a great

experience meeting other passionate youth, with knowledge and a willingness to make a

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 87


difference in this global issue, and draw from the different ideas to communicate our unified

struggle.

CYEN team and Kumi Naidoo

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 88


COP15

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 89


THE NEGOTIATION PROCESS

It was a privilege to be able to witness the negotiation process and gain some

understanding on how the views of different parties are developed. I also gained a renewed

respect for the letter of the law and how simple words can jeopardize the intention of a

negotiator if not used accurately. At times, I did wonder why the negotiations had to be so

complicated when the solutions seemed so obvious and simple, but I realized that many factors

were in play and parties could not take anything for granted lest they be taken advantage of.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 90


SIDE EVENTS

I was thoroughly excited about the side events that occurred which were informative

sessions which dealt with various issues as they relate to climate change. One of these was

Climate Change and Human Rights which gave me a greater understanding of the impact that

climate change would have on different people groups all over the world. These sessions were

also a great opportunity to share the views of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network as we

spoke on behalf of the Caribbean Youth.

One of these side events held by the Many Strong Voices we had the opportunity to

share on ‟20 years of inaction.‟

“Good day to one and all. Today I present to you, an opportunity of a life time. I present

to you…a unique species…I present to you Me! A representative of an endangered species, an

endangered Caribbean people… an endangered Caribbean youth…an endangered Caribbean

culture…living on endangered Caribbean lands…located in an endangered Caribbean

Region…just because of 20 years of inaction. My dear audience, those of you not from the

Arctic and other Small Island Developing States, you are seated among cultures and people

who are at risk and whose presence you are privileged to be in now, for if things are to continue

as they were for the past 20 years, these precious cultures in another twenty years represented

here today, may be no more.

Year one…a cry went out…greater damage is occurring simultaneously…the cries are

heard…nothing is done.

Year two…the cries continue…additional damage is occurring…the cries are heard…nothing is

done.

Year three…the cries continue to ring out…unfortunately ignored…the damage increases…but

nothing is done…

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 91


Year 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,9, 10 the cries continue but they fall upon deaf ears, year

11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20…December 17, 2009…the cries are still being heard…are they

being ignored…the damage is exacerbated…something must be done…the inaction must

cease!

Twenty years ago I was 5 years old when calls were being made by many to take some

action to curtail the problems that are now facing us head on. I was not old enough to begin to

defend myself or the land that I still depend on for my sustenance, but was relying on the

voices of those who cared about my health and well being who were crying out for something

to be done. It is 20 years later, and I am old enough to speak, but unfortunately, the cries of

those who went on before me and those who are here with us today, instead of being used for

praising the world‟s community on a job well done in curbing the issue of climate change, our

voices are being used as a warning alarm to show the world that something needs to be done

now by the perpetrators of climate injustice. We do not want the type of so-called action that

they have been doing for the past 20 years, but we want the action that will take responsibility,

stop any contribution to climate change and begin to act on correcting the damage done.

When my people, first began noticing the effects of climate change, we did not have the

compilation of the data collected by the brilliant scientists that put down the figures purported

by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change. But what we did have and continue to

have are eyes that observed what was taking place around us and the basic common sense,

which showed us that something eerie was occurring, that was different from what we heard

from the stories told by our ancestors. Dead reefs, dying oceans, drying lands, destroyed

beaches, changing seasons, hotter days, .… nothing was done when we spoke out before

because we don‟t have the strings to pull on in the economic corridors. But our lands are on the

brink of total devastation, the lands that we depend on heavily for our survival is in danger to

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 92


sea level rise…our countries are susceptible to more frequent and more intense hurricanes, our

health is at risk because of disease carrying vectors…and hundreds of lives have been lost and

are still in danger of being lost…yet 20 years of inaction has lapsed on by…and those that did

the most harm, and have brought on this climatic war, have put us, the more susceptible and

innocent ones, at the forefront of the battlefield.

Because we are a people who have survived during devastating times, my

organization the Caribbean Youth Environment Network, to whom I can attribute my presence

today at the COP15, designed a climate change advocacy and awareness programme on climate

change. The programme was called the Caribbean Youth Programme for Action on Climate

Change (CARYPACC), the idea was to have projects which were conducted around the region

which dealt with mitigation and adaptation on climate change. We have committed to act,

though we do not have the commitment from those guilty of endangering my future and the

future of those who I represent.

The CYEN‟s biennial exchange was held in Guyana during August 2007

under the theme of "Save our Climate! Save our Earth! Youth can make a

difference!!" The event which focused on environmental impacts brought

about by climate change, attracted the participation of twenty youth from

four Caribbean territories and Argentina

From July to October of 2008 CYEN conducted an on-line course on the Introduction to

Ecology, Environment and Development. Over 40 youth and youth leaders participated

in this project. It was designed to expand the knowledge of CYEN members in various

areas including: Energy and cycles; Biodiversity; Land degradation; Water resources;

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 93


Climate Change; Pollution; Alternative energy; Waste management and Disaster

management. The course was carried out by university trained members of CYEN

(most where from the Barbados chapter) had the experience and knowledge in the

particular subject areas. It was a clear example of the transference of information within

the Network.

On April 21st, in celebration of Earth Day, CYEN was contracted by the UNDP to

facilitate a national focus group consultation to discuss energy and sustainable

development in the Caribbean. The outcomes of the process will assist and support

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in the identification of venues and practices that

can help improve their energy security and access to sustainable energy services. This

project will also provide support encouraging changes and cooperation within and

between the countries of the region in order to facilitate more effective and successful

provision of sustainable energy services and progress toward attainment of energy

security.

These are just a few of the actions we have taken to do our part in this battle. We make

a call for below 350ppm of CO2 in the agreement and no more than 1.5 degrees Celcius rise in

temperate. We support the CARICOM (Caribbean Community‟s call for reduction in emissions

expressed in the Lilliendaal declaration, Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth declaration on

climate change, the AOSIS stand and we support those who are committed to see a fair, Legally

Binding document agreed upon in COP 15.

I reiterate the major objectives being put forward by the Many Strong Voices Group.

1) To reduce global emissions to avoid catastrophic warming while recognizing

common but differentiated responsibilities between nations;

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 94


2) To ensure adequate adaptation measures are taken in areas facing the adverse impacts

of climate change now and in the future; and

3) To include human rights protections in the final agreement.

I would like to end with the reading of this poem written.

350, 1.5 and Me!

I see the thick dark smoke reaching for the skies


The smell
The view
I‟m coughing too
Who knew that mankind‟s goals of success
Would lead the world into one big mess
Uh hmmm…
But yet you ask me,
“What does 350 and 1.5 have to do with me?”

Ice melting
Rivers drying
Deserts growing
Forests slowing
Tides rising
Islands sinking
People relocating
Yet we keep polluting

Yes

Cause

Pockets are filling


Money is making
Houses expanding
But the environment is dying
Industries growing
But who cares…keep going
The environment is dying

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 95


Our environment is dying.
And still you ask me
“What does 350 and 1.5 have to do with me?”

The same polluting


The same contribution
To our atmosphere is causing
Ozone depletion
That money you make
It‟s killing our children
It‟s killing our future
It‟s killing our nation
And you still ask me
“What does 350 and 1.5 have to do with me?”

Stop the polluting


Stop the abusing
Stop the raping
Of our forests and resources
Sustainable use
Should be your only excuse
For using God‟s blessing
Of this Earth we depend on.

Alternative energy though costly at first


Is cheaper in the long run
Than repairing a damaged Earth
350ppm of CO2
1.5 degrees Celsius
Is what we are demanding you to do
Cause if we continue with this
Is overcoming Earth with death‟s destructive kiss.

We have done and are doing our part…I call on those who are responsible for this human rights

issue, to do theirs. The Caribbean Youth Environment Network thanks you for allowing us to

be part of this session.

THE END

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 96


We also had the opportunity to be involved in the Global South Youth meeting with

YOUNG and to support the Pacific islanders as they made a call for a legally binding

agreement. It was also a privilege being able to support CARICOM and the Small Island

Developing States as they presented their cause to the world and stood strongly on demanding

1.5 degrees and 350ppm Carbon Dioxide.

