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Consumer Knowledge, Attitudes and Salt-Related Behavior in the Middle-East: The Case of

Lebanon.
Authors:
Nasreddine, Lara Akl, Christelle
Al-Shaar, Laila
Almedawar, Mohamad M.
Ismaeel, Hussain
Source:
Nutrients; 2014, Vol. 6 Issue 11, p2079-5102, 24p
Publication Year:
2014
Author-Supplied Keywords:
attitude
behavior
consumer
dietary salt
knowledge
Middle East
Abstract:
Sodium intake is high in Lebanon, a country of the Middle East region where rates of
cardiovascular diseases are amongst the highest in the world. This study examines saltrelated knowledge, attitude and self-reported behaviors amongst adult Lebanese
consumers and investigates the association of socio-demographic factors, knowledge and
attitudes with salt-related behaviors. Using a multicomponent questionnaire, a crosssectional study was conducted in nine supermarkets in Beirut, based on systematic random
sampling (n = 442). Factors associated with salt-related behaviors were examined by
multivariate regression analysis. Specific knowledge and attitude gaps were documented
with only 22.6% of participants identifying processed foods as the main source of salt,
55.6% discerning the relationship between salt and sodium, 32.4% recognizing the daily
limit of salt intake and 44.7% reporting being concerned about the amount of salt in their
diet. The majority of participants reported behavioral practices that increase salt intake with
only 38.3% checking for salt label content, 43.7% reporting that their food purchases are
influenced by salt content and 38.6% trying to buy low-salt foods. Knowledge, attitudes and
older age were found to significantly predict salt-related behaviors. Findings offer valuable
insight on salt-related knowledge, attitude and behaviors in a sample of Lebanese
consumers and provide key information that could spur the development of evidencebased salt-reduction interventions specific to the Middle East. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Nutrients is the property of MDPI Publishing and its content may not be copied
or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express
written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use.
This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users
should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright
applies to all Abstracts.)

ISSN:
20726643
Accession Number:
99665902
Salt intakes and salt reduction initiatives in Southeast Asia: A review.
Authors:
Batcagan-Abueg, Ada Portia
Lee, Jeanette JM
Chan, Pauline
Rebello, Salome A
Amarra, Maria Sofia V
Author Affliations:
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore
International Life Sciences Institute Southeast Asia (ILSI SEA) Region, Singapore
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore
International Life Sciences Institute Southeast Asia (ILSI SEA) Region, 9 Mohamed
Sultan Road #02-01, Singapore 238959, email: sofiaamarra@ilsisea.org.sg, tel: +65
6352 5220, fax: +65 6352 5536
Source:
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2013: 683-697.
Source Title:
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
Salt-free diet
Salt--Health aspects
Salt--Analysis
Dietary supplements
Geographic Terms:
Southeast Asia
Abstract:
Increased dietary sodium intake is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
The monitoring of population sodium intake is a key part of any salt reduction
intervention. However, the extent and methods used for assessment of sodium intake
in Southeast Asia is currently unclear. This paper provides a narrative synthesis of the
best available evidence regarding levels of sodium intake in six Southeast Asian

countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, and


describes salt reduction measures being undertaken in these countries. Electronic
databases were screened to identify relevant articles for inclusion up to 29 February
2012. Reference lists of included studies and conference proceedings were also
examined. Local experts and researchers in nutrition and public health were
consulted. Quality of studies was assessed using a modified version of the Downs and
Black Checklist. Twenty-five studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in
this review. Full texts of 19 studies including government reports were retrieved, with
most studies being of good quality. Insufficient evidence exists regarding salt intakes
in Southeast Asia. Dietary data suggest that sodium intake in most SEA countries
exceeded the WHO recommendation of 2 g/day. Studies are needed that estimate
sodium intake using the gold standard 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. The
greatest proportion of dietary sodium came from added salt and sauces. Data on
children were limited. The six countries had salt reduction initiatives that differed in
specificity and extent, with greater emphasis on consumer education.
ISSN:
0964-7058
URL:
http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=733675798840839;res=IELAPA
Accession Number:
733675798840839
Database:
Informit Health Collection
Knowledge, Attitude and Practice between Medical and Non-Medical Sciences
Students about Food Labeling.
Authors:
Mahdavi, Aida Malek
Abdolahi, Paria
Mahdavi, Reza
Source:
Health Promotion Perspectives; 2012, Vol. 2 Issue 2, p173-179, 7p
Publication Year:
2012
Subject Terms:
COLLEGE students -- Attitudes -- Research
MEDICAL students -- Attitudes
FOOD labeling
AWARENESS
NUTRITIONAL value of food
UNIVERSITIES & colleges -- Iran

