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Dayton

Review
Since 1877!

Home of Dayton Rodeo - Gateway to Des Moines River Valley


Vol. 139, No. 39

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Dayton, Lehigh seeking new


city clerks, new mayors

daytonreview@lvcta.com

Four resign from positions in two towns. . .



The City of Dayton and City of Lehigh had two
things in common as of last week: Both were searching
for a new city clerk and both were being led by a Mayor
Pro Tem.

Dayton City Clerk Randy Danielson had submitted his resignation a few months ago but stated he
would continue in his capacity until the end of January,
2017. He would personally train a new city clerk.

After 15 people applied for the position, and six
were interviewed, the Dayton City Council hired Sarah
Peters of Stratford. She accepted the position and was
working in the City Clerks office when she resigned last
week.

Lehigh City Clerk Kathy Gambill submitted her
resignation recently and Lehigh Mayor Paula Martin also
resigned as mayor. Mayor Pro Tem is Doug Dellachiesa.

Daytons Mayor Pro Tem Beth Wickwire will
hold that position until a Mayor is elected in November.

Running unopposed for that position on the November


ballot is Brent Brunner.

Al Martin, a key full-time employee for the City
of Dayton, also resigned last week.

At the Lehigh City Council meeting there was a
petition of 37 city residents calling for the resignation of
council member Troy Twito. He wasnt at the meeting
but did indicate via phone that he would resign. As of
Friday no letter of resignation had been received.

Both communities are advertising for a new city
clerk. And in Dayton a new full-time person replacing
Mr. Martin will no doubt be reviewed.

Paula Martin, who has been a member of the
Lehigh City Council and its mayor on and off for 25
years, stated late last week that there were issues that
needed to be handled but there wasnt enough support on
the council to execute this work.


Jordan Johnson, daughter of Lacy and Brian
Johnson and member of the Dayton Tigers exhibited her
breeding heifer. She received a purple for her purebred
Angus heifer.

Lanyon church thrived in fifties; Webster County


church closing was hard decision 4-Hers Exhibit at
School closure, dwinding congregation . . .

By Jill Viles

Perhaps Phil Ecklund, a Simi Valley, Calif. and
Gowrie, Iowa resident and whose family members as far
back as his Great Grandparents, were longtime members
of Lanyon Covenant Church, sums it up best, Just like
we have a natural lifewe are born, we live, and we die,
so too does a church, but its memories and its mission
continues.

For the members, both past and present, of the
Lanyon Covenant Church, these words ring crystal clear.
When asked to describe memories of this beloved church
and congregation, eyes sparkle and stories take flight, and
one thing is for surethough the church doors may close,
beloved life experiences will be shared for generations to
come.

The Lanyon Covenant Church, originally named
The Lost Grove Mission Church, celebrated a milestone
birthday on September 1st of this year. At 139 years old,

this is one of the oldest Covenant churches still active in


the U.S.

According to Ecklund, and a fellow longtime
member, Steve Gustafson, deciding to close the church
was a very difficult, yet a unanimous decision for the
church council in July of this year. Initially, the Lanyon
Covenant Church had tried to set benchmarks for fundraising, but ultimately, the church community was not
able to meet these goals.

In recent years, the population of both the town
of Lanyon and the church congregation has dwindled,
leaving the church unable to sustain the costs associated
with the church and parsonage. Additionally, several
prosperous church donors have passed away in recent
years, creating an immediate and unsustainable drain of
the churchs finances.

Currently, Ecklund and Gustafson estimate
there are around six homes left on Lanyons main street.

Clay County Fair


Dayton Tigers members place...


Six 4-Hers from Webster County exhibited at
the Clay County Fair recently.

Jordan Johnson, daughter of Lacy and Brian
Johnson and member of the Dayton Tigers exhibited her
breeding heifer. She received a purple for her purebred
Angus heifer.

Ben Carlson, son of Jim and Jennifer Carlson
and member of the Gowrie Groundbreakers exhibited his

Clay County Fair continued on page 4...


The town has a population of approximately 45-50 people including a few children. Residents of Lanyon receive their mail at the post office in Harcourt.

The Lanyon Covenant Church was thriving in
the 1950s. So many families attended the church that a
new Sunday School wing was added on the west side of
the building. In contrast, during the 1959-1960 academic
year, the Lanyon School merged with Gowrie but some
students chose to go to school in Harcourt.

When the school left, this led to the demise of
Lanyon, agreed Gustafson and Ecklund.

However, it took a great deal of time for the
community to realize the impact of a school closure. For
a while, the church community in Lanyon continued to
thrive. These current population changes and membership decline are in sharp contrast to the memories of the
church in the 1950s to the 1970s. As Gustafson attests,
there was a very large youth presence in the church at this
time.

For many, their grandparents attended this
church, said Ecklund. Theres a lot of history here.

Though the closure of the church is a certainty,
it is hoped the church parsonage may find new life. Gustafson stated that the sanctuary has wonderful acoustics
and is quite beautiful.

The Midwest Conference of the Covenant Denomination in Omaha, Nebraska owns both the church
and the parsonage, and Ecklund estimates that if these
buildings were located in a more prosperous environ-

The Lanyon church was built around 1910.

Visit www.daytongowrienews.com for your local news...

Lanyon Church continued on page 2...

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

After 50 years a few things remain


the same in Ladysmith, Wisconsin. . .

It was a very pleasant Saturday afternoon as I
drove to Ladysmith, Wisconsin for my 50th Ladysmith
High School class reunion.

I would be seeing many of these class members for the first time in 50 years and for several others
it would be the first time in 25 years as I attended that
milestone reunion.

We were driving north on Highway 27 through
Cadott, Cornell, and Lake Holcombe. Lake Holcombe is
a massive lake as both the Chippewa and Flambeau Rivers converge at this city and tourist area.

Driving north on Highway 27 one crosses a
bridge over the beautiful Flambeau River on the citys
south side. I made an immediate right turn and drove
into the drive of St. Johns Lutheran Church and its parsonage on the right. The church was constructed in the
early sixties and I was confirmed in this church and every
Sunday our family worshipped in this church.

I drove around the complex with its attached
gym/kitchen and Sunday school rooms. During the winter I often played basketball with my brothers and friends
there.

In the downtown area there were still some
stores/businesses there from my school years. But many
of the commercial buildings/businesses were gone.

The well known Gerard Hotel still overlooks
the Flambeau River in the downtown sector. Built in the
late 1800s, the three story, wood hotel is now a boarding
house, renting rooms by the week and month.

The old Pioneer National Bank building, dating
to the early 1900s, still stands proudly downtown. It is
no longer a bank as other businesses occupy the building.

Still in business is the Miner Theatre. I remember going to the Miner Theatre as a small boy to see
Bambi. There was a line of people for about a block
long outside waiting to see that movie in Ladysmith. The
theatre has a balcony where teenagers and couples would
usually occupy.

Gone downtown are Ditmansons Department
Store; two drug stores that had soda fountains; Grooms
Jewelry which had a record shop; Redwines Jewelry;
Gambles; Coast to Coast; Rubys Dress Shop; and two
dime stores. In our day the dime stores, or 5 and 10
stores like Ben Franklin, one could buy a certain amount
of items for a dime or nickle. Today we have dollar
stores where many things can be purchased for a dollar.

The American Inn & Bar was still there along

Dayton Review

with the Theatre Lounge, Clarks Auto Parts, and Lambert Yards Building Supplies.

One of the most beloved businesses that is gone
is the Ladysmith Bakery. They had excellent bakery.
Many industries, such as a the Paper Mill, are also gone.

My father worked at the Soo Line Railroad for
43 years before retiring as the agent there. He worked at
the Soo Line Depot which is still standing but it is no longer used. There was a lot of freight business with the Soo
Line Railroad in Ladysmith in the fifties, sixties, seventies and into the eighties. The Soo Line still runs through
the town but it no longer employs a significant number of
people.

I drove past our home in Ladysmith where my
parents raised their family. I am one of three brothers and
we have one sister. We have great memories living in
our wonderful home with our wonderful, caring parents.
The home still has the same appearance and exterior but
several landscaping improvements have been made.

I drove to Tony (four miles west of Ladysmith
on U.S. Eight), and then took County I to Lake Flambeau
where our family had a cabin that was enlarged into a
lake home over the years. Mom and Dad sold their lake
home more than 15 years ago. The lake home has the
same exterior and it has a beautiful view of Lake Flambeau.

The boat docks are mostly the same with the
new owners adding an extension at one end. The boat
house is collapsing. It was constructed on barrels filled
with cement and extending over the lake from the shoreline. That is illegal construction today but it was not prohibited back then. The roof is covered by moss now, one
side has collapsed into the lake, and it will probably be
totally gone within the next year or two. It has survived
for more than four decades and was well used when we
owned the property. The harsh Wisconsin winters and
ice from the lake are taking their toll.

Accompanied by Mary Ann, we drove to Flambeau Lodge which is farther north on the Flambeau River
and just above Big Falls dam. It is a dirt/gravel road and
the area is heavily forested for most of the route doing
to Flambeau Lodge. As a family we would go there for
meals and beverages. In Wisconsin, by the way, families
in our time went to bars and bar restaurants as a family.
The dads would have a beer, the children would have a
pop, and Moms had their routine too. And there was
always plenty of conversation with the people at those
establishments.

Flambeau Lodge is often a destination for people canoeing down the Flambeau (through white water
rapids) from points north and up-river. One such spot is
occupied by Big Bear Lodge where I have been numerous
times but there wasnt enough time to go there this year.

Flambeau Lodge today looks better than ever.
A deck has been constructed on the side facing the Flambeau. The campsites in front have been removed but the
lawn area is really nice. It appears that the cabins that
were once rented have been sold.

I drove back to Ladysmith. It was time to attend the social hour at the Tee-Away Supperclub and golf
course. I had a nervous moment or two and I just felt
dubious about attending.

But I had a great phone conversation with classmate Terry Wedwick a few weeks prior and I was so encouraged by our conversation. I drove to the Tee-Away
and as we walked to the front a few classmates were there
to greet us.

Next week: Stepping back into time with my
classmates.

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Hunters who need to satisfy the hunter education requirement can search for and sign up for a course
at www.iowadnr.gov/huntered.

Prospective students can see which courses or
field days are near them; how many seats are available for
the class or if the class is full and a waiting list is available. There is also a map showing the location along with
the instructors name, a course overview and any special
instructions.

Iowa law requires all hunters born after Jan. 1,
1972 to satisfactorily complete a hunter education course
in order to purchase a license. Children as young as 11
may enroll in the course, but their certificate of completion will not become valid until their 12th birthday.

Each year, around 12,000 students complete
hunter education in Iowa.
Online Only Course Option for Adults

The online only course for adults is designed for
Iowa residents 18 years of age or older that have prior
hunting and/or firearms handling experience.

The course covers the same material as the
classroom course, allowing the student to complete the
entire course, including the final test, in an online setting.
Certification is received at the successful completion of
the online course.

Catfish biking well


on Des Moines River;
use
stink baits: DNR


Des Moines River (Stratford to Saylorville
Lake)---Channel Catfish - Good: The river is good for
small boats to navigate. Use stink baits above tree falls
and along deep cut banks.

Lanyon Church...
continued from front page...
ment, such as Fort Dodge, the property could be sold for
$200,000 or more.

Members of the church are open to selling to a
buyer wishing to allow special events such as weddings,
receptions, funerals and other ministries. The overriding
concern is that that a potential buyer(s) needs to understand the practical concerns of maintaining this historic
property. Also, even if the septic system works, it must
be inspected and replaced upon sale. Additionally, another concern is the amount of asbestos in the building.
If the building is disturbed in any way, asbestos may be
released, potentially harming those in the area and therefore, requires inspection before the sale.

This is a wood structure and it needs a lot of
maintenance, said Ecklund.

Another, more drastic alternative, has been
sought by others in the area in similar circumstances. The
historic Swede Bend Church, the birthplace of the Covenant Denomination, originally located near Stratford, was
moved to the Twin Lakes Bible Camp.

The relocated structure still uses the original
kerosene lights and pump organ and has regular Sunday morning services. However, the moving of a church
building is such an unusual event, that the day the church
was moved, a concerned resident called the police. One
of Philip Ecklunds relatives, an attorney, was called to
verify that the moving plans for the church building were
legal.