ABRUPT END TO THE BELLA CENTRE

It was very disappointing that coming to the end of COP15 restrictions were placed on

the individuals that were allowed inside the Bella Centre. We were very fortunate to have side

events which were held outside the Bella Centre to attend.

REACTION TO THE RESULTS

I would like to express my disappointment with the results of COP15. As a graduate in

the field of environmental studies and the knowledge of the importance of making a difference

now, to ensure that there are measures put in place to protect our environment from further

degeneration, I felt that those who held my future in their hand, knowingly chose economic

gain over the survival of our nations and our future. I would be dishonest if I would say that I

was surprised by the results, because I feel that man has become so economically driven that it

seems that money is what matters and not the lives of individuals. I was also angry, to know

that the means of solving environmental degradation was available, but men chose to greed. I

do not believe that the concerns of the young were adequately addressed because of this same

greed. Financial agendas were placed as first priority.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 97


RESPONSE TO THE RESULTS

I would never forget a mentor saying to me, “Roxanne, if someone got knocked down

by a car, and there was still life within the person, you would not watch them and say, „You‟re

going to die anyway so I‟ll leave you,‟ but you would still try to help the person as much as

possible to ensure they increase their chance of survival.” This is my response to the situation.

Even though the fight against climate change seems hopeless at times, I will still be an

advocate for climate justice and the cause of the environment. I will, as much as possible,

dedicate time to bring more awareness, and influence those in authority and those in my

country and other spheres of influence. Hopefully, this would encourage the leaders to make a

greater effort in COP16 and come to a legally binding agreement.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 98


THANKS

Smiles of hope!

I would like to firstly, express my thanks to the regional director of the Caribbean

Youth Environment Network for giving me the opportunity to apply for the scholarship to

attend COP15 and COY 5, and the support from the national coordinator of the Trinidad

chapter for the support throughout the application process.

I would also like to extend my appreciation to the Dutch government and all those who

were involved in making this opportunity possible, including the 350 Campaign for

accreditation.

Last, but certainly not the least, I would like to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ,

for the safe journey to and from Copenhagen Denmark, to participate in this event.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 99


ANNEX C

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 100


Members of CYEN delegation

Prepared by
Ms. Elon Mc Curdy

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 101


Background

The fifteenth Conference of the Parties (COP 15) under the United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was held in the Capital of
Denmark, Copenhagen from December 7-18 2009. Conference of the Parties is
the highest body of the UNFCCC and consists of environment ministers from 192
countries who meet once a year to discuss the convention‟s developments and
further plans. The conference was considered to be one of the most important
given that it was intended to finalise the terms for the next commitment period
given the expiration of the Kyoto Protocol, which comes to an end in 2012.

The Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) with the assistant of the
Government of St Lucia, European Youth Forum and Sustainable Marketing
Foundation – 350. 0rg. were able to assemble an eleven (11) member delegation
to the conference. The delegation was led by Mr. Bevon Currie who is the
National Coordinator of CYEN- Guyana. The conference was attended by over
fifty thousand civil society participants mostly youths from around the world;
coming together to give their voice to an issue that will affect each and every one
of us now or in the future.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 102


Purpose of Trip

The purpose of travel to Denmark was to attend the UNFCCC Conference of the
Parties (COP15) to experience, participate in activities and witness the
negotiation process. The conference was held in tandem with other related
conferences and meetings to discuss climate change issues.

The objectives of attending the conference were;

To promote the Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration on Climate


Change and the work of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network,

To network with other nongovernmental organisations, financial


institutions and donor agencies in an effort to mobilize financial and
technical support for future work of CYEN,

To observe and understand the COP process and to build personal capacity
and to acquire information which will boost the work of CYEN in the
future.

Detail of Activities

With the aforementioned objectives in mind members of the delegation began


departing their respective territories and arrive in Copenhagen from the 3 rd of
December 2009 up until the 13 of December 2009. Some members of the
delegation arrived ahead and were able to participate in the Conference of Youth

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 103


(COY) while the others arrived days later. The last to arrive were Nintus Magre
and Angela St. Denis. The delegation was divided due to their sponsor
organizations thus Mariama Branker, Ryan Baseanoo and myself stayed on the
Noroona Cruise Line while Bevon Currie, Sashion Thomas, Yoland London,
Roxanne Brown and Arvis Mortimer, Nintus Magre and Angela St. Denis stayed
at a Danhostel. Most of the conference activities took place at the Bella Center
which was approximately fifteen minutes (15) train ride from Kongens Ntorv, the
community where the latter group was housed on board the Noronna symril ferry.

Daily Activities

8th December, 2009


Met my national delegation representative- Ms. Geeta Chanderpaul
Meeting with Pacific youths to discuss and prepare a draft youth
declaration
Attended a Plenary on Carbon Development Mechanism (CDM)

9th December 2009


Attended YOUNGO meeting
Group Meeting
Meeting with Ms. Indie McLymont-Lafeyette of Panos and Ms Petre
Williams of the Jamaica Observer
Attended an interview with St. Kittian Bill Liao, Special Envoy for
Sustainable Development and the Environment who spoke about the
effect that climate change had on agriculture.
Attended a Plenary session on CDM with Former COP President

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 104


Met Valmiki Kempadoo of Terra Forma Developments Ltd, who wanted
CYEN to produce a video about what the works of the organisation to be
aired in Trinidad and Tobago.

10th December, 2009


Attended a session On Intergenerational Inquiry on Climate Solutions with
Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC Mr. Yvo de Boer, President Nasheed
of the Maldives, YOUNGO President Christina and young people around
the world
Met with another member of the Guyana delegation
Met with Pacific youths to discuss draft declaration

11 December, 2009
Attended AOSIS Meeting

12th December.2009
Assisted the Grenada Permanent Representative to the United Nations
Ambassador and Chairperson of the AOSIS group H.E. Dr. Dessima
Williams
Met Mr. Angus Friday from the World Bank
Attended AOSIS meeting and met the negotiating team of AOSIS

13th December, 2009


Attended the Bright Green Exhibitions

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 105


14th December, 2009
Attended YOUNGO meeting where there was a need for a representative
from the Caribbean
Attended the Pacific Youths Press Conference where Roxanne made a
presentation. The conference was to give an insight the plight the people
are facing
-What the islands stand to lose,
-Their thoughts about migrating to Australia and New Zeeland,
-Their identity, culture and way of life
-Current effects being faced

15th December, 2009


Attended the Side Events at the People's Space in Klimaforum;
Attended the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre Side Event,
met the Prime Ministers of Belize Dean Barrow, Grenada‟s Prime Minister
Tillman Thomas, Saint Lucia Prime Minister Stephenson King and the
President of the Republic of Guyana Bharat Jagdeo. The Santo Domingo
Caribbean Youth Declaration along with other documents on CYEN was
distributed to each heads of Government. Below are some of the issues that
were discussed;
-Where we are (Caribbean‟s position),
-Cooperation from global leaders on (how do we get them (China and
US) to change their stand on climate change and their targets
-Financing for adaptation and mitigation
-Risk Management

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 106


Held a discussion with the President Jagdeo along with Bevon and Ryan to
discuss CYEN
Met with the Secretary General of Caricom, Dr. Edwin Carrington
Met with Melanie Mc Field, PhD from the Smithsonian Institution who
discussed the importance of coral reefs in our water for biodiversity and for
conservation
Attended 350.org rap session and meeting on the Norrona to discuss the
activities and challenges faced on the Day of Action in our respective
countries and the way forward for the organisation

16th December, 2009


Attended Side Events at Klimaforum

17th December, 2009


Attended the Side Events at Klimaforum
Attended Many Strong Voices Side Event on the Norrona where Roxanne
made a presentation on CYEN works and the effects were are facing

18th December, 2009


Attended Side Events at Klimaforum
Attended CYEN post-mortem meeting

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 107


Ryan, Bevon, President Bharat Jagdeo of Guyana,
Elon, Nintus, Angela

Members of the Delegation with Dr Ulric Trotz and Claire Heese-Boutin from the
University of Toronto (St. Georges)

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 108


Ambassador Dessima Williams, Elon, Arvis, Bevon, Roxanne and Yoland

Group interview with PANOS Caribbean reporters Indi Mclymont, Petre


Williams-Raynor

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 109


Protestors being arrested after an illegal protest

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 110


Heads of Government at the head table at the 5C‟s event

Elon and Secretary General of Caricom Dr. Edwin Carrington

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 111


Mr. John P. Crump of Many Strong Voices

Picture depicting small countries carrying the burden of bigger countries

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 112


Conclusion

More could have been completed if all the members of the delegation were able
to be accredited by their governments. I was quite disappointed to know that a
member of my national delegation believed that when members of CYEN in
Guyana approached about being accredited the office thought it was a hoax. More
Caribbean governments need to give youth an opportunity to play a greater role in
events like COP.

