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CEAB COMPLEMENTARY SKILLS

CAPSTONE SEMINAR - PART DEUX


Dr. Brandiff R. Caron
Associate Chair, Centre for Engineering in Society

A reminder about why were here

CEAB
Given the upcoming CEAB accreditation cycle, there is a need for
a more explicit incorporation of the complementary skills found
in the CEAB graduate attributes in the implementation (and
evaluation) of Capstone courses.

From the (Engineering Graduate Attribute


Development) EGAD Workshop

CEAB Graduate Attributes


1. A knowledge base for engineering: Demonstrated competence in university level mathematics, natural sciences, engineering fundamentals, and specialized
engineering knowledge appropriate to the program.
2. Problem analysis: An ability to use appropriate knowledge and skills to identify, formulate, analyze, and solve complex engineering problems in order to reach
substantiated conclusions.
3. Investigation: An ability to conduct investigations of complex problems by methods that include appropriate experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and
synthesis of information in order to reach valid conclusions.
4. Design: An ability to design solutions for complex, open-ended engineering problems and to design systems, components or processes that meet specified needs with
appropriate attention to health and safety risks, applicable standards, and economic, environmental, cultural and societal considerations.
5. Use of engineering tools: An ability to create, select, apply, adapt, and extend appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering tools to a range of
engineering activities, from simple to complex, with an understanding of the associated limitations.
6. Individual and team work: An ability to work effectively as a member and leader in teams, preferably in a multi-disciplinary setting.
7. Communication skills: An ability to communicate complex engineering concepts within the profession and with society at large. Such ability includes reading,
writing, speaking and listening, and the ability to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, and to give and effectively respond to clear
instructions.
8. Professionalism: An understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the professional engineer in society, especially the primary role of protection of the public and
the public interest.
9. Impact of engineering on society and the environment: An ability to analyze social and environmental aspects of engineering activities. Such ability includes an
understanding of the interactions that engineering has with the economic, social, health, safety, legal, and cultural aspects of society, the uncertainties in the
prediction of such interactions; and the concepts of sustainable design and development and environmental stewardship.
10.Ethics and equity: An ability to apply professional ethics, accountability, and equity.
11.Economics and project management: An ability to appropriately incorporate economics and business practices including project, risk, and change management into
the practice of engineering and to understand their limitations.
12.Life-long learning: An ability to identify and to address their own educational needs in a changing world in ways sufficient to maintain their competence and to allow
them to contribute to the advancement of knowledge.

7 out of 12!!!!!!!!

Real-Time Technology Assessment (RTTA)


Developed at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona
State University (CNS-ASU) - https://cns.asu.edu/
CNS-ASU's genesis begins with the 21st Century Nanotechnology
Research and Development Act passed in 2003. Since then, the
Center has received nearly $13 million*. The provisions of the Act
also mandated the integration of research on societal, ethical and
environmental concerns with nanotechnology research and
development.
*CNS-ASU was awarded an initial five-year, $6.2 million grant (NSF #0531194) that was favorably reviewed by NSF
for a $6.5 million renewal for October 2010 to September 2015 (NSF #0937591).

Real-Time Technology Assessment


RTTA places ELSI inside the knowledge creation and innovation process
itself.
Whereas conventional TA focused on generating information intended to
allow decision makers to react to emerging technologies, RTTA focuses
on improved decision processes that can enable learning, cultivate
deliberation, signal emerging problems, and allow more conscious choice
as research and innovation occur. The focus is on opening up the
innovation process, rather than managing it after-the-fact.
In terms of timing, RTTA demands to be implemented at a very early
stage in the evolution of a new area of technology, before social
outcomes are well understood, and economic and political interests are
reified.

MAIN POINT

To Provide an explicit
mechanism for observing,
critiquing, and influencing
social values as they become
embedded in innovations.

Specifics
Guston, D. & Sarewitz, D. 2002. Real-Time Technology Assessment,
Technology in Society 24 (2002) 93-109.
Available here: http://archive.cspo.org/documents/realtimeTA.pdf

Analogical Case Studies (Midterm Report)


Research Program Mapping (Midterm Report)
Communication and Early Warning (Final Report)
Technology Assessment and Choice (Final Report)

For this portion of your final Capstone grade (worth a total


of 10% of final grade), students will complete 4 separate
tasks to be incorporated into both the Midterm Report as
well as the final Capstone Report.