Additionally, some churches have found new
life by serving a different purpose. For example, a Covenant Church in Ogden was transformed into a home.
Also, a church near Barnum was moved about a mile and
a half south and transformed into a home.

The stained glass windows in the church would
be a great find for a new owner. A hail storm in 1998
took out most of the windows on the north side. Church
members had to look through wedding photos in order to
restore the beautiful stained glass windows to their original splendor. Additionally, new carpet was laid and several pews were replaced.

Next Week: Preserving history of Lanyon Covenant Church.

In 1876 Gospel services


began near Lanyon
Started in Bishop Schoolhouse...


In the wet, muddy spring of 1876, Rev. A. Hallner began holding gopel services in the Bishop Schoolhouse near Lanyon. These meetings led by rev. Hllner
lead to a far reaching revival touching the very hearts of
the people in the community. Realizing a need for an organized church, a meeting was called for September 1,
1877 in the Lost Grove Schoolhouse. The purpose of this
meeting was to form a congregation and to call a "Christian preacher to preach the Word of God." nine solemn
men with a fervent love of the Lord were seated inside the
Lost Grove School house on this seasonal September day.
A fifteen-year-old boy (C.B. Johnson, who later became
paestor of the congregation), sat quietly in the corner
watching as his father J.W. Johnson and eight other men,
J.L. Awilson, Andrews Perry, A. Johnson, .A. Carlson,
CHas. Malmberg, Carl Peterson, J.P. Johnson and Aucust SChults, discussed how to bring the gospel of Jesus
Christ to their world. When the meeting adjourned the
evening, these nine men and their seven wives were the
original keepers of the faith in waht was named "The Lost
Grove Missionary Association" - A church home we now
lovingly call the Lanyon Evengelical Covenant Church.

Lost Grove Mission Church, the first Lanyon Church

~ Email your news to daytonreview@lvcta.com ~

Review
THEDayton
GOWRIE
NEWS

Jaguars Cross Country Team compete at


Humboldt Invitational Monday, Sept. 19

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Card of Thanks!

The family of Lorraine Rustebakke


would like to thank everyone that visited her
while she was at Fort Dodge Villa, said a
prayer, or thought of her during her stay. She
truly appreciated everything that was done
for her while she resided there.
As Lorraines family, we would like to
take time to thank everyone that supported
us. She was surrounded by many people who
were special to her, as they comforted her
when she began her journey. Lorraine was a
very special person and will be truly
missed. Blessed be her memory!

Warehime currently ranked 2nd in class 2A...



The Jaguar cross country team competed in the
Humboldt Invitational on Monday, September 19th at
Sheldon Park west of Humboldt. Southeast Valley was
once again lead by Spencer Warehime who is currently
ranked individually 2nd in class 2A. Warehime earned
medalist honors with a 3rd place finish in a time of 17:11.
3rd ranked Reece Smith of Garner Hayfield won the
meet. Patrick Breitsprecher continued to run well Monday for the Jaguars, earning his 3rd medal in four meets
with a 20th place finish in a time of 18:28.

Helping the Jaguars to an 11th place finish in
the 19 school meet were Ben Carlson (85th, 21:05), Todd
Hamilton (91st, 21:33), Ben Sebring (113th, 23:10), Dalton Dencklau (117th, 23:33) and Lucas Pontius (119th,
24:14). Garner-Hayfield/Ventura won the meet with
54 points, followed by Humboldt (98) and Mason City
(100).

Katara Jondle continued to pace the girls team
for the Jaguars finishing 45th in 24:11, followed by Alli
True in 52nd (24:36). Both Katara and Alli ran season

PRs on the years toughest course. Sammy Alphs (75th,


26:12), Tessa Berg (85th, 26:53), Emma Hunter (86th,
26:58) and Emma Graves (87th, 27:01) were the next
four Jaguars to cross the finish line. Hannah Rees in her
first varsity race, ran a season best 29:23 to finish 11th.

In JV action, Chelsea Grossnickle also ran a
season best of 30:42 (46th) while Sarah Nahnsen (58th,
33:29) and Leslie Housken (60th, 34:03) just missed season bests.

JV boys Jared Kastendieck (87th, 24:05), Parker Johnson (95th, 24:19), AJ Smith (143rd, 26:48), and
Kyle Baird (147th 27:38) all powered over the hills for
season PRs. Aaron True (131st, 25:58), Lincoln Miller (144th, 26:54), Dillon Sytsma (146th, 27:30), Blane
Martens (154th, 29:00) and Jordan Lane (155th, 29:28)
also competed for the Jaguars on Monday.

The Jaguars will next compete at the Pocahontas
Invite on Saturday, October 1st and then the Titan Invitational in Lake City on Tuesday, October 4th.

Marian Dahl
Sherry and Randy Schott
Theordore and Lyn Dahl

Our Security

30 Years Ago...

The 1985 Central Webster Homecoming was this
week. The Central Webster Eagles host Rolfe with game
time at 7:30 p.m. Coronation of king and queen during
halftime ceremonies. Dayton and Stratford High School
students invited to participate in the dance following the
game. Dance music by Sound Express of Ames, ending at
midnight. Combined three-school marching bank performance during half will feature over 70 students. King and
queen candidates are Karla Caldwell, Mark Mickelson, Jon
Johnson, Rachelle Taylor, mark Peterson and Dawn Potter.
The student council sponsors the homecoming activities.

Tiffany Lynn Gruver was one year old Friday,
September 13. Her parents are Dave and Brenda Gruver,
Humboldt; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hansen, Dayton, and Mr.
and Mrs. Dennis Tjelle, Buffalo Center. Great-grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. LaVerne Hansen and Mr. and Mrs.
Allen Porter, Dayton, Great-great-grandparents are Charlie Hansen, Dayton, and Mrs. Grace Brundage, Lehigh.

State Fair participants county 4-H clothing selection winners participated in the 1985 state 4-H clothing selection event August 20 to 22 at the Iowa State Fair.
They modeled purchased garments they had selected
themselves. The 4-H clothing selection project helps youth
learn how to recognize quality and value when purchasing
clothing. State 4-H clothing selection activities included

hearing presentations on coordinating clothing and accessories, and selecting clothing for a mock job interview.

There were 18 participants from the Fort Dodge
Extension Are Office in this event. Among them are Amy
Pederson, Badger; Michelle Davis, Harcourt; Carolyn
Nostrom, Humboldt; and Jill Hartnett, Webster City. Lori
Witzel, Renwick; Marge Jansen, Blairsburg; Marcie Lager,
Clarion; and Melanie Johnson, Belmond.

20 Years Ago...


Dayton Community Club Yard of the Month
award goes to Dick and Kathy Swanson, 22 5th Ave NW.
Residents of Grandview Health Care Center, Dayton, have
been selecting the yards this year.

This week Southeast Webster High School students are holding their annual Homecoming Celebration.
Several activities are scheduled through-out the week.
Homecoming King and Queen will be crowned at the half
of the football game against Glidden-Ralston Friday, Oct.
6. Game time is 7:30 p.m. The dance will be held Saturday
night at the school in Burnside. King and Queen candidates are Nicole Owenson, Daughter of Denny and Julie
Owenson, Dayton; Michelle Jones, daughter of Leroy and
Erline Jones, Dayton and Jennifer Barkhaus, Daughter of
Mike and Karmin Barkhaus, Lehigh. Erik Heggen, son of
Eddie and Jackie Heggen, Harcourt; Ben VanSickle, son
of Mickey VanSickle, Harcourt and Shadd Scharf, son of
Dean and Alice Scharf, Duncombe.

Webster County livestock exhibitors were recognized for the fine job they did of presenting their exhibits to
the public at the Iowa State Fair according to County 4-H
Coordinator Karen Amman.

The beef exhibitors received the first palace purple ribbon and premium money. The exhibitors were Nicole Fevold and David Welter of Gowrie and jarred Johnson of Harcourt.

Have you ever been to a large city and seen a


window washer seemingly hanging on the side of the
building washing windows? Ive often thought boy,
I could never do that!. They seem so confident in their
work, hanging there approximately 200 or more feet from
the street. They seem secure because they know that their
safety harnesses are fastened to the building itself and
their harnesses will hold even if the platform should fall.
Some of our jobs can be lived on the edge, with confidence like that. When we give our lives to Jesus Christ,
He becomes our safety and our security. Because of Him,
we can risk living life to the fullest and be all that we
were created to be. He keeps us secure, even though life
is often insecure. He is our lifeline and we feel secure
even though we get disappointed, even though we may
feel the bottom has dropped out of a particular situation.
How about you? Do you have security for the events of
the day, no matter what challenges and dangers you may
face? Maybe you feel you have today covered, but what
about tomorrow? Why not try living life with Christ one
day at a time for a life thats secure and yet full of excitement?

Prayer: Lord, thank You for the security You
give us. Help us to place our trust in You day after day!
In Jesus Holy Name, Amen

We are Bursting with


Compassionate,
Pride as we help sponsor our
great studentsCare
at
Personal

Southeast Webster
High School!
since 1949

Carson-Stapp Dayton

Funeral
Home

406 3rd St. NE


(515) 547-2512

Swedish Club to meet


at Stratford Lutheran
Tuesday, Oct 4...


The Swedish club will be meeting at the Stratford
Lutheran Church on Tuesday, Oct 4th at 7p.m.

Al Bergman will show and tell of their Danube
River cruise. All are welcome. A Pot luck lunch will
be served.

Dayton Review
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Box 6 Dayton, IA 50530-0006


Ph# 515.547.2811 Fax 515.547.2337
E-mail daytonreview@lvcta.com
www.daytongowrienews.com

Official
Newspaper of
Webster County, Iowa

Towns of: Dayton, Lehigh, Harcourt, and Southeast


Webster-Grand Community School District

Published Wednesdays
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Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Dayton Review

Elna Mae Nordstrom, 96

Clay County Fair...


continued from front page...
market steer. Ben received a purple with his market steer,
earning District Champion Tall Steer and 4th place overall in the District Market Steer Show.

Jaedyn Condon of the Douglas Dreamers 4-H
club and daughter of Sara Scharf exhibited market lambs.

She received 1 purple and 3 blues with her market lambs.



Collin and Raechel Spangler, children of Scott
and Angie Spangler, members of the Nifty Newark 4-H
club, exhibited sheep. Collin received a Purple with his
breeding ewe and Raechel brought home a purple with
her market lamb.

Owen Oeltjenbruns, son of Brad and Lori
Oeltjenbruns and member of the Dayton Tigers received
a blue exhibiting his market lamb.

What can we do about growing violence


in United States and other world countries?
One teacher shares her thoughts. . .
By Laura Finley

It has been a rough few weeks, to say the least.
Philando Castile, killed by police during a traffic stop,
July 6, 2014. Dylan Noble, also killed by police during
a traffic stop, July 14, 2016. Both unarmed. Five Dallas
police officers are killed, and nine others wounded in alleged payback for police violence, July 7, 2016.

Some 40 people, including women and children,
executed by the Islamic State in Um al-Housh, Syria, July
5, 2016. Two dozen local soldiers killed by al-Qaeda suicide bombers in Aden, Yemen, July 6, 2016. Noncombatants killed by US bombs against ISIS and unknown US
drone civilian victims in up to seven nations. Seven killed
and 11 injured in Rashidiya, Iraq suicide attack, July 13,
2016. At least 84 people killed in terrorist attack in Nice,
France, July 14, 2016. Sadly, but surely, there are more.
So much heartbreak. So many questions.

Pundits and social media alike have discussed
that global violence may be the new normal. In these
troubled times, some turn to their faith, as evidenced by
the hashtag #prayfornice or the like. I do not write to
judge that response, but it is not for me. Its easy to see
how these events and the belief that violence is ubiquitous lead to hopelessness and despair. While I understand it, my heart heavy as well, that too is not for me.

Both these responses, I believe, do not challenge
this so-called new normal. They leave me, and perhaps
others, feeling powerless. And that is something I refuse
to feel. I know that I personally cannot end gun violence,
terrorism or any of these major problems. But I will not
pretend that I there is nothing I can do, that even my simple daily actions have no impact on the world. I by no
means want to be sanctimonious or to bury my head in
the sand about the seriousness of these issues. But, reflecting on what I can do, I offer the following list:

I can believe in the humanity of all people and
treat each person I encounter with respect and dignity.

