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June 1 5, 2015

Day 1

I. Objectives:
1. Introduce oneself;
2. Explain the requirements in the subject; and
3. Define School Rules and Regulations
II. CONTENT:
A. Topic: School Rules and Regulations
Subject Requirements
B. Reference: Students Handbook
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
B. Activity:

Welcome students to class/ Getting acquainted with each other


Explain classroom rules and daily procedures
Find-out what students already know (KWL)
Discuss course topic for the first grading period

C. Analysis
Why should we follow classroom rules and daily procedures?
D. Abstraction
SCNHS School Rules and Regulations
E. Application
How can you make yourself a good student?
IV. Extended activity/Agreement
Assignment: in a crosswise, explain why do we need to study science and technology?

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

Day 2
I. Objectives
1. Give examples of science and technology activities or products that make life more enjoyable and
comfortable; and
2. Show interest in science and technology.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: Why Study Science and Technology
B. Reference: Integrated Science 1
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity
Group activity : Make a poster that shows why do we need to study Science and Technology
Group Presentation
C. Analysis
What are the inventions that have made your life enjoyable and comfortable?
Which of these products can you live without? Not live without? Explain your answer.
D. Abstraction
Appreciate the influence of Science and Technology in our lives.
E. Application
Have the students submit a one-page essay about the importance of Science & Technology
and how it affect their lives.
Day 3
Pre-Test (50 items)

Day 4
Checking of Pre-Test and recording
Overview of the topics to be discussed for the first quarter

Note: Acacia (Vacant: every Monday); Apitong (Vacant : every Thursday) & Kamagong (Vacant : every Friday)
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

June 8 11, 2015


Note: June 12, 2015 (Holiday: Independence Day)

Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives:
1. Explain Scientific Methods; and
2. Describe Scientific Methods of doing investigations
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: Scientific Method of Solving Problems
B. References: Integrated Science 1
www.sciencebuddies.org
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Priming/Motivation (Spelling test)
B. Activity: The story of Thomas Alva Edison
Read the article and answer the self-test given after reading the article.
The Story of Thomas Alva Edison
Thomas Alva Edison once noticed that when electricity flowed through a piece of iron wire, the
iron wire became red hot. The wire glowed brightly, but not bright enough to light a room. When he
used a thinner piece of iron wire and allowed electricity to pass through, the wire glowed. But he
wanted greater brightness. He tried other metals. Finally he discovered that a thin piece of tungsten
wire could actually glow so bright that it could light up a room.
But he also saw the glow did not last long. After a few minutes, the wire had burned to ashes.
He wondered why. He knew that oxygen is needed in burning. Using a machine he pumped out all the
air inside the bulb. He enclosed the tungsten wire in what he thought was already an oxygen-free bulb.
He tested the bulb. The bulb glowed longer than before. What he wanted was a bulb to glow longer and
give light steadily, so he continued with his experiment.
He pumped out all the air or gases inside the tube and test the bulb. He repeated these steps
over and over again getting several bulbs busted in the process. He did not lose hope. He continued with
the experiment until finally the tungsten wire glowed steadily and brighter. He knew that he succeeded.
He invented the incandescent light bulb.
Source: Science and Technology I, SEDP Series, DECS pp. 3-4.

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

C. Analysis
Answer the following questions:
1. What was the problem of Thomas Alva Edison in his experiment?
a. Where does electricity come from?
b. What makes an iron glow?
c. How to make a wire glow brighter?
d. How to make a light enough to lit a room using a wire?
2. What was his hypothesis in making the wire glow brighter?
a. The thinner the wire, the brighter will be the bulb.
b. Tungsten wire can produce more brightness than ordinary wire.
c. Tungsten wire can light longer in oxygen-free bulbs.
d. The more oxygen in the bulb, the less glow is produced
3. What was the basis of the hypothesis?
a. What is produced when electricity is allowed to pass through a piece of iron wire?
b. What reaction tungsten wire has compared to the piece of iron wire?
c. What would it be like when there is no electricity?
d. Which type of metal glow brighter?
4. Which of the following methods of solving a problem is applied to Edisons case?
a. popular method
c. trial and error method
b. serendipity
d. scientific method
5. What personal trait helped Thomas Edison invent the incandescent bulb?
a. persistence
c. patience
b. resourcefulness
d. All of these
D. Abstraction
What are the different steps or scientific methods of solving a problem?
E. Application
Your house is located in a congested residential area in Manila. The place is so congested. You
have a neighbour who owns a piggery. Knowing the characteristics of this business, and being
one of the members of the community, what should you do? Will you complain against the
owner? Why or why not?
State the problem.
Give ways on how to solve the problem without resorting to quarrel.
IV. Extended Activity
Using a medicine dropper and water, a student determines the number of water drops that
different sizes of coins can hold. He gathers the data and records them in the table below

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Number of Water Drops
No. of Trials
1
2
3
Average

10-peso
45
47
48
47

5 peso
53
52
54
53

1-peso
34
30
32
32

25-centavo
15
17
17
16

1. What is the problem of the student in this experiment?


a. size of the coins
b. total amount of coins
c. type of medicine dropper
d. amount of water drops that different sizes of coin can hold
2. By looking at the data, which coin holds the greatest number of water drops?
a. a 10-peso coin
b. a 5-peso coin
c. a 1-peso coin
d. a 25 centavo coin
3. Which factor do you think has something to do with the differences in the number of water
drops a coin can hold?
a. distance of medicine dropper from the coin
b. sizes of the coins
c. diameter of the dropper
d. all of the above
4. If you want to verify whether the size of the coins affects the number of water drops that a coin
can hold, which of the following hypothesis will you test?
a. The farther the distance of the dropper, the more water drops the coin can hold.
b. The bigger the diameter of the dropper, the more water drops the coin can hold
c. The bigger the size of the coin, the more water drops it can hold.
d. The bigger the water drops, the more each coin can hold.
5. Proving the hypothesis the bigger the size of the coin, the more water drops it can hold,
which of the following variables will remain unchanged?
a. amount of pressure on the rubber of the medicine dropper
b. distance of the dropper from the coin
c. size of the medicine dropper used
d. size of the coins
6. Which of the following can you identify as the responding variable?
a. number of water drops
b. size of the coin
c. diameter of the dropper
d. kind of medicine dropper
7. Where should you base your conclusion or generalization?
a. gathered data
b. results of the series of experiment performed
c. direct observations
d. all of the above
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

Day 2

Extended Activity:

Science Process Skills

Answer the following in your notebook:


1. Identify one object in your classroom and give one qualitative observation using each of your senses
except the sense of taste (8pts.)
2. Rice is the staple food of Filipinos, describe the taste of rice (1pt.)
3. What is the height of the tallest and shortest in your section?
Note:
Observing : is using our 5 senses such as sight, smell, touch, taste and hearing
Qualitative observation : is when you use only your senses to obtain information
Quantitative observation : is when you include a reference to some standard unit of measure.

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

Day 3 & 4

I. Objectives
1. Recognize the Scientific attitudes needed to become successful in whatever one is doing; and
2. Take pride in the achievements of scientists and inventors
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: What Makes a Scientist
B. Reference: Integrated Science 1
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Read and study scientific attitudes on pages 6 7, Science & Technology Integrated Science 1.
C. Analysis
What are the characteristics of a man with proper scientific attitude?
D. Abstraction
Scientific Attitudes
1. Open-mindedness
2. Critical-mindedness
3. Objectivity
4. Curiosity
5. Careful judgement

6. Rationality
7. Intellectual honesty
8. Humility
9. Creativity

E. Application
Which of the scientific attitude do you possess? Do you think you can develop these attitudes
as you progress in our science class?

IV. Evaluation
Scientists and their Scientific Attitudes
A. Find out the traits scientists demonstrate from the given information about them. Write it
under the second column.
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

Scientist
1) Galileo Galilei was curious about the
heavenly bodies when he saw them the
first time using a telescope. He was the
first person to study the moon, the sun, the
planets and the stars. What scientific trait
did he possess?
2) Johannes Kepler discovered that the
planets follow an elliptical orbit and that
their motion could be used to predict the
planets motion in the future. His discovery
did not agree with the previous description
of the planetary motion. He rejected the
old idea because evidences supported his
new findings. What scientific trait did he
possess?
3) Isaac Newton formulated the three laws of
motion. He built his laws on the previous
work of Galileo and others. But then he did
not claim Galileos work as his own. What
scientific trait did he possess?
4) Dr. Luz Oliveros-Belardo is a national
scientist whose systematic studies of
various local plants have led to the
production of various new substances
called essential oils which our now used in
perfumes, medicine, and food. What
scientific trait did she possess?
5) Dr. Ricardo M. Lantican is a highly
respected scientist. He is an expert in plant
breeding. He is successful in his research
on
cytoplasmic
inheritance
of
hypersensitivity to a disease in maize. He is
a man who accepts statement as a fact
only if it is supported by convincing proofs.
What scientific trait did he possess?
6)

Trait
1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

Dr. William Padolina is best known for his


role in the development of biotechnology.
He was cited for his pioneering researches
in the field of chemistry and biotechnology.
He considers the evidences carefully before
formulating a conclusion. What scientific 6)
attitude did he possess?

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

June 15 19, 2015


Day 1 & 2

I. Objective:
1. Identify the different types of laboratory equipment used in science laboratory classes,
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: Common Laboratory Equipment used in Science Class
B. Reference: Integrated Science 1
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity :
Some Common Laboratory apparatus and their uses
Study the different apparatus grouped in each box.

