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Business Plan: 2011-12 and

Future Directions: 2013-14

MEMBERS OF THE ZERO WASTE SA BOARD APPROVING


THIS BUSINESS PLAN
Member
Mr Allan Holmes (Chair)
Ms Anne Harvey (Deputy Chair)
Mr Vaughan Levitzke (ex officio member)
Mr Frank Brennan
Ms Megan Dyson
Ms Cheryl Hill
Mr Lachlan Jeffries
Ms Michelle Morton
Ms Anne Prince
Mr Mark Withers

The Zero Waste SA Board (the Board) is the


governing body of ZWSA and must consist of 610
members. The Boards membership must include
persons who together have, in the Governors
opinion, practical knowledge of, and experience in:
>

environmental sustainability

>

local government

> waste management industry or waste related


infrastructure development
>

regional affairs

>

economic, financial and risk management

> advocacy on environmental matters on behalf


of the community.
The Board members, as listed above, satisfy the
requirements of section 9(6) Zero Waste SA Act 2004.

The Board of Zero Waste SA is clear that in order to achieve our objectives there
are several areas we need to get right.

CONTENTS
Foreword

1. Introduction

2. Our direction

3. Highlights of the Business Plan

4. ZWSA aims and objectives



4.1
Vision and mission

4.2

Primary objectives and guiding


principles

4.3

4.4
4.4.1

4.4.2

Functions of ZWSA
Funding provisions
Partnerships and shared
responsibilities
Goals and targets

5. Where we were in 2010


6. Organisation of this Business Plan

6
7
7
8
9

10

7. Objective: Maximising the useful life of


materials through reuse and recycling
11

7.1 Priority Area: Measurement, analysis,
evaluation and reporting to support
targets and assess the adequacy of
the Waste Strategy
11
7.1.1 Program: Waste audits and recycling
activities study
11
7.1.2 Program: Building our knowledge
and data on waste and recycling
11
7.1.3 Program: Financial and legislative
instruments 12
7.1.3.1 Review of solid waste levy
12
7.1.3.2 Environment Protection (Waste to
Resources) Policy 2010
12

7.2 Priority Area: Municipal solid waste


(MSW) 12
7.2.1 Program: E-waste collections
incentives and associated strategies 13
7.2.2 Program: Kerbside waste incentives
and associated strategies
13
7.2.3 Program: Regional implementation 14
7.3 Priority Area: Commercial and
Industrial Waste (C&I)
7.3.1 Program: Metropolitan infrastructure
(industry investment incentives)
7.3.2 Program: Commercial incentives
(Recycling at Work)
7.3.3 Program: Explore opportunities for
industrial symbiosis

15
15
16
16

7.4 Priority Area: Construction and


demolition waste (C&D)
17
7.4.1 Clean Site Building and Construction
Resource Recovery
17
7.4.2 Program: Markets for C&D materials 17
7.5 Priority Area: Problematic and
hazardous waste
17
7.5.1 Program: Household hazardous waste
and farm chemical collections
18
7.5.2 Program: Support the implementation
of the Waste EPP
18
7.6 Priority Area: Disposal and illegal
dumping 19
7.6.1 Program: Illegal dumping
19
7.7 Priority Area: Research and
development 19
7.7.1 Program: Sustainable markets and
innovation (industry investment
incentives) 19
7.7.2 Tertiary Education Sector (UniSA)
Partnership 19
7.7.3 Waste to energy policy
20

8. Objective: Avoid and reduce waste


21

8.1 Priority Area: Measurement, analysis,
evaluation and reporting to support
targets and assess the adequacy of
the Waste Strategy
21
8.1.1 Program: Measuring community
attitudes and behaviour
21

8.2 Priority Area: Municipal solid waste
21
8.2.1 Program: Recycle Right household
education 21
8.2.2 Program: KESAB Sustainable
communities (City and Country)
22
8.2.3 Program: Wipe Out Waste schools
program 22
8.2.4 Program: School and community
grants 23

8.3 Priority Area: Commercial and
industrial waste
23
8.3.1 Program: Resource Efficiency Assistance
Program for industry, business and State
and Local Government
23
8.3.2 Program: Consumption and waste
avoidance incentives
24

8.4 Priority Area: Construction and
demolition waste
25
8.4.1 Program: Promote better design of the
built environment
25

8.5 Priority Area: Litter reduction
25
8.5.1 Program: Litter Data and Research
and Branded Litter Monitoring
25
8.5.2 Program: Community Litter,
Education, Resources and Campaigns 26

9. Stakeholders, partnering and linkages


27

9.1 Tertiary Education Sector (UniSA)
Partnership 27

9.2 Local Government Association
27

9.3 Waste Management Association
of Australia
27

9.4

National and State policies

28

10. Corporate support functions




10.1 Corporate communications,
education, marketing and website


10.2 ZWSA Board support


10.3 Corporate services (accommodation,
office running costs and salaries)

29

11. Budget

30

12. Budget distribution charts

33

29
29

29

We invite you to join us in our continued challenge to create South Australias


more sustainable future.

FOREWORD
This Business Plan guides Zero Waste SAs programs
and activities over the next three years and reflects
the objectives of the new South Australias Waste
Strategy 20112015.
Putting together the next five-year strategy has
allowed us to look at our achievements under
the first Waste Strategy South Australias Waste
Strategy 20052010.
Between 2002 and 2009, we reduced waste to landfill
by 17% more than 200,000 tonnes in spite of
our States increasing population and continued
economic growth. We now recycle more than 70%
of our waste and new systems in place will help us
reduce waste to landfill even more.
Key to our States achievements are the introduction of
high performing kerbside collection systems, improved
regional waste planning and infrastructure, and new
ventures in the areas of electronic waste, composting,
recycling of construction and demolition, and
commercial and industrial, waste streams, and resource
efficiency assistance for businesses and industry.
The first Waste Strategy also stimulated investment
across the State with more than $20 million provided
by Zero Waste SA since 2004 to improve resource
recovery in metropolitan and regional areas which
leveraged an additional $40 million dollars from
industry and local government.
These achievements have been made only
through Zero Waste SAs strong collaboration
with local government, the waste industry, KESAB
environmental solutions, and its research partner,
the University of South Australia.
While we should recognise our achievements, we
can always do more, and find new and improved
ways of realising our strategic objectives.
South Australias Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies
new stretch targets for diverting waste from landfill
and emphasises that further actions are required
in two key objectives: maximising the useful life of
resources through reuse and recycling and avoid
and reduce waste.

The Board of Zero Waste SA is clear that in order to


achieve these objectives, there are several areas we
need to get right: foster behaviours that encourage
us to live within natures limits, confront the
assumption that waste is inevitable and unavoidable,
and encourage open dialogue for successful
partnering and collaboration.
This Business Plan responds to these fundamental
needs by giving life to the objectives of the Waste
Strategy 2011 2015. It builds on the work already
done by its predecessors but sets renewed priorities
for the next one to three years.
Work over the next three years will also
consider innovative ways to take action in waste
management. Using additional revenue from the
Waste to Resources Fund for significant initiatives is
a key area of interest of the Board of Zero Waste SA.
It is already clear to the Board, that greater effort in
materials management and conservation is needed and
that this effort must come from everyone. It will also be
important to link with industry development in other
sectors of the South Australian economy to encourage
an industrial symbiosis a collective approach to the
management of resources across all industries, which
may explore alternative waste technologies.
We acknowledge the commitment of the South
Australian community so far for their willingness
to change habits to reduce waste. Because of
it, South Australia leads waste management in
resource recovery nationally and in some instances
internationally. On this sound footing we can
continue innovation and reform.
South Australia has more potential to be realised in
waste management and resource conservation but
we need your help. The vision of zero waste will
come only from a South Australian community that
understands and is committed to the change required.
We invite you to join us in our continued challenge
to create South Australias more sustainable future.

Allan Holmes
Chair, Board of Zero Waste SA

1. INTRODUCTION

2. OUR DIRECTION

Zero Waste SA is having an effect, shown in


reductions in waste to landfill.

The Waste Strategy provides a mechanism for State


Government to engage with all South Australians to
achieve waste management reform. It is guided by
the concept of zero waste which challenges end of
pipe solutions and shifts a focus to encouraging the
cyclical use of materials in our economy.

Zero Waste SA (ZWSA), established by the


Zero Waste SA Act 2004, provides strategic policy
advice, guidance and leadership to government
and stakeholders to bring about change. ZWSA
establishes programs and projects that maximise
waste reduction, and promote recycling and
ecological sustainability.
ZWSA is having an effect, shown in remarkable
reductions in waste to landfill. From 200203 to the
end of the 200910, metropolitan waste disposed to
landfill was reduced by 17.32%.
However, a growing economy makes it difficult
to continue to show overall reductions in waste
to landfill. The reductions achieved by improved
kerbside recycling collections for households, for
example, are not as easily gained in other areas
of waste management.
This Zero Waste SA Business Plan: 201011 and
Future Directions: 201214 reects the objectives,
actions and priorities of South Australias Waste
Strategy 20112015 which highlights two key
objectives:
> maximising the useful life of materials
through reuse and recycling
>

avoiding and reducing waste.