The objectives of the trip which was to promote the Santo Domingo Caribbean
Youth Declaration and the CYEN, but the others I didn‟t know until the group
meeting. There should have been a debriefing session before members departed,
but I guess this was difficult to coordinate given that sponsorship was received at
a late date and some members did not receive confirmation that they would
acquire visas etc. until the final date of travel.

Additionally, I believe that as a group more could have been accomplished if only
all the members were situated in one place. Amidst the challenges that were faced
I believed the group made a collective effort to promote the organisation at every
opportunity, and financial institutions were approached. Personally I was
disappointed with the outcome given the importance of having a legally binding
agreement which leave the upcoming discussions on climate change quite open
with little or no hope. The experience and knowledge gained will be beneficial
towards strengthening the work of CYEN as a whole.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 113


ANNEX D

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 114


Caribbean Youth Environment Network
Delegate Report
Copenhagen, Denmark – December 3rd-18th, 2009
By: Arvis Elaine Mortimer

1.1 Name and position Arvis Elaine Mortimer


Caribbean Environment Network Member
1.2 Places visited Copenhagen, Denmark
1.3 Duration December 3th – 18th, 2009
1.4 Date of Report January 8th, 2010

1. Identification

2. Purpose of the Trip


The purpose of the Copenhagen trip was to attend the United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate Change – Conference of Parties 15 – and network with environmental
organizations, non-governmental and governmental, and Caribbean delegates; promoting the
goals and mission of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network.

3. Summary of Work Carried Out


In Copenhagen at the Conference of Parties 15, on week one I attended several plenary
sessions. These sessions addressed numerous environmental issues affecting the world;
particularly the Caribbean. Some of these sessions focused on water shortage, deforestation,
sustainability and food. Additionally, during this time I was able to meet the Bahamian
governmental delegation and several other Caribbean delegates; inclusive of St. Vincent and
the Grenadines, Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago. Furthermore, during this time the
entire CYEN team was able to sit in the Small Island and Developing States (SIDS) meeting
and hand out the written goals promoted by the organization. I was also able to attend a Pacific
Islander youth meeting at their residence and there we all had dinner and developed a policy
reflective of the Pacific, Maldivian and Caribbean youth opinions on climate change.

On week two, since the Bella Center was no longer accessible to non-governmental
organizations the entire team inclusive of me attempted to attend some of the sessions being

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 115


held outside of the center. One of these sessions/presentations was held at the Klima forum
located in downtown Copenhagen. However, on the second week I was able to enter the Bella
Center once, for short while, with the aid of a pass. This is because I was the spokes person at
our, Caribbean Youth Environment Network, press release and although the release was not
well attended I do feel that it was a success, due to the fact that we were able to publicly
announce CYEN‟s goals and stance on the climate change issues. This particular stance is a
Carbon Dioxide level of 350 parts per million or less and a temperature increase of no more
than 1.5˚C.

4. Details of Activities
4.1 Details of Presentations:
The presentations I attended during the conference of parties 15 were inclusive of several
plenary sessions open to non-governmental organizations at the Bella Center. I also attended a
presentation at the University of Copenhagen and at the Klima Forum.

4.2 Details of Meetings:


In Copenhagen several meetings were attended. These meetings were inclusive of small island
and development states (SIDS) meetings, YOUNGO meetings, Global South Youth Meetings,
CYEN Meetings and Meetings with Caribbean delegates.

4.3 Highlights of Conference Sessions, Workshops and Field Trips


The highlight of all the conference sessions, workshops and field trips I attended was the vast
amount of knowledge pertaining to climate change and the issues associated with it that I
acquired. Furthermore, this new knowledge allowed me to strengthen my platform and become
increasingly passionate about the environment. I must also mention that while attending these
sessions, workshops and going on the field trips I was able to meet, interact with, and be
inspired by numerous likeminded individuals, both young and old, and build lasting
friendships/partnerships. This is so because we have a common interest…this interest is the
environment and advocating its protection and conservation for future generations.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 116


4.4 PR and Media Links
Public Relations/interactions and obtaining media links were an integral part of this experience
and all contacts/links were given to Ms. Mariama Branker and Mr. Bevon Currie.

4.5 Networking
In Copenhagen, Denmark I met numerous individuals from all over the world and different
walks of life. What was extraordinary about this is that although each and every one of the
individuals I met were different they all had a collective stance and this stance is the promotion
for the reduction of Carbon Dioxide emissions to lessen and hopefully cease the disastrous
effects of global warming.

5. Follow Up
At the climate change convention in Copenhagen, Denmark a policy was established, however,
to the disappointment of many this policy was not a cohesive agreement developed by all of the
countries present at this convention. Therefore, without a doubt, there will be another
Conference of Parties – COP16 – and hopefully a favorable binding document, agreed on by all
countries will be the outcome.

COPENHAGEN WAS AWESOME…THANK YOU CYEN!!!!!

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 117


ANNEX E

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 118


CARIBBEAN YOUTH ENVIRONMENT NETWORK

PARTICIPANT REPORT

UNFCCC CONFERNECE

COPENHAHEN, DENMARK
December 5 – 18, 2009

Prepared by
Ryan Baseanoo

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 119


SUMMARY

The Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) with the assistance of the Government of
St Lucia, European Youth Forum and Sustainable Markets Foundation (SUSTAINUS)
sponsored eleven members of CYEN from the region to participate in the fifteenth Conference
of the Parties (COP 15) under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
(UNFCCC) in Copenhagen, Denmark from December 18, 2009.

COP is the highest body of the UNFCCC and consists of environment ministers from 190
countries who meet once a year in December to discuss the convention‟s developments. COP
15 was intended to finalize the terms for the next commitment period given the expiration of
Kyoto Protocol, which was negotiated in 1997 and comes to an end in 2012.

The objectives of the Caribbean Youth Environment Network delegation set out to achieve at
COP15 were:

1. To promote the Santo Domingo Youth Declaration on Climate Change and the work of
Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) among the regional delegations;

2. To network with other NGO‟s, Financial Institutions and donor agencies in an effort to
mobilize financial and technical support for the work of CYEN;

3. To observe the COP process in order to build personal capacity and to acquire
information as this will boost the work of CYEN in the future.

The following pages summarise my participation at COP 15.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 120


DAILY ACTIVITY REPORT

Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th December, 2009


Attended COY on both days, I was able to meet with young people from various countries
across the globe and share CYEN initiative. A relationship was made with the Pacific Youth at
this COY event.

Monday 7th December, 2009


1. Attended the opening ceremony on the COP15 and observed the events for the day at the Main
Plenary Conference Room.

Tuesday 8th December, 2009

1. Attended The contribution of bio fuels to climate change mitigation hosted by the
government of Brazil;
2. Attended the Stronger Southern Voice session hosted by the Climate Action Network
international (CAN International);
3. Attended the Centre for Clean Air Policy session titled: Developing Country
Implementation Strategies and Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAS);
4. Attended a High-level briefing with Michael Zammit Cutajar and John Ashe,
unfortunately after waiting 45 minute we were informed that the said speakers was not
coming to the meeting again.