I can reach out to people I dont know, making
them feel comfortable and included.

I can do good by my family, my neighbors, my
colleagues and others, offering a helping hand, encouraging word, or even just a smile.

I can share what I have with others through donating my time, skills, food, money, or other things.

I can speak up when I hear people speak with
hatred or prejudice.

I can make my voice be heard politically by
educating myself about candidates and about their voting
records so that, perhaps, elections at all levels are won by
people who are determined to reduce the violence.

I can continue teaching my daughter about both
the problems and the beauties of the world today, and can
help her see that she can use her imagination, her intel-

ligence, and her motivation to be part of the solution.



I can ensure that I do not act or react with violent words or behaviors, even in the face of conflict.

Although it might be easier to numb the heartbreak, to be resolved to the horrid normalcy of violence, I
wont do it. I hope that others feel that they, too, still have
the power to make a much-needed change toward a safer
and more peaceful world.

Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is
syndicated by PeaceVoice.

Very disappointed...

The Labor Day Parade was not very good this
year. There were too many gaps. The traffic was not
stopped so there was cars and trucks stopping it and getting into it. It was a farce, flop, or whatever you want to
call it.

Years before traffic was stopped at all entrances
to Dayton but not this year because it was backwards. I
have never seen such a mixed up, balled up thing in my
life.

Yes we live at the end of the parade but the people up town every other year did not have to put up with
gaps in the parade because traffic butted in because it was
stopped at every entrance. I am not the only one that was
very disappointed in the parade. Everyone that watched it
up here was disappointed.

Please, please turn it back around so that we can
all enjoy a nice smooth parade. Like it was set up to be. It
ran that way for years and was working just fine.

Now Alan passed and someone gets a brilliant
idea to change everything. Stupid move. People are not
happy. Leave things the way they are. It runs much more
smoothly.
Frankie West


Elna Mae Nordstrom, 96, of Dayton, Iowa,
passed away on Monday, September 19, 2016, at
Grandview Health Care Center in Dayton.

Funeral services were held 11:00 a.m., Friday,
September 23, 2016, at Emanuel Lutheran Church in
Dayton. Pastor Russ Crouthamel was the officiant. Burial followed in the Dayton Cemetery.

Elna Mae Charlotte Nordblom was born on November 10, 1919, in Harcourt, Iowa, to Edna Elizabeth
and Edwin Emanuel Nordblom. She attended school
in Dayton, Iowa, graduating in 1937. She married Glen
Nordstrom February 2, 1944. They farmed southwest of
Dayton for many years until Glens ill health forced them
into early retirement.
Throughout her life Elna Mae was actively involved
in teaching Sunday School at Emanuel Lutheran Church
in Dayton, ELCA, Womens Relief Corps, Senior Citizens, Dayton Country Club womens card group, a former member of Eastern Star and a member of the Care
Review at the Dayton Care Center. She had a heart for
service and made numerous baby quilts for the Womens
Violence Center in Fort Dodge, Iowa, as well as scrapbooks for family, friends and nursing homes.
She was preceded in death by her husband Glen,
daughter, Connie, and two brothers, Iver and Vernon.

Survivors include two daughters, Janet (Bill)
Kahler of Cedar Falls, Iowa, and Becky (Doug) Lundberg of West Des Moines, Iowa; five grandchildren, Scott
(Melissa) Kahler, Ben (Hollie) Kahler, Andy (Cara)
Kahler, Phil Lundberg and Amanda Lundberg; eight
great-grandchildren, Sam, Tatum and Malena Lundberg
and Landon, Owen, Nora, Neville and Kattarina Kahler;
and numerous relatives and friends.

Her faith and love for the Lord sustained her
through life.

Memorials may be left for the familys discretion.

Harcourt man killed


in pickup rollover
near Stratford


Tim Haffner, 46, Harcourt, was killed in a onevehicle accident Sunday night, Sept. 18, in Hamilton
County near Stratford.

Investigators say a westbound 1990 Chevrolet
pickup driven by 46-year-old Timothy Gail Haffner of
Harcourt failed to negotiate a curve and the vehicle went
off the road.

Haffner lost control of the truck and it rolled
several times before coming to rest on its passenger side.
He was partially ejected through the side window. Haffner was pronounced dead at the accident scene.

Funeral services were Thursday, Sept. 22 in Fort
Dodge.

Timothy Gail Haffner attended Fort Dodge
Schools. He served in the Army Reserves. Tim married
Brenda Andrews on August 28, 1998 at Brushy Creek
State Park.

He was currently employed with Certified
Transmissions. Tim was a member of the IRCA Rodeo
Committee and Dayton Wranglers. He was a cowboy, a
bull rider and a wild horse racer. He enjoyed being outdoors, camping, fishing and hunting.

Tim is survived by his wife Brenda; his daughters Sierra Eldridge of Lincoln, NE and Taylor Haffner of
Harcourt; his grandchildren Kyan and Scarlett; his mother Betty Haffner of Ames, his father Raymond (Judy)
Haffner of Fort Dodge; his siblings in Iowa.

Down Memory Lane

Review
THEDayton
GOWRIE
NEWS

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

B Y

Fresh, homemade noon specials!


and serving breakfast
Wed. 9/28................. Baked Potato Soup
Thurs. 9/29........................... Roast Beef
Fri. 9/30................................... Lasagna
Breakfast: 6:30 - 8 a.m.
Lunch: 11 - 1 p.m.

Closed the Month of October


Lunch will be served
at the Golf Course

Dayton Community

Grocery

22 N. Main 515-547-2217 Dayton, Iowa 50530

Hunter education classes


scheduled in Iowa;
fall classes available

Hunters who need to satisfy the hunter education requirement can search for and sign up for a course
at www.iowadnr.gov/huntered.

Prospective students can see which courses or
field days are near them; how many seats are available for
the class or if the class is full and a waiting list is available. There is also a map showing the location along with
the instructors name, a course overview and any special
instructions.

Iowa law requires all hunters born after Jan. 1,
1972 to satisfactorily complete a hunter education course
in order to purchase a license. Children as young as 11
may enroll in the course, but their certificate of completion will not become valid until their 12th birthday.

Each year, around 12,000 students complete
hunter education in Iowa.
Online Only Course Option for Adults

The online only course for adults is designed for
Iowa residents 18 years of age or older that have prior
hunting and/or firearms handling experience.

The course covers the same material as the
classroom course, allowing the student to complete the
entire course, including the final test, in an online setting.
Certification is received at the successful completion of
the online course.

Southeast Valley
Schedule of Events
Week of Sept 28th to Oct 5th

Wednesday, Sept 28
Fall NWEA Map Testing Sept 26 thru 30
Thursday, Sept 29
SWG Elementary School Picture Day
6:00 p.m. JVR Football GAME - Ogden @ Southeast
Valley
6:00 p.m. JVR/JV/V Volleyball GAME - Ogden @
Southeast Valley
Friday, Sept 30
7:00 p.m. V Football GAME - Underwood @
Southeast Valley
Saturday, Oct 1
JH Cross Country @ Pocahontas
8:30 a.m. JVR Volleyball SOUTHEAST VALLEY
9:00 a.m. B&G V Cross Country - Southeast Valley
@ Pocahontas Area
Monday, Oct 3
Fall NWEA Map Testing Oct 3 thru 7
SVHS Dance Team Fundraiser (Oct 3-Oct 17)
4:00 p.m. JH Volleyball vs East Sac
6:00 p.m. JV Football GAME - Southeast Valley @
Manson NW Webster
6:00 p.m. JV Volleyball GAME - Mutli-Team
Tuesday, Oct 4
4:00 p.m. JH Football @ Jefferson
4:30 p.m. B&G V Cross Country - Southeast Valley
@ South Central Calhoun
4:30 p.m. JH Cross Country @ Lake City
6:30 p.m. PV Elementary Title I Parents Meeting
Wednesday, Oct 5
1st Trimester Midterm
*Schedule is pulled from the SV website for your convenience*
www.southeastvalley.org
***Schedules are subject to change at anytime***

S A R A

D O W N S

Where were you?



Where were you, and what were you doing on
the morning of September 11, 2001? Is it a day you will
never forget? I thought it was but then as with all things,
good and bad, times seem to dim and it often takes a mind
jogger to bring back. Perhaps we dont care to remember
or the thing that happened was just not so significant to us
-- but
9-11? Did you remember it this year or did it take news
reports to bring it back?

I have to admit it sneaked up on me this year, not
because I dont want to remember but because life goes
on and there are other things to attract me and get my
attention. This year the day was on a Sunday and in our
church neighborhood there was an afternoon celebration
of the SW 9th St. corridor and our church participated
by giving out information about our church as well as
free snow cones and popcorn. Most businesses and other
entities had some sort of colorful display/handout/entertainment and numerous people to greet and tell about
their establishment. Our church is on a corner and thus
the powers that be honored us by placing a kybo on
our property not aside on the corner but exactly in front
of our church sign with all its beautiful, colorful flowers
for which we often receive compliments. I guess they
wanted people to have it handy.

But it was the fifteenth anniversary of that fateful day and I know over lunch with some friends and during pre-forum/pre-church times many of us recalled what
we were doing that morning. It was a minor election day
(dont recall which one) in Des Moines. My usual routine at that time was to get ready to go up to church and
stop at the then Dahls store in our neighborhood, grab a
paper and have a cup of coffee and perhaps a donut.

There were the usual morning coffee people sitting around the horseshoe shaped counter. On my way
over my radio was on and I had heard something about a
plane taking off from a New York City airport and evidently having trouble and believed to have crashed into
one of the twin towers. I asked if anyone had heard about
that.
Nobody had and their usual everyday conversations went
on. I checked out Dagwood and Blondie, Dear Abbie,
various headlines and had my repast. That was less than
half an hour. Getting back into my car the radio was really blaring by that time and I just sat there for a short
time trying to absorb what I was hearing from the almost
agitated voices of reporters.

Proceeding on to the church and greeting the
ladies manning the election sign in table in our narthex
the conversation immediately went to the crash which
quickly became crashes and evident that they were no
accident. How horrible! Was this happening in OUR
COUNTRY?? Pastor Chet went downstairs and brought
up a small TV to our office and our secretary, who lived
a short way from the church, went home and got another
small one to set up for the elections people. Needless to
say, no work was done in our office as our eyes and ears
were glued to the TVs. Few people voted that year and
the ones that did stopped to look at the TV and make their
comments before heading back home to their own sets.
Telephones jangled and conversations took place but
eyes remained fixed on TV. Little work was done over
our whole city; need I say, our whole country and probably the whole world? I am sure those of us who were
alive and adult will remember all our lives and I hope
that it gets into our history books and studied. Things
have not been the same since in our country throughout
the world since that day. It is probably one of the things
that had more impact worldwide than a lot of others that
preceded it and I hope and pray that something like that
never happens again anywhere.


That evening there was to have been a citywide meeting of Lutheran churches in the city with the
Bishop. Since the host church was already prepared with
the supplies for the evening meal for attendees we gathered for that but no discussions of the topics which were
to have taken place. Instead, following the meal we all
went into the sanctuary for a service led by Bishop Hougen. In addition to the original delegates others in the
community were invited to come to the service. Bishop
gave a very comforting, inspiring message, appropriate scriptures were read, hymns were sung and many
prayers offered. Did it help? Of course it did but still we
understood there was a big, big healing that would take
years maybe never.

Let us make sure this is in our history books.
Let us not forget. Let us use this as an alert. I dont think
Ill ever forget.

Our Security

Have you ever been to a large city and seen a


window washer seemingly hanging on the side of the
building washing windows? Ive often thought boy,
I could never do that!. They seem so confident in their
work, hanging there approximately 200 or more feet from
the street. They seem secure because they know that their
safety harnesses are fastened to the building itself and
their harnesses will hold even if the platform should fall.
Some of our jobs can be lived on the edge, with confidence like that. When we give our lives to Jesus Christ,
He becomes our safety and our security. Because of Him,
we can risk living life to the fullest and be all that we
were created to be. He keeps us secure, even though life
is often insecure. He is our lifeline and we feel secure
even though we get disappointed, even though we may
feel the bottom has dropped out of a particular situation.
How about you? Do you have security for the events of
the day, no matter what challenges and dangers you may
face? Maybe you feel you have today covered, but what
about tomorrow? Why not try living life with Christ one
day at a time for a life thats secure and yet full of excitement?