In line with the Waste Strategy 20112015, this


Business Plan directs a focus to the higher end of
the waste hierarchy to avoid and reduce waste
and builds on South Australias achievements
in recycling, infrastructure development and
community engagement through:
> further investments in local infrastructure,
economic interventions and incentives for
change to maximise the useful life of materials
through reuse and recycling
> advocating more thoughtful approaches to
the way we use resources, and the choices we
make as a government, business and/ or an
individual in a community to foster behaviour
change in avoiding and reducing waste.
The diverse and flexible range of tools to be used
into the future include: advocacy, partnerships,
research and development programs, incentives
programs, communication and education,
investigation. knowledge and data capture, new
technology investment, and product stewardship
programs and regulation.

It is guided by the concept of zero waste which challenges end of pipe solutions
and shifts a focus to encouraging the cyclical use of materials in our economy.

3. HIGHLIGHTS OF THE BUSINESS PLAN


Collection of food waste at kerbside

Business Sustainability Alliance

Many of the 50 local councils that have


implemented, or committed to, high performing
kerbside collection systems are currently recycling
up to 55% of kerbside material. It is estimated
that up to half of the remaining waste placed
in the red/blue bin from over 500,000 households
is compostable.

Resource efficient manufacturing can make a


sustainable difference by reducing raw material,
energy and water use, and thus minimising waste
production and focusing on the higher end of the
waste hierarchy.

The Kerbside Performance Plus program commits


$1,150,000 in 201112 to capture food waste for
composting and follows on from the kerbside
food waste collection pilots that began in 2009
(program reference: 7.2.2).

E-waste
South Australia is moving to phased bans on some
waste types from entering landfill, reducing their
harmful effects on the environment and paving
the way for new recycling industries and green
jobs. In November 2009, the nations environment
ministers resolved to introduce a national product
stewardship scheme for televisions and computers
by 2011. In 200708, an estimated 16.8 million
televisions and computers were discarded in
Australia, with 84% going to landfill. The phase-out
of analogue televisions in the next few years will
increase this gure.

ZWSA is committing $1,209,000 in 201112 to


help businesses, and local and State government,
understand, develop and implement cost-saving and
resource efficient measures that will reduce waste
(program reference: 8.3.1).

Infrastructure investment
Investment in recycling and sorting facilities
infrastructure across South Australia remains a key
priority of ZWSA.
The $1,469,000 committed in 201112 to the
Metropolitan Infrastructure and Regional
Implementation programs aims to stimulate further
industry investment and will help achieve more
viable recycling outcomes in metropolitan and
regional areas of our State (program references:
7.3.1 and 7.2.3).

This program commits $500,000 in 201112 to


assist councils to run e-waste collections for their
householders (program reference: 7.2.1).

South Australia is moving to phased bans on some waste types from entering
landfill, reducing their harmful effects on the environment.

4. ZWSA AIMS AND OBJECTIVES


4.1 Vision and mission

4.3 Functions of ZWSA

Vision: The achievement of zero waste.

Section 1.3 of the Zero Waste SA Act 2004 states:

Mission: To change the direction of waste


management in South Australia to one that
meets both the preferred approach of the waste
management hierarchy and the principles of
ecologically sustainable development.

The functions of ZWSA are


(a) to develop, co-ordinate and contribute to
the implementation of government policy
objectives in respect of

> waste management for regions, industry


sectors or material types; and

> public and industry awareness and education


in relation to waste management; and

> programs for the prevention of litter and


illegal dumping; and

> m
 arket development for recovered
resources and recycled material; and

4.2 Primary objectives and guiding principles


The primary objective of ZWSA is to promote waste
management practices that, as far as possible:
>

eliminate waste or its consignment to landfill

> advance the development of resource recovery


and recycling
> are based on an integrated strategy for the State.
In the exercise of its functions, ZWSA is to be
guided by:
>

the waste management hierarchy (Figure 1)

> principles of ecologically sustainable


development as set out in section 10 of the
Environment Protection Act 1993
> best practice methods and standards in
waste management and the principle that
government waste management policies
should be developed through a process
of open dialogue with local government,
industry and the community in which all are
encouraged to contribute to decision making.

Most Preferable
SUSTAINABILITY

Avoid
Reduce
Reuse
Recycle
Recover (including energy)
Treat
Dispose

Least Preferable
Figure 1. The waste hierarchy

(b) to develop, adopt and administer the waste


strategy for the State; and
(c) to monitor and assess the adequacy of the
waste strategy and its implementation; and
(d) to provide assistance to local councils
with arrangements for regional waste
management; and
(e) to contribute to the development of waste
management infrastructure, technologies and
systems; and
(f) to commission, support and collaborate on
research into waste management practices and
issues; and
(g) to advise the Minister from time to time about
the amount to be charged by way of the levy
under section 113 of the Environment Protection
Act 1993;
(h) to advise the Minister about any matter
referred to it by the Minister or any matter it
sees t to advise the Minister on in connection
with its responsibilities under this Act; and
(i) such other functions as may be conferred on
it by this Act or any other Act, or as may be
assigned to it by the Minister.

4.4 Funding provisions


Funding for ZWSA programs comes from the solid waste component of the waste depot levy, collected
under the Fees and Levies regulations of the Environment Protection Act 1993.
The Environment Protection Authority (EPA) collects the levy of which 50% is paid into the Waste to Resources
Fund to be used by ZWSA for its programs.
The solid waste levy will increase from $26 per tonne in metropolitan Adelaide to $35 per tonne from
1 July 2011 and from $13 to $17.50 per tonne in non-metropolitan Adelaide.
ZWSA will also take advantage of other funding sources, such as the Australian Packaging Covenant, and
engage with existing alliances with organisations like KESAB environmental solutions, the EPA, industry
bodies and local government.
4.4.1 Partnerships and shared responsibilities

The goals and targets of the Waste Strategy 20112015 and future strategies will be realised through
consultation, successful cooperation and partnering with a range of stakeholders to identify priorities and
areas of interest.
The organisations and partnerships listed in Figure 2 are identified as essential to implementation of the
Waste Strategy 20112015.
Environment and Water Ministerial Council
Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
National Waste Policy

Environment Protection
Authority South Australia

Local government regional


resource management
authorities

Regulates the waste and


recycling sectors
Zero Waste SA
Develops the States Waste
Strategy and facilitates
statewide programs on waste
Broader state government

Zero Waste SA Act 2004


Environment Protection
(Waste to Resources) Policy

Has agency partnerships


Tertiary education/research
and development sector

South Australias Waste


Strategy 2011-2015

Does municipal waste regional


planning and implements
statewide waste environmental
risk programs
Local government
Does waste program planning,
management, operation,
collection, and service provision
education and promotion

Private sector waste generators

Environment and community


groups, NGOs and Indigenous
communities

Has increased responsibility for


products across lifecycles and
generated wastes

Promotes sustainable
production consumption and
waste reduction

Zero Waste SA

Resource management and


recycling industry
Manages resource recovery and
residual waste activities
Individuals
Are responsible for changing wasteful consumption practices, such as through better buying decisions

Figure 2. Roles and relationships in waste management in South Australia

4.4.2 Goals and targets

Within each objective, this Business Plan outlines specic goals and priorities for action across the three
broad waste-generating sectors of the community: municipal solid waste (MSW), commercial and industrial
(C&I) waste, and construction and demolition (C&D) waste.
Key material recovery and recycling targets in the Waste Strategy 20112015 (Table 1) and South Australias
Strategic Plan target to reduce landfill disposal by 25% by 2014 (from a 200203 baseline) form the higher
level key performance indicators. In regional areas, greater distances, transport costs and low economies of
scale make improvements more difficult. Thus, the Waste Strategy 20112015, does not set specific recycling
targets for regional South Australia to allow flexibility for rural councils.

Table 1. Summary of diversion targets and goals

South Australias Strategic Plan (Department of Premier and Cabinet)


> 25% reduction in landfill disposal from 2002-03 level by 2014

Per capita target


> 5% reduction in waste generation per capita by 2015
South Australias Waste Strategy 2011-2015 (Zero Waste SA)

Year

Metropolitan
(% diversion)

Non-metropolitan

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill diversion targets


2009 (baseline)*

55

Not applicable

2012

60

Maximise diversion to the extent practically achievable

2015

70

Maximise diversion to the extent practically achievable

Commercial and industrial (C&I) landfill diversion targets


2009 (baseline)**

60

Not applicable

2012

65

Maximise diversion to the extent practically achievable

2015

75

Maximise diversion to the extent practically achievable

Construction and demolition (C&D) landfill diversion targets


2009 (baseline)***

80

Not applicable

2012

85

Maximise diversion to the extent practically achievable

2015

90

Maximise diversion to the extent practically achievable

*  Estimated from Recycling Activity Report 2008-09 and assumes 30% MSW disposed to landfill. The MSW baseline figure is also supported by Zero
Waste SA funded kerbside audit data of three-bin system from 2008 and 2009 in which the collection frequency (all tenements) consisted of:
weekly residual waste; with fortnightly co-mingled and fortnightly green organics. These audits typically find diversion in the mid 50% range.
**

Estimated from Recycling Activity Report 2008-09. Assumes 43% C&I disposed to landfill.

***

Estimated from Recycling Activity Report 2008-09. Assumes 27% C&D disposed to landfill.