Wednesday 9th December, 2009


1. Attended the WMO session titled: Observation, monitoring and Prediction: Essential
Elements of Climate Knowledge;
2. Attended the stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future, Global Water Partnership
Organisation session titled: COP15 and Beyond: Bridging the Water and Climate
Change Agenda; and
3. Attended the Wetlands International session titled: Wetland Restoration for Climate
Change Mitigation and Adaptation.

Thursday 10th December, 2009


1. Attended the YOUNGO meeting;
2. Made contact with the editor of the COP15 news letter with the hopes of getting an
interview;
3. Contacted the Trinidad Express to possibly produce articles about our progress here in
Copenhagen to be publish in Trinidad and Tobago;
4. Contacted the climate-change interview booth to get a live interview for CYEN;

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 121


5. Meet with my one of the Trinidad and Tobago delegate;
6. Met with the Pacific youths to discuss our declaration paper;
7. Attended the Global witness Limited, Rainforest Foundation Norway presentation;
8. Attended the Indian Youth Climate Change network- Voices from the Global South
session;
9. Attended the meeting with Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC for young people;
10. Attended the AIESEC Young leaders of today delivering premises if tomorrow session;
11. Made contact with Mr. David Turnbull of CAN International to have our representation
at Can meeting;
12. Made contact with Mr. Dipesh Chapagain of Nepalese Youth for Climate Action, Ms.
Kayla Clark of the British Council and Ms. Leela Raina Indian Youth Climate Network;
13. Attended the UNEP - Finance Initiative (UNEP- FI) - Financing the battle - Scaling up
Private Sector investment though public mechanisms;
14. Attended the Holland Climate House - Towards a climate proof freshwater supply;
15. Attended the Green Belt Movement - Livelihoods, Forest and Climate with Nobel
Laureate Wangari Maathai, GBM and Partners; and
16. Met with the Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC Mr. Yvo de Boer and
the SBI President John Ashe.

Friday 11th December, 2009

1. Attended YOUNGO Meeting;


2. Attended Green Belt Movement, Brighter Greene Inc session titled: Livelihoods,
Forests and Climate with Nobel Laureate Wangari Maathai, GBM and partners;
3. Attended the Secretariat of the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD) session titled:
Connecting Biodiversity and Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation - Report of the
second Ad HOC;
4. Attended the Centre for Community Economics and Development Consultants Society
session titled: Brining Agriculture in Climate Change Negotiations;
5. Attended youth reception where I met the executive secretary of the UNFCCC and I
was able to tell him about CYEN briefly for 2 minutes.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 122


Saturday 12th December, 2009

1. Attended YOUNGO meeting;


2. Attended Carbon Fix e.V. session titled: The future of afforestation/reforestation
projects;
3. Attended International Council for Science session titled; Science, society and
adaptation;
4. Attended European Renewable Energy Council session: Renewable energy - the Key
solution to mitigate climate change;
5. Assisted team with AOSIS request; and
6. Attended AVAZZ rally with Yoland with guest speaker Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

Monday 14th December, 2009

1. Attended the YOUNGO meeting;


2. Attended the Institute for Conservation and sustainable Development of Amazonas
session titled - Regional and Amazonian initiatives on Climate Change and REDD:
Voices of Latin America;
3. Attended the CCCCC ad Euro-Mediterranean Centre for Climate Change session titled:
Hot Spots: Projects and Impacts of Climate Change in the Caribbean and Mediterranean
Areas;
4. Attended the United Nations side event titled: Advancing Work on Adaptation to
Climate Change: A United Nations Systems Perspective;
5. Attended 350.org side event with President Nasheed of the Maldives and Bill
McKibben of 350.org; and
6. Attended a reception for young environmental leaders where we heard from the
Environmental Defence Fund President, Fred Krupp, EDF‟s Climate Director, Peter
Goldmark.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 123


Tuesday 15th December, 2009

1. Attended interview with COP15 Newspaper in Klima Forum;


2. Attended the side events at the People's Space in Klima Forum;
3. Attended the Caribbean Community side event at the Crown Plaza Hotel. Here we were
able to give the various heads of government present the information pack;
4. Attended the 350.org group meeting on the Norrona

Wednesday 16th and Thursday 17th December, 2009

Attended the side events at Klimaforum.

Friday 18th December, 2009

Went to Klimaforum to the side events at the people's space and attended CYEN post-mortem
meeting

Recommendations

1. A briefing kit clearly defining roles should be sent to everyone before attending any
event, especially if the management team has met the member previously and is clearly
aware of their talents and potential.

Conclusion

My participation at the COP15 meeting allowed me to represent the region and experience a
prestigious global environmental event. They entire team worked hard to achieve the goals of
the organisation and in my opinion made a mark at this global event. Our team was small but
big in heart, passion and very hard working. I have no hesitation if asked to recommend any
member of the COP15 team to represent the region.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 124


ANNEX F

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 125


NATURE PASSES JUDGEMENTS WHILE MAN MEETS IN

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK, 2009

My name is Shashion Thomas. I am nineteen years old and I attend Wolmers High

school for Girls. I was chose to represent my country, Jamaica and the Caribbean Youth

Environmental Network (CYEN), in Copenhagen, Denmark, between December 7th and 19th, at

the United Nations Framework Convention on Climatic Changes (UNFCCC).

Sea levels are rising, floods and droughts are more frequent, global temperatures are

increasing; our wildlife and ecosystems are being destroyed, while High levels of carbon

dioxide continue to bombard the atmosphere, ripping it apart.

Nature had passed her verdict, Guilty! And the penalty is the death sentence, and there

is no room in her courts for negotiations. No man is above her laws, no matter what race,

colour or social status. Mankind, at the apogee of their intelligence and development creates a

global stage in Denmark, Copenhagen to negotiate amongst them selves the best way suited to

avert and tackle nature‟s decisions. Nature screams at us in anger,” I am in your hands but not

at your command, time controls us both and the way how you use your time, will determine

how I use mine.”

It all happened so fast. I kissed the warmth of the Jamaican air goodbye and embarked

upon a path into the unknown. Young, scared and confused, my mind ran erratically thousands

of questions as it related to the journey I was to take. I could already smell the adventure, taste

the challenge, feel a strange experience ahead, see a massive culturally diverse arena in the

making and hear nature whispering loudly in my ear, Guilty! Guilty! The plane landed in

Copenhagen on December the 5th, at 5:30 PM, and it was as dark as midnight. The warmth of

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 126


my spirit embraced the coldness of Copenhagen. Total mental catastrophe, because my mind

was on the road ahead, my heart back home with my family and friends, and my soul in a state

embedded in absolute fear. The fractions of my existence were torn apart.

Ever since man realized that he could surpass the greatest limits of his wildest

imagination to make them into a blossoming reality, it has been full speed ahead. Therefore,

there can be no regression, no matter what it costs. Now there we were, to discuss, agree and

confirm something, the demands of nature, our increasing climatic changes, our environmental

crisis, which all spans far beyond the scientific imagination and realities we have constructed

over the years, that have grown to define human beings in contemporary times. On that global

platform created in Copenhagen, man stared the future of our existence in the eyes and instead

of focusing on the bigger picture of what is essential; many buried themselves in political

interests, bordered by socio-economic diversity. In a time where the individual self interest

took precedence over the whole of global unity, reaching a common consensus in Copenhagen

was like killing ourselves, before nature had the complete chance to do so. Earth was at a

standstill, watching to see what would be the ultimate decision in Copenhagen, while nature

beckoned for justice and world readers talk about what to do, while doing nothing.