Erlenmeyer flask

Florescence flask

Test Tubes

Test tube
rack

Glass plate

Dropping bottle

Reagent bottle

Specimen bottles

Figure 1: Some apparatus used for storing liquids

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

Medicine dropper

Erlenmeyer
flask

Graduated cylinder
Volumetric Flask

Burette

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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C. Analysis
What are the common equipment used in Science Laboratory Class?
Classify laboratory equipment according to functions.
D. Abstraction
There are varieties of instruments available for use when performing scientific activities or
experiments.
E. Application
Given four laboratory apparatus: spring balance, graduated cylinder, microscope and test tube.
Which will you use to get the mass of water?
You are asked by your teacher to clean the test tube. What should you use?
What will you use to transfer liquid to another bottle without spilling?
IV. Evaluation
Matching Type: Shown in Column A are the drawings of some common laboratory apparatus listed. In
Column B are the uses of these apparatus. Draw a line that connects each apparatus
with its use.
COLUMN A
APPARATUS

1.

beaker

COLUMN B
USES

A. used to transfer small amount of liquid from


the reagent bottle to a test tube

B. used to clean test tubes or


2.

spring balance

alcohol lamp

glassware with narrow opening

C. used to measure the volume of liquid

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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4.

graduated cylinder

5.

evaporating dish

D. used in evaporating the liquid substances


when heating

E. used to measure the mass of an object

F. used to hold liquid / solution to be tested

6.
crucible tong

7.

8.

9.

test tube

test tube brush

mortar & pestle

G. used to hold hot materials

H. used to pulverize solid materials to make it


in powder form

I. used to contain liquids or solution in large


amount

J. used for heating substances


10.

medicine dropper

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 3
I. Objectives
1. Define solution; and
2. Differentiate solvent from solute
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: Understanding Solution and the Dissolving Process
B. Reference(s): Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Read the selection about solutions on pages 1 to 2, Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
Given the following table below, identify the components of each given samples:
Solutions
1. Ice cold tea
2. Hot chocolate
3. Toyomansi
4. Brewed coffee
5. Salt solution
6. Vinegar

Solute

Solvent

C. Analysis
Differentiate solute from solvent
Is water a universal solvent? Why?
Define Solution
D. Abstraction
Solute the one dissolved and present in lesser quantity
Solvent the dissolving medium and component of the solution in greater quantity
Solution single phase, homogeneous mixture whose component are distributed throughout.
IV. Evaluation
It was 3:00 p.m. when Zyreen woke up from her afternoon nap. Feeling hungry, she prepared an egg
sandwich and an orange juice. In preparing her orange juice , she used orange powder and ice cold
water then mix the solution well by stirring.
Identify the following:
a. Solute: _________________________________
b. Solvent: _________________________________
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 4

I. Objectives:
1. Describe the observable characteristics or properties common of common solutions found at home
or in stores; and
2. Present the data gathered in table form to show the different properties of common solution.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: What Solutions do You Find in Your Home
B. Reference(s): Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Do Activity 1 found on page 2, Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
Make a table similar to the one below:
Products or Solutions Found at Home or in Stores

Characteristics

C. Analysis
What observable characteristics or properties common to products or solutions that you have
identified and listed?
Give examples of naturally occurring solutions.
Give examples of manufactured or processed solution
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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D. Abstraction
Solution is not always a liquid, it can be solid, liquid or gas.
Solutions can occur naturally or it can be manufactured or processed
IV. Evaluation
Identify the following solutions whether they are naturally occurring or manufactured solutions:
1. Gasoline
2. Seas
3. Air
4. Steel
5. Brass

6. Rain water
7. Blood
8. Vinegar
9. Wine
10. Brewed coffee

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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June 22 26, 2015


Day 1
I. Objectives:
1. Describe the properties of solutions based on observations; and
2. Explain how solutions are formed.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: What are the Properties of Solutions
B. Reference(s): Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity: Group Activity
Do Activity 2 found on page 4, Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
See attached activity sheet
Group presentation of data gathered
C. Analysis
Based on the activity, what are the common properties of solution?
Differentiate homogeneous from heterogeneous solution
Which of the given samples are solution?
D. Abstraction
Explain how solutions are formed
Describe the common properties of solutions
E. Application/Valuing
What happens when we throw substances in rivers and streams and they do not dissolve?
What will happen if we throw substances in rivers and streams that can be dissolved, but are
toxic?
IV. Evaluation
Identify the following:
1. Milk
2. Antibiotic
3. Mud
4. Tea

Solution or Not Solution


5. Brewed Coffee
6. Gasoline
7. Chalk powder
8.Flour

9. Wine
10. Liquor

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 2 & 3

I. Objectives:
1. Determine how much solid solute completely dissolves in a given volume of water; and
2. Compare and contrast saturated, unsaturated, and supersaturated solutions.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: SOLUBILITY OF SOLUTIONS: Describing Saturated, Unsaturated and Super Saturated Solutions
B. Reference(s): Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)

III. Learning Task


A. Daily Routine
Checking of Attendance
Recall and Motivation
B. Activity
WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE THAT A SOLUTION IS SATURATED?
Objectives:
1. Determine how much solid solute completely dissolves in a given volume of water; and
2. Describe the appearance of a saturated solution.
Materials needed:
2 tablespoon of sugar (note: 1 tablespoons = 2 teaspoon)
5 mL water
Graduated cylinder
Stirrer/spoon
Glass/Disposable cup
Procedure:
1. Put 5 mL of water in a small clear transparent cup. Add teaspoon of sugar and stir (observe the
appearance of the solution).
2. To the sugar solution in step no. 1, add teaspoon sugar, a small portion at a time and stir the
solution to dissolve it. At this point, you have added 1 teaspoon sugar.
3. Add teaspoon of sugar to the solution in step no. 2 and stir the solution. At this point you have
added 1 teaspoon of sugar.
4. Use the teaspoon to dissolve as much of the sample as possible. Record in Table below if it will
dissolve completely, partially, or not at all.
5. Continue adding teaspoon of sugar to the same cup until the added sugar no longer dissolves.

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Data Table for Activity 4


Sample

teaspoon

1 teaspoon

1 teaspoons

2 teaspoons

Sugar

Questions to Answer:
1. How many teaspoons of sugar have you added until the sugar no longer dissolves? ___.
(Note: in this step, you will observe that there is already excess sugar which did not dissolve)
2. How many teaspoons of sugar dissolved completely in 5mL of water? ______________.
(Note: This is now the maximum amount of sugar that will completely dissolve in 5mL of water)
C. Analysis
1. What happened to sugar when added to 5ml of water?
2. How many teaspoons of sugar have you added until it no longer dissolves?
3. How many teaspoons of sugar dissolved completely in 5 ml of water?
4. In the activity performed, which is unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solution?
D. Application
Why do doctors advise us to drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of water daily?
E. Evaluation
1. If a solution can hold more solute (it is not full yet) it is: ______________________
2. If a solution cannot hold anymore solute (it is full) it is: _______________________
3. If a solution holds more solute than it should be able ( it is over full) it is:
_____________________
Identify the solute and which is the solvent in the following solution:
4. Powdered Juice and water:
Solvent: ___________________

Solute: _____________________

5. Salt water
Solvent: ___________________

Solute: _____________________

IV. Assignment:
Study the topic about concentration of solution on pages 10 12, G7 Learners Material

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 4

I. Objective:
1. Differentiate dilute solution from concentrated solution by the way they look; and
2. Explain the concept of concentration of solution.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: Describing the concentration of solution by the way they look
B. Reference(s): Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
III. Learning Task
A. Daily Routine
Checking of Attendance
Recall and Motivation
B. Activity
CAN YOU TELL THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SOLUTIONS BY THE WAY THEY LOOK?
Teacher Demonstration: Concentration of Solutions
Materials
food color (blue, yellow, or green)
medicine droppers water
4 clear, transparent bottles
Stirrer

Procedure (Part 1)
1. Label the clear, transparent bottles with numbers 1 to 4.
2. Place one drop of food color in bottle #1.
3. Add 50 mL water to the food color in bottle #1 and stir the solution.
4. Place 10 drops of food color in bottle #2.
5. Add 50 mL water to the food color in bottle #2 and stir the solution.
6. Show the class bottles #1 and #2 and ask them to differentiate the two bottles.
Procedure (Part 2)
1. Place one drop of food color in bottle #3.
2. Add 20 mL water in bottle #3 and stir the solution.
3. Place one drop of food color in bottle #4.
4. Add 100 mL water to the food color in bottle #4 and stir the solution.
5. Show the class bottles #3 and #4 and ask them to differentiate the two bottles.

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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After the demonstration, student should be aware that concentrated solutions can be prepared
either by adding more solute and keeping the amount of solvent the same or keeping the
amount of solute the same and reducing the amount of solvent.
C. Analysis
Based from the simple demonstration that you observed, describe the concentration of solutions:
1. Qualitatively (by simply observing their appearance)
2. Quantitatively (by comparing the number of drops per volume of water)
D. Abstraction
Differentiate dilute solution from concentrated solution
IV. Assignment:
Study the ways of expressing concentration of solution quantitatively.

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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June 29 July 3, 2015


Day 1 - 4
I. Objectives:
1. Explain the concept of concentration of solution; and
2. Be able to solve problems on concentration of solutions.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: Calculating the Concentration of solution.
B. Reference(s): Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
III. Learning Task
A. Daily Routine
Checking of Attendance
Recall and Motivation
B. Activity
COMPUTATION/PROBLEM SOLVING
1. How many ethyl alcohols are present in a 50 mL bottle of rubbing alcohol?
2. A one peso coin has a mass of 5.5 grams. How many grams of copper are in a one peso coin
containing 75% copper by mass?
C. Analysis
What is the significance of knowing how to get the percentage concentration of a solution?
D. Abstraction
What are the formulas used in computing the following percentage concentration of a solution?