5. WHERE WE WERE IN 2010


South Australia is a strong performer in
recycling and recovery of resources.
The 200910 SA Recycling Activity Report by Rawtec
Pty Ltd on behalf of ZWSA, shows that South
Australia remains a strong performer in recycling
and recovery of resources.
In 200910, 2.76 million tonnes of materials was
diverted from landfill to recycling in South Australia
an 8% increase from the 2.55 million tonnes
recycled in 200809. The 200910 diversion rate
is the highest recorded in the last seven years at
72.7%. The South Australian per capita recycling
rate has increased to the second highest level of the
last seven years at 1,680 kg/capita and is the best in
the country for the first time since recycling data
collection began in 200304.
The Waste Strategy 20112015 sets further stretch
targets for kerbside recycling and, to achieve them,
the Business Plan encourages local government
to embrace food waste collection and reduce
contamination of recyclables.
South Australia performs well in C&D, beverage
container and steel recycling, and leads the way in
the recycling of some plastics (mainly PET and HDPE
polymers from the beverage sector).
South Australia has a large network of privately
operated drop-off centres (some 115 across the
State). Local councils are committed to working with
State Government and industry towards sustainability
and resource conservation. The State also has industry
leaders in the composting and C&D recycling sectors.

The South Australian per capita recycling rate has increased to the second
highest level of the last seven years and is the best in the country.

10

6. ORGANISATION OF THIS BUSINESS PLAN


The Zero Waste SA Business Plan 201112 and
Future Directions 201214 closely follows the Waste
Strategy 20112015 and its two key objectives
(Figure 3).
Each objective is treated separately in the Business
Plan (Sections 7 and 8) and priorities for action for
each objective are listed by priority areas including
waste (resource) streams.
Each area lists actions from the Waste Strategy
20112015 and sets an indicative budget for each
program, with outcomes.

M
 aximising the useful
life of materials through
reuse and recycling
Avoid and reduce waste

Waste Strategy
201115

Key targets 2015:


Municipal Solid
Waste: 65% of
material presented
at kerbside
diverted from
landfill
Commercial and
Industrial Waste:
75% of C&I
materials diverted
from landfill
Construction and
Demolition Waste:
90% of C&D
materials diverted
from landfill
SAs Strategic
Plan target: 25%
reduction of waste
to landfill by 2014

Priority areas:
Review and
assessment
Municipal Solid
Waste
Commercial and
Industrial Waste
Construction
and Demolition
Waste
Problematic and
Hazardous Waste
Disposal and
Illegal Dumping
Research and
Development

3-year Annual
Business Plan &
Future Directions

Tools:
Advocacy
Partnership
Research and
development
programs
Incentives
programs
Communication
and education
Investigation
knowledge and
data capture
New technology
investment
Product
stewardship
programs
Regulation

Figure 3. Relationship between draft South Australias Waste Strategy 20112015 and ZWSA Business Plan

11

7. OBJECTIVE: MAXIMISING THE USEFUL LIFE OF


MATERIALS THROUGH REUSE AND RECYCLING
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies that
achieving this objective requires action in the
key priority areas:
> promote green innovation (e.g. promote
the development and uptake of new, cleaner
technology)
> recognise the lifecycle of products and account
for the resources used
> develop and adopt innovative products and
services that help reduce our ecological
footprint to create comparative economic
advantage
> increase and maintain capacity of recycling
systems and reprocessing infrastructure

7.1.1 Program: Waste audits and recycling activities study

This annual survey collects data from recyclers and


reprocessors in South Australia to provide stream
by stream and waste type recycling tonnage. The
data summarises the current market, including its
market size and strength. Past surveys have shown a
steady increase in recycling. The Review of Recycling
Activity in South Australia 200910 (Rawtec Pty Ltd)
identies the areas of greatest need and best return
on investment.
ZWSA will continue with the study of recycling
activity in South Australia in the 2010-11, 2011-12
and 2012 13 financial years.
Budget for the next three years:

> implement regulation that drives progress and


supports long-term investment decisions
> identify new opportunities through developing
and promoting innovative solutions
> monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of
appropriate price signals and legislative
instruments.

7.1 Priority area: Measurement, analysis,


evaluation and reporting to support
targets and assess the adequacy of the
Waste Strategy
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies that
building our knowledge and data on waste and
recycling is essential to support the long-term
implementation of its targets and assess the
strategys adequacy.
To monitor how effective our programs are and to
identify areas for additional attention, we need
to know and understand what is happening with
waste streams, recycling performance, markets and
consumption. Several studies conducted for ZWSA
have pointed to the lack of quality data about the
sector, which the following programs aim to rectify.

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$70,000

$70,000

$70,000

7.1.2 Program: Building our knowledge and data on


waste and recycling

ZEUS is a knowledge-based system that helps to


facilitate monitoring, analysis and reporting on
waste reduction targets in the Waste Strategy
20112015 and in South Australias Strategic Plan.
As more waste, recycling and resource recovery data
is gathered, a management and reporting system is
needed to accommodate and extract information on:
>

recycling activity

> waste (tonnes) to landfill by waste stream


(MSW, C&I, C&D)
> litter
>

economic and environmental costs and benets

>

infrastructure needs

>

areas needing regulatory underpinning.

ZEUS currently stores data on illegal dumping,


household hazardous waste and farm chemicals,
container deposit, litter, landfill, grants and incentives.

12

In future, ZEUS will:


> report on waste and recycling data at a State,
metropolitan and regional level, and at an
individual council/organisation level as this
level of data becomes available

ZWSA will work with the EPA on several initiatives


for implementing the Waste EPP. Key areas of
urgent mutual concern are development of
guidelines for material recovery facilities, and
related standards and data capture.

> include data about organic waste composted


and recycling from the material recycling
facilities and transfer stations

This Business Plan also details how ZWSA will


support the implementation of the Waste EPP
(program reference: 7.5.2).

> capture data online from councils, recyclers and


landfill operators in regular reports and audits.

Budget for the next three years:

Additional modules will be planned as modelling


requirements change or as external requirements,
such as any proposed carbon pollution reduction
scheme, need spatial analysis modelling. Funds will
be required in future years to develop additional
modules as priorities are adjusted.

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$190,000

$284,000

$310,000

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$40,000

$30,000

$30,000

7.2 Priority area: Municipal solid waste


The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the
following priority actions for maximising the useful
life of materials through reuse and recycling in MSW:

Budget for the next three years:


2011-2012

2011-2012

> developing incentives for successful food


organics collection and treatment
> improving feedstocks to maximise value of
source separated systems

7.1.3 Program: Financial and legislative instruments

> improving:

7.1.3.1 Review of solid waste levy

> networks for drop-off of non-kerbside


collected materials (e.g. e-waste)

> sorting infrastructure


> value-adding of materials

The State Government Budget papers for 201011


indicate an increase in revenue collected through
the solid waste levy under the Fees and Levies
regulations of the Environment Protection Act 1983.
The Minister for Environment and Conservation has
directed ZWSA under the Zero Waste SA Act 2004 to
review the structure and impacts of the solid waste
levy in consultation with key stakeholders. The levy
review began in early 2011 and its findings will be
used to advise the Minister.

> coordinating and advocating for national


solutions to problematic wastes (e.g. packaging
and hazardous wastes)
> encouraging better contracting and monitoring
for household collection services
> supporting the implementation of the
Waste EPP
> monitoring and reviewing kerbside collection
systems to ensure maximum performance

Budget for the next three years:


2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$30,000

$0

$0

7.1.3.2 Environment Protection (Waste to Resources)


Policy 2010
The Environment Protection (Waste to Resources)
Policy 2010 (Waste EPP) came into operation on
1 September 2010 and will progressively ban
certain wastes from going to landfill. The Waste
EPP provides the regulatory underpinning for the
Waste Strategy 20112015.

> assisting local government to review, update and


implement regional waste management plans
> encouraging reuse of materials or items
through refurbishment
> supporting coordinated and integrated
householder recycling education campaigns
such as ZWSAs Recycle Right
> developing resource information to assist
non-metropolitan councils to divert waste
from landfill
> reducing contamination arising from collection
vehicle compaction rates

13

> developing guidelines for residential waste


and recycling services associated with higher
density urban living.
7.2.1 Program: E-waste collections incentives and
associated strategies

In November 2009, the nations environment


ministers resolved to introduce a national product
stewardship scheme for televisions and computers
with anticipated introduction in 2012. In 200708,
16.8 million televisions and computers were
discarded in Australia, with 84% going to landfill.
The phase-out of analog televisions is dramatically
increasing this gure.
Many electronic products contain hazardous
substances such as the heavy metals lead, mercury,
cadmium and hexavalent chromium. Computer
monitor (CRT) screens contain about 2 kilograms
of lead, depending upon size and make. Most
substances of concern in e-waste are of no concern
for human exposure or release into the environment
during ordinary use and handling; these concerns
arise if e-waste is improperly handled, disposed to
landfill, incinerated, shredded, ground, melted or
illegally dumped.
Many parts of regional South Australia switched
over from analog to digital television signal on
15 December 2010, the rst large-scale switch over
in Australia. In 201011, ZWSA funded councils
to help collect e-waste products, with a focus on
helping regional South Australia deal with e-waste
generated by the switch over.