The conferences were to begin on December 7th and would last until December 19th,

which meant a global consensus was to be agreed upon in twelve days. It was like saying let us

solve a problem that has been constructed by earth‟s greatest architects and engineers in ten

minutes. However, the faith of many in Copenhagen was stronger than the reality of our global

crisis. The Caribbean was well represented in Copenhagen, under the CARIBBEAN YOUTH

ENVIRONMENT NETWORK (CYEN) and we met at the Bella Center on a daily basis, which

was the focal point of the global battle. This was where the diplomats, political advocates,

politicians, business men, economists, global governmental representatives, journalists and

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 127


most importantly, youth environmental environmentalists were to meet daily, debate and

negotiate the rest of our lives and the generations to come. The youths In Copenhagen stood for

the preservation of tomorrow and symbolized the necessity for political leaders to ensure they

left Copenhagen with a legally binding agreement, which was the cry of the majority. This

legally binding agreement was to be objective in nature, to especially facilitate the most

vulnerable nations worldwide, and would force all nations globally to adhere to its legally

binding principles of mitigation, adaptation, transparency, funding and so on, in order to

combat our global climatic crisis. I referred to the world staging In Copenhagen as a battle

because we were on a battlefield, in fact life in itself is a battlefield, on which many battles are

fought and won. It is all about survival of the fittest. But, who are we really fighting but

ourselves? Is it nature against man? Is it the global south against the global north? Is it the

developed countries against the Developing countries? Or is it really man against himself? On

the global stage in Copenhagen I was in the front row seat and I saw mankind gave once more,

one of their greatest performances, by trying to divide nature into political, economical and

social spheres. I found it amazing to see man put on a global theatre piece, creating a comfort

zone of bliss, characterized by who was the most powerful, wealthy and essentially most vital

nations in Copenhagen, while nature mocked us each day on our journey for environmental

reformation, to and fro the Bella Center with extreme coldness. I contemplated if the coldness

outside symbolized man‟s coldness towards nature and its value to human life. Is it that man in

all his intelligence does not have the mental capacity to put aside minor political differences

and socio-economic conditions in order to accelerate on a path for the betterment of the whole

and not the individual?

The coldness wrapped us in its arms so tightly, on a day negative seven degrees Celsius,

as we the CARIBBEAN YOUTH ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK soldiers ventured out for

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 128


the Bella center again. The day was characterized by gloom and dullness but our warm tropical

spirits rose above it. The laughter we shared on that day was extensive, deep and fulfilling. It

was a moment in time when we took the limited joy in Copenhagen to its peak and our souls

were in total captivation. Time was at a standstill, nature had frozen; climatic change placed at

the back our minds, while we graced each other with comforting widespread smiles. Reality

sunk in our skins again as we approached the Bella Center for another day of hard work, all

geared towards our main goal in Copenhagen, which was to promote and display our full

interest and support of the Santo Domingo Declaration of August 2009. We the Caribbean

youths had to meet our governmental representatives who had our voices in their hands, we had

to network with our global friends, we had to attend as many side events as possible to acquire

as much information on the global climatic crisis we faced and to keep up to date with what

was taking places in Copenhagen. We had to perform and showcase on this global stage, our

piece, which was entangled in many challenges and disagreements, but we performed in the

best way we could to please our audience. The amusing thing was that we were all actors on a

global stage and so each performer was an actor or actress as much as they were a part of the

audience. It was hard because playing both roles were sometimes conflicting. I sometimes

became confused with when to perform and when to watch. It was like a battlefield on which at

any time an enemy could become a friend and a friend could become an enemy. At times I

questioned myself, who were the stage directors and why did they not organize effective

rehearsals prior to this performance, in others words who are our leaders and what are they

really doing? One thing I knew for certain was that human beings are the world‟s greatest

entertainers, even in times when defeat is inevitable.

The president of Green Peace International Kumi Nadoo was the best speaker I

encountered in Copenhagen. It was he who said “yes we can! Yes we must! Yes we will!” A

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 129


sense of hope and purpose were written across the foreheads of the people who listened to the

speech that he made. He made it clear when he explained that the actions that world leaders

must take in Copenhagen seems so expensive today but will be even more expensive tomorrow.

He said we are not living for today only, but for the rest of our lives. At the end of his speech

there was a standing ovation, the applauding was perpetual, the rhythm of joy, focus,

togetherness and faith danced through the room, and even if it was an idealistic feeling, it was

definitely a moment to remember in Copenhagen. The message of the president of Green Piece

International complimented what Dr. Linus Spencer Thomas said at the opening Plenary on

December 7th 2009, “Copenhagen is a moment of action. The lives of billons and the future of

entire countries and civilizations are at jeopardy; and another political statement, declaration of

COP decisions will do little to ensure the required response to the defining challenges of our

time”. This man spoke on behalf the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS), which is a group

of 77 developing nations and China, he spoke on behalf of the Caribbean. CYEN strongly

supported their shared vision. Even when their though neighboring brothers beckon for

assistance, which could be best achieved through a legally binding agreement, all they got was

mere political agreement.

We walked towards a ship towards the ship where some of the CYEN members were

staying, to attend a small group production on climatic changes. I saw beauty in its profundity,

as the tranquil river ran by while strange birds sat gracefully on its surface. The snow glistens

from the cold sunshine above, the trees stood bare but strong and tall, the grey skies were

radiant; the cold wind forcefully embraced my body and I could see the ship towering above all

in the distance. Suddenly my whole body became numb, I could not move, I was temporarily

paralyzed. I stood looking at the CYEN members walking ahead unknowingly. I became one

with nature, I was walking on snow and tears ran down my eyes, as the frozen water beneath

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 130


my feet soaked through my snickers. Nature was cold and bitter, even in all her majestic beauty

that surrounded me. I was comforted by the warmth of my colleagues, who came running to my

rescue. I had to go on, even though the odds of nature were against me. Yes I could, yes I must

and yes I will were the words that ran haphazardly ran through my mind.

Time was running out and mankind continued to question the value of their existence.

We the youths of tomorrow sat down, bound by the bondages of inexperience and wisdom

according to societal standards, and watched our leaders play with our survival, like children p

we had left in playing with a ping pong ball on a playground. I thought that this was absolute

hypocrisy, because these same leaders tell us to think and plan for a successful future. But, how

can we do this when the guarantee of our existence is being ripped apart by nature, which is

innocent in all her judgments. At this point I deem that man thought their heads were bigger

than the world they lived in. one of my philosophies going into Copenhagen was that “talk is

cheap and actions are expensive”, and a common statement used in Copenhagen was that

“politicians talk and leaders act”. Is it that our world‟s leaders are too cheap to act? I think

world leaders enjoy enforcing the laws of society but when the laws of a bigger power , such as

nature are to be enforced on them they strive to reject them. Is that our leaders are not trained

to follow. I do not have a entirely pessimistic outlook on what took place in Copenhagen

because I think that there is nothing you can do when you have done your best, and the best

thing we cold have done In Copenhagen was to get our voices heard. The limited time we had

left in Copenhagen was what the world rested their heads on, but that was then, so what do we

do now? No legally binding agreement was signed.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 131


ANNEX G

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 132


CARIBBEAN YOUTH ENVIRONMENT NETWORK

CYEN

TRAVEL REPORT FORM

1. IDENTIFICATION

1.1 Name and position Yoland London, Member CYEN St. Vincent and the
Grenadines

1.2 Places visited Denmark

1.3 Duration December 4th to 20th

1.4 Date of Report 9th January 2009

2. PURPOSE OF TRIP:
The purpose of the trip was to meet the Objectives of CYEN which were:

4. To promote the Santo Domingo Youth Declaration on Climate Change and the work of
Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) among the regional delegations

5. To network with other NGO’s, Financial Institutions and donor agencies in an effort to
mobilize financial and technical support for the work of CYEN.

6. To observe and get a first hand understand of the COP process in order to build personal
capacity and to acquire information which will boost the work of CYEN in the future

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 133


7.
8. SUMMARY OF WORK CARRIED OUT:
The CYEN Delegation was headed by a management committee comprising of:
NAME POSITION/ Country CONTACT
Mr. Bevon Currie Head of Delegation- GUYANA Bevon_currie@yahoo.com
Ms. Mariama Branker Advisor and Logistics Coordinator- omokarobranker@hotmail.com
BARBADOS
Mr. Aldrin Calixte Senior Advisor- HAITI Aldrin.calixte@gmail.com

The other members of the delegation were:


NAME COUNTRY CONTACT
Shashion Thomas Jamaica Shashion_thomas19@hotmail.com
Roxanne Browne Trinidad and Tobago Roxanne.jinelleb@gmail.com
Arvis Mortimer Bahamas Arvis_mort@yahoo.com
Nintus Magre St. Lucia nintii@hotmail.com
Elon Mccurdy Guyana Elon_mccurdy@yahoo.com
Ryan Basenoo Trinidad and Tobago rd-bas@hotmail.com
Angella St. Dennis St. Lucia amstdenis@gmail.com
Yoland London St. Vincent and the Grenadines Vincygirl_22@hotmail.com

I arrived in Copenhagen on the 4th of December 2009. I encountered some difficulties trying to
get to my Hostel and after approximately forty (40) minutes of searching I eventually found my
new home for the next few days with assistants from a friendly stranger.

