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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC

Addresses
Objectives
Part 1: Identify and Work with PC NICs
Part 2: Identify and Use the System Tray Network Icons
Part 3: Set Up the Topology and Initialize Devices

Set up equipment to match the network topology.

Initialize and restart (if necessary) the router and switch.

Part 4: Configure Devices and Verify Connectivity

Assign static IP address to PC-A NIC.

Configure basic settings on R1 and S1.

Assign a static IP address to R1 and management address on S1.

Verify network connectivity.

Part 5: Display, Describe, and Analyze Ethernet MAC Addresses

Analyze MAC address for PC-A.

Analyze MAC addresses for router R1.

Display the MAC address table on switch S1.

Part 7: Clean-up

Background / Scenario
This lab requires you to determine the availability and status of the network interface cards (NICs) on the
PC that you use. Windows provides a number of ways to view and work with your NICs.
In this lab, you will access the NIC information of your PC and change the status of these cards.
Every device on an Ethernet LAN is identified by a Layer-2 MAC address. This address is burned into the
NIC. This lab will explore and analyze the components that make up a MAC address, and how you can
find this information on various networking devices, such as a router, switch, and PC.
You will cable the equipment as shown in the topology. You will then configure the router and PC to
match the addressing table. You will verify your configurations by testing for network connectivity.
After the devices have been configured and network connectivity has been verified, you will use various
commands to retrieve information from the devices to answer questions about your network equipment.
Note: The routers used with CCNA hands-on labs are Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Routers (ISRs)
with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 (universalk9 image). The switches used are Cisco Catalyst 2960s with
Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other routers, switches, and Cisco IOS versions can be
used. Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced
might vary from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of this
lab for the correct interface identifiers.
Note: Make sure that the routers and switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If
you are unsure, contact your instructor.

Required Resources

1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with two NICs, wired and wireless, and a wireless connection)
Note: At the start of this lab, the wired Ethernet NIC in the PC was cabled to one of the integrated
switch ports on a wireless router and the Local Area Connection (wired) was enabled. The wireless

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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC Addresses


NIC was disabled initially. If the wired and wireless NICs are both enabled the PC will receive two
different IP addresses and the wireless NIC will take precedence.

1 Router (Cisco 1941 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(4)M3 universal image or comparable)

1 Switch (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)

1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term)

Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports

Ethernet cables as shown in the topology

Part 1: Identify and Work with PC NICs


In Part 1, you will identify the NIC types in the PC that you are using. You will explore different ways to
extract information about these NICs and how to activate and deactivate them.
Note: This lab was performed using a PC running on the Windows 7 operating system. You should be
able to perform the lab with one of the other Windows operating systems listed; however, menu selections
and screens may vary.

Step 1: Use the Network and Sharing Center.


a. Open the Network and Sharing Center by clicking the Windows Start button > Control Panel >
View network status and tasks under Network and Internet heading in the Category View.
b. In the left pane, click the Change adapter settings link.
c.

The Network Connections window displays, which provides the list of NICs available on this PC. Look
for your Local Area Connection and Wireless Network Connection adapters in this window.

Note: Virtual Private Network (VPN) adapters and other types of network connections may also be
displayed in this window.

Step 2: Work with your wireless NIC.


a. Select the Wireless Network Connection option and right-click it to bring up a drop-down list. If your
wireless NIC is disabled, you will have an option to Enable it. If your NIC was already enabled, then
Disable would be the first option on this drop-down menu. If your Wireless Network Connection is
currently disabled, then click Enable.

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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC Addresses


b. Right-click the Wireless Network Connection, and then click Status.

c.

The Wireless Network Connection Status window displays where you can view information about your
wireless connection.

What is the Service Set Identifier (SSID) for the wireless router of your connection?
________________________________________________________________
What is the speed of your wireless connection? __________________________

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d. Click Details to display the Network Connection Details window.

What is the MAC address of your wireless NIC?


_____________________________________________
Do you have multiple IPv4 DNS Servers listed?
_____________________________________________
Why would multiple DNS Servers be listed?
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
e. When you have reviewed the network connection details, click Close.
f.

Open a command window prompt and type ipconfig /all.

Notice that the information displayed here is the same information that was displayed in the Network
Connection Details window in Step d.
g. Close the command window and the Network Connection Details windows. This should bring you
back to the Wireless Network Connection Status window. Click Wireless Properties.
h. In the Wireless Network Properties window, click the Security tab.

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i.

The type of security the connected wireless router has implemented displays. Click the Show
characters check box to display the actual Network security key, instead of the hidden characters,
and then click OK.

j.