ZWSA will also:


> investigate South Australias reprocessing
capacity for the expected increase in e-waste
> develop a strategy for e-waste that will support
and underpin the Waste EPP in consultation
with the EPA, local government, the recycling
industry and other key stakeholders
> take a leadership role on policy interventions,
such as market development and
infrastructure assistance.
This program will assist implementation of the
Waste Strategy 20112015 by seeking to improve
networks for dropping off e-waste and to influence
State and national policy development in e-waste.
Budget for the next three years:
Budget

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

Incentives

$500,000

$0

$0

Associated
strategies

$30,000

$0

$0

7.2.2 Program: Kerbside waste incentives and


associated strategies

In 2002, South Australian councils diverted on


average only about 20% of kerbside collected
material from landfill. By June 2010, all metropolitan
councils had implemented, or committed to, high
performing kerbside collection systems (50 councils
in total). Audit results indicate that three-bin systems
have a recycling rate of up to 55%.

In 201112, ZWSA will continue to make it easier


for householders to recycle televisions, computers
and other electronic waste, through grants to help
councils collect and reprocess these items. ZWSA will
continue grant funding to councils until the national
product stewardship scheme begins.

The Waste Strategy 20112015 includes a stretch


target of 70% of all material presented at kerbside
to be recycled by 2015. This target will be achieved
only with kerbside collection of food waste and
improvements to reduce contamination.

National efforts to manage e-waste better will need


legislative and practical support from individual
states before the national product stewardship
scheme begins. Where possible, ZWSA will continue
to inuence State and national policy development
as well as State Government procurement contracts
and processes in this area.

In 200809, 10 councils were funded to pilot


domestic food waste collection. Two different
designs of bench-top containers were tested with,
and without, the use of compostable liner bags.
Food waste was collected as part of existing council
green organics collections households could
recycle all food scraps, including meat and bones,
as well as shredded paper and tissues.

14

The food waste pilots informed ZWSA and


stakeholders of: the potential for diversion, kerbside
yields, contamination rates, resident satisfaction
levels, changes in presentation rates with differing
collection frequency, cost implications, load
capacities and odour levels. The assessment showed
high levels of participation and diversion of up to
71% of materials away from landfill in some areas.
Results from the pilot have informed a further
ZWSA incentive program, Kerbside Performance
Plus, to which the State Government committed
$6.1 million over four years (2010 11 to 201314).
The first round of funding under the new program
was offered to councils in 201011 and further
rounds are budgeted over the next three years.
Beyond working with local government, it is
necessary to understand the potential food diversion
arising from each ZWSA program. Resources can
then be aligned for maximum food waste diversion
by identifying crucial intervention points. Several
ZWSA programs address the generation of food
waste across food supply chains:
> Resource Efficiency Assistance Program
(REAP) for industry, businesses and State and
local government (program reference: 8.3.1)
is working with manufacturers to identify
opportunities for greater efficiencies in food
manufacturing processes and capturing food
waste generated in industry.
> Commercial incentives program Recycling
at Work (program reference: 7.3.2) seeks
to introduce robust collection systems in
commercial and industrial settings.
> Kerbside incentive program including food
waste (program reference: 7.2.2) is focused on
the introduction of food waste collection in
households.
ZWSA will prepare a map of food activities using
a value-chain model and data recently collected
during pilot programs and case studies. This map
will identify points on the value chain where food
waste is generated and quantify volumes of waste
generated. This will open opportunities not yet
explored and inform current intervention programs.

Budget for the next three years:


Budget

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

Incentives
(Kerbside)

$1,100,000

$853,000

$879,000

Associated
strategies

$30,000

$0

$0

7.2.3 Program: Regional implementation

Of South Australias waste, 20% is generated in rural


areas, where population densities are low and delivery
of waste and recycling services can be signicantly
more difficult than in metropolitan areas.
In recognition of these difficulties, the Waste
Strategy 20112015 does not set specific recycling
targets for regional South Australia. Diversion
targets for non-metropolitan areas are to maximise
diversion to the extent practically achievable to
provide flexibility for rural councils.
As regional strategies are completed, ZWSAs
emphasis has moved to support implementation,
granting up to 50% of costs.
The program has been subject to review and
continuous improvement, and is strongly supported
by regional councils. ZWSA will support local
government to review regional waste management
plans in the future.
A further $1.6 million has been allocated to this
program over three years for regional projects starting
in 201011 to provide funding and assistance for:
> infrastructure investment for local government
and industry
> the development and update of regional waste
management plans and strategies
> identifying and implementing innovative local
solutions.
In 201011, 19 regional infrastructure projects were
successful in receiving a total of $1.7 million in
funding under this program, mostly directed to new
or improved transfer stations and recycling facilities
in rural areas. Other projects include improved
facilities for e-waste handling, baling equipment
and a new oil waste recycling facility.
A further funding round will be made available in
201112 for regional projects. Funds will also be
allocated to projects awarded in 201011 as projects
gain approvals and achieve milestones.

15

Budget for the next three years:

7.3.1 Program: Metropolitan infrastructure (industry


investment incentives)

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$807,000

$559,000

$550,000

7.3 Priority area: Commercial and


industrial waste
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the
following priority actions for maximising the useful
life of materials through reuse and recycling in C&I:
> improving source separation, collection systems
and sorting infrastructure
> improving waste management and recycling
service delivery by the private sector
> reducing barriers to the use of recycled
materials in projects or products
> identifying solutions to achieve diversion of
C&I in regional areas
> supporting development of guidance for
management of farm generated waste streams
> supporting implementation of the Waste EPP
> identifying chemical hazard reduction and
related opportunities in government and
business, and identifying business leaders who
can assist with education and change
> identifying recycling systems, resources and
tools for workplaces to assist with ongoing
awareness
> working with economic development agencies
to look at growing resource recovery sectors
(e.g. e waste sector)
> monitoring energy recovery enterprises to
ensure that viable options for higher-order
beneficial uses are not circumvented, consistent
with the waste hierarchy.

ZWSA has initiated five rounds of grant funding for


metropolitan recycling infrastructure projects over
the past six years.
In 200910, ZWSA completed the Recycling Industry
Investment Review, which consulted with the recycling
industry, projected future recycling infrastructure
needs and considered investment opportunities.
In line with the findings of the review, priority
areas for investment were identified and included
in the 201011 Metropolitan Infrastructure Grants
program which allocated funding of $1.34 million
over two years to successful projects.
The Metropolitan Infrastructure Incentives program
aims to increase the ability of local reprocessors
to produce high value end-use products from
recyclables by investing in infrastructure that
enables greater reuse of waste materials and
reduces waste sent to landfill.
The State Government has committed to providing
$7.3 million over four years for investment in key
waste infrastructure across South Australia.
Funding rounds will be held over the next two years.
Priority projects will be determined based on the
ndings from the investment review in 201011 and
a multi-criteria analysis.
Successful projects will be provided funding from
$50,000 to a maximum of $300,000 (excluding
GST). Funds will also be allocated to projects
awarded in 201011 as projects gain approvals
and achieve milestones.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$662,000

$900,000

$900,000

The State Government has committed to providing $7.3million over 4 years for
investment in key waste infrastructure across South Australia.

16

7.3.2 Program: Commercial incentives (Recycling


at Work)

The highly fragmented C&I sector has many


very competitive small, medium and large scale
enterprises serviced by several waste and recycling
providers. It presents challenges in the diversity of
activities and wastes generated. The sector must be
approached with a range of complementary tactics,
including placing more responsibility on producers
and manufacturers to:
> manage their products beyond the point of
manufacture or sale
> implement improved waste handling,
collecting and processing.
Waste reduction in the C&I sector will need
sustained emphasis on developing and
implementing practical strategies for collecting
recyclable material. ZWSA has developed a guide
for the retail sector and is keen to work with other
sectors to do the same.
ZWSA will seek to encourage the adoption of
sustainability practices by South Australian business
and industry, linked with waste reduction, and
reduced water and energy use.
ZWSA will use landfill audit results and waste
generation and disposal data to identify specic
industry sectors and/or companies (e.g. food
processing/manufacturing, hardware, retail) that
offer opportunities for better waste management.
ZWSA will explore these opportunities and set
initiatives for waste avoidance, reduction, reuse
and recycling in these targeted areas.
Adelaide has high performance recycling collection
systems for households and a strong history in
source separation. An equally effective system is
needed for the C&I sector.
ZWSAs Recycling at Work program is supported by
$576,800 in Australian Packaging Covenant funding
and aims to encourage and support effective
recycling collection systems for small to medium
businesses across metropolitan Adelaide.
ZWSA works with waste collection companies to
introduce source separated co-mingled dry recycling
systems and/or organics collection systems. The
program was launched in January 2009, and 11
waste collection companies have received funding
through the program as new recycling services are
introduced into businesses.