% concentration by Volume
% concentration by Mass
Mass of Solute
Volume of Solution

E. Application
When you buy rubbing alcohol, which one would you choose, 30% ethyl alcohol at P 23.00 or 70%
alcohol at P 28.00? Why? (Assume equal volumes of rubbing alcohol)
IV. Evaluation
Calculate the percentage concentration of the following solutions:
a. 20mL ethanol in 60 mL solutions.
b.12g of salt in 72g solution.
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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July 6 - 10, 2015


Note: July 9 Class suspended due to heavy rains

Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives
1. describe the factors affecting solubility- the nature of the solute and the solvent, temperature, stirring
and particle size; and
2. compare the rate of solubility of some substances.
II. Topic: Factors Affecting Solubility
III. Learning Tasks
B. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity: Demonstrations
Demonstrate the effect of temperature, effect of stirring and the size of particles on the rate of
dissolution.
1. Particle size
Place equal amounts of refined (iodized salt) and rock salt in two separate test tubes.
Add 5 mL of water into each of the test tube.
Take note of the time it takes for the salt to dissolve.
2. Effect of temperature
In one test tube put 10Ml of hot water and put another 10mL of cold water into another test
tube.
Add about 1 teaspoon of salt or sugar to each test tube.
Take note of the time it takes for the salt or sugar to dissolve
3. Stirring
Put equal amount of salt or sugar at the bottom of two beakers.
Slowly add 50 mL of water to each beaker
Stir the content s of one beaker and let the other stand undisturbed.
Take not of the time for the salt or sugar to dissolve
C. Analysis
1. Compare the dissolution in each of the following conditions:
a. water + refined salt
water + rock salt
b. hot water + salt (sugar)
ice cold water + salt (sugar)
c. Water + stirred sugar
water + undisturbed sugar
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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2. How does the surface area of solute particles affect solubility?


Which has greater surface area, iodized salt or rock salt? Why?
3. What is the effect of temperature on the solubility of solid in liquid.
D. Abstraction
Summarize the factors affecting solubility
E. Application
Why is it possible to adulterate vinegar with water?
IV. Evaluation
Enumerate the different factors that affect solubility.

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 3
I. Objectives
1. Describe what a mixture is;
2. Differentiate homogeneous (solution) from heterogeneous (colloids, and suspensions) mixtures.
3. Give example of each kind of mixtures.
II. Topic: MIXTURES
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students perform an activity about mixtures (see attached activity sheet)
C. Analysis
1. Compare the colors of the three systems;
2. Which of the 3 mixtures is/are homogeneous?
3. Which is clear and transparent, meaning no particles are observable?
4. Which has fine particles that do not settle? Are these particles visible to the naked eye?
5. Which mixture has a big particles that tends to settle at the bottom of the container?
6. Which exhibits tyndal effect?
7. What is mixture?
D. Abstraction
Describe and give examples of the different kinds of mixtures:
suspension
colloids
solution
E. Application
List 5 to 10 mixtures that are found in the kitchen or at home and classify them whether they are:
suspension
colloids
solution
IV. Evaluation
1 10 Quiz

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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July 13 17, 2015


Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives:
know some information about the elements that may be found in the periodic table;
identify the group number an element it belongs to; and
appreciate the importance of knowing the symbols and names of elements.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: The Periodic Table: Its Element-ary!
B. Reference(s): Science G7 Learners Material (Q1 & 2)
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Activity 6. The Periodic Table. See attached activity sheet.
C. Analysis
What is the convention in writing or giving symbols of element?
What are the origins of the names of the elements?
D. Abstraction
All matter in the universe is composed of elements.
Each element is represented by symbols.
The symbol for most elements consists of the first one or two letters of the name of the element.
The first letter of the element is always capitalized. If a second letter is used it must be lowercase.
Chemical symbols are a shorthand way to write chemical formulas of compounds.
E. Application
Use a modern periodic table:
On the basis of the names of the elements, list down elements, which you think are named after
each of the following. (Have at least 3 elements in each lisct)
1. Place/town/country
2. Ancient name /Person
IV. Evaluation
Short quiz: Identification & naming of symbols (10 items)
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 3 & 4

I. Objectives
1. be familiar with the layout of the periodic table;
2. know some information about the elements that may found in the periodic table;
3. use the periodic table to predict the chemical behaviour of an element.
II. Topic: The Periodic Table
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Using a periodic table, let the students study its parts and how it was arrange. Let them identify the
metals, non-metals and metalloids.
C. Analysis
1. How many elements are there in a periodic table?
2. How were the elements arranged or grouped in the periodic table?
D. Abstraction
Each element in the periodic table is represented by a chemical symbol.
Elements are grouped as follows:
E. Application

IV. Evaluation
1 10 Quiz

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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July 20 - 24, 2015


Note: July 22 Hermano Pules 200th Birth Anniversary

Day 1 to 4
I. Objectives
At the end of the activities, the students should be able to:
1. State the operational definition of acids and bases;
2. testing for acids and bases in commonly-used materials; and
3. discuss the significance of knowing the characteristics of acids and bases in relation to the
environment.
II. CONTENT
A. Topic: Acids and Bases in Matter
B. Reference(s): Any Integrated Science or Physical Science Textbook
C. Materials: refer to the Student Activity Sheet
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
Bring out Kalamansi, green mango, and unripe sampalok. Call out 3 volunteers to come near
the teachers table. Give a piece of kalamansi to the first, a slice of green mango to the second,
and a piece of unripe sampalok to the third. Ask them to chew their respective fruit then ask
the rest of the class to describe their facial expressions. What seems to be the problem of the
three? What could be the reason for their unusual expressions? Ask further questions until
students relate acids to sour taste.
Ask the students, if acidic foods taste sour, how about basic foods? Tell them that there are
materials, other than foods. that are either acidic or basic but they cannot be identified
through tasting . Another way is through the use of acid-base indicator. In this activity they will
further differentiate acids and bases using pH or litmus paper.
B. Activity: Testing the Indicators with Acids and Bases
1. Label 5 test tubes A to E and line in a test tube rack.
2. Fill each test tube with 5 mL of the liquids as shown in the figure below.

A
muriatic
acid

B
C
D
E
calamansi
distilled
soap
sodium hydroxide
extract
water
solution
solution
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

29

3. Get 5 pieces of the dry paper indicator. Spread out in a petri dish as in the figure below.

4. Place 1-2 drops of the corresponding solution onto the paper indicator. Note down the
changes in color of the paper indicators. For better results, place a white bond paper under
the petri dish. Tabulate your observations. Remember these colors because they will be your
basis of comparison in identifying other materials.
5. Keep the remaining indicator paper in tightly covered vials. This can last for several months.
Do the same to the liquid indicator. You will use these in the Activity 8-4b.
Data
Table 1
Solution
Muriatic acid
Calamansi
Distilled water
Soap solution
Sodium hydroxide

Nature of Solution
Strongly acidic
Weakly acidic
Neutral
Weakly basic
Strongly basic

Color change on Indicator Paper

C. Analysis
1. Which of the materials is/are strongly acidic? Weakly acidic?
2. Which of the materials is/are strongly basic? Weakly basic?
3. Which of the materials is/are neutral?
4. Why do we study acids and bases? Explain
5. In what way is pH related to soil characteristics?
6. Research on the application of acids and bases in agriculture.
D. Abstraction
The word acid and alkaline (older term for base) are derived form direct sensory experience. Acid
comes from the Latin word acere meaning sour. All acids taste sour. Vinegar, fruit extract and
juices tastes sour. Aspirin tastes sour if you let it stay awhile in your mouth. Its chemical name is
acetylsalicylic acid.
The word base, unlike acid, is not related to taste. All bases taste bitter. Mustard and ampalaya
taste bitter. Cough syrup and many medicines taste bitter. Manufacturers add sugar and other
flavorings to medicines to hide the bitter taste of the active ingredients. Bases feel slippery,
sometimes people say soapy. This because they dissolve the oils from your skin and this reduces
friction between your thumb and another finger as you rub them together. In essence the base is
making soap out of you.
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Acids and bases destroy each other s properties to produce a new substance, generally called salt.
This type of reaction is called neutralization.
Chemists use the pH scale to express how acidic (like an acid) or basic (like a base) a substance is.
A pH value below 7 means that a substance is acidic, and the smaller the number, the more acidic
it is. A pH value above 7 means that a substance is basic, and the larger the number, the more
basic it is. The closer the pH of a substance to zero, the more acidic it is. Conversely, the closer the
pH of a substance to 14, the more basic it is.
Points to remember:
Indicators show the presence of an acid or base in a substance by changing colors at different
values or pH ranges.
The pH scale is used to measure the degree of acidity and basicity.
Acids and bases are found everywhere: in the homes, in schools, in the streets.
Acids and bases have wide applications in the arts, industry, and agriculture.
Acids and bases affect the environment.
E. Application
Why do we study acids and bases?
1. Acids and bases are studied because many substances that we use daily contain acids and bases.
They are found in food (citrus fruits, ) , in cleaning materials (soap, toothpastes, cleansers).
2. Acids have applications in arts (etching), in industry (fertilizers, vegetables explosives, dyes),
transportation (batteries) and the home (baking, preserving, cooking).
3. Bases have applications in industry (leather tanning), and agriculture (liming soils and lakes).
4. Acids and bases affect the human body (ulcers, excess use of antacids, stomach upset)
5. Acids affect the environment (acid rain and corrosion, acid lakes and rivers)
IV. Evaluation
Applying what they have learned, ask the students to find within and outside the building various
acid and base products. Let them work in groups. The group that can identify the highest number of
acids and bases will get additional grade points.