I met with the CYEN delegation for our first daily meeting a few days later and was assigned
the task to provide information from the plenary sessions which fellow CYEN members could
not attend. This included AOSIS (at the time), G77 and the meetings of the subsidiary bodies.
At the present time I was the only member of the delegation to have received a PARTY pass
making it possible for me to attend the AOSIS meetings among others.

All members of the delegation were asked to meet with their respective country delegates in
addition to representatives of other Caribbean countries. Where possible I also facilitated
networking between some members of the CYEN team and some Caribbean government
delegations. Each representative was presented with a CYEN brief which had been provided by
the regional secretariat. The brief included information on the past activities of the Caribbean
Youth Environment Network on climate change, contact information and a copy of the Santo

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 134


Domingo Caribbean Youth Delegation. Most of the representatives indicated they had heard
about CYEN but were not too knowledgeable as to the details of its work or Objectives.

The team supplemented this work by forwarding additional copies of the brief to the Caribbean
national delegations‟ information boxes.

I was able through Mr. Edmund Jackson St. Vincent and the Grenadines Head of National
Delegation meet the chair man of AOSIS Mr. Leon Charles, who after learning of CYEN‟s
presence in Copenhagen offered an open invitation to all members of the CYEN delegation to
be apart of their daily meetings.

I inquired of Mr. Jackson about the possibility of CYEN presenting the Santo Domingo
Declaration at one of AOSIS meetings. He spoke with the chairman and advised we would be
able to do it but, said it has to be done in three (3) minutes and also during the first week as the
second would be more hectic. I mentioned this to the group and it was agreed that the document
would be prepared by myself and edited by Ms. Branker using the information which was
provided in the brief documents sent to the delegation prior to our arrival. The document was
expected to be ready for presentation within the first week of COP.

Given the restrictions which were placed on the team entering the Bella Centre and the fact that
the Caribbean delegations had been previously provided earlier in the week with the
information, the management team decided not to conduct the intervention.

4. DETAILS OF ACTIVITIES:

4.2 Details of Meetings attended


A. AOSIS MEETINGS
I attended a number of AOSIS meeting where most of the discussions were centred on the legal
outcomes of some documents that were produced and presented at the negotiating table.

At the initial meeting we were informed that:


The vast majority of AOSIS members sent high level delegations to Copenhagen. Several of
these delegations were led by Heads of State and Government. The Chair of AOSIS attended at
the level of Head of State - His Excellency Prime Minister Tillman Thomas, supported by the
Minister of Environment, Hon. Michael Church and the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Hon. Peter
David. Over 100 negotiators from AOSIS member countries were also in attendance. They
worked tirelessly, attending and fighting very hard as per usual to keep AOSIS negotiating
position on the table across all six meetings.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 135


B. AOSIS PRESS CONFERENCE

I along with other members of the delegation went to a thirty (30) minute press conference
organized by the AOSIS, to express the proposal for the negotiations. Ambassador Dessima
Williams spoke of the AOSIS position at the negotiations and later acknowledged the presence
and support of CYEN; she expressed happiness on seeing Caribbean young people involved in
the process and invited us to continue to support the AOSIS group.

C. METING WITH HON. PRIME MINISTER STEPHENSON KING

I attended a meeting with Mr. Stephenson King Prime Minister of St. Lucia. Present were
Dr. Edwin Carrington Secretary General of CARICOM, Dr. Edward Greene Assistant
Secretary General of CARICOM, Ambassador June Soomer and Mr. Michael Bascombe Public
Relations Officer of AOSIS. Also present were Mariama, Nintus, Angela and Neil from
CYEN.
Mr. King praised CYEN for its work throughout the region on sustainable development. He
advised how pleased he was that such a network as CYEN is set up and continues to work hard
in keeping Sustainable Development issues to the forefront. He further advised that he was the
lead speaker for sustainable development on the CARICOM cabinet and said he would
advocate on CYEN‟s behalf at the regional level.

Dr. Carrington and Dr. Greene also extended appreciation to CYEN and encouraged us to keep
on working hard. Dr. Greene spoke briefly about the upcoming CARICOM youth summit to be
held in Suriname in January 2010 he invited CYEN to be part of the preparatory work on
climate change. Copies of the signatures, collected from around the region, in support of the
Santo Domingo Caribbean Youth Declaration were presented to the Honourable Prime Minister
King.

I attended a few side events during the first few days of the conference this was done due to the
fact that we were yet to have our group meeting to put in place our Action Plan for the next two
weeks, and felt it would be useful to attend. Some of these events included.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 136


D. YOUNGO MEETING

YOUNGO meeting: Here the youths were discussing plans to put a body in place to keep this
network together during and after COP15, they asked persons to volunteer for two positions.
1. Spokes Person – this committee meets the media and deals with any public
presentations while the Bottomliners Committee has assumed the responsibility of
managing the international youth movement during and after COP15.

I volunteered to be on the bottom line committee after realizing that they have grouped
Latin America with the Caribbean but were only making reference to Latin America
and not the Caribbean. During our daily briefing we informed the other members of the
delegation about the meeting and were advised that YOUNGO was an organisation
which had been created by members of the global north and was not registered as a
constituency with the UNFCCC. This meant that the organisation was not legitimate
and should not be representing the interests of the International Youth Community or
the Caribbean Youth Delegation. Additionally, the management team felt that
participation in YOUNGO meetings would not ensure representation of the Caribbean
youth voice, given that we were had direct access through various media to the
representatives of our respective national delegations and unlike our partners in the
global north did not need to take full advantage of that particular platform to reach our
leaders.

The team was encouraged not to participate in any further meetings until verification of
the YOUNGO constituency status had been conducted by the regional secretariat.

E. SIDE EVENTS

I attended a presentation on CDM (Clean Development Mechanism) from my understanding of


how the CDM was explained was quite interesting but in the end did not make much sense to
me, the presenters spoke about countries reducing their Carbon Emissions and being rewarded
for it, it may be some sort of reduction at a national level but in reality they are just passing
these emissions onto other countries and passing on or “off setting” as they have termed it

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 137


serves no great purpose because the emissions are still in the atmosphere. It appears its all
about the money or investment opportunities.

I attended other side events with topics including: Connecting Biodiversity and Climate Change
where the main discussion was centred on the importance of Mitigation initiatives and The
Importance of Biodiversity. This side panel event also highlighted the key regions where
climate change is having a very disastrous effect. Also, it was mentioned that CO2 is a
facilitating factor in climate change and ecosystem adaptation is necessary to preserve the
various ecosystems affected by climate change. Furthermore, increased forest diversity is
important for carbon sequestering, thus making it important to reduce deforestation, taking into
account forest mitigation. This mitigation will enable the forests to be more resilient. These
sessions were informative and I have gained a lot of knowledge from them.

Many Strong Voices Event -This event was organized by many strong voices and was done
onboard the Noronna Symril line. Roxanne made an outstanding presentation on CYEN and
read a poem which she wrote as part of CYEN-Trinidad‟s tribute to the 2009 Caribbean
Climate Change Day of Action event.

a. Highlights of conference sessions, workshops and field trips

One of the main highlights for me was when an open invitation was given by the AOSIS
chairman to all members of the CYEN delegation to attend their daily meeting. This I felt was a
high point because other delegation members were presented with a great opportunity to
understand further AOSIS stand relative to the negotiations, acquire information on the process
and get a first hand experience on how the meetings are structured and conducted. They also
got an opportunity to meet and interact with other Caribbean Countries National Delegation to
further promote CYEN.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 138


Meeting with the Prime Minister of St. Lucia Mr. Stephenson King, Secretary General of
CARICOM, Dr. Edwin Carrington and Ass Secretary General of CARICOM, Dr. Edward
Greene was another highlight for me. They all expressed their appreciation for the work of
CYEN and express their continued support of youth work through the Caribbean. It was a
highlight because they found the time from their busy schedule to accommodate us and that in
it self is saying there is still some level of hope in our leaders relative to acknowledging the role
of young people in being catalyst in the world of environment and otherwise.