ZWSA continues to invest in this area to gain


signicant diversion of materials such as packaging
and organics to more benecial uses.
In delivering Recycling at Work, ZWSA maintains
strong links with business and industry, and thus
with ZWSAs Resource Efficiency Assistance Program
(program reference: 8.3.1).
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$280,000

$678,000

$750,000

7.3.3 Program: Explore opportunities for industrial


symbiosis

Industrial symbiosis is defined as mutually beneficial


partnerships between organisations. It is based
on the premise that one industrys waste can be a
valuable input to another organisation.
The Business Sustainability Alliance and ZWSAs
REAP focuses on internal resource efficiency;
industrial symbiosis addresses the external aspects of
resource management. ZWSA has provided financial
support to one facility which focuses on industrial
symbiosis the Adelaide Brighton Cement and
ResourceCo fuel substitution program for cement
manufacturing.
Over recent years, significant progress has been
made internationally with governments establishing
a structured approach to facilitate industrial
symbiosis. The most successful example is the United
Kingdoms National Industrial Symbiosis Program
(NISP) established in 2005. From a total of 23
million in funding (over five years), the NISP has
diverted 5.2 million tonnes of industrial waste from
landfill; generated 151m in new investment; saved
participants over 131 million and reduced carbon
emissions by over 5.2 million tonnes. The UK NISP
model is being implemented by other EU countries,
the US, China and Japan.
The main objective of this program is to identify
opportunities in South Australia to develop a broader
industrial symbiosis program in South Australia.
Funding will be used to conduct practical studies that
would generate examples of potential projects and
provide insight into whether an industrial symbiosis
program is feasible in South Australia.

17

Industrial symbiosis. like REAP, is likely to be


more successful with an integrated approach that
addresses solid waste, energy, water and lean
processes. Consequently, ZWSA will engage with
other government agencies through the Business
Sustainability Alliance to determine government
wide support for industrial symbiosis.
Budget for the next three years:

ZWSA will contribute funding for an industry-driven


program that establishes broad scale voluntary
compliance using education on C&D resource
recovery, recycling, stormwater pollution reduction
and litter management, and encouragement of
industry leaders to implement voluntary compliance
programs, provided that industry increases its
funding commitment.
Key actions that KESAB has committed to include:

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$70,000

$30,000

$30,000

7.4 Priority area: Construction and


demolition waste
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the
following priority actions for maximising the useful
life of materials through reuse and recycling in C&D:
> developing markets and removing barriers to
the responsible use of secondary materials such
as concrete, aggregates, fill materials
> improving the quality of recycled materials
ensuring fit for purpose
> promoting source separation wherever feasible
> supporting the implementation of the Waste EPP
> embedding waste reduction and management
practices in TAFE courses
> encouraging salvaging and reuse of building
materials.
Signicant change in this sector over the past
six years has seen large investment in new
infrastructure and innovation. Nevertheless,
specications are needed for products to
improve their acceptance in civil works and
other applications.
7.4.1 Clean site building and construction resource
recovery

The Waste Strategy 20112015 recognises that


engaging with the building and construction
industry is essential to improve waste management
and resource recovery practices in the C&D sector.
To improve waste management on construction
sites, KESAB will develop information for the
building and construction industry that clearly
outlines clean site management to support source
separation and diversion of site clearing materials to
appropriate recycling facilities.

> development and pilot of a clean site module,


run frequently by at least one training provider
by 2014
> deliver up to six rural/regional workshops per
annum
> four demonstration best practice sites in
metropolitan and rural areas
> four on-site best practice demonstration days.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$20,000

$10,000

$10,000

7.4.2 Program: Markets for C&D materials

The Sustainable Markets and Innovation (industry


investment incentives) program will also provide
opportunities to the C&D sector to develop and
improve markets for secondary materials
(program reference: 7.7.1).

7.5 Priority area: Problematic and


hazardous waste
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the
following priorities for action on the management
of hazardous waste:
> encourage the recovery and treatment of oils,
solvents and other valuable materials for reuse
> reduce hazards through hazardous waste
collection, recycling and appropriate disposal
> encourage remediation of low level and high
level contaminated soils for reuse.
Household chemicals can be dangerous without
safe storage and disposal. ZWSA, with the
assistance of local government, undertakes free
household hazardous waste collections to help
the public dispose of unwanted chemicals in an
environmentally safe way.

18

Licensed professional waste management


contractors set up temporary collection points
in metropolitan and regional areas of the State
and householders are asked to deliver unwanted
chemicals to collection points. The collection
timetable is on the ZWSA website.
In line with the direction of the Waste Strategy
20112015, in 2011 12 ZWSA will:
> continue to fund a household and farm
hazardous waste collection program across South
Australia, and monitor and report the results
> educate the community on proper household
hazardous waste management practices and
better inform stakeholders and the community on
household and farm chemical collection facilities
> encourage the recovery and treatment of oils,
solvents and other valuable materials for reuse
> reduce hazards through hazardous waste
collection, recycling and appropriate disposal
> encourage remediation of low level and high
level contaminated soils for reuse.
Following a State Government commitment,
$2.8 million was allocated for the collection of
household and farm hazardous waste across the State
for a further four years (commencing 201011).
7.5.1 Program: Household hazardous waste and farm
chemical collections

The Hazardous Waste Depot at Dry Creek has been


funded and managed by ZWSA since July 2008;
previously it was an EPA facility.
The depot is open between 9am and noon on the
rst Tuesday of every month. The facility has been
invaluable to the South Australian community over
many years but it is not always convenient
for residents south of the city or for those with
full-time work.
Between July 2008 and May 2011, 3,773 people
delivered more than 200 tonnes of hazardous waste
for safe disposal at the depot monthly collection.
As a complementary measure to the depot, a more
accessible service in a ZWSA mobile system for the
proper disposal of household hazardous waste and
farm chemicals, operates across metropolitan and
regional areas of the State. ZWSA manages the
proper collection and disposal of the unwanted
chemicals by an EPA authorised contractor.

The program began in March 2004 and by May


2011, 24,605 people had delivered 1,219 tonnes of
unwanted hazardous materials to collection points
in council areas and the Outback Areas Community
Development Trust.
Extended producer responsibility (EPR) will continue
to be considered at a national level. The EPR policy
approach extends the producers responsibility for a
product (physical and/or financial) past the purchase
and use period to the post-consumer stage of a
products lifecycle. Initiatives and policies that require
the producer or the retailer, or both, to take back the
product or its packaging after use are the clearest
example of extending producer responsibility.
Because of the large number of manufacturers and
the diverse types of products, EPR will take time
to implement. Once it is introduced and accessible
systems are in place, ZWSA will be able to reduce
and its hazardous waste commitments.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$856,000

$793,000

$800,000

7.5.2 Program: Support the implementation of the


Waste EPP

ZWSA will develop a strategy in 201112 to support


and underpin the Environment Protection (Waste
to Resources) Policy 2010 (Waste EPP). The Waste
EPP will progressively ban certain wastes to landfill
including computers, oil, lead acid batteries and
compact fluorescent lights. ZWSA will take a
leadership role and consider policy interventions
to support the Waste EPP. This role will address
strategies for banned materials including high
volume/low toxicity materials such as compact
uorescent lighting, mercury lights, tyres, lead acid
batteries, gas bottles, paints, waste oil and all plastics.
ZWSA has already made progress in some areas.
For example, as the community moves away from
traditional incandescent light bulbs, ZWSA has
helped householders safely dispose of the mercury
contained in the new energy efficient lights.
In January 2011, the State Government launched a
three-year pilot ZWSAs BackLight Household Light
Globe Recycling Program.

19

Householders can now drop off a range of used


fluoro globes for recycling at 24 metropolitan and
26 regional Mitre 10 stores across the State, free of
charge. The globes are then recycled by Chemsal
Resource Recovery.
In formulating strategies, ZWSA will work closely
and consult with the EPA, local government,
recycling industry (including container deposit
operators), lighting industry, plastics industries, tyre
industry, major retailers and other key stakeholders.

7.7 Priority area: Research and development


The Waste Strategy 20112015 recognises that
research will underpin and inform how we address
these new challenges of wasteful consumption,
and change behaviours. Research priorities will
be evaluated from time to time. As we extend
our knowledge and focus on sustainable use of
resources, we begin to extend beyond known
approaches to recycling and reuse.
7.7.1 Program: Sustainable markets and innovation

Budget for the next three years:

(industry investment incentives)

Budget

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

Incentives
(Backlight
program)

$57,000

$84,000

$90,000

Associated
strategies

$70,000

$0

$0

7.6 Priority area: Disposal and illegal dumping


The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the
following target for illegal dumping:
> decreasing incidences and tonnages of illegally
disposed waste.
ZWSA will work closely with the EPA and its
stakeholders to assist efforts to reduce illegal
dumping. ZWSA offers its data capture system for
illegal dumping incidences to councils and to the EPA.
7.6.1 Program: Illegal dumping

Illegal dumping is a signicant cost to outer urban


councils, and it has been suggested that the increase
to the solid waste levy will increase the problem.
ZWSA will work with the EPA to identify ways to
reduce illegal dumping and encourage behavioural
awareness of litter and illegal dumping issues.
Key priorities for action, detailed in the Waste
Strategy 20112015, include:
> supporting the implementation of the Waste EPP
> implementing litter reduction and public place
recycling initiatives
> identifying and maximising opportunities to
increase awareness, and link environmental
values with reduced litter, illegal dumping and
associated impacts (program reference: 8.5.1
and 8.5.2).

The need to promote markets for recycled materials,


improve the viability of the recycling sector and
develop value-added recycled products is a priority
for action in the Waste Strategy 20112015.
In 201112, the ZWSA Sustainable Markets and
Innovation grants program will target key waste
streams and their associated recycling industries.
The program will use financial incentives to increase
and support markets for recycled materials. Projects
will be coordinated through each material industry
sector (e.g. composting, aggregate and plastics).
Funding rounds for the grants program will be held
over the next three years with priority projects to
be determined based on the investment review and
ZWSA multi-criteria analysis tool. This program will
be implemented in collaboration with Innovate SA
and other Business Sustainability Alliance partners.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$172,000

$200,000

$200,000

7.7.2 Tertiary education sector (UniSA) partnership

The Waste Strategy 20112015 recognises that


collaboration, research, data collection and monitoring
will help us to refine programs to in turn achieve
better waste avoidance and resource efficiency.
The Zero Waste Centre for Sustainable Design and
Behaviour, established in 200809 at the University
of South Australia, is a centre of excellence for:
> building long-term capacity to undertake
activities at the higher end of the waste hierarchy
> creating a focal point for waste-related research.