Prayer: Lord, thank You for the security You
give us. Help us to place our trust in You day after day!
In Jesus Holy Name, Amen
Always Fresh
and Crispy,
Right from the
Headlines!
We put the
MOCK in
Democracy!

Great Care...

Thank you to the Dayton Rescue for coming to
my aid Monday, Labor Day, at the rodeo when I found
myself very weak and a very kind gentlemen catching me
as I went down on the steps from heat exhaustioin.

Thanks to all for their care and concern and
helping me to get back up and meeting me with the gator
to take me to the car. I didnt drive and I am so thankful
my granddaughter (Miranda) was with me. Thank you
again for yor prompt response and great care.

The Capitol Steps are what Washington would be


like if everyone were smarter and could sing.
P.J. ORourke, Humorist

OCTOBER 18, 2016 7:30 pm


Present this ad for one FREE non-alcoholic beverage at the show!

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Rockwell City

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Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Dayton Review

Mason Ackerson, #4, makes a great catch against East Sac. Photo by Lisa Peterson.

SV Jags rout East Sac 36-7,


great defensive, offensive game
Turning point, timely interception came early. . .
By Glenn Schreiber

The Southeast Valley Jaguars routed East Sac
36-7 at Sac City Friday night. The Jags led 22-7 at the

The
Perfect Gift

half and then added 14 points in the third quarter.



Our coaches are very happy how the kids
bounced back after last weeks performance, said coach
Mike Swieter. Our defense had a great game by only allowing 159 total yards. The offense had 389 yards and
coach Swieter said the line got things done and the running backs and passing game took advantage of them.

We wanted the ball and planned on coming
out and play smash mouth football but East Sac was aggressive early forcing the Jags to punt after 3 plays, said
coach Swieter.

The Jag defense forced a 4 and out then SV executed a nine play drive together but had to punt. The
Jags forced another 4 and out.
Jags begin scoring,
take commanding lead

Southeast Valley got things rolling with an 18
yard run from Aaron Swieter, 10 yard catch to Nyles
Johnson and Nolan Brand hit Dakota Jaeschke on a seven
yard TD pass. Nolan Johnson passed to Dakota Jaeschke
for the 2 point conversion to take the lead 8-0.

East Sac countered with a 14 play drive after a
very good kick return to score and make the score 8-7.

Aaron Swieter had runs of 6 and 3. Then on
3rd and 12 Nolan Brand hit Aaron Swieter for a 49 yard
middle screen as he ran into the end zone.

This was a big turning point in the game, said
coach Swieter. Nolan Johnson hits JJ Graves for the two
point conversion and the Jags took a 16-7 lead.

Five plays later Nolan Johnson had a huge in-

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515-576-7646

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26 for only $555. What
a perfect way to protect
what matters most, your
loved ones.

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515-576-7882

826 Central Ave


Fort Dodge, IA

AUTO HOME LIFE

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Shelter Life Insurance Company Columbia, Missouri

Policy Form #s L-096.4 in CO, IA, KS, KY, MS, MO, NV, L-096.5 in AR, LA, NE, TN, L-096.6 in IN, L-096.7 in OK, L-096.8 in IL


Hunter Kruse, #12, has a great run for the Jaguars. Photo by Lisa Peterson.

terception. Nolan Brand hit Dakota Jaeschke for a 11


yard pass then hit Nolan Johnson for a 33 yard passing
play. Aaron Swieter finished the drive with an eight
yard touchdown run and the Jags took a 22 to 7 lead into
half-time.
Jag rushing attack
is good at East Sac

Aaron Swieter led a very good Jag rushing attack. Swieter rushed 17 times for 82 yards and one
touchdown. Kaleb Jondle rushed nine times for 57 yards
and Kyler Jondle was 3-22 and one touchdown.

Quarterback Nolan Brand was 9-16 for 179 and
he threw three touchdowns. Tight end Dakota Jaeschke
had six receptions for 87 yards and two touchdowns.
Four others had one reception apiece.
Jag defense
dominates East Sac

The Jag defense basically shut down the East
Sac offense, limiting ES to one touchdown and 159 yards.

Linebacker Ryan Gustafson led the defense with
six solo tackles, seven assisted; DT Alex Pliner, two solo
tackles, four assisted, and one tackle for loss; linebacker
Kyler Jondle, 2-6-and one tackle for loss; and defensive
end Jaden Cline, one solo, three assists, and one tackle for
loss.

The entire defense obviously did a great job.
Jags end scoring
in third quarter

East Sac starts second half with an eight play
drive but the Jags forced another punt.

Aaron Swieter had runs of 3-8-7-4. Kaleb
Jondle had a 13 yard run and Nolan Brand hit Dakota
Jaeschke for a 36 yard touchdown. Aaron Swieter ran in
the two-point conversion.

The Jag defense continued to make East Sac
Punt.

Nolan Johnson had a 27 yard punt return which
set up a Kyler Jondles 16 yard touchdown and SV led
36-7 at the end of three.

The backups and JV got to play most of the
fourth quarter noted coach Swieter.
Southeast Valley play
another 2-1 team

We have a few things we got to clean up, said
coach Swieter. He said the Jags need to improve on
kickoffs and penalties.

This week we have a huge game with Underwood, said coach Swieter. Both teams are 2-1 in District play. We need to enjoy the win but also need to
start preparing for Underwood, said the coach.

Individual Statistics
Passing

Att.
Comp Yds/Com.
Nolan Brand
16
9
19.9
Hunter Kruse
2
1
7
Rushing

Att.
Yds.
Rush TDs
Kenny Blunk
2
9
0
Nolan Brand
5
-6
0
Ryan Gustafson 2
1
0
Dakota Jaeschke 1
-1
0
Nyles Johnson
6
18
0
Kaleb Jondle
9
57
0
Kyler Jondle
3
22
1
Ethan Pliner
2
21
0
Aaron Swieter
17
82
1
Receiving

#Rec. Yds. Yards/Catch
TDs
Dakota Jaeschke
6
87
14.5
2
Nolan Johnson
1
33
33.0
0
Nyles Johnson
1
10
10.0
0
Carter Lane
1
7
7.0
0
Aaron Swieter
1
49
49.0
1
Scoring

Pts.
Rushing
FG
PAT
JJ Graves
2
0
0
0
Dakota Jaeschke
14
0
12
0
Kyler Jondle
6
6
0
0
Aaron Swieter
14
6
6
0
Tackles

Unas.
Asst.
Solo Sacks
Joel Anderson
1
2
0
Sam Berglund
0
3
0
Kenny Blunk
1
1
0
Jaden Cline
1
3
1
Nick Eslick
0
2
0
Carter Fluckiger 1
0
0
JJ Graves
0
1
0
Ryan Gustafson 6
7
0
Ivan Hudson
0
1
0
Dakota Jaeschke 1
0
0
Nolan Johnson 2
2
0
Nyles Johnson
0
1
0
Kaleb Jondle
2
0
0
Kyler Jondle
2
6
1
Calyton Kiefer 0
1
0
Tom Lennon
0
1
0
Jarrett Loseke
1
0
0
Clayton McFarland, 0
1
0
Alex Pliner
2
4
1
Aaron Swieter
0
3
0
Interceptions

Interceptions Return Yrds
TDs
Nolan Johnson
1
0
0
Kickoffs

SV Football continued on page 8...

THEDayton
GOWRIE
NEWS
Review

Webster County families urged


to formulate plan for emegencies

1
g
t

If disaster strikes. . .

e

Make A PlanYour family may not be together
s
if a disaster strikes, so it is important to think about the
following situations and plan just in case. Consider the
d
following questions when making a plan:
e

How will my family/household getemergency
alerts and warnings?

How will my family/household get to safe locations for relevant emergencies?

How will my family/household get in touch if
cell phone, internet, or landline doesnt work?

How will I let loved ones know I am safe?

How will family/household get to a meeting
o
place after the emergency?
r

Here are a few easy steps to start your emergene
cy communication plan:
r

Understand how to receive emergency alerts
and warnings.Make sure all household members are
able to get alerts about an emergency from local officials.
Check with your local emergency management agency to
see what is available in your area, and learn more about
y
alerts by visiting:www.ready.gov/alerts.

Discuss family/household plans for disasters
b
that may affect your area and plan where to go.Plan toa
gether in advance so that everyone in the household unn
derstands where to go during a different type of disaster
like a hurricane, tornado, or wildfire.
c

d
n

Karri Scully, Dayton


races on Dragway
in Humboldt
Saturday nights at 5 p.m. . . .


Karri Scully is the driver of a dragster with a
498 Chevy. Her pit crew is her husband Pat Scully who is
her mechanic and daughter
oMaliah Scully. She races at Iowa's oldest dragway in
Humboldt. Karri's quickest time is 5.67 in the eighth
mile. She and her crew try to race every Saturday night.

Gates open at noon and eliminations start at 5
p.m. Come to Iowa's oldest dragway is you like the smell
of racing fuel and smoking tires to watch Karri Scully
race.


Collect information.Create a paper copy of the
contact information for your family that includes:

phone (work, cell, office);

email;

social media;

medical facilities, doctors, service providers;

school.

Identify information and pick an emergency
meeting place.Things to consider:

Decide on safe, familiar places where your
family can go for protection or to reunite;

Make sure these locations are accessible for
household members with disabilities or access and functional needs.

If you have pets or service animals, think about
animal-friendly locations.
Examples of meeting places:

In your neighborhood:A mailbox at the end of
the driveway, or a neighbors house.

Outside of your neighborhood:library, community center, place of worship, or family friends home.

Outside of your town or city:home of a relative or family friend. Make sure everyone knows the address of the meeting place and discuss ways you would
get there.

Share information.Make sure everyone carries a copy in his or her backpack, purse, or wallet. You
should also post a copy in a central location in your home,
such as your refrigerator or family bulletin board.

Practice your plan.Have regular household
meetings to review your emergency plans, communication plans and meeting place after a disaster, and then
practice, just like you would a fire drill.

Webster County
Unit of Retired
School Personnel
To meet Monday, Oct 3...

The Webster County Unit of Retired School
Personnel will meet on Monday, October 3, at Riverside
Methodist Church, 610 Ave C, Fort Dodge.

The noon lunch will be catered by the church
women.

The program will feature, Jeff Becker on Fall
Plant Care. Scholarship money will be collected.

Reservations must be made to Sharon McNeil
by September 27th at 515-576-2820.


Karri Scully, driver and Husband Pat Scully, mechanic, get ready to race at Humboldt raceway Saturday
night.


Karri Scully drives a dragster with a 498 Chevy.
You can find Karri at the Humboldt raceway on Saturday
nights.


Karri Scully and her crew won the Webster City
Machine Pro II. Karri Scully's fastest time was 5.67 in the
eighth mile.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Crappies in large schools


at Don Williams Lake


Don Williams Lake--Black Crappie - Fair: The
crappie bite is still good at Don Williams. Slowly troll
jigs in 12-20 feet of water.

When a crappie is caught, continue to fish that
area as the fish are suspended in large schools. Use 1/8
ounce jigs tipped with minnows or small white or chartreuse twister tails. The upper half of the lake has been
best, but groups of fish can be found throughout.

Hickory Grove Lake--Black Crappie - Fair: A
fair crappie bite has been going at Hickory Grove. Drift
or slow troll 1/8 ounce or lighter jigs with twister tails or
minnows or 1.5 inch panfish tube jigs.

Work the mid-lake area out from the Oriole
Ridge Lodge. Bluegill - Good: Use small jigs tipped with
crawler over pallet piles in water less than 15 feet deep.