V. Agreement/Assignment
1. Research Project: Have students, research in groups and report on the importance of pH levels
in a public swimming pool, in soils, and a landfill site.
2. List some acids and bases and state their uses.

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July 27 31, 2015


Day 1 and 2
I. Objectives
1. Differentiate acids from bases; and
2. Identify acids and bases in household and environment.
II. Topic: Acids and Bases
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Test different substances if they are acids or bases using litmus paper.
Make a table as follows:
Substances
1. Vinegar
2. Baking soda
3. Soap
4. Shampoo
5. Distilled water
7. Coffeee

Color

Acid/Base

C. Analysis
1. Based on the activity, which of the following samples or substances that are acidic? Basic?
2. Differentiate acids from bases.
3. What are acids and bases around us?
D. Abstraction
Acids are compounds that tend to give up hydrogen ion. They are usually sour. They react with
bases to form salt and water. Bases are compounds that tend to receive a hydrogen ion. They are
usually bitter. They react with acids to form salt and water.
E. Application
Create a simple poster about acid and bases in our environment.
IV. Evaluation
1 10 Quiz. Identification of acid, basic and neutral substances.

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Day 3 and 4

I. Objectives
1. Demonstrate awareness on elements and compounds found on food labels;
2. Cite elements essential to life, their source, function, and conditions that may result from their
deficiency.
II. Topic:

Some Elements Essential to Life

III. Learning Tasks


A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read and study elements essential to life on page 40 of G7 Science Learners
Material
C. Analysis
1. Give example of elements that are essential to our life.
2. What are the conditions that may arise from their deficiency?
3. Name an element essential to life and cite its source and function.
D. Abstraction
Elements are said to be the building blocks of matter and they are part of almost anything around
us. Meat fruits and vegetables contain elements that are essential to our health.
E. Application
Make a list of what you have eaten this week. Based from what you have learned, find out which
essential elements have you taken and the corresponding food source that you have eaten.
IV. Evaluation
1 10 Quiz. Enumerate or give examples of minerals essential to our life and explain what will happen if
you have a deficiency of these elements.

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August 3 7, 2015
Day 1 and 2

I. Objectives
1. Identify the importance of knowing pH; and
2. Determine the pH value of some common mixtures.
II. Topic:

The pH Scale!

III. Learning Tasks


A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read the information sheet found on pages 54 to 57 found on their Science Manual.
C. Analysis
1. What is the importance of pH level in our body?
2. What is the use of pH level in food processing and food preservation?
3. What is the importance of pH in the following:
a. soil
b. metal
c. personal care products
d. rainwater
D. Abstraction
pH plays a very important role not only on our environment but also it affects the processes of our
body, as well as, in some products that we often use.
E. Application

IV. Evaluation
Give or enumerate the importance of pH on people, on plants and animals, as well as, on our
environment.

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 3

I. Objectives
1. Differentiate metals from no metals;
2. Identify elements that are metals and non-metals.
II. Topic:

Metals and Non-metals

III. Learning Tasks


A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read the information sheet found on pages 61 62.
Show different samples of metals and non-metals to students and let them describe its
appearance and color. Let them identify whether it is a metal or non-metal.
C. Analysis
1. Which of the samples look like metals? How about non-metals?
2. Differentiate metals from non-metals using a Venn diagram.
D. Abstraction
How are metals different from non-metals and how are they similar.

IV. Evaluation
1 10 Quiz. Enumeration. Give the general properties of metals and non-metals.

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Day 4
I. Objective:
1. Identify elements that are metals and non-metals based from the periodic table.
II. Topic:

Metals and Non-metals

III. Learning Tasks


A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Identify the elements that are metals and non-metals based from the periodic table of elements.
C. Analysis
1. Which of the elements found on the periodic table are metal? How about non-metal?
2. What are metalloids
3. Which are electrically conductive, metal or non-metal?
D. Abstraction
Elements that are metal and non-metals.
IV. Evaluation
1 10 Quiz. Identify the following elements whether it is a metal or non-metal:
1. N
2. C

3. O
4. H

5. Ca
6. Fe

7. Sn
8. Au

August 10, 2015

9. Fe
10. Ag

Monthly Test (see attached test paper)

Objective:
Evaluate students knowledge on past lessons.
Learning Tasks
Giving Instructions
Test Proper

August 11 13, 2015


Checking of Monthly Test Paper
Objective:
Identify the part where students find difficulties in the test and needs remediation.
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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MOTHLY TEST

Name: _________________________________

Section: _________________

I. Unscramble the clue letters to get the correct answer.


QUESTIONS
1. An element that exhibits brittleness, dull, and with poor heat and
electrical conductivity is considered as ____________.
2. Silicon is an example of ________________ element.
3. An element that exhibits hardness, luster, ductility and malleability
is known as _______________.
4. It can be used to identify whether a compound is acidic or basic.
5. Refers to a scientific guess
6. An impure form of matter
7. A laboratory apparatus used to measure temperature.
8. The most abundant element in our body
9. A process in science that involves the use of five senses.
10. It is the simplest form of matter composed of only one atom.
11. A substance which has a pH level of more than 7 is said to be ____.
12. A homogeneous mixture composed of solute and solvent
13. It has a pH level of 6.9 and below
14. __________ can be formed in the presence of acids.
15. A substance that is composed of two or more elements that is
chemically combined is known as ____________________

Date: _____________

CLUE LETTERS

ANSWER

EAMLNTNO
ETIDALMLO
AELTM
LUSITM ERPAP
ISHOSTHEYP
MIUREXT
ETTERHMOERM
CONARB
CPAOMRING
ELNEMET
BICAS
OLUTISON
ICDACI
SUTR
DCOPOUNM

16-20. The following are familiar elements around you. Classify them whether it is METAL or NON-METAL
_____________16. Iron
_____________17. Helium

__________18. Nitrogen
__________19. Gold

__________20. Iodine

21 -30. Arrange the following steps of the scientific method in correct order by writing numbers 1 to 5.
_______ Drawing a conclusion
_______ Gathering of relevant data
_______ Testing the hypothesis or Experimenting

_______ Identifying problem


_______ Formulating a hypothesis

II. Understanding. Based on the given situation below, choose the best answer of each of the following questions:
Every night, before going to bed, Shaun loves to drink hot chocolate. To prepare his drink, he prepares 3
tablespoon of Lactum choco powder and half teaspoon of sugar in hot water.
31. What is the solvent from the solution Shaun has prepared?
a. Lactum choco powder
b. Hot water
c. Hot chocolate
32. What kind of matter is hot chocolate?
a. compound b. element
c. solution

d. Sugar
d. suspension

One day while Zyreen was unhappily waiting in their home for the rain to stop so that she could play outside.
She noticed a beaker and a blue litmus paper on her mothers desk and wondered where her mother, a
science teacher, uses the beaker and the paper for. Out of curiosity, she got a piece of litmus paper and
examined it near their widow sill. Then using her mothers beaker, she collected a sample of rain water and
dipped the litmus paper on it. Surprisingly, the blue litmus paper turned into red.
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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33. What kind of scientific attitude did Zyreen showed?


a. objectivity
b. rational
c. curiosity
d. honesty
34. What kind of compound is rain water?
a. acidic
b. basic
d. neutral
d. organic
35. What laboratory apparatus did zyreen used to collect rain water samples?
a. litmus paper
b. container
c. beaker
d. window sill
36. If you are to conduct an experiment, what would you use to determine the kind of compound is the rain
water?
a. base
b. acid
c. indicator
d. organic
37. What scientific process did Zyreen do in the paragraph?
a. measuring
b. inferring
c. observing
d. predicting
28 - 30. Identify the following components or constituent elements present in the following compounds:
Compounds
Carbohydrates or C6H12O6
Table salt or NaCl
Water or H2O

Components/constituent elements
28.
29.
30.

31 40. COMPUTATION (5 points each).


Given the following formula:
% concentration by mass = mass of solute
mass of solution

100

Volume of solute = % concentration by volume x volume of solution

1. What is the percentage concentration by mass of 200grams of sugar in 900 grams syrup solution?

2. How many mL of acetic acid are present in 50 mL vinegar containing 75% by volume of acetic acid?

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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August 14, 2015


Teachers Convention @ Lucena City

August 17, 2015


Checking and Recording of Test Paper (First Periodical Exam)

Note: Aug. 19 Quezon Day


Aug. 21 Ninoy Aquino Day

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Second
Quarter

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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August 18 and 20, 2015


Note: Aug. 19 Quezon Day
Aug. 21 Ninoy Aquino Day

I. Objectives
1. Identify the parts that make up the organism;
2. Describe the function of each part; and
3. Describe how these parts work together in an organism.
II. Topic: What Makes Up an Organism
Reference/s: G7 Science Learners Material
Quarter 1 & 2 pp. 78 80
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read the selection on pages 78 to 80 found on their Science Manual and let them
answer the questions that follow.
C. Analysis
Answer guide questions on pages 79 to 80. Q1 to Q 10.
What are organisms? What makes them up?