20

The centres ZWSA Chair for Sustainable Design and


Behaviour, Professor Steffen Lehmann, appointed
August 2010, will continue to develop the centre
with UniSA and ZWSA.
Collaboration and partnering with other State
tertiary and research and development institutions,
such as Flinders University, the University of
Adelaide, the South Australian Research and
Development Institute (SARDI), interstate and
overseas research centres, will work with the Waste
Strategy 20112015 to:
> analyse the flow of materials and other
resources in a products lifecycle from raw
material extraction and manufacturing,
through a products useful life and recycling,
to final disposal
> identify where in the lifecycle, changes can
make large positive impacts on energy, waste,
materials use and greenhouse gas production
> attract other funding partners, such as the
Australian Research Council for research projects
> consistent with the guidance provided by the
waste hierarchy, support research into new
technologies that either enhance performance
or replace landfill as a disposal option
> support research into durable goods and
products that encourage reuse
> understand how sustainable behaviour change
is achieved and apply findings to waste
avoidance, and reduction of littering, illegal
dumping and consumption
> find the information we need to make better
decisions about what we buy and use
> help discover the policy choices society will
need to ensure its future wellbeing
> fund and develop graduate and post-graduate
capacity
> measure consumption and ecological
footprint; understand links between wasteful
consumption, disposable income, behaviours
and ecological footprint.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$211,000

$211,000

$215,000

7.7.3 Waste to energy policy

The Waste Strategy 20112015 recognises the need


to support new technologies that either enhance
performance or replace landfill as a disposal option,
consistent with the guidance of the waste hierarchy.
Since ZWSA developed a waste to energy policy
in 2005, waste to energy has rapidly developed
worldwide.
This program will review and update the existing
ZWSA waste to energy policy and consider a broad
range of environmental, social and economic factors.
This will equip ZWSA with a better understanding
of the opportunities and priority areas associated
with recovering energy from waste. The policy
will examine opportunities with alternative waste
technologies and optimal use of waste resources,
and set directions for research and innovation.
Funding is being utilised to conduct studies that
will inform the waste to energy policy. ZWSA will
engage with other relevant government agencies
and encourage a partnership approach through
development of the policy.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$70,000

$0

$0

21

8. OBJECTIVE: AVOID AND REDUCE WASTE


The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies that
achievability of this objective requires action in
these key priority areas:
> avoid and reduce wasteful use of resources in
production processes and products (e.g. leaner
production, design for environment
and extended producer responsibility)
> learn and foster attitudes and lifestyle choices
that encourage us to live within natures limits
> embed this new learning within our education
systems
> support consumers to make informed
purchasing decisions.

8.2 Priority area: Municipal solid waste


The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the following
priority actions for avoid and reduce waste in MSW:
> use innovative approaches to inform
households, increase awareness of wasteful
consumption and effective recycling, and
maintain awareness above 80%
> promote green purchasing and waste
avoidance with householders and councils
> explore links with emerging sustainability
agendas (e.g. sustainability in food policy)
> engage the community in opportunities
involving resources and sustainability

8.1 Priority area: Measurement, analysis,


evaluation and reporting to support
targets and assess the adequacy of
the Waste Strategy

> develop systems that assist purchasing decisions


such as extended producer responsibility,
star-rating systems and the choice to leave
packaging in-store.

8.1.1 Program: Measuring community attitudes

8.2.1 Program: Recycle Right household education

and behaviour

Monitoring community attitudes and behaviours


will assist ZWSA to monitor, report and support
targets and to assess the adequacy of the Waste
Strategy 20112015.
Recycling has become progressively easier and
widespread, and meaningful metrics to measure
behavioural change will be identied.
ZWSA will undertake market research in
collaboration with Ehrenberg-Bass Institute for
Marketing Science (UniSA) to measure behavioural
change, knowledge and perceptions towards
recycling in South Australia.
In future, ZWSA will continue to survey public
attitudes towards waste avoidance and reducing
consumption which will assist in tailoring
communications to help individuals to learn and
foster attitudes and lifestyle choices that encourage
living within natures limits.

ZWSA has developed a communication campaign to


encourage householders to recycle correctly in an
effort to reduce the incidence of placing the wrong
materials (contamination) in kerbside collected
recycling bins.
This campaign has been developed in collaboration
with the Local Government Association of South
Australia, Visy Recycling and waste industry
stakeholders including Compost SA.
The main elements of the campaign include
advertising, direct mail, an educational DVD, online
information, 1300 hotline and a training program
about recycling for local government staff and
elected members.
ZWSA will continue with the Recycle Right
campaign for the next three years. The campaign
will supplement and improve current recycling
knowledge and behaviour, and provide a tested
model that can be replicated.
Budget for the next three years:

Budget for the next three years:


2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$35,000

$40,000

$40,000

$305,000

$300,000

$300,000

22

8.2.2 Program: KESAB Sustainable communities (City


and Country)

The Waste Strategy 20112015 recognises the


importance of supporting local activities, including
schools, to tap into the values of the community and
encourage sustainable behaviour change.
KESAB has committed to ongoing environmental
education and action embracing rural
communities, local government, schools and
groups through a revamped Tidy Towns
program, Sustainable Communities.
KESAB will engage rural communities to adopt and
implement sustainable environmental practices,
encouraging a whole of community approach through
environmental education and action. This will include
recognition of waste and recycling efforts through
annual awards, community action and councils.
KESAB has committed to:
> delivering the Sustainable Communities
program to a high standard with engagement
by communities in each region evidenced by
applications from a range of community-based
groups including councils, schools, natural
resources management boards, and service and
community groups
> involving Adelaide communities, with at least
five urban entries in 2012, eight in 2013 and
10 in 2014
> recognising and rewarding sustainable
environmental outcomes
> ensuring that at least 30% of councils in each
region promote the program via websites,
newsletters or other high-profile media.

8.2.3 Program: Wipe Out Waste schools program

The Wipe Out Waste (WOW) program provides


training and resources to teachers and helps drive
positive change in schools. WOW was developed on
behalf of ZWSA by KESAB environmental solutions,
the Department of Environment and Natural
Resources, and Department of Education and
Childrens Services (DECS). WOW is an integrated
comprehensive waste education program supported
by curriculum resources and teacher training. It is
the rst program in Australia to span kindergarten
through to primary and secondary schools.
These resources enable students to gain an
understanding of waste, litter, recycling and
related environmental issues as part of the school
curriculum. WOW is a fundamental adjunct to the
DECS Sustainable Schools Program. The ndings of
a 2008 comprehensive evaluation of the program
continue to inform ZWSAs funding provision and
direction for the program.
In 201112, the program will continue with its focus
on regional and metropolitan schools. In particular,
KESAB has committed to:
> preparing a strategic plan for implementation
of the expanded program, to be adopted by
November 2011
> identifying a key performance indicator for the
number of additional schools in the strategic plan
> developing age-appropriate resources as needed
> establishing community, council and
industry linkages and partnerships for each
participating school
> reducing waste in schools
> regular reporting to stakeholders.

ZWSA will continue to provide some support to


KESABs Sustainable Communities activities.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012
$25,000

2012-2013
(indicative)
$25,000

2013-2014
(indicative)

Budget for the next three years:


2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$230,000

$240,000

$240,000

$25,000

The Wipe Out Waste program is the first in Australia to span kindergarten
through to primary and secondary schools.

23

8.2.4 Program: School and community grants

School and Community grants targets charities,


service clubs and other not-for-profit organisations,
and schools (including metropolitan and regional
high schools and kindergartens) that recover
reusable resources.
Consistent with the Waste Strategy 20112015,
ZWSA will deliver this program in recognition of
the important role community-based organisations
and some schools play in collecting materials for
recycling or reuse and also working at the higher
end of the waste hierarchy (avoid, reduce, reuse).
The program supports small-scale community and
school projects that encourage reuse, recycling and
the diversion of waste from landfill.
This program is complementary to the WOW program
and to be eligible for funding, schools must have staff
who have attended a ZWSA WOW workshop.
Subject to a review by ZWSA in 201112, the
program will continue in 201213 and 201314.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$0

$120,000

$120,000

8.3 Priority area: Commercial and


industrial waste
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the
following priority actions to avoid and reduce
waste in C&I:
> promote EPA sustainability licences that
incorporate sustainability measures
> encourage industry training and awareness
> promote sustainable procurement and
undertake specific analysis to demonstrate
the full costs and other benefits of sustainable
procurement
> promote industry knowledge and awareness
through web based publications and
information dissemination
> implement sustainability initiatives within the
State Government, including assets such as
buildings and infrastructure
> promote innovation in business sustainability