Try also between the island the beach and near
buoy off the shore from the Plover Bay Shelter. Hickory
Grove can produce some nice 7 to 8.5 inch bluegills.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Dayton Review

CHURCH

Worship Schedule

EMANUEL LUTHERAN, DAYTON


9 a.m. Sunday School; 10 a.m.Worship;
McGUIRE BEND UNITED BRETHERN, RURAL DAYTON
9:30 a.m. Adult Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. worship
TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN, DAYTON
8:30 a.m. Worship; 9:45 a.m. Coffee hr. & Fellowship.
DAYTON UNITED METHODIST,
9:15 a.m. Sunday School
9:30 a.m. Coffee; 10:30 a.m. Worship
IMMANUEL LUTHERAN, BURNSIDE
9:30 a.m. Worship
UNITED METHODIST, PILOT MOUND
8:30 a.m. Worship; 9:40 a.m. Sunday School
FIRST BAPTIST, STRATFORD
10:30 a.m. Worship & Childrens Church
HARCOURT UNITED METHODIST,
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
DUNCOMBE UNITED METHODIST
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
LEHIGH CHRISTIAN
9a.m. Worship;
LEHIGH-OTHO METHODIST
Lehigh--9.30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Worship
Otho-- 9 a.m. Worship; 10 a.m. SS
SOUTH MARION UNITED METHODIST, STRATFORD
10:30 a.m. Worship
TRINITY LUTHERAN, BOXHOLM
9:30 a.m. Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship.
EVANGELICAL COVENANT, LANYON
9:30a.m. Worship;
10:45a.m. Sunday School
CALVARY UNITED METHODIST, STRATFORD
9:00 a.m. Worship Service; 10:15 a.m. Sunday School.
UNITED EVANGELICAL COVENANT, HARCOURT
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH LUTHERAN, HARCOURT
10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:30 a.m. Fellowship
STRATFORD EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
10:30 a.m. Worship
AMUNITED METHODIST, BOXHOLM
9:30 a.m.-10:15 a.m. Fellowship Time 10:30 a.m. Worship;
9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. Sunday School
WASHINGTON LUTHERAN, ELCA, DUNCOMBE
Sundays: 9:15 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30 a.m. Worship

We have SIX
locations to serve you!
Boxholm Dayton
Farnhamville Gowrie
Harcourt Lehigh

515.352.3151

Sandholm Sandholm
Insurance

Callender family owned Kesho area


in the early years; bustling town

In 1869 the first records show that a settlement
called Kesho (later Callender) was made along the Des
Moines Valley Rail road that went to Fort Dodge. A depot was built but because of lack of business was moved
to Tara by rail. Another depot was built in 1875 and was
used until about 1960. After standing idle all these years,
it was torn down in 1973.

In 1875, Agnes and James Callender of New
York owned all of Kesho and much of the surrounding
area. In 1896 a train load of relatives from Buckingham,
ILL., came to Webster County and settled in the Kesho
area. They included the Heggen and John Wing families.

The first school was held in the Anton Hanson
home and the second was held in 1876 in the Eli Bean
Grocery and Dry Goods store.

About this time the citizens of Kesho decided to
move to the west side of the tracks and change the name
of the town to Callender, after the founder. They donated
the area which is now the park and school grounds--also
the area where the Town Hall and three churches were
located.

The town began to grow. A larger school was
needed so the first one was built in 1880.

In 1892 they organized the Callender Independent District. It continued to grow. In 1898 a new building was erected which was to serve, after remodeling in
1919, until 1936. At this time a large brick structure was
erected with W.P.A. help and in 1957, it had to be enlarged.

In the spring of 1962, the last Callender High
School class held graduation commencement exercises.

On July 1, 1962 the Prairie Community School
System was officially formed, combining Callender,
Moorland, Gowrie, and Lanyon schools. In 1965 more
classrooms were added to the school.

The first blacksmith was Ole Larson, father
of Lewis H. Larson, whose shop stood for a short time
where the east side of Schuster Grocery once stood.

Later blacksmith work was done by Merril and
Old Thorsrud followed by a Mr. Castle, Sprague Davis,
Whitten, Munson and Slagle.

Callender had a cop of its own. In early days
there was a jail behind the town hall. Later a cell or compartment was made in the back part of the clerks office.
This was built in the late 20s or early 30s after the big
fire of 1923.

One of the first justices of peace was H. M. Ultang who also was mayor.

Real Estate


Old-time grain and coal weighing station in Callender. Callender also had a flour mill which was built and operated
by N.C. Rasmussen. The mill was located where the old Callender Elevator used to have their office.

Dayton

547-2311

23 South Main
Dayton, IA 50530
(515)547-2311

Jim Blair
Sanitation
Roll Offs
& Recycling
(515)359-2211

515/879-2716
515/571-1271

TCB Sanitation

Carson-Stapp
Funeral Home

Dayton
Ogden

601 Division St. 275-2702

Harcourt 354-5570

PLEASE
RECYCLE!
Paper Plastic
Cans Class

SV Football...

continued from page 7...


Dakota Jaeschke

Kick Offs
yds.
5
166
Punting

Punts
yds.
Mason Ackerson 4
128
Kick Off Returns

KOR
yds.
Nolan Johnson
1
20
Kaleb Jondle
1
24
Punt Returns

Punt Return
yds.
Nolan Johnson
3
41
2 pt Conversion
JJ Graves
2
Dakota Jaeschke 2
Aaron Swieter
2

Touchbacks
0
Longest Punt
42
KOR for TDs
0
0
Punt Ret for TDs
0

JV Jaguar team
earns a tie with PAC


The JV Jaguar Football team played Pocahontas
Area on 09/19/16. The game ended in a 0-0 tie after regulation and one overtime. The Jaguar defense was very
good. The JV record is now 1-0-1.

Seventh grade Jaguars


win at Burnside 26-0;
Eighth graders lose


The seventh grade Jaguars won their game
Tuesday, Sept. 13 at Burnside 26-0.

In the second quarter Riley Ferrari had a 10 yard
touchdown run. And in the second quarter Lathe Muench
had a 15 yard touchdown run.

In the third quarter Lathe Muench ran for 37
yards and a touchdown and Riley Ferrari made the twopoint conversion. Lathe Muench finished the scoring
with a four yard touchdown run.

The eighth grade team lost 38-6. In the third
quarter Sam Hanson 5 yard touchdown run.

Tim & Staci Blair

406 3rd St NE (515)547-2512


One of the most popular citizens of the town in
early 1900s was Sam Bollinger. He was considered the
smartest man in town as he taught school. He gave legal
advice and anyone who needed advice would go see Sam.

Then too, Benny Farber with a little wagon and
ponies, would come in the summer months and go into
the country and buy junk. Hed pile it by the stockyards
and ship it out.

A newspaper called the Callender Times was
established in 1892. Its first editor was A. A. Rasmusson
who sold it to a Mr. Libby who in turn edited it for a few
years and then sold it to a man in South Dakota.

Callender also had a flour mill which was built
and operated by N. C. Rasmussen. The mill was located
where the old Callender Elevator used to have their office.

The first school in Callender was built in 1880

Review
THEDayton
GOWRIE
NEWS

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

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10

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Public Notice
Your Right to Know
City of Dayton

REGULAR SESSION OF THE


DAYTON CITY COUNCIL-abridged minutes
Wednesday, September 14, 2016
202 1st Avenue SW
Dayton, IA 50530

Mayor ProTem Beth Wickwire called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.
Roll Call-Present: Council members Breitsprecher, Diehl, Lambert, Stapp,
Wickwire. Absent: none. Vacant: Mayor Position. Fourteen employees
and visitors were also present.

AGENDA: Council member Diehl moved to approve the agenda as
posted. Second by Stapp. Ayes: Motion carried unanimously.

MINUTES: Council member Stapp moved to approve the minutes
of the August 31 special meeting as printed. Second by Breitsprecher.
Motion carried unanimously.

BILLS: Council member Breitsprecher moved to approve the bills as
presented. Second by Stapp. Motion carried unanimously.

WATER CURB STOP REPAIR: Angel Weier explained that their
water service line was damaged a few years ago when it was not located
correctly by the City. She didnt feel that they should be responsible for
recent repairs to the water line which were likely the result of the poor
locate. After discussion, Council member Lambert moved that the City pay
for the repair costs. Second by Breitsprecher. Motion carried unanimously.

TRUCK FILL WATER LINE: Al Price discussed removal of sewer
charges from water used to fill trucks at his shop at 908 1st Avenue SW.
Council member Diehl moved to install a second water meter for this and
to bill Al for the meter charge and water usage by this meter. Second
by Breitsprecher. Motion carried unanimously. After further discussion,
the Council directed the Clerk to contact Al and inform him that backflow
prevention would be needed before the meter would be installed.

WATER MAIN PROJECT: MER Engineering representative Lance
Rossow went over project change order #2. Council member Breitsprecher
moved to approve change order #2 in the amount of $2,885. Second by
Diehl. Motion carried unanimously. Council member Breitsprecher moved
to approve pay estimate #2 to Nels Pederson Company in the amount of
$106,834.99. Second by Lambert. Motion carried unanimously. Lance
also informed the Council of proposed change order #3, which will extend
a 6 water main about 80 feet. The Council agreed to allow the work to be
done and to put change order #3 on the next meeting agenda for official
action.

1ST STREET NW RESURFACING PROJECT: Lance Rossow
reported that a pre-construction meeting had been held and that Dayton
Farm Drainage was ready to start on the project. The Council agreed to
get property owners petition and waiver signatures as soon as possible
and to consider a special City Council meeting in September to approve
project documents.

HOUSE SEWER SERVICE: Lance Rossow reported that the house
at 506 3rd Avenue SW could be served by a gravity sewer service line. It
will be fairly shallow and if freezing is a concern, a grinder pump could
also be used. The Council agreed that these are the best options for the
property.

SCHOOL FIRE SYSTEM METER: Lance recommended that the
school project engineer provide flow data for the fire system water line and
that a meter not be installed in the line.

2015-2016 FISCAL YEAR EXAMINATION: Council member Diehl
moved to accept the proposal from Schnurr and Company, LLP to conduct
the 2015-2016 fiscal year examination at a not-to-exceed fee of $3,200.
Second by Stapp. Motion carried unanimously.

SALARY RULE CHANGES: City Clerk trainee Sarah Peters and
Mayor ProTem Wickwire informed the Council of rule changes to take
effect on December 1, 2016 for salaried employees. Wickwire asked
Council members to be ready to discuss options to deal with the changes
at the next regular meeting.

LIVESTOCK PERMIT: After discussion, Council member Wickwire
moved to approve a permit for horses for Mike Schwering at 203 8th Street
SW. Second by Lambert. Motion carried unanimously.

MAINTENANCE POSITION: Mayor ProTem Wickwire reported that a
hiring committee had interviewed applicants and made recommendations.
She asked that the offers not be put on social media for 24 hours. The
committees recommendation was to offer a part-time maintenance
position to Cameron McGuire at $9.75 per hour, with a 35 cent increase
for obtaining a CDL, a 50 cent increase for being able to operate the City
generator, and a 25 cent increase for obtaining water or sewer treatment
licenses. The CDL is to be obtained within 90 days of hire, the generator
operation is to be done within 90 days of hire, and the water and sewer
licenses are to be obtained within 14 months of hire. Failure to obtain any
of these within the time allowed will be brought to the Councils attention
and may be grounds for dismissal. The committee also recommended that
the employee handbook be changed to increase raises for water or sewer
licenses to 25 cents per hour. Council member Breitsprecher moved,
contingent upon meeting pre-employment requirements, to offer the
position to Cameron McGuire at $9.75 per hour and with the stipulations
listed by the committee. Second by Lambert. Motion carried unanimously.
Kenny Sanders also reported that the museum board would like to offer
a temporary position to Dennis Esperson. As the museum is part of the
City, he would be a City employee. Council member Diehl moved to offer
a temporary position for museum building work to Dennis Esperson at
$9.75 per hour, contingent upon meeting pre-employment requirements.
Second by Stapp. Motion carried unanimously.

RODEO ARENA PROPERTY: The Council reviewed an email from
the City Attorney. They directed the Clerk to let a Wrangler representative
know that their attorney should contact the City Attorney.

STREET FINANCE REPORT: Following review, Council member
Diehl introduced Resolution 2016-18, Resolution to Approve and Adopt
the 2015-2016 Street Finance Report, and moved its adoption. Second
by Lambert. Roll call vote-all ayes. Resolution adopted.

EMPLOYEE WAGE: Bobbie Jean Martin informed the Council of
wages paid by other surrounding cities, and read aloud portions of the
employee handbook. The Council asked the Clerk to copy maintenance
employee time sheets from the last six months for their review.