What Youve Done So Far


Midterm reports dealing with first two parts of Real-Time
Technology Assessment method:
Analogical Case Studies
Research Program Mapping

Analogical Case Studies


Studying past examples of transformational innovations can help to develop analogies and
frameworks for understanding and anticipating societal response to new innovations.

Have the students identified and described an appropriately analogical case study?
Have the students gathered knowledge about:
who has responded to transforming innovation in the past,
the types of responses that they have used, and
the avenues selected for pursuing those responses
Have students drawn appropriate links between case study and their project?

Can be applied to understand connections between emerging areas of rapidly advancing


technology and specific patterns of societal response that may emerge. (Impact of Tech on Society
attribute/Ethics & Equity attribute)

Research Program Mapping


Research program mapping (RPM) monitors and assesses current R&D activities at regional,
national, and international levels. The unit of assessment can vary from a single laboratory to an
entire field of innovation but, whatever the scale, some effort to map the resources and
capabilities of the enterprise is necessary to identify key R&D trends, major participants and
their roles, and organizational structures andrelations.
Have the students identified current R&D practices making use of appropriate, text-mining,
bibliometric, interview, and literature review techniques?
Have students used this information in satisfying the relevant indicators under the Economics
and Project Management Attribute for their specific project?

(FOR THE MOST PART)

FOR THE FINAL REPORT


An appendix (2-3pages) addressing the
following topics needs to be included in each
groups FINAL reports. See the handout, the
PowerPoint presentations, and the
information provided during Dr. Brandiff R.
Carons Capstone lecture on January 19th at
4:15-5pm in H110 for more information.

Communication and Early Warning


The communication and early warning aspect of Real-Time Technology Assessment provides
empirically grounded, research-based strategies for enhancing the quality of the understanding
and communication of scientific, technical, and social developments within a particular area
of innovation.

content analysis of major media sources for public information about the innovation.
research to assess both expert and public concerns about, and aspirations for, the
development and application of the innovation.
survey research to identify public reaction to media portrayals of the innovation and to
track changes in public attitudes about developments in the innovation.
mapping ethical, legal, social, and professional concerns for your particular project in
media.

Possible Sources
Possible sources for Engineering in the News include:
Concordias Mechanical and Industrial Design Research Guide:
http://www.concordia.ca/library/guides/mie.html
Canadian Engineering News: http://www.engineeringcanada.ca/index.php/canadianengineering-news
The Science Daily website:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/news/matter_energy/engineering/
The Engineer : http://www.theengineer.co.uk/news/
Concordia ENCS Faculty News: https://www.concordia.ca/encs/news/newsletter.html
Chemical and Engineering News: http://cen.acs.org/news.html
Wired: http://www.wired.com/
Newspaper/Magazine websites, Professional Associations for Engineers, Blogs, etc.

Technology Assessment and Choice


Students ought to be able to write/talk explicitly about how the capstone
project has been influenced by the knowledge acquired through the
application of the techniques described above.

Students out to reflect on and demonstrate explicitly iterations in the process


followed where ethical, legal, environmental, economic and/or social
implications were identified and addressed.
Students ought to be able to evaluate the role of real-time technology
assessment in their own (and other similar) projects. What choices were
affected by this research? (see claims below)

Claims made by RTTA


Analogical case studies hold promise for encouraging contextually
sensitive innovation.
Research program mapping improves opportunities for
strategically oriented innovation.
The communication and early warning component helps assure
awareness about innovation among researchers and the public.
The technology assessment and choice component provides a
mechanism for such awareness to be reflexively incorporated into
innovation.

Meet with me
Just like last time, Id strongly recommend you schedule a meeting
with me to discuss your appendix.
My email is: Brandiff.caron@Concordia.ca
My office is in EV2.249. (open hours Tuesday and Wednesday 4-5pm)
My Campus phone number is: 514-848-2424 extension 5130

Further Breakdown of Relevant CEAB


Graduate Attributes
As with the midterm report appendix, you
do NOT need to try to address all of the
bullet points under the attributes.
In the process of writing your appendix, you
DO need to address at least a couple under
each one.

Impact of engineering on society and the


environment
An ability to analyze social and environmental aspects of
engineering activities. Such abilities include an
understanding of the interactions that engineering has
with the economic, social, health, safety, legal, and cultural
aspects of society; the uncertainties in the prediction of
such interactions; and the concepts of sustainable design
and development and environmental stewardship.