Being invited to the Pacific Youth Press Conference and given the opportunity to present the
Caribbean CYEN. This was a great opportunity for us to let the media and others know we may
be small in numbers but certainly we have a voice and we stand ready to let our voices be
heard. Roxanne was the presenter and she did an outstanding job.

I attended a Youth session where Mr. Kumi Naidoo President of Green Peace was the featured
speaker. He briefed us on the mission of green peace stating “They exist to expose
environmental criminals, and to challenge Government and corporations when they fail to live
up to their mandate to safeguard our environment and our future. He further stated they exist in
forty different countries across Europe, The Americas, Asia and the Pacific. His presentation
was a highlight because he was not only passionate on calling on World Leaders to seal the
deal but was dynamic and motivating. He encouraged us to use the Slogan “Yes we Can, Yes
we must and Yes We will” relative to fighting to have our voices heard so that the leaders can
reach a legally binding agreement. He further reminded us not to be weary in what ever we are
doing as we are the future leaders and whatever decision is made would affect us. The session
ended with a Question and Answer forum.

The Copenhagen Accord

The Copenhagen Accord was developed by a representative grouping of 25 Parties representing


all major regions in the world, the European Community and the office of the United Nations
Secretary General. Grenada participated as Chairman of AOSIS.
The main provisions of the Accord are:

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 139


• To hold the increase in global temperature below 2 degrees Celsius, and to take action to meet
this objective consistent with science and on the basis of equity.

• To assess the implementation of the Accord in 2015, including consideration to strengthening


the long-term goal referencing various matters presented by the science, including in relation to
temperature rises of 1.5 degrees Celsius.

• Developed countries will provide US$D 30 Billion in funding to developing countries for the
period 2010 – 2012, with priority on the most vulnerable developing countries, such as the least
developed countries, small island developing States and Africa. This will be scaled up to
US$100B per year by 2020. These funds will be operated by a newly established Copenhagen
Green Climate Fund.

• Agreement that actions to reduce emissions will be monitored and verified through
transparent international processes.

We were further told that It should be noted here that AOSIS had to battle for reference to 1.5
degrees in the Accord. It was removed three times from what was intended to be the final
document and three times Grenada in its capacity as chair of AOSIS wage battle for its
inclusion.

Ultimately, the Accord was not adopted by the Conference of Parties as a number of countries
opposed its adoption, and UNFCCC rules of procedure require that all decisions be taken by
consensus.

I got the opportunity to learn the structure and processes of the AOSIS meetings. It was a bit
difficult to follow at first but many thanks to Mr. Edmund Jackson (Head of National
Delegation of St. Vincent and the Grenadines) who would after the meetings explain to me
what was taking place, hence making it easier for me to understand.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 140


I have learned a lot from following the AOSIS meetings and I hope a lot more young people
from CYEN would get the opportunity to sit in at these future meetings.

b. PR and Media links

I was involved in one interview done by PANOS along with all other members of CYEN. In
my opinion the interview went well and the article printed on the interview I have to agree was
not a totally true reflection of the interview. I hope we can learn from this experience.

I was apart of an interview along with Mr. Bevon Currie done by a French reporter where we
were stopped on our way into the Bella Centre and asked who we were representing and what
are our expectations on the outcomes of the negotiations. We spoke of CYEN and echoed each
other‟s sentiments in saying our hope is that we get a fair, legally binding agreement. Ms.
Branker and Mr. Ryan Baseanoo were responsible for arranging media mobilisation and
publicity for the team.

4.5 Networking
I attended a press conference done by a member of the St. Kitts and Nevis Government
delegation. Roxanne Browne and I met with him after the briefing and spoke about CYEN and
its work. He referred us to another member of their National delegation who informed us he has
radio station on Trinidad and Tobago and has contacts in St. Kitts and a few other Caribbean
Islands, He advised us to get any material on CYEN we would like have aired and he would be
happy to feature CYEN.

9. FOLLOW UP
The team was asked to provide contact information to Ms. Mariama Branker, so that the
information could be provided to the regional secretariat after departing from Copenhagen.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 141


Conclusion

Our start as a group was bumpy at first but we were able to get pass our hiccups. We focused
and in my opinion worked hard in an attempt to realize our objectives. In my opinion everyone
has done well in carrying out the task to which they were assigned by the management team. I
hope we can continue to work together as a team and maintain the friendships formed at COP
15.

I would have to join with many in saying Copenhagen did not produce the outcomes that
CYEN hoped for and that was; an internationally legally binding agreement to respond to
climate change. As a result Copenhagen was not a resounding success for me. There were
points where I felt as if it seems no one really cared about the environment and about people‟s
existence, but when I looked at the many pleads and listen to what the voices of many other
young people were echoing, it was similar to what we were saying. This reassured me that we
were not alone fighting to save the planet and there are people who do care.

I felt the young people including CYEN delegation members worked very hard in presenting
our cases in Copenhagen, in speaking out and in selling our organisations. We may not see the
immediate fruition of the work done but we should not be discouraged, we should continue to
let our voices be heard, continue to do our part by being advocates of the protection and
preservation of our environment and by extension our Islands from Climate change effects.

No deal at COP 15 should encourage CYEN to augment our Public Education Campaigns, and
work hard to mobilise public support and inculcuate a culture of individual responsibility at the
National Level. We should utilize the media more and educate our people especially our
children to ensure the preservation of our islands and of lives.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 142


Recommendations

1. CYEN chapters are encouraged to organise at a national level and encourage their
members to participate in training workshops/sessions on media interviews and
delivering public presentations. This should be done in an attempt to equip members
with the necessary skills so they can be most effective should they be given the
opportunity to participate in any of the above mentioned activities.

2. It is very important to review background documents administered to all members of


the delegation. Members would then be able to participate more effectively in the action
plan process, ensuring that delegates feel incorporated into the process of role
assignment rather than feeling as though they have been assigned a specific task.

3. Each chapter should commit to enhance their public education campaigns to raise
awareness of climate change. The programmes should be largely community-based as
well as multi tiered, targeting persons from various educational backgrounds.

4. CYEN should utilise original work (songs, poems etc) done by its members copy of as
promotional pieces to be sent to the various media houses and uploaded to the CYEN
website.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 143


ANNEX H

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 144


CARIBBEAN YOUTH ENVIRONMENT NETWORK

CYEN

TRAVEL REPORT FORM

3. IDENTIFICATION

1.1 Name and position Angela St. Denis, National Coordinator, St. Lucia
1.2 Places visited COP15 – Copenhagen, Denmark
1.3 Duration 12 - 18 December 2009
1.4 Date of Report 31 January 2010

4. PURPOSE OF TRIP:
The purpose was to attend and participate where possible in the United Nations Climate Change
Conference (COP15) as part of the St. Lucian delegation and representing CYEN.

5. SUMMARY OF WORK CARRIED OUT:

Monday, 14th December 2010

Due to the nature of the trip and timing work carried out was more attending sessions and
networking. The first two days were spent familiarising myself with the environment. On day
one I spent approximately 5 hours in a line to register in order to obtain passes to enter the main
facility. While on the line I along with Nintus met a professor of environmental studies from a
Canadian Grass Roots organisation. We exchanged contact information and once inside we
delivered a copy of the 350 video and song to their booth. Nintus also did an impromptu
performance of the “I Pledge” song. The professor‟s information is in the contact details below.

Once inside the Bella Centre I attended a debriefing with the St. Lucian delegation and
remainder of the day was spent with the grouping at a plenary session where some countries
were giving opening statements.