ACH PROGRAM: The Council was informed that Sarah Peters had
come up with a way to provide ACH billing information to the Citys bank
without purchasing an additional computer program. The Council directed
the Clerk to draft a letter to Data Tech asking them to improve their service.

LIBRARY BENCHES: Council member Diehl moved to allow the
Dayton Library to install a concrete pad and two benches on the west side
of the library. Second by Stapp. Motion carried unanimously.

TIF REQUEST: Council member Diehl moved to request $3,500 of
the available residential TIF district increment and $4,000 of the available
commercial TIF district increment for the 2016-2017 fiscal year. Second
by Lambert. Motion carried unanimously.

VACANT BUILDINGS: The Council reviewed a map showing
locations of 20 houses and buildings that had not been occupied for at
least a year. They directed the Clerk to obtain information about a program
used in another city to clean up properties.

BEGGARS NIGHT: Council member Breitsprecher moved to hold
the 2016 Beggars Night on Sunday, October 30th from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Second by Stapp. Motion carried unanimously.

OTHER BUSINESS: The Council agreed to direct the Ahlers and
Cooney Law firm to destroy old capital loan documents. Changes to truck
parking areas and times were also discussed.

ADJOURN: Council member Diehl moved to adjourn. Second by
Stapp. Motion carried unanimously. The meeting was adjourned at 9:10
p.m.
_____________________________________
______
Mayor ProTem Beth Wickwire
Attest
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE ACTIVITY
CLAIMS REPORT

VENDOR NAME
INVOICE DESCRIPTION INVOICE AMT TOTAL
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE CLAIMS

LIABILITIES
AFLAC
AFLAC-PRE-TAX 104.22
AFLAC
AFLAC-PRE-TAX 104.22
208.44
EFTPS
FED/FICA TAX
2,470.21
EFTPS
FED/FICA TAX
2,626.49
5,096.70
IPERS
IPERS - REGULAR 1,587.58
IPERS
IPERS - REGULAR 1,543.17
3,130.75

LIABILITIES
8,435.89

POLICE
CASEY'S GENERAL STORES INC, AUG-110.5 GAL GAS
228.30
DOUBLE M SIGNS
INV 16172 8/11/16
10.00
GALLS, LLC
INV 5951440 AND 5906610
72.27
GIS BENEFITS
SEP DISABILITY,LIFE INS
20.14
KELTEK
INV 12341A 09/14/2016
653.95
LEHIGH VALLEY COOP TELEPHONE, AUG PHONE,INTERNET SERV 62.42
MACKE GOWRIE
05 TRANSMISSION FLUID
22.92
NICK DUNBAR
REPLACEMENT SD CARD
29.99
QUILL.COM
BROTHER PRINTER,TONER, 381.98
QUILL.COM
STAPLER
6.74
388.72
UNITY POINT CLINIC-OCC MEDICIN, PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TEST 37.00

Dayton Review
UNITYPOINT HEALTH TRINITY, 2 PRE-EMPLOY PHYSICALS 465.00
US CELLULAR
JULY CELL PHONE SERVICE
33.82
WELLMARK BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIEL SEP HEALTH,DENTAL INS 907.83

POLICE
2,932.36

ANIMAL CONTROL
DAYTON COMMUNITY GROCERY, 08/10/2016 INVOICE CITY
2.98
J.P. COOKE CO.
INV 408426 08/15/16
66.06

ANIMAL CONTROL
69.04

ROADS, BRIDGES, & SIDEWAL
ANDERSON IMPLEMENTS, FARM KING MOWER BLADES,PINS 93.56
BARCO MUNICIPAL PRODUCTS, ST SIGNS,POSTS,WORK SIGNS 942.50
BERGMAN PLUMBING INC., VIDEO STORM SEWER
200.00
BLACK HILLS ENERGY AUG-8 THERMS
36.33
CASEY'S GENERAL STORES INC, AUG-29.8 GAL GAS
61.41
CENTRAL IOWA DISTRIBUTING, SHOP TOWELS
45.70
CITY OF DAYTON, ACCT 2750154778 HWY STRT LIGHT
1,000.00
DAYTON COMMUNITY GROCER, 08/10/2016 INVOICE CITY
19.99
DAYTON REVIEW
INV 3798 08/31/2016
99.00
DODSON TRUCK & TRACTOR, INV1910 08/05/16
770.05
HAWKEYE FIRE
INV 3669 08/30/16
16.75
HEFFRON SERVICES
INV 15025 08/24/16 2,400.75
HEFFRON SERVICES
INV 15042 09/02/16 1,994.85
4,395.60
J.P. BYSON OIL COMPANY, 100 GAL DIESEL
185.00
K AND D LAND IMPROVEMENT, SHOULDER WORK ON 1ST AVE SW 660.00
LANDUS COOPERATIVE ACCNT 6025 08/31/16
18.82
LAWSON PRODUCTS
INV 3709480 08/18/2016
88.65
MARTIN MARIETTA
INV 18499752 08/25/16
156.06
MENARDS-FORT DODGE INV 28637 08/25/16
21.49
MID AMERICAN RESEARCH CHM, WASH AND WAX
124.75
MID-IOWA SALES
INV 296017 08/10/16
80.43

ROADS, BRIDGES, & SIDEWAL 9,016.09

OTHER HEALTH AND SOCIAL S
TROPHIES UNLIMITED COM SERVICE PLAQUE
35.70

OTHER HEALTH AND SOCIAL S
35.70

LIBRARY SERVICES
BLACK HILLS ENERGY AUG-10 THERMS
37.26
CITY OF DAYTON
ACCT 5050085223 LIBRARY
182.42
GROSSNICKLE PLUMBING & HEATING REPAIR, LIBRARY TOILET 162.67
LEHIGH VALLEY COOP TELEPHONE, ACCOUNT 1445 LIBRARY 39.69

LIBRARY SERVICES
422.04

MUSEUM
CONKLIN ELECTRIC
WEST MUSEUM ROOM WIRING
162.00
DAVIS INDUSTRIES
INV 001243 09/02/16
805.00
ENGQUIST LUMBER
INV 1608-572580 08/25/16
41.50

MUSEUM
1,008.50

PARKS
BERGMAN PLUMBING INC., DRINKING FOUNTAIN REPAIR
68.00
CENTRAL IOWA DISTRIBUTING, TOILET PAPER
133.50
CHRISTOPHER WHEELER, RESTROOM CLEANING
300.00
MARTIN MARIETTA
INV 18499752 08/25/16
156.07
MENARDS-FORT DODGE, TRASH CAN,BAGS,PAINT 21.21
MENARDS-FORT DODGE INV 28794 08/27/16 27.92
MENARDS-FORT DODGE INV 29233 09/01/20 16 27.78
76.91
PLASTIC RECYCLING OF IA FALLS, INV 0101980-IN 08/09/16 762.00

PARKS
1,496.48

GOLF CLUBHOUSE
BLACK HILLS ENERGY AUG-109 THERMS 83.63
CITY OF DAYTON
ACCT 2680151002 OAK PARK GC 1,080.04
DAVIS EQUIPMENT CORPORATION, INV JI12476 09/01/16
51.17
DAYTON COMMUNITY GROCERY, 08/10/16 INVOICE 66.29
DAYTON COMMUNITY GROCERY, 09/08/16 INV G.C. 302.03 368.32
FORT DODGE DISTRIBUTING, AUG 24 BEER DELIVERY 244.65
FORT DODGE DISTRIBUTING, SEP 14 BEER DELIVERY 90.95 335.60
HUMES DISTRIBUTING 9-7 BEER DELIVERY
215.75
HUMES DISTRIBUTING AUG 24 BEER DELIVERY 631.70
HUMES DISTRIBUTING 8-31 BEER DELIVERY
327.45
HUMES DISTRIBUTING SEP 14 BEER DELIVERY 192.75 1,367.65
IRRIGATION & TURF EQUIPMN

LF3400 FAIRWAY MOWER NET PRICE
7,000.00
J.P. BYSON OIL COMPANY, 150 GAL DIESEL 950.67
JOHN SKOGLUND
AUG CART RENTAL 1,187.83
LEHIGH VALLEY COOP TELEPHONE, ACCNT 01457 OAK PARK GC 130.75
NAPA AUTO SUPPLY
MOWER PARTS,FILTERS
133.94
NORTHERN LIGHTS
ACCNT 36068 09/01/16
1,837.83
TREAS, STATE OF IOWA AUG SALES,OPTION TAXES
1,463.00
WALMART BUSINESS/SYNCB, AUG 10 POP PURCHASES 520.76
WALMART BUSINESS/SYNCB, 8-26 POP PURCHASE 234.38 755.14

GOLF CLUBHOUSE
16,745.57

GOLF COURSE
LANDUS COOPERATIVE ACCNT 6025 08/31/16
32.10
NAPA AUTO PARTS
INV 210747 08/25/16
950.00
PORTABLE PRO, INC
AUG TOILET RENTAL
75.00
ZIMCO SUPPLY COMPANY ARMORTECH,FOLIAR PAC,AGENT 414.50

GOLF COURSE
1,471.60

CLERK TREASURER, & FINANC
GIS BENEFITS
SEP DISABILITY,LIFE INS
22.60
WELLMARK BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIEL, SEP HEALTH,DENTAL INS 1,247.74

CLERK TREASURER, & FINANC 1,270.34

LEGAL SERVICES & CITY ATT
DAYTON REVIEW
INV 3842 8/25/16 20.35
DAYTON REVIEW
INV 3843 8/24/2016 74.62
DAYTON REVIEW
INV 3846 8/24/16 301.89
396.86

LEGAL SERVICES & CITY ATT
396.86

CITY HALL & GENERAL BUILD
BLACK HILLS ENERGY AUG-6 THERMS
35.37
DAYTON COMMUNITY GROCERY, 08/10/2016 INVOICE CITY
4.99
DON'S PEST CONTROL INV 29487 09/08/16
45.00

CITY HALL & GENERAL BUILD
85.36

OTHER GENERAL LIABILITY
LEHIGH VALLEY COOP TELEPHONE, ACCNT 01456 DAYTON CLERK 35.78

OTHER GENERAL LIABILITY
35.78

WATER
AGSOURCE COOPERATIVE SERVICES

BACTERIA,TTHM,HAA5 TESTS
176.50
BARB COXE
DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 1550075003 50.00
BLACK HILLS ENERGY AUG-3 THERMS
33.99
BRITTANY FIALA, DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 4180110004
129.14
CITY OF DAYTON
ACCT 3120055223 WATER PLANT 899.95
CITY OF DAYTON - B BRENNAN

DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 4730127003 75.00
CITY OF DAYTON - D FORD,

DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 3300009003 200.00
CITY OF DAYTON - FIALA DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 4180110004 70.86
CONKLIN ELECTRIC
ST LIGHT CONDUIT REPAIR
180.00
DARRELL MONTGOMERY, DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 242012002 75.00
DAWN KESLER
DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 1130045006 50.00
DAYTON COMMUNITY GROCERY, 08/10/2016 INVOICE CITY
8.13
DAYTON FARM DRAINAGE, INV XI-13460 07/11/16 770.00
DAYTON FARM DRAINAGE, INV XI-13470 08/22/16 740.00 1,510.00
DAYTON REVIEW
INV 3898 9/8/16
32.22
DAYTON VET CLINIC
DEPOSIT REFUND #6129
50.00
DENNIS GOEDERS
DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 4010066003 50.00
ENVY, DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 4970085002
200.00
GIS BENEFITS
SEP DISABILITY,LIFE INS
21.70
HEARTLAND BACKFLOW, INC INV 161 08/12/2016
195.00
IOWA ASSOCIATION OF UTILITIES, INV 13710 09/01/16
93.08
IOWA ONE CALL
INV 184225 09/08/2016
19.00
JEREMIAH JOHNSON
DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 4100097002 30.00
JORDAN GERRARD
DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 690026006 200.00
KAY CHRISTIE
DEPOSIT REFUND ACCT 3980067004 50.00
LEHIGH VALLEY COOP TELEPHONE ACCNT 01456 DAYTON CLERK 33.38
MID AMERICA METER INC, INV 016-2394 08/10/16
47.00
MUNICIPAL SUPPLY, INC, INV 0633217-IN 08/2916
1,878.20
NELS PEDERSON CO HAUL 2ND ST NW ASPHALT
236.36
POSTMASTER
400 STAMPS
188.00
QUILL.COM
PRINTER LABELS
65.99
QUILL.COM
ENVELOPES,FOLDERS, MISC 80.32
QUILL.COM
LABELS
46.99
QUILL.COM
MAGNIFIER
6.49 199.79
ROGER STEVENS
DEPOSIT REFUND #6121
50.00
SAFEGUARD PROPERTIES, DEPOSIT REFUND #6116
50.00
STOREY KENWORTHY/MATT PARROTT, RECEIPT FORMS
123.43
THE MESSENGER, 1ST ST NW PROJECT HEARING NOT
100.07
TREAS, STATE OF IOWA AUG SALES,OPTION TAXES
815.70
UNITED COOPERATIVE 25.1 TON SOFTENER SALT
2,961.80
US CELLULAR
JULY CELL PHONES (3)
109.14