Close the Wireless Network Properties and the Network Connection Status windows. Select and rightclick the Wireless Network Connection option > Connect/Disconnect. A pop-up window should
appear at the bottom right corner of your desktop that displays your current connections, along with a
list of SSIDs that are in range of the wireless NIC of your PC. If a scrollbar appears on the right side of
this window, you can use it to display additional SSIDs.

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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC Addresses

k.

To join one of the other wireless network SSIDs listed, click the SSID that you want to join, and then
click Connect.

l.

If you have selected a secure SSID, you are prompted to enter the Security key for the SSID. Type
the security key for that SSID and click OK. You can click the Hide characters check box to prevent
people from seeing what you type in the Security key field.

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Step 3: Work with your wired NIC.


a. On the Network Connections window, select and right-click the Local Area Connection option to
display the drop-down list. If the NIC is disabled, enable it, and then click the Status option.
Note: You must have an Ethernet cable attaching your PC NIC to a switch or similar device to see the
status. Many wireless routers have a small 4-port Ethernet switch built-in. You can connect to one of
the ports using a straight-through Ethernet patch cable.

b. The Local Area Connection Status window will open. This window displays information about your
wired connection to the LAN.

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Click Details to view the address information for your LAN connection.

c.

Open a command window prompt and type ipconfig /all. Find your Local Area Connection
information and compare this with the information displayed in the Network Connection Details
window.

d. Close all windows on your desktop.

Part 2: Identify and Use the System Tray Network Icons


In Part 2, you will use the network icons in your system tray to determine and control the NICs on your
PC.

Step 1: Use the Wireless Network icon.


a. Click the system tray Wireless Network icon to view the pop-up window that displays the SSIDs that
are in-range of your wireless NIC. When the system tray displays the Wireless Network icon, the
wireless NIC is active.

b. Click the Open Network and Sharing Center link. Note: This is a shortcut way to bring up this
window.

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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC Addresses

c.

In the left pane, click the Change adapter settings link to display the Network Connections window.

d. Select and right-click the Wireless Network Connection, and then click Disable to disable your
wireless NIC.

e. Examine your system tray. The Wireless Network Connection icon should be replaced by the Wired
Network icon, which indicates that you are using your wired NIC for network connectivity.

Note: If both NICs are active, the Wireless Network icon is the one that is displayed.

Step 2: Use the Wired Network icon.


a. Click the Wired Network icon. Notice that the Wireless SSIDs are no longer displayed in this pop-up
window, but you still have the ability to get to the Network and Sharing Center window from here.

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b. Click the Open Network and Sharing Center link > Change adapter settings and Enable your
Wireless Network Connection. The Wireless Network icon should replace the Wired Network icon
in your system tray.

Step 3: Identify the Network Problem icon.


a. On the Network Connections window, disable both the Wireless Network Connection and the Local
Area Connection.
b. The system tray now displays the Network Disabled icon, which indicates that network connectivity
has been disabled.

c.

You can click this icon to return to the Network and Sharing Center window (examine the network
diagram at the top).

You can click the red X to have the PC troubleshoot the problem with the network connection.
Troubleshooting attempts to resolve the network issue for you.
d. If troubleshooting did not enable one of your NICs, then you should do this manually to restore the
network connectivity of your PC.
Note: If a network adapter is enabled and the NIC is unable to establish network connectivity, then
the Network Problem icon appears in the system tray.

If this icon appears, you can troubleshoot this issue just like you did in Step 3c.

Reflection
Why would you activate more than one NIC on a PC?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________

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Part 3: Set Up the Topology and Initialize Devices


Topology

Addressing Table
Device

Interface

IP Address

Subnet Mask

Default Gateway

R1

G0/1

192.168.1.1

255.255.255.0

N/A

S1

VLAN 1

192.168.1.2

255.255.255.0

192.168.1.1

PC-A

NIC

192.168.1.3

255.255.255.0

192.168.1.1

Part 4: Set Up the Topology and Initialize Devices


In Part 4, you will set up the network topology, clear any configurations, if necessary, and configure basic
settings, such as the interface IP addresses on the router and PC.

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.


a. Attach the devices shown in the topology and cable as necessary.
b. Power on all the devices in the topology.

Step 2: Initialize and reload the router and switch.

Part 5: Configure Devices and Verify Connectivity


In Part 5, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP
addresses and device access. For device names and address information, refer to the Topology and
Addressing Table.

Step 1: Configure the IPv4 address for the PC.


a. Configure the IPv4 address, subnet mask, and default gateway address for PC-A.
b. Ping the default gateway address from a PC-A command prompt.
Were the pings successful? Why or why not?
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________

Step 2: Configure Switch Management Address.