A meeting for CYEN delegates was scheduled for the morning of the 14th December 2010.
However, due to the long wait at the registration line I was unable to attend. In the evening I
briefly meet with some of the other members of the group at the Bella Centre. At this time I was
not quite sure what the plan was and did not obtain a lot of information. Nonetheless I returned
to the plenary session with the SLU delegation.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 145


Tuesday, 15th December 2010

This day was set to host CYEN‟s press conference along with the other activities for the
conference at Bella centre. Upon arrival at the centre I was informed that the Press Conference
which had been scheduled by Bevon and Mariama could not occur.

In the morning I attended a networking meeting along with Bevon and Nintus with
representative from the Global Water Partnership. At this session we share our experiences of
working with the grouping and received some suggestions on possible actions. She also
suggested we write an article and submit for publishing with the organisation magazine for our
region. We promised to look into the possibilities.

Following this meeting I attended a side event hosted by the Caribbean Community Climate
Change Centre and CARICOM at the Crown Plaza Hotel. At this meeting I heard statements
from the President of Guyana Bharat Jagdeo and Prime Minister of St. Lucia Stephenson King.
There were also brief remarks from the President of Belize. The rest of the sessions entailed
presentations from technocrats on Climate Change adaptation and mitigation initiatives.

At this event a copy of the Climate Change pledge video produced by CYEN St. Lucia was
played several times for the audience prior to the commencement of the programme. This gave
the organisation some recognition at the gathering. I also had the opportunity to meet some of
the other members of CYEN who were in attendance at COP15.

I also observed a short meeting with the President of Guyana who shared his input/position of
expected results from the general conference.

At this meeting I was informed that the press conference was rescheduled for later in the day at
4.00pm. Upon return to the Bella Centre I was in the company of Bevon and who was refused
entry into the Centre. I was allowed in because I formed part of a government delegation.
However, later on he was allowed access to the building.

There was some time remaining and I went in search of the room for the press briefing.
However, the room to which I went was the wrong one and by the time I found the correct room
the conference was over. Later I was informed that the press conference did take place but the

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 146


the Caribbean media did not attend neither did members of the international press. Thankfully,
as a result of the press conference being screened in the media centre, UNRadio saw the press
conference and agreed to Mariama and Nintus‟ request to conduct an interview the following
day.

I believe that this was due to the timing of the activity which was at the same time the opening
of the official governmental session was scheduled to commence. Considering that this was the
officially opening ceremony most media houses would have been focused on covering this
activity. Hence the maximum coverage we wanted would not have been achieved. Nonetheless,
it was a good effort.

At the opening ceremony interventions were heard from many leaders from CARICOM and
AOSIS. The Prime Minister of St. Lucia presentation was well written and executed.

Wednesday 16th, December 2010

By Wednesda,y the restrictions on access to the Bella Centre were in full effect. As such only
persons with accreditation to a government gained free access. These restrictions were also
associated with protest and crowding which occurred at the entrances. It was announced that the
metro would have been shut down so I travelled with St. Lucia‟s PM.

I spent part of the morning visiting the exhibition centre collecting information and keep sakes.
During the morning I, Nintus and Mariama participated in an interview with Donald Bob of UN
Radio. The interview was aired on radio stations around the region for two weeks in January
and was available for download free on UNRadio‟s Caribbean website.

In the afternoon I attended a networking meeting held with members of the executive Project
Survival with Mariama and Nintus. The meeting was scheduled to explore possibilities for
collaboration between the two organisations. However, since I was not very well I did not
actively participate.

I spent the rest of the afternoon listening to interventions from various government leaders.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 147


Thursday 17th, December 2010

The morning of this day was spent listening to some interventions.

In the afternoon at about 1.00pm a small contingent from CYEN including myself, Nintus
Magre, Yoland London, Niel Oculi and Mariama Barker attended a meeting with Prime
Minister Stephenson King, Secretary General of Caricom Dr. Edwin Carington, Assistant
Secretary General of CARICOM and Ambassador June Soomer. At this meeting PM King
indicated that he intends to reach out to the youth on sustainable development issues and to
build awareness at the national and regional level. He hopes to encourage youth contribution in
the process. Further, he indicated that Copenhagen was the beginning of activities to come.
There was discussion on the CARICOM Youth Commission and that process along with
discussions on the meeting which was scheduled for Suriname. It was indicated that
environmental issues will be placed on the agenda.

In summary the meeting served as an opportunity for us to share our views and concerns on
climate change and general issues. Neil Oculi also shared his experience with running a project
funding by an external agency with support from the Government of St. Lucia.

CYEN St. Lucia has been challenged to develop a project around the theme “Keeping it Green
clean and Pristine” for which the government will provide complete funding.

The meeting was covered by Micheal Bascombe a reporter from Grenada working with the
AOSIS secretariat.

Following this meeting Nintus and I were invited to accompany PM King to a presentation with
renewable energy investors who are interested in establishing a plant to produce energy from
waste produced in St. Lucia and other islands.

Friday 18th December 2010

Friday had a sense of silent chaos at the Bella Centre since it was to be the final day for talking
and a decision had to be made. It saw the arrival of President of the US and other high level
leaders.

For the first time I made it to the AOSIS meeting which felt like a very thick cloud was over the
room. It entailed discussions on force be exerted by the G8 to short change the AOSIS
groupings.

Following this I attended the signing of the SIDS DOCK, the small island developing states
energy initiative, a mechanism aimed at facilitating the development of a clean energy economy
within the small island developing states. A brief presentation was made by PM King and other
countries signing the document.

A small performance was done of the “I Pledge” by Nintus in the Bella Centre. It brought a
crowd and some media coverage. On Hine sight this could have been a bigger done at the press
briefing and other activities.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 148


The remainder of the day was spent in other plenary sessions and listening to presentation from
leaders.

I did not attend final group meeting because was not aware of it until late and I would have
missed most of it during the travel back to the meeting venue.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 149


PICTURES

VIP Lounge Hewanora Airport St. Lucia: Nintus Magre and Angela St. Denis

Ambassador Soomer, Nintus and Angela


Waiting on registration line at the beginning

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 150


In Plenary: Niel Oculi, Nintus Magre and Angela St. Denis

One of the many lines outside the Bella Centre

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 151


Dinner with African Counterpart: Patrice, Yoland and Angela

Signing of SIDS Dock

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 152


Some members of St. Lucia Delegation: Ambassador Soomer, Judith Ephraime, PM
Stephenson King, Crispin D’Auvernge and Angela St. Denis

Nintus Performing on the Farmers Platform

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 153


Media Recording Nintus’s Performance

Caricom Side Event: A laugh with Dr. Edwin Carrington

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 154


Neil, Judith, Crispin Angela and Ambassador Soomer
Some Members of St. Lucia‟s Delegation

CARICOM Side Event Head Table

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 155


CYEN members at meeting with CARICOM Secretary General and Deputy and PM King

Meeting Party

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 156


- ABOUT -

The Caribbean Youth Environment Network is a non-profit organisation


dedicated to improving the quality of life of Caribbean young people by facilitating
their personal development and promoting their full involvement in all matters
pertaining to the environment and sustainable development.

The organisation promotes education and training, Caribbean integration and


community empowerment as tools to develop an ethic amongst young people that
assists in the conservation and protection of natural resources within the Wider
Caribbean.

Please visit CYEN’s website


http://www.cyen.org to learn
more about the largest youth
environmental organisation in the
Caribbean!
Also, sign onto CYEN’s social
networking site
http://www.cyenregion.ning.com
to view more photos from COP15
and other CYEN events.

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 157


- CONTACT INFORMATION -

REGINALD I. BURKE
EXECUTIVE COORDINATOR
CARIBBEAN YOUTH ENVIRONMENT
NETWORK
REGIONAL SECRETARIAT
„HALSWORTH‟
WELCHES MAIN ROAD
ST. MICHAEL
BARBADOS
Tel: (246) 4376055/56
Fax: (246) 4373381
Email: executivecoordinator@cyen.org

MAILING ADDRESS
PO BOX 915
CHEAPSIDE
BRIDGETOWN
BARBADOS

Caribbean Youth Environment Network 158