D. Abstraction
Cell the basic unit of life
Tissues clusters of cells performing one specific function
Organs made of tissues that perform a specific function
Organ Systems groups of organs that performs specific purpose in the human body
Organism a living thing which can be unicellular or multicellular; can be composed of
different organ systems
BIOLOGICAL LEVEL OF ORGANIZATION
cell

tissue

organs

Organ systems

organism

IV. Evaluation
Make your own illustration showing what makes up an organism.

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August 24 - 28, 2015


Note: Agust 26 NCAE
August 28 - Pagdiriwang ng Buwan ng Wika

I. Objectives
1. Enumerate the different organ systems that make up an organisms or human beings;
2. Describe the function of each part of the human organ system.
II. Topic: What Makes up an Organisms
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity: Read the following information sheet and answer the questions below:
Human Body Organ Systems
The human body is made up of 11 organ systems that work with one another (interdependently).
These systems include the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, lymphatic
system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, endocrine system, cardiovascular
system, urinary system, and reproductive systems.
1. Integumentary system (skin, hair, nails) Forms the external body covering and protects deeper
tissues from injury. Houses cutaneous receptors, sweat glands, oil glands, and
synthesizes vitamin D.
2. Skeletal system (bones, joints) Supports and protects the bodys organs. Provides a framework
muscles use (movement). Bones also store minerals and create blood cells.
3. Muscular system (skeletal muscles) Maintains posture and produces movement (locomotion).
Produces heat.
4. Lymphatic system (red bone marrow, thymus, lymphatic vessels, thoracic duct, spleen, lymph
nodes) Houses white blood cells (lymphocytes) involved in immunity. Returns leaked
fluid from blood vessels to the blood and disposes debris within the lymphatic
stream.
5. Respiratory system (nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchus, lung) Removes carbon
dioxide and continually supplies blood with oxygen. Gaseous exchanges occur in the
respiratory system (lungs).
6. Digestive system (oral cavity, oesophagus, liver, stomach, small intestine, large intestine,
rectum, anus) Breaks down food to be absorbed and eliminates indigestible waste.
7. Nervous system (brain, spinal cord, nerves) Control system of the body, responds to internal
and external changes, activates muscles and glands.
8. Endocrine system (pineal gland, pituitary gland, thyroid gland, thymus, adrenal gland,
pancreas, ovary, testis) Glands from the endocrine system secrete hormones that
regulate many processes like growth, metabolism, and reproduction.
9. Cardiovascular system (heart, blood vessels) The heart pumps blood and blood vessels
transport it. Blood carries oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients, waste and more
throughout the body.
10. Urinary system (kidney, ureter, urinary bladder, urethra) Eliminates nitrogenous wastes from
the body. Regulates acid-base, electrolyte and WATER balance of blood.
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11. Reproductive systems the main function of the reproductive system is to produce offspring.
MALE (prostate gland, penis, testis, scrotum, ductus deferens)
FEMALE (Mammary glands, ovary, uterus, vagina, uterine tube
C. Analysis
Classify the following organs to which organ system does it belong. Write your answer on the
blank.
__________1. Skull
__________6. Stomach
__________2. Muscle
__________7. Heart
__________3. Brain
__________8.Ovary
__________4. Skin
__________9. Lungs
__________5. kidney
__________10. Liver

D. Abstraction
Describe the function of the different organ systems.
IV. Evaluation
Recitation. Sample question: The heart pumps blood that carries oxygen and nutrients to the
different parts of the body. To which organ system does the heart belong?

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August 31, 2015 Holiday (National Heroes Day)


September 1, 2015
Long Quiz
Direction: Organize the following words by putting in their proper columns on the table below.
Stomach
kidney
femur
trachea
adrenal gland
tricep
tendon

testes
thyroid gland
spinal cord
bronchi
Pituitary gland
lymph
pancreas

heart
lungs
nails
rectum
alveoli
oesophagus
vein

skull
uterus
thymus
ureter
ulna
sternum
brain

hair
intestine
bladder
patella
deltoid
arteries
spleen

Muscular

Reproductive

Respiratory

Skeletal

Nervous

Circulatory

Immune

Urinary

Digestive

Endocrine

Integumentary

Identify what body system does not function well in each of the following situations.
_______________1. After playing hard in basketball game Nigel fractured his legs.
_______________2. The baby always regurgitates (throw up) the milk he drinks.
_______________3. Lennon cannot easily urinate.
_______________4. Rangel has an asthma.
_______________5. Due to hardened artery, Mike has high blood pressure.
_______________6. Cramps
_______________7. Amnesia
_______________8. Having pimples
_______________9. Being acidic
_______________10. Sarah cant bear a child.
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September 2 - 4, 2015

I. Objectives:
1. Identify the different parts of a cell;
2. Differentiate plant cells from animal cells.
II. Topic: Comparing Plants and Animal Cells
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Study closely Figures 1 and 2 below. These are diagrammatic presentations of plant and animal
cells and their parts

Figure 1

Figure 2

C. Analysis
1. Which cell parts are found in both cells?
2. Which are present only in animal cells?
3. Which are present only in plant cells?

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D. Abstraction
Enumerate the different parts of a cell
Compare and contrast the structures of plant and animal cells.
Similarities and differences of plant and animal cells
Organelles

Centrioles

Animal Cell
Round (irregular shape)
Absent
One or more small vacuoles (much
smaller than plant cells).
Present in all animal cells

Chloroplast

Animal cells don't have chloroplasts.

Cytoplasm
Endoplasmic Reticulum
(Smooth and Rough)
Ribosomes
Mitochondria
Golgi Apparatus
Plasma Membrane
Lysosomes
Nucleus

Present

Plant Cell
Rectangular (fixed shape)
Present (formed of cellulose)
One, large central vacuole taking up
90% of cell volume.
Only present in lower plant forms.
Plant cells have chloroplasts because
they make their own food.
Present

Present

Present

Present
Present
Present
Only cell membrane
Lysosomes occur in cytoplasm.
Present

Present
Present
Present
Cell wall and a cell membrane
Lysosomes usually not evident.
Present

Shape
Cell wall
Vacuole

IV. Evaluation
Make a Venn diagram comparing plant and animal cells.

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September 7 11, 2015


Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives
1. Observe plan and animal cells as seen under microscope.
2. Draw plant and animal cells as viewed under the microscope
II. Topic: Plant and Animal Cell as viewed in the Microscope
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Viewing of plant and animal cells under the microscope
Let the students describe and draw what they have seen.
C. Analysis
1. How do plant cells look like? How about the animal cells that you have seen or observed under
the microscope?
2. What structures can you see in in plant cells? in animal cells?
D. Abstraction
Based on your observation, how would you differentiate a plant from animal cells?

IV. Evaluation.
Label the parts of an Animal Cell and Plant Cell.

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Day 3 & 4
I. Objectives
1. Name the parts that make up an organisms;
2. Describe the function of each part; and
3. Describe how these parts work together in an organism.
II. Topic: The Cell
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
See attached activity sheet.
C. Analysis
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

6.
7.
8.
9.

What are the two groups of organelles in the story that are quarrelling with one another?
Why are these organelles complaining?
Do you agree or disagree with the first group? Why?
How important are these organelles in the company? Give their duties.
a. Why do you think the chloroplast agrees with the mitochondria?
b. In what way are they similar?
c. In what way are they different?
What makes lysosome describe himself as clean-up crew?
If you were the nucleus, would you do the same thing?
Among the organelles, why does the nucleus head the company?
If you will be given a chance to be these organelles, who do you want to be? Why?

D. Abstraction
Enumerate the different parts of a cell and describe its functions.
IV. Evaluation
Let the students answer the following:
1. The cytoplasm contains the following organelles:
______________, ________________,
______________,______________,______________,______________,________________,
2. The chloroplast can be found in ______________________ cells.
3. _______________ and ____________ protect the cells by screening what goes in and out of the cells.

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September 14- 18 2015


Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives
1. Label the different parts of the microscope and explain their functions.
2. Focus and view the specimen under the microscope.
II. Topic: The Compound Microscope
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read their Science Manual on pages 95 to 100 and let them identify the different
parts of the microscope.
C. Analysis
What are the different parts of the microscope? Why do we need to study and be familiar with it?
D. Abstraction
Microscope is a basic biological tool. Familiarizing yourself with all its parts and understanding how to
manipulate it is necessary in order to use it properly.

IV. Evaluation
Practical test. Identification of parts of a compound microscope.
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Day 3 & 4
I. Objectives
1. Focus the microscope properly
2. Prepare materials for microscope study
3. Compare the images of the object see by the unaided eye and under the microscope
4. Compute for magnification of objects observed under microscope
II. CONTENT:
A. Topic: How to use the Light Microscope
B. Material: LM, chalk board, visual aids
C. Reference: Learning Material
Quarter 1 & 2 pp. 95 102
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
let the students use a microscope
tell them to focus and observe a specimen under a microscope
C. Analysis
Describe the specimen as seen under the microscope
Compare the image of the specimen that you see using your unaided eye with what you see
through the microscope
Which two parts of the light microscope magnify the image of an object?
How much was the specimen that you observed under the microscope was magnified if the
eyepiece is 10x and the objective of the microscope you are using is 15x?

D. Abstraction
Microscope is a basic biological tool it enables one study objects too small to be seen and
observed by unaided eye.
It also give enlarge view of objects and organisms.

IV. Evaluation
If the cell being observed has been magnified 200x under high power objective (HPO), what
is the magnifying power of the eyepiece used.?