Refer to Lab 2 for basic switch configuration. In this step, you will perform the basic switch configuration
tasks and set the management IP address for the switch.
a. Console into the switch and enter global configuration mode and set the basic switch settings (see
Lab 2).
b. Enter global configuration mode to set the SVI IP address to allow remote switch management.
S1# config t

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S1#(config)# interface vlan 1
S1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
S1(config-if)# no shut
S1(config-if)# end
S1#
*Mar 1 00:06:11.590: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console

Step 3: Configure the Router.


The basic configuration for a Cisco router is similar to the basic configuration for a Cisco switch - refer to
Lab 2. In this step, you will you will perform the basic router configuration tasks and set the IP address for
one of the routers interfaces.
a. Console into the router enter global configuration mode and set the basic router settings (see Lab 2).
b. Configure and enable the G0/1 interface on the router.
R1(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/1
R1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if)# no shutdown
R1(config-if)# end
*Feb 23 09:06:01.927: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface GigabitEthernet0/1, changed state
to down
*Feb 23 09:06:05.279: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface GigabitEthernet0/1, changed state
to up
*Feb 23 09:06:06.279: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface
GigabitEthernet0/1, changed state to up

Step 4: Verify network connectivity.


Ping the default gateway address of R1 from PC-A and S1.
Were the pings successful?
____________________________________________________________________________________

Part 6: Display, Describe, and Analyze Ethernet MAC Addresses


Every device on an Ethernet LAN has a Media Access Control (MAC) address that is burned into the
Network Interface Card (NIC). Ethernet MAC addresses are 48-bits long. They are displayed using six
sets of hexadecimal digits usually separated by dashes, colons, or periods. The following example shows
the same MAC address using the three different notation methods:
00-05-9A-3C-78-00

00:05:9A:3C:78:00

0005.9A3C.7800

Note: MAC addresses are also called physical addresses, hardware addresses, or Ethernet hardware
addresses.
In Part 3, you will issue commands to display the MAC addresses on a PC, router, and switch, and you
will analyze the properties of each one.

Step 1: Analyze the MAC address for the PC-A NIC.


Before you analyze the MAC address on PC-A, look at an example from a different PC NIC. You can
issue the ipconfig /all command to view the MAC address of your NICs. An example screen output is
shown below. When using the ipconfig /all command, notice that MAC addresses are referred to as
physical addresses. Reading the MAC address from left to right, the first six hex digits refer to the vendor
(manufacturer) of this device. These first six hex digits (3 bytes) are also known as the organizationally
unique identifier (OUI). This 3-byte code is assigned to the vendor by the IEEE organization. To find the
manufacturer, you can use a tool such as www.macvendorlookup.com or go to the IEEE web site to find
the registered OUI vendor codes. The IEEE web site address for OUI information is

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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC Addresses


http://standards.ieee.org/develop/regauth/oui/public.html. The last six digits are the NIC serial number
assigned by the manufacturer.
a. Using the output from the ipconfig /all command, answer the following questions.

What is the OUI portion of the MAC address for this device?
________________________________________________________________________________
What is the serial number portion of the MAC address for this device?
________________________________________________________________________________
Using the example above, find the name of the vendor that manufactured this NIC.
________________________________________________________________________________
b. From the command prompt on PC-A, issue the ipconfig /all command and identify the OUI portion of
the MAC address for the NIC of PC-A.
________________________________________________________________________________
Identify the serial number portion of the MAC address for the NIC of PC-A.
________________________________________________________________________________
Identify the name of the vendor that manufactured the NIC of PC-A.
________________________________________________________________________________

Step 2: Analyze the MAC address for the R1 G0/1 interface.


You can use a variety of commands to display MAC addresses on the router.
a. Console into R1 and use the show interfaces g0/1 command to find the MAC address information. A
sample is shown below. Use output generated by your router to answer the questions.
R1# show interfaces g0/1
GigabitEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is CN Gigabit Ethernet, address is 30f7.0da3.1821 (bia 30f7.0da3.1821)
Internet address is 192.168.1.1/24
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit/sec, DLY 100 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Full Duplex, 100Mbps, media type is RJ45
output flow-control is unsupported, input flow-control is unsupported
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:00, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
5 minute input rate 3000 bits/sec, 4 packets/sec

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5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
15183 packets input, 971564 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 13559 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
0 watchdog, 301 multicast, 0 pause input
1396 packets output, 126546 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets
195 unknown protocol drops
0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 pause output
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

What is the MAC address for G0/1 on R1?


