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Pronouns.

Kartojimo teorija
Kartojimui jums pateikta gramatikos mediaga apie vardius, kuri yra keletas ri. Primenu, koki yra ri
There are many different types of pronouns in English. Here are some lists, with explanations and examples:
o Personal pronouns: I, me, you, him, . . .
o Reflexive pronouns: myself, yourself, ourselves, . . .
o Possessive pronouns: mine, yours, ours, . . .
o Interrogative pronouns: what, who, whom, . . .
o Relative pronouns: who, which, that, . . .
o Demonstrative pronouns: this, that, these, . . .
o Intensive pronouns vs. reflexive pronouns
Dabar isamiau apie vardi ris
Asmeniniai vardiai

Personal pronouns
Gender

Subject
pronoun

Object
pronoun

Examples

male / female

me

I saw John yesterday.


John saw me yesterday.

male / female

you

you

You like John.


John likes you.

male

he

him

He loves Angela.
Angela loves him.

female

she

her

She knows David.

David knows her.


neuter
(things,
animals)

it

it

It costs a lot of money.


Eric bought it.

male / female
(plural)

we

us

We saw John.
John saw us.

male / female
(plural)

you

you

Do you both live here?


Ill show you both the garden.

male / female
(plural)

they

them

They live together in Paris.


We met them in Spain.

vardiuotiniai

Reflexive pronouns
Personal pronouns

Reflexive pronoun

Example

I, me

myself

I looked at myself in the mirror.

you, you
(singular)

yourself

Did you hurt yourself when you fell?

he, him

himself

He burnt himself when he was cooking.

she, her

herself

Her real name is Mariella


but she callsherself Mary.

it, it

itself

The animal hurt itself trying to escape.

we, us

ourselves

We blamed ourselves for the mistake.

you, you (plural)

yourselves

You can help yourselves to tea and coffee.

they, them

themselves

The children can look after themselves for


a short time.

Savybiniai

Possessive pronouns
Possessive
adjective

Possessive pronoun

Example

my

mine

I bought this flat - its mine.

your (singular)

yours

Are you the owner of this car - is it yours?

his

his

The house belongs to him - its his.

her

hers

The flat belongs to Sally - its hers.

its

--

--

our

ours

We bought this piece of land - its ours.

your (plural)

yours

This room key is yours, Mr and Mrs


Johnson.

their

theirs

Mike and Liz Jones won the jackpot so all


the money is theirs.

Klausiamieji

Interrogative pronouns

Pronoun

asking for / about ...

Example

What ?

general information

Whats your name?


What is your adress?

Which ?

limited choice

We have fruit tea and green tea


- whichwould you like?

Who ?

a person, a name

Who wrote War and Peace - was it


Tolstoy?

Whose ?

possession, owner

Whose is this pen? Is it yours or mine?

Whom ? [formal]

a person, name

Whom did you ask?

Parodomieji

Relative pronouns
We use who or that when we talk about
people.
Who is more formal than that.
We use which or that when we talk about
things (not people).

This is the man who helped us.


(more formal)
This is the man that helped us.
(less formal)
We cannot use what:
This is the man what helped us.

Which is more formal than that.

It's the watch which my husband bought


me for my birthday. (more formal)
It's the watch that my husband bought me
for my birthday. (less formal)

In informal speech, we can


omit which andthat when the pronoun

It's the watch my husband bought me for


my birthday.

refers to the object of the sentence.

In this sentence, 'the watch' is the object of


the verb 'bought' so we don't need to
usethat or which.

We cannot omit which and that when the


pronoun refers to the subject of the
sentence.

It was the man that sold me the car.


In this sentence, 'the man' is the subject of
the verb 'sold' so we need to
use that orwho.
It was the man sold me the car.

We use whose to show possession.

John, whose brother was also a musician,


plays over 100 concerts every year.