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September 21- 25 2015


Note: Sept. 25 - Holiday
Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives
1. Develop students inquiry skills of observing, communicating, inferring and comparing;
2. Identify other living things aside from plants and animals.
II. Topic: Living Things Other than Plants and Animals
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Show pictures of the following living things and give them enough time to observe and record or
write down their observations.
C. Analysis
Picture A (mushroom) and picture B (seaweeds or Ar-arusep)
1. Is it a plant?
2. What is its name?
3. What is your reason for your answer in question no. 1?
Compare picture A and B

Picture A

Picture B

4. How are they different?


5. How are they alike?
Show a third specimen (Picture C - Lichen)
6. What do you think it is?
7. Is it a plant?
8. Give your answer in question no. 6.

Picture C

Show a picture of the following specimens:


1. A bacterial colony

3. Old bread with molds

2. Rotten Banana

4. Pond with moss

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51

D. Abstraction
What you have seen and observed are also living things. There are living things or organisms that
cannot be readily identified by usual parts of plants we recognize like roots, stem, leaves, flower or
fruits though they may have green color and have some plant-like parts.

IV. Evaluation
1 10 Quiz. List down living things that you know of aside from plants and animals.
V. Assignment.
Study about sexual and asexual reproduction

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Day 3 & 4
I. Objectives:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Describe how plants reproduce;


Explain what is vegetative reproduction;
Differentiate asexual from sexual reproduction.
Describe the advantages of growing plants using vegetative reproduction.

II. Topic: Modes of Reproduction (Asexual Reproduction)


Reference(s): G7 Learning Materials
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read their Science Manual on pages 113 to 121. Then ask or tell them to give their
own understanding and explain how plants reproduce.
C. Analysis
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Define reproduction
What are the modes of reproduction?
What does vegetative reproduction mean?
How is asexual reproduction different from sexual reproduction?
Give the advantages of growing plants using vegetative reproduction.

D. Abstraction
Vegetative reproduction is a kind of asexual reproduction where new individual known as offspring
is produced from a single parent.
In asexual reproduction, a single organism is a sole parent and the offspring is genetically identical to
the parent. While sexual reproduction, two parents produce offspring that have unique combination
of genes. Offspring of sexual reproduction differ genetically from their siblings and both parents.
Propagation of plants through vegetative reproduction is done due to the following reasons:
1. Vegetative propagation reaches maturity faster than plants grown from seeds.
2. Same good agricultural traits such as taste, yield, and resistance to pests will be passed on from
generation to generation.
Union of gametes or sex cell, however, is another form of reproduction which is known as sexual
reproduction.
IV. Evaluation
1. What are the two modes of reproduction? Differentiate each.
2. Give two types of asexual reproduction.
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September 28- October 2, 2015


September 30 Science Fair

Day 1 and 2
I. Objectives
1. Define asexual reproduction; and
2. Describe the methods of asexual reproduction in different organisms.
II. Topic: Asexual Reproduction in Plants and Animals
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
Show an illustration (visual aid or audiovisual aid) of hydra (see attached), planaria budding off or
bees producing eggs without sex cells, and the asexual (sporophyte generation) of a fern or a
moss. Then teacher may ask: what do all these have in common?
B. Activity:
Show a picture of different types of asexual reproduction such as:
1. A bacteria budding off
2. Starfish with a missing arm or lizard with missing tail
3. Yeast
4. Bread with molds
5. Ferns/mushroom
6. Filamentous algae (Spirogyra)
C. Analysis
1. What form of asexual reproduction does each organism show/exhibit?
2. Describe the different forms of asexual forms of reproduction, e.g. binary fission, budding,
spore formation, regeneration, fragmentation, and parthenogenesis.
3. How do offspring produced asexually compare those with the parent and with one another?
4. What is the importance of asexual reproduction?
D. Abstraction
Asexual reproduction involves mitotic cell division of only one parent. The simplest form of
asexual reproduction is binary fission where parent cell divides into two daughter cells of
approximately equal size.
In budding, the parent organism divides into two individuals of unequal size. The new individual
is smaller than the parent and grows to full size after separation from the parent.
Spores are specialized reproductive cells that can be formed sexually or asexually. The asexual
formation of spores involves mitotic cell division when environmental conditions become
favorable. The spore develops into a new organism.
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Regeneration is the ability to regrow lost body parts. It occurs in starfishes, sponges and
earthworms.
Autotomy is the process of reflex separation of a part from the body: It is the process of selfamputation of appendages. Crustaceans and salamanders exhibit autotomy.
Bees, aphids, some fishes, amphibians, lizards and the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia
reproduce by parthenogenesis.
Forms of asexual reproduction:
a. Bacteria spore formation
b. Yeast budding
c. Bread mold spore
d. Filamentous algae (Spirogyra) fragmentation
e. Starfish regeneration
f. Ferns spore
IV. Valuing/ Application
Oyster farmers used to chop starfish they find in their oyster farms. They used to place the chopped
pieces back in the water. Is this a good practice or not?
V. Evaluation
Use any three of these questions for the lesson assessment.
Use the following key to answer numbers 1 5:
A. Binary fission
B. Budding
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

C. Spore formation
D. Regeneration

E. autotomy
F. mitosis

Daughter cell is an outgrowth of parent cell.


Specialized cells are formed asexually.
Regrowing of lost parts
Self amputation
Mitotic division of parent cell resulting to two daughter cells

Answers:

1. B

2. C

3. D

4. E

5. F

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Day 3 and 4
I. Objectives
1. Define and describe ecosystem; and
2. Differentiate biotic from abiotic components of an ecosystem
II. Topic: Interactions between living and non-living things
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
Ask the students to describe the places they have visited

B. Activity: see attached activity sheet

C. Analysis
Differentiate living things from non-living things.
Give examples of biotic and abiotic components of an ecosystem.
Find out which things are important and which things you cannot live without?

D. Abstraction
An ecosystem is an ecological unit where living and non-living things interacts. Biotic components are
living components in an ecosystem while the abiotic components are non-living thing.
IV. Valuing or Application
As a student, how would you take care of our ecosystems?
V. Evaluation
A. Define ecosystem
B. Classify the following whether it is abiotic or biotic component.
1. Air
2. Lion
3. Soil
4. Plants
5. Sun

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Name: __________________________________

Section: ____________

Date: _______

Activity 1. ECOSYSTEM
ECOLOGY is the study of interactions of living things and their environment. The environment in which
these interactions occur is called an ECOSYSTEM. An ecosystem can be as small as a fallen log or as wide
as a rainforest. But no matter what size it is, many factors are always involved.
2 components of an Ecosystem:
1. Biotic refers to the living component;
It includes all the living organisms that live in the ecosystem
2. Abiotic the non-living things;
It includes the physical environment such as soil, temperature, water and light.
BASIC REQUIREMENTS OF AN ECOSYSTEM
To support itself, an ecosystem must have the following:
1. A source of Energy like sunlight
2. A way to store this energy in chemical bonds (like in photosynthesis as foods); and
3. A way to recycle essential substances, such as oxygen, carbon, water, and nitrogen between the
organisms and the environment.
Look at the picture of an ecosystem below and do the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Color the picture


Name or list down the biotic components of this ecosystem
Name the abiotic components found on the picture
Explain how do they (biotic and abiotic) relate to each other.

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October 5 10, 2015


October 5 Worlds Teachers Day Celebration

Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives
1. Enumerate the different relationship among organisms in an ecosystem;
2. Cite examples of each kind of relationship; and
3. Describe the different kind of feeding relationship.
II. Topic: Relationship among organisms
References (s) : G7 LM / Science II Biology book
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Show pictures of different kinds of feeding animals.

Introduce to the class the different ecological relationship


Discuss the different ecological relationship and give examples of each kind.

C. Analysis
1.
2.
3.
4.

What kind of relationship exists between man and mosquito?


Do you find similar relationship among students in our school?
Which relationships are healthy? Why? Which are not?
What other relationship can you identify based from the picture that you observed?

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D. Abstraction
The different kinds of ecological relationships in an ecosystem are as follows:
Predation - The process by which one species captures and feeds upon another
- Heterotrophs can prey on autotrophs and other heterotrophs
Symbiosis - A close ecological relationship between two or more organisms of different species that
live in direct contact with one another
Mutualism - an interspecies interaction in which both species benefit
Flowers and pollinating insects
Humans and intestinal E. coli
Clown fish and anemones
Commensalism is a relationship between two organisms in which one receives an
ecological benefit from another, while the other neither benefits
or is harmed.
Parasitism - relationship in which one species benefits while the other is harmed.

IV. Evaluation
Identify the different kinds of ecological relationship that exists between the following organisnms.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Carabao and Heron


Orchids and Tree
Dog and Flea
Cat eating rat
Butterfly and bee

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Day 3 and 4

I. Objectives:
1. Explain the differences between food chain and the food web;
2. Distinguish between producers and consumers.
II. Topic: Food Chain and Food Web
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
See attached activity sheet on Food Web and Food Chain.
C. Analysis
Let the students answer guide questions in the attached activity sheet.
D. Abstraction
In an ecosystem, living and non-living things relate with each other and the environment by
alternately depending and competing with one another for their food and space. A food chain only
follows just one path as animals find food and an interconnected and more complex process of
eating and being eaten may form a food web.