WATER
11,192.44

SEWER
CASEY'S GENERAL STORES INC, AUG-78.3 GAL GAS
145.51
CITY OF DAYTON
ACCT 2830146223 LIFT STATION 261.32
DAYTON COMMUNITY GROCERY, 08/10/2016 INVOICE CITY 11.46
IOWA ASSOCIATION OF UTILITIES, INV 13710 09/01/16
93.08
LANDUS COOPERATIVE ACCNT 6025 08/31/16
18.83
LEHIGH VALLEY COOP TELE., ACCNT 01456 DAYTON CLERK 33.38
MID AMERICAN RESEARCH CHM, SEWER BACT ZYME
436.00
MUNICIPAL PIPE TOOL CO, CLEAN 3738' SEWER MAINS
2,055.90
TREAS, STATE OF IOWA AUG SALES,OPTION TAXES
50.53

SEWER
3,106.01

GARBAGE
JIM BLAIR SANITATION AUG RECYCLING
1,314.00

TCB SANITATION
SEP-292 X 15.5
4,526.00

GARBAGE
5,840.00

TRANSFERS
AHLERS & COONEY, P.C. 2016 G/O CAP LOAN NOTE FEES 4,635.61
CITY OF DAYTON
TRANS PEDERSON PMT #1, 80,437.06
CITY OF DAYTON , TRANS CLINIC GIFTS TO MUSEUM 3,200.00 83,637.06
DAYTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, CLINIC EQUIPMENT DONATIONS 20.00

TRANSFERS
88,292.67
TOTAL ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
21,667.75
PAYROLL CHECKS
17,990.36
**** PAID TOTAL *****
39,658.11
**** SCHED TOTAL *****
130,184.98
***** REPORT TOTAL *****
169,843.09
City of Dayton Revenue Report
August, 2016
General $762.51
Residential TIF
$0.00
Commercial TIF
$10.31
Other Property Taxes
$259.73
Municipal Building
$770.00
Local Option Sales Tax
$8,041.19
Road Use
$11,446.56
Special Assessment
$0.00
Park
$288.00
Water Utility
$13,644.19
Sewer Utility
$7,765.53
Solid Waste Utility
$5,747.09
Golf Course
$22,593.95
Museum $100.00
Veterans Park
$0.00
Community Building Trust
$441.89
Memorial $0.00
Library $2,764.09
Electric Utility
$58,521.58
Interfund Transfer
$24,004.80
TOTAL CITY REVENUE
$157,161.42
Payroll $28,241.63

Public Notice
Your Right to Know
Lehigh City Council


Notice is hereby given that there is currently a vacancy in the position
of Mayor for the City of Lehigh, Iowa, due to the resignation of Paula
Martin. It is the councils intention to appoint a person to fill the unexpired
term of Paula Martin on October 10, 2016, at their regular council meeting.
Anyone interested in filling this vacancy is invited to submit a resume to
the office of the City Clerk, on or before October 7, 2016, at 4:30 p.m. at
City Hall, 241 Elm St., Lehigh, Iowa. The resume must contain information
which would indicate their qualifications to hold public office. All candidates

must live in the City of Lehigh.

Notice is also given that anyone wishing to petition the council for ap
special election may do so by obtaining the required number of signatures
on a petition and filing said petition with the office of the city clerk within(
fourteen (14) days following the publication date of this notice or withinM
fourteen (14) days of the date of appointment of a person to fill the vacancy.
If a petition is filed, the appointment shall be temporary until the election isr
held. The required number of signatures necessary for a special electionC
is 15% of the number of voters who voted for candidates for the office att
the preceding regular election to fill that position. The exact number isR
available by contacting the office of the city clerk or the commissioner ofb
T
elections at the Webster County Auditors office.
A
N
Office of the City Clerk
M
City of Lehigh, Iowa
c
a
A
f
p
T
t

p
a
i
m
DAYTON LIGHT AND POWER BOARD OF TRUSTEES
t
REGULAR MEETING
a
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2016
a
7:00 a.m.-City Hall
w

Board Chairman Kenny Sanders called the meeting to order ata
7:00 a.m. Roll call: Present-Board members Rentschler, Sanders, anda
Vangilder. Absent: none. Also present: Randy Danielson and Craigp
a
Johnson.

AGENDA: Rentschler moved to approve the agenda as posted.r

Second by Vangilder. Motion carried unanimously.

MINUTES: Vangilder moved to approve the minutes of the AugustM
17 regular meeting as printed. Second by Rentschler. Motion carried
K
unanimously.

BILLS: Following discussion of a park camper outlet repair bill,C
Rentschler moved to approve the bills as presented. Second by Vangilder.
Motion carried unanimously.

SUBSTATION TRANSFORMER: City Foreman Craig Johnson
reported that the substation transformer replacement project went
smoothly. The new transformer is working well.

SUBSTATION CIRCUIT BREAKERS: The Board agreed to continue
with rebuilding the circuit breakers after the east feeder repair is completed.

EAST FEEDER REPAIR: Craig Johnson reported that the boring
work to replace the underground wire was scheduled for September 22nd.

IUB INSPECTION REPAIRS: Craig Johnson reported that most of
the repairs noted on the IUB inspection report had been made.

METER ACCESS: The customer had moved their dog pen so that
the electric meter can be accessed.

GENERATOR OPERATION: The Board was informed that there was
not insurance coverage for non-employees to operate the City generator.

OAK PARK TREE REMOVAL: The bad trees had been trimmed or
removed. The Board decided not to pay for stump removal.

LABOR DAY ELECTRIC: The Board reviewed employee overtime
and power costs for campers over Labor Day weekend.

LAKE OLE CAMPER OUTLETS: The Board discussed the possible
overloading of electric outlets by campers over Labor Day weekend. They
will review a letter to the Celebration Committee regarding this at their next
meeting.

ARC FLASH CLOTHING: Vangilder moved to purchase an arc-flash
protective suit to be stored at the substation for use there. Second by
Rentschler. Motion carried unanimously.

CLERK POSITION: The Board was informed that trainee Sarah
Peters had resigned and that the position had been re-advertised.

EMPLOYEE REPORTS: The Board was informed that Al Martin
had resigned from his maintenance position, and that Cameron McGuire
had been offered a maintenance position. They discussed the amount of
contracted work done and the need to trim trees on the south side of 3rd
Avenue NE. Rentschler moved to contribute $100 to the Southeast Valley
Athletic Booster Club. Second by Vangilder. Motion carried unanimously.

ADJOURN: Rentschler moved to adjourn. Second by Vangilder.
Motion carried unanimously. The meeting was adjourned at 7:38 a.m.
_________________________________
Board Chairman Kenny Sanders
Attest

Public Notice
Your Right to Know
Dayton Light and Power

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE ACTIVITY


CLAIMS REPORT
VENDOR NAME
INVOICE DESCRIPTION INVOICE AMT TOTAL
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE CLAIMS
ELECTRIC
3E ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT CO, 400 WATT PARK LIGHT
462.16
BARB COXE
DEPOSIT REFUND
50.00
BRITTANY FIALA
#6117 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
100.00
CASEY'S GENERAL STORES INC, BATTERIES
197.64
CENTRAL IOWA DISTRIBUTING, 5 GAL BARREN HERBICIDE 116.50
CITY OF DAYTON-6007 ON AC, #6007 ON ACCT
100.00
CITY OF DAYTON-6118 #6118 ON ACCOUNT
150.00
CONKLIN ELECTRIC PARK CAMPER OUTLET REPAIR 1,270.00
CORN BELT POWER COOP, LOCATE EAST FEEDER FAULT 741.65
DAKOTA AMERICAN TRANSFORM, REBUILT SUB TRANS 18,500.00
DARRELL MONTGOMERY, #6025 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
100.00
DAWN KESLER
DEPOSIT REFUND
50.00
DAYTON LEADER
LABOR DAY AD
20.00
DAYTON REVIEW
8-17 MEETING MINUTES, BILLS 75.47
DAYTON REVIEW
PRINT PROJECT SHARE NOTICE 84.00
DAYTON REVIEW
RODEO AD
22.00
181.47

Dayton Legal Continued on page 11...

THE Dayton
GOWRIE
NEWS
Review

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Dayton Legal Continued from page 10...


DAYTON VET CLINIC #6129 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
100.00
DENNIS GOEDERS
DEPOSIT REFUND
50.00
DSW BACKYARD SERVICE, LLC

TAKE DOWN 4 OAK PARK TREES 2,325.00
ENVY #6137
DEPOSIT REFUNDED
150.00
FAMILY PHARMACY STING KILL
8.40
FLETCHER-REINHARDT CO, 40 KEARNEY FUSES, 160.24
FLETCHER-REINHARDT CO, 15 KEARNEY FUSES-125 AMP, 158.10
FLETCHER-REINHARDT CO,

CRIMPS,FUSES,PHOTOCELLS,279.06 597.40
GARY ZERWAS
LEGION FLAG REIMB
58.90
IA DEPT OF REVENUE-USE TAX, Aug IA Sales Tax - Elec
1,308.77
IOWA ASSOCIATION OF UTILITIES, 1/2- SEP-NOV SAFETY DUES 186.16
IOWA UTILITIES BOARD, 2017 IEC/CGRER ASSESSMENT
634.00
J.P. BYSON OIL COMPANY, 629 GAL DIESEL
1,163.65
JEREMIAH JOHNSON #6080 REFUNDED
20.00
JORDAN GERRARD
#6136 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
150.00
KAY CHRISTIE
#6143 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
50.00
KRIZ-DAVIS CO
WIRE,CONNECTOR,COLD SHRINK 502.31
LARRY HOOVER
#6138 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
50.00
LAWSON PRODUCTS WASP KILLER
25.53
LEHIGH VALLEY COOP TELEPHONE, Lehigh Valley Coop #01456 150.87
MARTIN'S FLAG CO, LLC, 4X6 US FLAG, TASSEL, CORD
92.51
MCGOUGH INC
SUB TRANS CRANE SERVICE
1,757.50
MIDLAND POWER COOP, EAST FEEDER FAULT LABOR 872.50
MIDLAND POWER COOP, AUG-549,592 KWH 35,942.99
36,815.49
POSTMASTER
200 STAMPS
94.00
QUILL.COM
CHAIR MAT, TONER
262.65
QUILL.COM
TAPE
28.99
291.64
ROGER STEVENS
#6121 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
50.00
SAFEGUARD PROPERTIES, #6116 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
50.00
STOREY KENWORTHY/MATT PARROTT, 1320 UTILITY BILL FORMS 554.24
US CELLULAR
JULY GENERATOR ALARM LINE
46.63
VICKY HENDRICKS
#6133 DEPOSIT REFUNDED
50.00
WELLMARK BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIEL

CRAIG OCT HEALTH,DENTAL INS 1,247.74
WELLMARK BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIEL

ELECTRIC
70,620.16
**** PAID TOTAL *****
70,620.16
***** REPORT TOTAL *****
70,620.16

Public Notice
Your Right to Know
Lehigh City Council

City of Lehigh, IA 50557


Special Council Meeting
Monday, September 19, 2016 City Hall

Mayor Pro-Tem Dellachiesa brought the meeting to order at 7:00
p.m.