> fund the expansion of resource efficiency


initiatives to include accreditation schemes
> involve greater numbers of businesses,
especially small and medium sized enterprises
and retail sectors, in work-based recycling and
resource efficiency programs
> identify business leaders who can assist with
industry education and enable change across
sectors and through supply chains.
8.3.1 Program: Resource Efficiency Assistance Program
for industry, business and State and local
government

Resource efficient manufacturing reduces raw


material, energy and water use, and minimises
waste production. Resource efficiency maintains
a high prole in this program, which seeks case
studies and iconic companies to tackle their waste
and related issues.
Similar programs in South Australia, interstate
and overseas have shown that companies can
realise large environmental and cost savings by
implementing resource efficiency measures. Actions
can also be accredited, and give the organisation a
new marketing edge.
ZWSA is part of the Business Sustainability Alliance
(BSA) in partnership with the Department of Trade
and Economic Development (Innovate SA), SA Water
and the EPA. The alliance delivers the Resource
Efficiency Assistance Program (REAP) and has
developed an online web portal as a single point of
contact to promote member agency services (www.
southaustralia.biz/Innovation-in-SA/BSA-REAP.aspx).
The BSA is strategically positioned to provide key
competencies in the areas of waste, water, energy,
lean manufacturing, construction, compliance,
climate change and sustainability.
REAP helps businesses and government to
understand, develop and implement cost-saving
resource efficiency measures. In doing so, the
companies also build capacity to deal with a range
of rapidly emerging environmental, financial and
social imperatives. For this reason, REAP is critical to
achieving several Waste Strategy 20112015 priority
actions in avoid and reduce waste in the C&I sector.
REAP is the key waste avoidance program for ZWSA
and will have economic and sustainability benets
as well as developing a core of environmental
knowledge in the business community.

24

Key elements of REAP are:

8.3.2 Program: Consumption and waste avoidance


incentives

> commitment from management

The Consumption and Waste Avoidance incentives


program is consistent with the direction of the
Waste Strategy 20112015 as it aims to promote
innovation for projects which demonstrate:

> diagnostic evaluation


> training programs
> in-house technical support
> financial support in the form of resource
efficiency audits.
Consistent with priority actions in the Waste Strategy
20112015, ZWSA will extend its work under the
REAP program following a State Government
commitment of $1.6 million over four years. Key
work to be undertaken by ZWSA will include:
> extending REAP so that it reaches up to
approximately 150 sites and 60 companies
per year
> undertaking an advocacy and enabling role
in greening State Government which is a
signicant generator of C&I waste across
myriad operations including offices, hospitals,
national parks, emergency services, correctional
facilities, TAFE campuses and schools (in
201112, State Government agencies will have
the opportunity to work with the REAP alliance
of agencies and experts to improve their
management of materials, energy and water)
> advising on and informing a range of issues
such as State Government procurement,
accommodation t-outs, and waste
management; government procurement
processes and decisions can avoid and reduce
waste at the beginning of a products life, and
ensure that what is purchased can be reused
and recycled. Through its procurement power,
government can inuence change in business
and the wider community.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$1,179,000

$1,261,000

$1,272,000

> effective ways to avoid waste


> reach a larger number of people
> help to guide social change towards models
of sustainable consumption.
ZWSAs support will help guide a transition to
sustainable resource use in the economy. For
example, it may assist supply to meet a genuine
demand, or it may facilitate more sustainable
consumer choices.
Applicants will be required to meet the following
criteria for suitable projects to receive funding:
> are unique/innovative in South Australia
> need seed or kick-start funding
> need funding for an element essential to the
initiatives success (i.e. the initiative would not
proceed without the element)
> operate at the avoidance, reduction or
reuse levels of the hierarchy
> can demonstrate measurable outcomes and
return on investment
> are based on a model that has been proven
successful elsewhere
> deliver multiple benets in addition to reduced
consumption and improved resource (social,
economic or environmental)
> are consistent with Government policy
directions including targets for reduction
of waste to landfill and the Waste Strategy
20112015
> can be implemented and reported within
18 months of initiation.
ZWSA will offer this program in 201112 and assess
future rounds of funding in 201213 and 201314
following review of the initial round of applicants
and initiatives proposed.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$141,000

$203,000

$230,000

25

8.4 Priority area: Construction and


demolition waste
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies the
following priority actions for avoid and reduce
waste in C&D:
> taking account of waste generation and waste
reduction in advocating for planning decisions

developers, Planning SA, Department for Transport,


Energy and Infrastructure, Land Management
Corporation, and others, to promote better
sustainable design of the built environment. This
will include adoption of new and more sustainable
building materials and practices.
Budget for the next three years:

> promoting sustainable procurement, especially


in the government sector

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

> applying financial instruments to drive change

$45,000

$0

$0

> engaging industry training and association


bodies to include avoidance, reduction and
recycling within a sustainability context in
apprentice training.
8.4.1 Program: Promote better design of the built
environment

Building and retrotting of commercial and


residential development and construction work
can strengthen the ability to move towards a more
sustainable use of building materials and practices.
This can be achieved by working within the
legislative planning framework to develop principles
and guidelines that:
> promote better design of the built
environment and adoption of new and more
sustainable building materials
> minimise or avoid waste in the construction
process
> promote building design that supports
future adaptability and maximises reuse and
redevelopment of existing infrastructure
> incorporate material reuse, materials with
recycled content and materials that are
recyclable
> include on-site waste separation and recovery
systems during construction and demolition
> provide sufficient space to manage waste and
recycling infrastructure in the design phase of
developments
> where feasible, achieve the outcomes under
Management and Materials in the Green
Star Rating tool (www.gbc.org.au).
ZWSA will work with the appropriate stakeholders,
such as Department of the Premier and Cabinet
Green Building initiative, University of South
Australia, Housing Industry Association, Master
Builders Association of SA, Property Council,

8.5 Priority area: Litter reduction


The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies that
achieving litter reduction requires action in:
> identifying and maximising opportunities
to increase awareness, link environmental
values with reduced litter, illegal dumping
and associated impacts.
8.5.1 Program: Litter data and research and branded
litter monitoring

KESAB has been monitoring litter incidence at


151 sites across the State on a quarterly basis since
1998, providing the best continuous data set for
measuring litter incidence in Australia.
This program aims to maintain effective litter data
on trends, item types and locations, and develop
community education and awareness campaigns.
Data will be stored and analysed in ZEUS.
National litter monitoring was reintroduced in 2006,
using the methodology developed by KESAB.
This program will continue to be supported for at
least the next three years. KESAB has committed to:
> conducting quarterly counts at 151 sites
throughout South Australia in February, May,
August, November
> maintaining a comprehensive database and
trend line of litter streams in SA
> integrating with Keep Australia Beautifuls
National Litter Index and Branded Litter Study
> developing litter reduction strategies and
resources based on litter count data
> achieving measureable reduction in
targeted litter
> regularly reporting to, engaging and
informing stakeholders

26

> continuing ongoing public awareness and


media management
> independently auditing count procedure and
results annually.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$70,000

$70,000

$70,000

8.5.2 Program: Community litter, education, resources


and campaigns

Extensive social research into community behaviour,


litter and recycling highlights the need for new
community and public place litter resources and
strategies. The research ndings identify targets and
opportunities to focus on key issues and community
sector groups. This enables resources and strategy
options to be developed in collaboration with
partners and stakeholders.
This program aims to develop and regularly update
a suite of contemporary litter awareness and
information materials (brochures, posters, signs,
some in languages other than English), and make
them available to councils, schools, community
groups and stakeholders to increase awareness
of litter disposal.
KESAB has committed to:
> develop and implement litter awareness
strategies in collaboration with sectors
identified through the Litter Data and Branded
Litter Monitoring programs and through
stakeholder feedback
> monitor new packaging types and report on
their impacts
> develop and disseminate Information and
resources to stakeholders for implementation.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$100,000

$100,000

$100,000

Extensive social research into community behaviour, litter and recycling highlights
the need for new community and public place litter resources and strategies.

27

9. STAKEHOLDERS, PARTNERING AND LINKAGES


The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies that, as
an underlying principle, open dialogue with local
government, industry and the community:

Strategy 20112015 by:


> supporting local council implementation of
food collection with kerbside organics

> is fundamental to gain trust and subsequent


improvements to waste management

> supporting the continued process of waste


management reform by regional councils

> acts as encouragement for these sectors to


contribute positively to change.

> facilitating local government discussion of


key issues of relevance to ZWSA.

A range of stakeholders has been identified as


essential to the implementation of the Waste Strategy
20112015 (reference 4.4.1). ZWSAs key partnering
organisations help achieve the goals of the Waste
Strategy 20112015.

Budget for the next three years:

9.1 Tertiary Education Sector (UniSA) Partnership


The ZWSA Centre for Sustainable Design and
Behaviour opened in 2008. This $2 million partnership
between the University of South Australia and ZWSA
over five years brings together design and behaviour
change across diverse academic disciplines such as
architecture and childhood development. The centre
examines issues of waste management and reduction,
recycling and resource efficiency. It is a key tool to
tackle some of the harder challenges ahead
(program reference 7.7.2).