_________________________________________________________________________________
What is the MAC serial number for G0/1?
_________________________________________________________________________________
What is the OUI for G0/1?
_________________________________________________________________________________
Based on this OUI, what is the name of the vendor?
_________________________________________________________________________________
What does bia stand for?
_________________________________________________________________________________
Why does the output show the same MAC address twice?
_________________________________________________________________________________
b. Another way to display the MAC addresses on the router is to use the show arp command. Use the
show arp command to display MAC address information. This command maps the Layer 2 address
to its corresponding Layer 3 address. A sample is shown below. Use output generated by your router
to answer the questions.
R1# show arp
Protocol
Internet
Internet

Address
192.168.1.1
192.168.1.3

Age (min)
0

Hardware Addr
30f7.0da3.1821
c80a.a9fa.de0d

Type
ARPA
ARPA

Interface
GigabitEthernet0/1
GigabitEthernet0/1

What Layer 2 addresses are displayed on R1?


_________________________________________________________________________________
What Layer 3 addresses are displayed on R1?
_________________________________________________________________________________
Why do you think there is no information showing for the switch with the show arp command?
_________________________________________________________________________________

Step 3: View the MAC addresses on the switch.


a. Console into the switch and use the show interfaces command for ports 5 and 6 to display MAC
address information. A sample is shown below. Use output generated by your switch to answer the
questions.
Switch> show interfaces f0/5
FastEthernet0/5 is up, line protocol is up (connected)
Hardware is Fast Ethernet, address is 0cd9.96e8.7285 (bia 0cd9.96e8.7285)

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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC Addresses


MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Full-duplex, 100Mb/s, media type is 10/100BaseTX
input flow-control is off, output flow-control is unsupported
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input 00:00:45, output 00:00:00, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
3362 packets input, 302915 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 265 broadcasts (241 multicasts)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
0 watchdog, 241 multicast, 0 pause input
0 input packets with dribble condition detected
38967 packets output, 2657748 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets
0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 PAUSE output
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

What is the MAC address for F0/5 on your switch?


_________________________________________________________________________________
Issue the same command and write down the MAC address for F0/6.
_________________________________________________________________________________
Are the OUIs shown on the switch the same as those that were displayed on the router?
_________________________________________________________________________________
The switch keeps track of devices by their Layer 2 MAC addresses. In our topology, the switch has
knowledge of both MAC address of R1 and the MAC address of PC-A.
b. Issue the show mac address-table command on the switch. A sample is shown below. Use output
generated by your switch to answer the questions.
Switch> show mac address-table
Mac Address Table
------------------------------------------Vlan
---All
All
All
All
All
All
All
All
All

Mac Address
----------0100.0ccc.cccc
0100.0ccc.cccd
0180.c200.0000
0180.c200.0001
0180.c200.0002
0180.c200.0003
0180.c200.0004
0180.c200.0005
0180.c200.0006

Type
-------STATIC
STATIC
STATIC
STATIC
STATIC
STATIC
STATIC
STATIC
STATIC

Ports
----CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU

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Lab 4 - Viewing NIC Information & Network Device MAC Addresses


All
0180.c200.0007
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.0008
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.0009
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.000a
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.000b
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.000c
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.000d
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.000e
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.000f
STATIC
CPU
All
0180.c200.0010
STATIC
CPU
All
ffff.ffff.ffff
STATIC
CPU
1
30f7.0da3.1821
DYNAMIC
Fa0/5
1
c80a.a9fa.de0d
DYNAMIC
Fa0/6
Total Mac Addresses for this criterion: 22

Did the switch display the MAC address of PC-A? If you answered yes, what port was it on?
_________________________________________________________________________________
Did the switch display the MAC address of R1? If you answered yes, what port was it on?
_________________________________________________________________________________

Reflection
1. Can you have broadcasts at the Layer 2 level? If so, what would the MAC address be?
____________________________________________________________________________________
2. Why would you need to know the MAC address of a device?
____________________________________________________________________________________

Part 7: Clean-up
Before you leave you must ensure that lab and equipment is left in order and ready for the next class to use.
You must:

Initialize and reload any and all devices you have used in the lab.

Disconnect all the cables you connected and return them to their appropriate place.

Note: The total mark you achieve in the lab will be halved if the clean-up is not carried out correctly.

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Router Interface Summary Table


Router Interface Summary
Router Model

Ethernet Interface #1

Ethernet Interface #2

Serial Interface #1

Serial Interface #2

1800

Fast Ethernet 0/0


(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1


(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0


(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1


(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801

Fast Ethernet 0/0


(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1


(F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)

Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811

Fast Ethernet 0/0


(F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1


(F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0


(G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1


(G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many
interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router
class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device.
The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An
example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be
used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

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