Present: Hrubes, Richardson, Timmons, Dellachiesa and Twito
(joined by phone). Also present were Terwilliger and Friedel, City Men.
Motion by Timmons, sec. by Hrubes to approve the Agenda. All Ayes/MC.

NEW BUSINESS: Motion by Twito, sec. by Dellachiesa to accept the
resignations of Mayor Paula Martin and Kathy Gambill, City Clerk. Several
Council members accepted the resignations with great regrets and felt
they had to for the City to move forward. Roll Call Vote: Ayes: Hrubes,
Richardson, Timmons, Dellachiesa and Twito. Nays: None. MC. Motion
by Hrubes, sec. by Timmons to accept Resolution 2016-23. A Resolution
To Fill Vacancy In The Office Of Mayor By Appointment. Roll Call Vote:
Ayes: Hrubes, Richardson, Timmons, Twito and Dellachiesa. Nays:
None. MC. The Council reviewed the City Clerk position newspaper ad.
Motion by Timmons, sec. by Hrubes to have Clerk publish the ad with
changes noted. All Ayes/MC. Motion by Richardson, sec. by Twito to
accept Fort Dodge Asphalts bid of $4140.67 to due street repair work. All
Ayes/MC. Motion by Timmons, sec. by Richardson to purchase a new tire
for the plow truck. All Ayes/MC. Motion by Hrubes, sec. by Richardson to
purchase a 4 valve for hydrant on Main Street. All Ayes/MC. Motion by
Timmons, sec. by Hrubes to allow Terwilliger to take the City laptop home
to study for his water tests online. All Ayes/MC.

BUSINESS FROM THE FLOOR: Approximately 45 citizens were
present to present the Council with a petition asking for the resignation of
a Council member. There was much discussion on this matter and since
it was not on the agenda no action could be taken by the Council. This
matter will be put on the agenda and addressed by the citizens again at
the October 10th meeting. A citizen voiced concerns about a property
at 762 Oak Street. A letter will be sent. Cody Palmer was present to
ask about fixing the street near 408 Main Street. The Council thought it
was to be done when Fort Dodge Asphalt does the repairs the City had
already contracted them to do. A citizen was present to ask that his bill be
adjusted. It will be put on the agenda for the next meeting. A citizen was
present to ask about replacing a broken electric pole near their property
at 772 Oak Street. Terwilliger will contact someone to assist with the
replacement.

Motion by Timmons, sec. by Hrubes to adjourn the meeting. All Ayes/
MC. Meeting adjourned at 8:20 p.m.
Kathy Gambill, City Clerk
City of Lehigh, IA 50557

Gowrie Police Chief being called


to SV High School most days
Fights, problems at High School. . .

Concerns regarding our youth took center stage
at the Gowrie City Council meeting held September
19. Police Chief, Patrick Monaghan, has been called
to the high school nearly every day this school year and
conditions are deteriorating outside of school hours as
well.

On Homecoming Night, September 17th, 4-5
calls were placed to police dispatch, alerting Monaghan
to at least three fights among students. According to
many, these calls place an undue burden on Monaghan as
he is sometimes the only patrolman available to respond
to the call. On Saturday night, two Webster County deputies were called in to assist, but they were summoned to
other calls within a half an hour.

We want citizens to be aware of how busy
he [Chief Monaghan] is, said mayor, Gayle Redman.
People must understand that concerns about less serious
issues, such as junk cars, are going to have to take a little
longer to address. He is only one person with only so
much time.

Chief Monaghan reports that not all the trouble
is generated by students who live in Gowrie and surrounding small towns. Some troublemakers are coming
in from Fort Dodge, and may not even attend school in
the area, but may know others that do attend school in
Gowrie.

However, he does indicate that Southeast Valley
students are part of the problem as well, and explained
he has been summoned to address concerns such as girls
involved in physical fights on school property. Additionally, he is very busy with other police matters. For
example, on Homecoming Night he needed to address a
person on the roof of their home.

Were a small town, suggested Redman.
Perhaps we feel like we can rest on our laurels, but we
have to be proactive at combating these problems.

When asked to describe the problems plaguing
Gowrie, those in attendance suggested fights, drugs, alcohol, racial disharmony, and bullying. It was also noted
that the high school cannot discipline students for problems occurring off school property. There are some deterrents for athletes, such as the good conduct policy, but
of course, this only covers a small percentage of students.

Ive been very impressed with the superintendent, offered Chief Monaghan.

Redman suggested there are greater issues at
play as well, even beyond the immediate issue of fights.
This is just as big of a concern for our city as it is for our
school. Reports such as this may cause people to move
away.

But, on the positive, Mayor Redman praised the
efforts of Monaghan. Hes on it. Hes doing a great
job.

It seemed the consensus of those in attendance
that Chief Monaghan is swamped. The hiring of Matt

Public Notice

Photo: Joan Marcus

IN THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT FOR WEBSTER COUNTY


BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC
CASE NO. EQCV3 l 8883
Plaintiff
vs.
MICHAEL HUBBARD; DOROTHEA
ORIGINAL NOTICE
HUBBARD SPOUSE OF MICHAEL
HUBBARD; MARK HUBBARD; KARI
HUBBARD SPOUSE OF MARK
HUBBARD; JANELLE HUBBARD;
SPOUSE OF JANELLE HUBBARD;
JA YLENE THOMPSON; SAM PARSONS
SPOUSE OF JAYLENE THOMPSON;
PARTIES IN POSSESSION
Defendants

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TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS:


Jaylene Thompson

Sam Parsons, Spouse of Jaylene Thompson

You are notified that a petition has been filed in the office of the clerk
of this court, naming you as the defendant in this action. Which petition
prays for Foreclosure of a First Mortgage Lien held by the Plaintiff against
the real estate legal described as follows:

Lot No. 28, In Block "D" Kime's Addition to Fort Dodge, Iowa
The attorney for the plaintiff(s) is Cunningham & Kelso, P.L.L.C. whose
address is 2830 100th Street, Suite 106, Urbandale, Iowa, 50322. That
attorney's phone number is 515-278-4200; facsimile number 515-2784655.

You are further notified that the above case has been filed in a county
that utilizes electronic filing. You must serve a motion or answer on or
before the 1 day of November, 2016 within a reasonable time thereafter
file a motion or answer, in the Iowa District Court for Webster County, at
the courthouse in Fort Dodge, Iowa, judgment by default will be rendered
against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Please see Iowa Court
Rules Chapter 16 for information on electronic filing and Iowa Court Rules
Chapter 16, division VI regarding the protection of personal information in
court filings.

If you need assistance to participate in court due to a disability, call
the disability coordinator at 641-421-0990. Persons who are hearing or
speech impaired may call Relay Iowa TTY (l-800-735-2942). Disability
coordinators cannot provide legal advice.
(SEAL)
CLERK OF COURT
WEBSTER COUNTY COURTHOUSE
FORT DODGE, IOWA, 50501
IMPORTANT
YOU ARE ADVISED TO SEEK LEGAL ADVICE AT ONCE TO PROTECT
YOUR INTERESTS.

It Pays to Advertise!

Burns as a reserve officer was discussed. Burns is willing


to commute from Manson, and would continue to serve
the community of Manson as well as Gowrie.

Hed be a good fit here, suggested Monaghan.
Hes educated, and he knows what hes doing.

Redman concurred. I agree. Hes the best of
the ones weve interviewed.

Redman wished to move forward with a motion
to approve the hiring of Burns, but was advised this was
not on the agenda for the meeting and would have to wait
for the next meeting. Redman agreed, but also indicated
that Chief Monaghan is covering a lot of weekend shifts
and the hiring of a new reserve officer would raise the
number in the force to four, thereby reducing the workload on Chief Monaghan.

In other police news, it was noted that the new
police car is now on the street. Work will now be complete on the other patrol car, such as the addition of a cage
for the back seat. Chief Monaghan discussed the benefits
of the Tracks program, a computerized program that allows an officer to quickly seek information, for example,
about a vehicles license plate without having to call dispatch.

I think its crucial for us, suggested Monaghan.
Also, it allows me to run plates a lot more and know
whos coming into town.

However, there are concerns that the program
costs $100 a month. It was asked if Gowrie could collaborate with Fort Dodge, for example, to try to reduce costs
of this program. However, since Gowrie is considered its
own municipality, the burden of paying for this rests with
the taxpayers of Gowrie. It was noted that Gowrie Police
arrested five additional people this year, just by running
plates through the system.

I think its quite expensive for the volume of
arrests in Gowrie, suggested resident, Gail McLoud.

Councilmember, Jeff Peterson suggested if
people consider this a hardship for small towns, such as
Gowrie, they should address this with state lawmakers
such as Krayenbrink and Sexton.

Dayton Police Report


**Aug 9, 2016- Aug 30, 2016**
Wednesday, 08/10/16 Dispatched to Coalville
reference possible funnel clouds in the area. Handled; Assisted Dayton Fire Dept. with a hog barn
fire, 3300 blk Oak Ave.; Grandview Apartments
for a possible burglary. After investigation it was
determined not to be a burglary.
Thursday, 08/11/16 Impounded an abandoned
camper, 200 blk 1st Ave SW. CAD# 16-037621.
Parking ticket issued.
Monday, 08/15/16 A hit-and-run accident was
reported in the 10 blk 1st St NW. Report taken,
#16-0012.; Spoke to a parent and juvenile at Dayton PD at the parents request regarding a juvenile
issue.
Tuesday, 08/16/16 Open door at Dayton Elementary School. Building was cleared and secured; Driving complaint reference a vehicle
speeding in the NE side of Dayton.; Completed a
fingerprint request.; 100 blk 1st St NE, removed a
subject from a residence at owners request.; Completed a welfare check per telephone request.; 900
blk 1st Ave SW, civil property issue.; Report of
water running in the post office in Dayton. Unable
to make contact with a key holder.
Thursday, 08/18/16 Report of a suspicious male
1st Ave NE and 1st St NE. Located the male, determined to be ok.
Friday, 08/19/16 Traffic Stop: 400 blk 2nd St
NW. Warning: Speed.
Tuesday, 08/23/16 Caseys reported checks
written on a closed account. Report taken: #160013. Charges sent to County Attorney.; Assisted
Hamilton and Webster County Sheriffs Dept. attempt to locate a suicidal male. Handled.
Wednesday, 08/24/16 Assisted Hamilton and
Webster County Sheriffs Dept. locate a suicidal
male. Subject later located deceased.
Friday, 08/26/16 Iron Saddle reported criminal
mischief. Arrest made. #16-0015; A person reported an assault. Arrest made. #16-0014
Sunday, 08/28/16 A person reported a sex assault. Under investigation. Report taken #16-0016
Tuesday, 08/30/16 200 blk 8th St SW, civil
property issue/exchange.
*Note: All charges are merely an accusation. All defendants are
presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

12

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Dayton Review

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Fall is a great time to be outdoors. The air is cool, the
views are picturesque and the fish are pulling out of their late
summer slumber.

Fall offers excellent fishing opportunities for both
new and expert anglers, said Joe Larscheid, chief of the Iowa
Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Bureau. Get out
there and enjoy them.

Cooler temperatures and shorter daylight periods trigger fish to actively move in search of food to build energy reserves to settle into their winter habitat. These predictable movements make them easier to locate.

Yellow perch, muskies, crappies, walleyes largemouth and smallmouth bass put on a last minute flurry before
winter, explained Larscheid.

The fall bite in lakes and ponds shifts to the main part
of the day. Fish are more active during the day and can be caught
close to shore. Target areas of a lake where the water is warmer,
particularly in shallow water bays along the north shore.

Use live bait, particularly minnows, small tackle and
fish slowly when fishing in cooler water, Larscheid said.

Look for panfish schools in open water near structure
like a brush pile, underwater hump, drop-offs and rock reefs.
Largemouth bass will be close to some type of structure during
the fall like underwater brush piles, old road beds, rock reeks or
weed lines.

Fish in streams will begin moving to their wintering
areas in October. Stream flow is often lower in the fall; allowing better angler access. Channel catfish will move downstream
from smaller streams to the deepest holes they can find in larger
streams. Walleyes will move to the next deepest holes and pike to
the next deepest.

Find a new favorite fishing spot this fall with the interactive Fishing Atlas available on the DNR website at www.
iowadnr.gov/Fishing/Fishing-Maps.