9.2 Local Government Association


The Waste Strategy 20112015 recognises that local
government is central to planning infrastructure
needs, including industrial waste needs where
municipal and industrial facilities combine. Many
councils operate education and awareness programs.
Some develop strategies for the environment
and sustainability including waste management,
engaging with communities, and identifying targets
and priorities. Some councils work cooperatively with
ZWSA to establish regional waste management plans.
These activities will complement and support the
Waste Strategy 20112015.
A successful partnership with the Local Government
Association, which began before the establishment
of ZWSA, will continue for the period of the Business
Plan and will be reviewed annually. The partnership
between the Local Government Association and
ZWSA will support the implementation of the Waste

2011-2012
$42,600

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$44,200

$50,000

9.3 Waste Management Association of


Australia
The Waste Management Association of Australia
(WMAA) SA division, coordinates and articulates its
members concerns and suggestions. Initiatives in
C&I waste streams will require greater consultation
with, and signicant involvement from, the waste
collection and sorting industry. The WMAA holds
brieng sessions on a range of ZWSA issues each year.
The Waste Strategy 20112015 recognises that
ZWSAs partnership with the WMAA provides
valuable input into decision-making processes.
This continued partnership will help WMAA link the
industry with ZWSA. ZWSA will continue to support
WMAA to:
> run events to improve industry knowledge
and expertise, and provide networking
opportunities
> administer working groups and distribute
ZWSA information to members.
ZWSA will provide funding support of $40,000 for
each Enviro Conference to be held in Adelaide in
2012 and 2014.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012
$45,400

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$54,800

$58,000

28

9.4 National and State policies


The Australian Government is responsible for
ensuring that Australias international obligations
are met, through national or State actions. ZWSA
contributes to national discussions on a range of
issues such as plastic bags, tyres, end of life vehicles,
e-waste, waste oil, product stewardship and the
Australian Packaging Covenant.
The Waste Strategy 20112015 identifies that
effective product stewardship schemes should be
in place by 2015. ZWSA will continue to influence
policy direction in the future to support product
stewardship initiatives for a range of products
including e-waste, televisions, tyres and batteries.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$258,000

$115,000

$115,000

ZWSA contributes to national discussions on a range of issues such as plastic


bags, tyres, end of life vehicles, ewaste, waste oil and product stewardship.

29

10. CORPORATE SUPPORT FUNCTIONS


10.1 Corporate communications, education,
marketing and website

10.3 Corporate services (accommodation, office


running costs and salaries)

ZWSAs communications, education and marketing


activities target industry, government and
community and will underpin the implementation
of the Waste Strategy 20112015.

All organisations require administrative support and


advice, and this budget funds the administration
of ZWSA activities. Administration includes rental
ofce lease payments, payroll, insurance and
purchasing, as well as administrative support
to the Board and management of the Waste to
Resources Fund. This budget item provides ongoing
administration support to the organisation.

Communications aim to raise awareness of ZWSAs


purpose, achievements and programs, and enhance
its stakeholder relationships by encouraging twoway communications, especially with local councils
and industry.
The focus on public information and engagement
on recycling will be complemented by linking
consumption with waste and climate change. The
introduction of food waste collections will also
increase the need to raise public awareness of
contamination issues, green organics, waste oil
facilities and the greenhouse gas benets of recycling.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$289,000

$300,000

$310,000

10.2 ZWSA Board support


ZWSA provides policy and administrative support
to the Board of ZWSA and committees approved
by the Board (e.g. Governance Committee). The
Board meets around 10 times a year and members
(excluding public servants) receive appropriate
sitting fees for attending meetings.
This budget item reects running costs of Board
meetings, training of members and ZWSA staff
salaries and on-costs allocated to support the
Board function.
Budget for the next three years:
2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

$157,000

$145,000

$146,000

Budget for the next three years:


Budget

2011-2012

2012-2013
(indicative)

2013-2014
(indicative)

Corporate
activities

$713,000

$693,000

$755,000

zGreen
initiatives

$25,000

$25,000

$25,000

30

11. BUDGET
Revenue and expenditure
Revenue

2011 12 ($)

2012 13 ($)

2013 14 ($)

Cash held 1 July, opening balance (estimated)

21,521,000

28,398,000

35,668,000

50% of waste levy payments from EPA

15,087,000

15,153,000

15,544,000

Interest on deposits

555,000

555,000

555,000

Income from external sources

160,000

37,323,000

44,106,000

51,767,000

8,925,000

8,438,000

8,690,000

Total revenue Waste to Resources Fund


ZWSA expenditure authority

Priority areas and programs


Expenditure

7.

Maximising the useful life of materials through reuse and recycling

7.1 Priority area: Measurement, analysis, evaluation

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

70,000

70,000

70,000

190,000

284,000

310,000

260,000

354,000

380,000

7.1.3.1 Review of solid waste levy

30,000

7.1.3.2 Environment Protection (Waste to Resources)


Policy 2010 refer to 7.5.2 program

40,000

30,000

30,000

70,000

30,000

30,000

530,000

1,130,000

853,000

879,000

807,000

559,000

550,000

2,467,000

1,412,000

1,429,000

and reporting to support targets and assess the


adequacy of the Waste Strategy

7.1.1 Waste audits and recycling activities study


7.1.2  Building our knowledge and data on waste
and recycling
Sub-total
7.1.3  Program: Financial and legislative instruments

Sub-total
7.2

Priority area: Municipal solid waste

7.2.1 E-waste collections incentives and associated


strategies
7.2.2  Kerbside waste incentives and associated
strategies
7.2.3 Regional implementation
Sub-total

31

7.3

Priority area: Commercial and Industrial Waste

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

7.3.1 Metropolitan infrastructure industry


investment incentives

662,000

900,000

900,000

7.3.2 Commercial incentives Recycling at Work

280,000

678,000

750,000

70,000

30,000

30,000

1,012,000

1,608,000

1,680,000

20,000

10,000

10,000

20,000

10,000

10,000

7.5.1 Household hazardous waste and farm chemical


collections

856,000

793,000

800,000

7.5.2 Support implementation of the Waste EPP

127,000

84,000

90,000

983,000

877,000

890,000

7.7.1 Sustainable markets and innovation Industry


investment incentives

172,000

200,000

200,000

7.7.2 Tertiary education sector (UniSA) partnership

211,000

211,000

215,000

7.3.3  Explore opportunities for industrial symbiosis


Sub-total
7.4 Priority area: Construction and demolition waste

7.4.1  Clean site building and construction resource


recovery
7.4.2  Markets for C&D materials (budget allocated in
program 7.7.1)
Sub-total
7.5

Priority area: Problematic and hazardous waste

Sub-total
7.6.

Priority area: Disposal and illegal dumping

7.6.1 ZWSAKESAB litter reduction refer to


programs 8.5.1 and 8.5.2
Sub-total
7.7

Priority area: Research and development

7.7.3 Waste to energy policy

8.

70,000
Sub-total

453,000

411,000

415,000

Total 7.

5,265,000

4,702,000

4,834,000

2011 12

2012 13

2013 14

35,000

40,000

40,000

35,000

40,000

40,000

305,000

300,000

300,000

25,000

25,000

25,000

230,000

240,000

240,000

120,000

120,000

560,000

685,000

685,000

Avoid and reduce waste

8.1 Priority area: Measurement, analysis, evaluation


and reporting to support targets and assess the
adequacy of the Waste Strategy

8.1.1 Measuring community attitudes and behaviour


Sub-total
8.2

Priority area: Municipal Solid Waste

8.2.1 Recycle Right household education


8.2.2 KESAB Sustainable communities (City and
Country)
8.2.3 Wipe Out Waste schools program
8.2.4 Schools and community grants
Sub-total

32

8.3

Priority area: Commercial and industrial waste

8.3.1 Resource efficiency assistance program for


industry, businesses and State and local
government

1,179,000

1,261,000

1,272,000

141,000

203,000

230,000

1,320,000

1,464,000

1,502,000

45,000

45,000

8.5.1 Litter data and research and branded litter


monitoring

70,000

70,000

70,000

8.5.2 Community litter, education, resources and


campaigns

100,000

100,000

100,000

Sub-total

170,000

170,000

170,000

Total 8.

2,130,000

2,359,000

2,397,000

8.3.2 Consumption and waste avoidance incentives


Sub-total
8.4

Priority area: Construction and demolition waste

8.4.1 Promote better design of built environment


Sub-total
8.5

9.

Priority area: Litter reduction

Stakeholders, partnerships and linkages

9.1 Tertiary education sector (UniSA) partnership


refer to 7.7.2 program
9.2

Local Government Association

42,600

44,200

50,000

9.3

Waste Management Association of Australia

45,400

54,800

58,000

9.4

National and State policies

258,000

115,000

115,000

346,000

214,000

223,000

289,000

300,000

310,000

157,000

145,000

146,000

738,000

718,000

780,000

Total 10.

1,184,000

1,163,000

1,236,000

Total expenditure

8,925,000

8,438,000

8,690,000

Total 9.

10. Corporate support functions


10.1 Corporate communications, education, marketing
and website
10.2

ZWSA Board support

10.3 Corporate services (accommodation, zGreen


initiatives, office running costs and salaries)

33

12. BUDGET DISTRIBUTION CHARTS

Budget breakdown by key project/activity

2009-10 BUDGET

Budget breakdown by priority area

2010-11 BUDGET

2011-12 BUDGET

34

Zero Waste SA

Level 8
Statewide House
99 Gawler Place
ADELAIDE SA 5000

Telephone: (08) 8204 2051


Facsimile: (08) 8204 1911
Email: zerowaste@zerowaste.sa.gov.au
Internet: www.zerowaste.sa.gov.au