IV. Evaluation
In a crosswise of paper, create a simple drawing or diagram of the following:
1. Food chain
2. Food web

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Name: ___________________________________

Section: _____________

Date: ________

FOOD CHAIN AND FOOD WEB

Objectives: After performing this activity, you should be able to:


1. Distinguish between producers and consumers;
2. Analyze the transfer of energy from one organism to another
3. Explain the differences between food chain and food web.
ACTIVITY 1. WHO EATS WHAT?
Directions: Read the selection and answer the questions that follow. Write your answers on your
answer sheet.
Most animals spend a great deal of time looking for and consuming food, which is their source
of energy. Each type of animal prefers certain kinds of foods. And in most cases, each animal becomes
food for other animals.
Consider the links given below:
Green
Plants

Grasshoppers

Frog

Snake

Hawk

Arrows are used to show the flow to which food energy moves. It also shows how certain living
organisms depend on one another for food energy. Each one is a link in the chain. A food chain only
follows just one path as animals find food.
Questions:
1. Which links are the producers? _________________________________________________________
2. Which are the consumers?_____________________________________________________________
3. Can a grasshopper be called primary consumer? Why? ______________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
4. Why are animals called secondary consumers? _____________________________________________
5. Which organisms are secondary consumers?_______________________________________________
6. Which consumers are herbivores? _______________________________________________________
7. Which consumers are carnivorous? ______________________________________________________

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October 12 16, 2015


Day 1
ACTIVITY 2. FOOD WEB
The food web below includes a third group of organisms. Besides the producers and the
consumers, the food web depicts the decomposers consisting of bacteria and fungi. Decomposers act on
dead organisms and change these to simple nutrients which plants can use again.

Directions: Consider the given diagram. Then answer the questions below the diagram.

Food Web

Questions:
1. Which is the producer in this food web? __________________________________________________
2. Which is the herbivore in this food web? Why? _____________________________-_______________
3. Which is the carnivore in this food web? Why? _____________________________________________
4. Identify the omnivore in this food web ___________________________________________________
5. What do you think will happen if the snake is removed in this food web? Why? __________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________

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Day 2 - 4
I. Objectives:
The students will:
1. Use the game to review important skills and content;
2. Learn the rules of the game; and
3. Recall concepts about cells, living things besides plants and animals, reproduction and ecological
relationship.
II. Subject Matter
A. Topic: Unit Review: Living Things and their Environment
B. Materials: Manila paper, whistle, scotch tape, lumber crayons and manila paper
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
1. Ask the students about topic which was previously discussed; and
2. Ask them if they are ready for a test? review? compete? And how about playing a game?
B. Activity:
Small Group Activity
Title of the game is 7th Grade Feud!. It is a take-off from a game known as Family Feud. It is a fun
way to recall concepts which was previously discussed about Living Things and their Environment.
Test Questions:
PART I.
1. A cell that can be found in animals only?
2. It is the basic structural and functional unit of life.
3. Known as sex cells.
4. Other term for living things.
5. Ecological relationship where both organisms benefited.
6. Organelles present in plant cells only.
7. An example of asexual reproduction is regeneration, from the choices given give example of
sexual reproduction.
8. If a predator has a prey, a parasite has a ____________.
9. An ecological relationship where both organisms benefited.
10. An example of harmful bacteria is e. coli, which of the following is an example of useful bacteria?
PART II.
1. Draw a complete flower and label its parts.
2. Create a Venn diagram showing similarities and differences between plant and animal cells.
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

63

C. Analysis
What did you learn from the activity?
D. Abstraction
Ask students to recall concepts that they could remember about cells, living things besides plants
and animals, reproduction and ecological relationship.
IV. Evaluation
HAS THE FOLLOWING COMPONENTS:
ARE LIVING IN AN

ARE GROUPED INTO THE


FOLLOWING KINGDOMS:

A _____________________ AND

B________________________

E __________________

M _________________
P _________________
P _________________
A _________________
F _________________

IS WHERE WE CAN SEE 2 KINDS OF RELATIONSHIP


T _____________________ AND

CAN REPRODUCE
THROUGH:

N________________________

A________ R_________
S________ R_________
CAN

LIV ING THINGS

ARE ALSO CALLED

HAVE THE
FOLLOWING
CHARACTERISTICS

1. ___________________

CAN BE STUDIED USING AN


INSTRUMENT CALLED
C___________________
M___________________

ARE MADE
UP OF
GROUPED
TOGETHER
BECOMES

T_____________________

GROUPED
TOGETHER
BECOMES

O_____________________

GROUPED
TOGETHER
BECOMES

P_________ C________

ONLY THEM HAVE THE


FOLLOWING ORGANELLES:

1. G ____________________
2. D ____________________
3. R ____________________
4. UNDERGO C___________
P____________________
AND ABSORB
E____________________
5. R ____________________
6. A ____________________
7. ARE MADE UP OF C ______

EXAMPLE OF THESE ARE:

A_________ C________

Both of them
have the
following
organelles

C_______ W_________
C_______ V_________
C___________________

ONLY THEM HAVE THE


FOLLOWING ORGANELLES:
C___________________

E_____________________
B_____________________
A_____________________
O_____________________
S_____________________
S________ C__________
D_____________________
M_____________________
A_____________________
B_____________________

M___________________
N___________________
E________ R_________

O__________ S_________

C________ M_________
G________ A_________
L___________________
R___________________
C___________________

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October 19, 2015


MONTHLY TEST

Name:_____________________________________

Section: ________________

Date: ___________

I. Match Column A with Column B. Write the letter of the correct answer.
Column A
1. What is a group of the same cells performing a specific function?
2. What is the other term for living things?
3. It is an organelle present in plant cells only.
4. It is an organelle that can be found in animal cells only.
5. It is the group of organism where mushroom belong.
6. You are eating these organisms when you are eating yoghurt.
7. They are also called sex cells.
8. It is an ecological relationship where both organisms involved are
benefited

Column B
A. Centriole
B. Gametes
C. Tissue
D. Chloroplast
E. Bacteria
F. Fungi
G. Organisms
H. Mutualism

II. ANALOGY. Fill in the blank with the best answer. Pick your answer from the given choices.

Protist
Giant mushroom

Autotrophs
Nervous system

Organ
Circulatory system

Powerhouse
Budding

fungi
E. coli

Mold
Pollination
Waste

Fission

Regeneration
Prey
Small vacuole

Host
Heterotrophs
E. coli

large vacuole

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

food
captain

Group of cell: _________________


Brain:
_________________
Digestion:
_________________
Nucleus :
_________________
Plant:
_________________
Mold:
_________________
Harmful bacteria:________________
Microscopic: _________________
Bacteria:
_________________
Asexual:
_________________
Parasite has: _________________
Plants are called:_________________

Tissue

group of tissue: ________________


heart : _______________________
excretion: _____________________
mitochondria: ________________
animals: ______________________
seaweed: _____________________
Useful bacteria: ________________
Macroscopic fungi: _____________
Ginger: ______________________
Sexual: ______________________
Predator has__________________
Animals are called: _____________

Fill in the conceptual map:


Fission
Can change
Chloroplast Budding
Can grow
Heart
Large vacuole
Organism
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

Lungs
Lion
Tiger

Organ
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

Can reproduce
Eagle
Brain

Parts of plant cell


_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

Shark
Kidney
Vegetative

Made up of cells
Cell wall
Regeneration

Asexual reproductions
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

Predator
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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III.

UNDERSTANDING.

A. Organize the following words by putting them in their proper boxes in the concept map.
Amoeba
Streptococcus
Dog
Mangrove
Yeast
Protist
Plants
Animals
Fungi
Bacteria
26.
Can be grouped into
27.

28.
An example of this is:

32.

29.
An example of this
is:

33.

34.

30.
An example of this
is:

into

35.

31.
An example of this is:

into

36.

PRODUCT. Prepare a simple diagram(representation or drawing) of the following: (Dont forget to label
your work.)
A. Levels of Biological Organization(5 pts. )

B. Venn Diagram showing similarities and


differences between an animal cell and plant
cell. (5 pts.)

C. Draw a Gumamela flower and label its parts (5pts)

D. Parts of Microscope (10 pts)

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October 20 21, 2015

Second Periodical Exam

October 22, 2015

United Nation Day Celebration

October 23, 2015

Checking and Recording of Test Paper

October 26 - 30, 2015

SCNHS IN SE RVICE TRAINING

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Third
Quarter

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68

November 2 6, 2015
Note: November 4 Holiday (Hermano Pule)

Day 1 and 2
I. Objectives:
At the end of the lesson, the students should be able to:
1. Identify the four primary and secondary directions; and
2. Describe the position or location of an object.
II. Topic: Where is it?
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
See attached activity sheet - Where is it?
C. Analysis
1. Answer guide questions in the activity sheet.
2. Based from the activity, how can you describe the position of an object?

D. Abstraction
Describing exact position entails two ideas:
1. Describing how far the object is from the point of reference; and
2. Describing its direction relative to the point of reference.

IV. Evaluation
Follow the direction:
1. Get a crosswise of paper.
2. Name two persons you like most in the classroom.
3. From where you are seated, as a reference point, describe and illustrate their location.

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Name: _______________________________

Section: _________________

Date: _________

Activity 1. Where is it?


N

S
A. Write the object that can be found in the following directions:
1. North _____________________________
2. East ______________________________
3. West _____________________________
4. South _____________________________

5. Northeast _________________________
6. Northwest _________________________
7. Southeast _________________________
8. Southwest ________________________

B. 1. What are the four primary directions?


___________________ , ____________________ , ___________________ , ____________________
B. 2. What are the four secondary directions?
___________________ , ____________________ , ___________________ , ____________________
C. Follow the directions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Draw a ball east of a tower.