More specifically, students will be assessed on their


abilities to:
Recognize relevance of societal impact of engineering to improving
innovation
Categorize wide range of engineering & society relationships, including
economic, social, health, safety, legal, and cultural aspects
Demonstrate familiarity with evolution of technologies
Analyze impact of engineering on society and environment
Diagnose appropriate models in engineering design for optimal social and
environmental impact
Identify social and environmental protection issues
Locate challenges to sustainability from technological design
Identify knowledge gaps and the need for additional data when designing
for optimal social and environmental impact
Design strategies for incorporating social sustainability
Utilize appropriate models in engineering design for optimal social and
environmental impact

Ethics and Equity


An ability to apply professional ethics, accountability, and
equity.

More specifically, students will be assessed


on their abilities to:

Differentiate between ethics, morals, values, and law


Apply ethical reasoning to resolve professional dilemmas
Distinguish professional ethics from ethics in Canada and Quebec
Define and categorize concepts such as Trust and Loyalty
Identify duties and obligations in the Professional/Engineers code
Apply professional ethics in case studies
Describe accountability to multiple constituencies: engineering
profession, public, client
Apply accountability to professional context
Describe professional obligations against discrimination
Appreciate gender dimensions of equity
Identify economic disparity as a challenge in globalization and
sustainability

Communication Skills
An ability to communicate complex engineering concepts
within the profession and with society at large. Such
abilities include reading, and listening, and the ability to
comprehend and write effective reports and design
documentation, and to give and effectively respond to
clear instructions.

More specifically, students will be assessed


on their abilities to:
Identify audience needs, interests and level of knowledge
Frame supportable, significant theses and arguments
Develop appropriate expository and argumentative
strategies

Identify and utilize relevant, high quality resources


Create drafts and revisions
Respond to critical feedback

Articulate research questions


Formulate research plans and data collection strategies

Develop effective use of databases, library resources


Evaluate quality and usefulness of sources
Maintain complete and accurate records of sources used
Choose correct genre and format

Organize information appropriately for readers use


Identify and utilize correct citation format

Differentiate between correct source usage and plagiarism

Demonstrate understanding of cognitive and


conceptual differences between oral and written
presentation

Create appropriate scope for treatment of topic in ora


presentation
Adapt written text to oral presentation
Identify audience needs, interests and level of
knowledge
Plan, design and effectively utilize visual materials
Utilize effective presentation techniques
Identify strategies to overcome linguistic difference
Adapt presentation to heterogeneous audiences

Professionalism
An understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the
professional engineer in society, especially the primary
role of protection of the public and the public interest.

More specifically, students will be assessed


on their abilities to:
Appreciate the role filled by professional engineers in society
Describe the role of engineers in Quebecs professional system
Differentiate between professional and personal roles
Distinguish between dimensions of responsibility moral, legal & social

Identify legal issues on occupational safety and intellectual property


Apply responsibility in professional context
Demonstrate a good understanding of liability in Quebecs legal system
Communicate through accepted professional means
Identify relevant professional standards

Life-Long Learning
An ability to identify and to address their own educational
needs in a changing world, sufficiently to maintain their
competence and contribute to the advancement of
knowledge.

More specifically, students will be assessed


on their abilities to:
Assess a physical problem and identify the knowledge necessary to
solve it
Self-acquire necessary information from different sources
Show awareness of various engineering organizations for training
opportunities
Knows his/her shortcomings to tackle a challenge
Able to identify new or advanced fields/opportunities in his/her
engineering discipline
Can make educated predictions for the future technological and
scientific advancements

Economics and project management

An ability to appropriately incorporate


economics and business practices including
project, risk and change management into
the practice of engineering and to
understand their limitations.

More specifically, students will be assessed


on their abilities to:

Perform economic assessment of projects


Evaluate and select alternative projects
Perform economic sensitivity analysis
Perform economic risk analysis
Carry out project cost estimation
Explain and select organizational structures
Develop work breakdown schedule
Develop project schedules
Identify root causes of project failure
Determine customer satisfaction

Applying Lessons from the Past


Remember your training in ENGR 201, ENCS 282, and ENGR 392!
None of these tasks are asking you to do anything you have not already been
asked to do in these courses.
Take advantage of my office hours. (Tuesdays and Wednesdays4-5pm in
EV2.249) I have an open-door policy. If I am in my office, feel free to knock
on my door any time! Also feel free to send an email to arrange another time to
meet!

Brandiff.Caron@Concordia.ca