Author-Supplied Keywords:
Attitude
Food labeling
Iran
Knowledge
Practice
Abstract:
Background: Considering the significant role of consumers' awareness about food
labels in making healthy food choices, this study was designed to assess the
knowledge, attitude and practice of university students about food labeling.
Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 332 students aged 18-25 yr in five different
academic majors (including Nutrition, Public Health, Health Services Administration,
Paramedical and Engineering) were asked to complete an approved questionnaire
contained fifteen questions. The chi-square test was applied to examine the
differences across various major groups. Results: 89.2% of the students believed that
food labels had effect on nutritional awareness. 77.4% were agreed with the
usefulness of the food labels and 79.2% did not feel that nutrition claims on food
label were truthful. For 84% of students, the expiry date and storage conditions
information were the most important informational cues to appear on the food
labels. From 47.6% of students who reported the use of nutrition facts label in their
often or always shopping; only 32.3% used the information on labels to fit the food
into their daily diet. Surprisingly, fatty acids were the least noteworthy items (1.9%)
on nutrition facts labels. Regarding students' major, there was significant difference
in their knowledge, attitude and practice about truth of the nutrition claims, using
food labels and importance of health claims (P<0.05). Conclusion: Food labels
were more useful tools for students and had an effect on their nutritional
awareness. Designing and implementation of the educational programs in order to
increase the level of knowledge about food labels is suggested. [ABSTRACT FROM
AUTHOR]

Copyright of Health Promotion Perspectives is the property of Tabriz University of


Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or
posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission.
However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract
may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should
refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright
applies to all Abstracts.)
ISSN:
22286497
Accession Number:
85164226
Healthy Food Awareness, Behavioral Intention, and Actual Behavior toward Healthy
Foods: Generation Y Consumers at University Foodservice.
Authors:

Joung, Hyun-Woo (David)


Choi, Eun Kyong (Cindy)
Joo Ahn
Hak-Seon Kim
Source:
Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture; 2014, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p336-341, 6p
Publication Year:
2014
Subject Terms:
GENERATION Y -- Health
FOOD habits
STRUCTURAL equation modeling
HEALTH behavior
COLLEGE students
FOOD service
UNIVERSITIES & colleges
Author-Supplied Keywords:
behavioral intention
Generation Y
Healthy food awareness
university foodservice
NAICS/Industry Codes :
722330 Mobile Food Services
611310 Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools
Abstract:
This study examined relationships among healthy food awareness, behavioral
intention toward healthy foods, and actual behavior of Generation Y consumers.
This study hypothesized that Generation Y consumers are aware of healthy foods
and more likely to eat healthy foods while avoiding junk foods. According to
structural equation modeling, all hypothesized paths were statistically significant,
meaning that the three constructs in the model showed positive relationships with
each other. Results showed that this group of college students is generally aware of
healthy foods and have positive intentions toward healthy food choices. Therefore,
university foodservice management needs to continue to improve their menus in
order to attract this new generation of college student consumers. [ABSTRACT FROM
AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture is the property of Korean
Society of Food Culture and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple
sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written
permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use.
This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy.

Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full
abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
ISSN:
12257060
Accession Number:
99437420