Draw a star south of the ambulance.
Draw a triangle North of the car.
Draw a heart west of the cow.
Draw a tree Northeast.
Draw a cup Northwest.
Draw a guava Southeast.
Draw a leaf Southwest.
W

Motion is a change in position based on a point of reference.


Direction is important in determining your position and direction.

S
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 3
I. Objectives:
1. Describe the position of an object; and
2. Define or describe motion
II. Topic: Describing Position
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
See attached activity sheet - Describing Motion using Diagrams

C. Analysis
1. Answer guide questions in the activity sheet.
2. Based from the activity, how can you describe the position of an object?

D. Abstraction
The position of an object can be described in many ways. You can use words, and also you can use
visuals like diagram or graphs. But to be able to describe the motion of an object, you must be able
to tell exactly where its position is.
In science, motion is defined as the change in position for a particular time interval.

IV. Assignment
Study another way to describe motion using graph.

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Name: _______________________________

Section: _________________

Date: _________

Activity 2. Describing Motion using Diagrams

The position of an object can be described in many ways. You can use words or you can use
visuals, like diagrams or graphs in describing the positions of an object.
Now try doing this activity and answer the following questions:

1. What is the position of the dog? ________________________________________________________


2. What is the position of the tree? ________________________________________________________
3. What is the position of the dog with respect to the house? ___________________________________
4. What is the position of the tree with respect to the dog?_____________________________________

In this diagram, the positions of the ball rolling are shown at equal intervals of time. You can use the
diagram to describe the position of the ball at any given time.

5. What is the initial position of the ball? What is its final position? ______________________________
6. What is the position of the ball at 10 seconds? _____________________________________________
7. At what time is the position of the ball equal to 5 meters? ___________________________________

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November 9 13, 2015


Day 1 & 2
I. Objectives:
1. Differentiate distance from displacement; and
2. Demonstrate skills in plotting
II. Topic: How Far? (Distance vs. Displacement)
Reference (s): G7 Science Learners Material
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Do Activity 3. Understanding Distance and Displacement through Graphical Method
C. Analysis
1. Differentiate distance from displacement.
2. When can displacement be equal to distance?
3. Can displacement be greater than distance? Why?
D. Abstraction
Displacement always follows a straight line, while distance does not follow a straight line.
Distance refers to the total length or the entire path that the object travelled. Displacement,
however, refers to the shortest distance between the objects two positions or in other words
shortcut.
Displacement can be equal to distance when path travelled is a straight line but it cannot be
greater than distance.
IV. Evaluation
Plot the following using 1 cm = 10m
To reach Zyreens home she needs to travel to the following directions:
1. 30m west
2. 50 m north
3. 20 m east

4. 10 m north
5. 40m west

A. Find the total distance travelled Zyreen to reach her home? __________________________________
B. What is the displacement? _____________________________________________________________
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Name: _______________________________

Section: _________________

Date: _________

Activity 3. Understanding Distance and Displacement through Graphical Method

Motion is defined as the change in position for a particular time interval. You can then start
describing motion with the question, How far did the object travel? There are actually two ways to
answer this question. First is by getting the total length of the path travelled by the object. The other
way is by measuring the distance between the initial position and final position of the object.

The illustration below shows the difference between distance travelled (represented by broken line) by
an object and its displacement (represented by continuous line).

Illustrating distance and displacement:


On his way to school, Jed travelled 100 m North,
300 m East, 100 m North, 100 m East and
100 m North.

Scale: 1 cm = 1 m

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Draw a diagram for the following situations and then find the distance and displacement each persons
moves or travel.
1. Marisa runs North for 40 m, then turns east and runs for another 10 meters, then stops.
(scale: 1cm = 10 m )
2. Alex walks east for 3km, stops for a break, and then runs for the same direction for 4 km before he
stops (scale 1cm = 1 km)
3. Using 1cm = 100 m scale, plot the distance and displacement travelled by Grace as she walks to the
pizza place for lunch, she walks:
a. 100m west
b. 500m north
c. 200m east
d. 300m south
e. 400m west

What is the total distance travelled? _____________


Displacement? ______________________________

S
CSM Lesson Plan SY 2015 - 2016

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Day 3 & 4
I. Objectives:
1. Differentiate distance from displacement; and
2. Measure distance and displacement from a travel map.
II. Topic: How Far? My Home to School Roadmap
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Activity 4. My Home to School Roadmap
Objective
In this activity you should be able to make a roadmap that shows how you get to school from your house.
Procedure:
1. Get a 1 whole sheet of paper or a long bond paper, pencil and ruler.
2. Devise a way to easily measure distance. Let your teacher check your non-standard measurement for
precision.
2. Using your measuring device, gather the data that you will need for your roadmap. Make sure that you
take down notes of all names of the roads, landmarks, corners, posts, and establishments you pass by.
Record your data properly.
3. Using your gathered data, draw your house-school roadmap on a short bond paper. Decide on the
most convenient scale to use when you draw your roadmap. An example is shown below.
4. Label your roadmap properly, including names of the roads, establishments, etc. Specify also the
length of road.
5. Finally, let your teacher check again your work.
C. Analysis
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

What is the total length of your travel from your house to your school?
What is the total displacement of your travel?
What have you noticed about distance and displacement?
When can displacement be equal to distance?
Can displacement be greater than distance? Why?

D. Abstraction
To easily plot as well as measure the distance and displacement of an object, using a most
convenient scale is necessary.
Displacement can be equal to distance when path travelled is a straight line but it cannot be
greater than the distance.
IV. Evaluation
Make an illustration or drawing that shows the distance travelled by an object and its displacement.

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November 16 20, 2015


Day 1 and 2
I. Objectives:
1. Describe motion using graph; and
2. Demonstrate skills in plotting data and interpreting graphs.
II. Topic: Graphing Motion
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
PLOT OR CONSTRUCT DISTANCE TIME GRAPH
I. Plot the given values in Tables 1 and 2 below as points on the graph. Note that time is plotted on
the x axis while position is plotted on y-axis.
Table 1. Position of the 1st ball vs. time
Time (s)
Position of the ball (m)
0
0
5
5
10
10
15
15

Table 2. Position of the 2nd ball vs. time


Time (s)
Position of the ball (m)
0
5
5
5
10
5
15
5

II. Plot the distance- time graph using the data below:
Time (s)
0
5
10
15
20

Distance (m)
0
2.5
5.0
7.5
10.0

III. Plot the displacement time graph using the given tabulated data below:
Time (s)
0
2
4
6

Distance (m)
0
2
2
6

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Name: ________________________________________ Section: ________________

Date: ________

Activity 5. Graphing Motion


Plot the given values in Tables 1 and 2 below as points on the graph. Note that time is plotted on the
x - axis while position is plotted on the Y- axis.
Y

Table 1. Position of the 1st ball vs. time


Position of the ball (m)
0
5
10
15

Note: The graph that you have drawn is called


position-time graph. This graph describe the
position of an object at any given time.

20

15
Position (m)

Time (s)
0
5
10
15

10
5

10

15

20

Time (s)
Y
Table 1. Position of the 2nd ball vs. time

20

Time (s)
0
5
10
15

Position (m)

15

10

Position of the bead (m)


5
5
5
5

5
X
0

10

15

20

Time (s)
Q1. Compare the two graphs. ____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Q2. What is position time graph? __________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
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Graph the given tabulated data below:


1.

2.
Time (s)
0
5
10
15
20

Distance (m)
0
2.5
5.0
10.0
20.0

Time (s)
0
2
4
6

Displacement (m)
0
2
2
0

Note:
When a graph is plotted in terms of the distance travelled by the object and the time it took to
cover such distance, the graph can be called distance-time graph. If the graph is plotted in terms of
displacement and time, it is called displacement time graph.
a. Plot the Distance Time Graph
Y
20

Distance (m)

15

10
5

10

15

20

Time (s)
b. Plot the Displacement Time Graph

Displacement (m)

3
Time (s)

X
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C. Analysis
1. Compare the position - time graph of the 1st ball from the 2nd ball.
2. What is position time graph?
3. Differentiate distance - time graph from displacement time graph.
D. Abstraction
Position - time graph describe the position of an object at any given time.
When graph is plotted in terms of the distance travelled by the object and the time it took to
cover such distance, the graph can be called distance - time graph.
If the graph is plotted in terms of displacement and time, it is called displacement time graph.
IV. Evaluation
Identify what kind of graph are the following:

2).

Distance (m)

Position (m)

1).

Time (s)

Time (s)

Displacement (m)

3).

Time (s)

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November 23 27, 2015


Day 1
I. Objectives:
1. Define speed operationally;
2. Write the correct unit of speed; and
3. Differentiate constant speed versus average speed; and average speed versus instantaneous
speed.
II. Topic: SPEED
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
Pose this question: How do you describe the motion of an object? How slow do you walk? How
fast do you run?
Introduce the new lesson and ask students to define speed in their own words.
B. Activity:
1. Explain the concept of average speed and instantaneous speed.
Speed refers to the rate of motion. It is the ratio of distance covered and the time of travel.
In equation,
distance___
Speed = elapsed time
In symbol,

d
t

If the speed is not constant, this speed is called the average speed.
For example, a bus travelled 120 kilometers in 3 hours. What is the speed of the bus? Did the
bus travel at constant speed of 40 km per h in 3 hours?
Perhaps, the bus travelled at 20 km/h, 30 km/h, 60 km/h or 120 km/h or it stopped several
times. In other words, its speed was not constant as it travelled for 3 hours. So the 40 km per h
refers to the average speed of the bus.
Are you familiar with the instrument called speedometer? It is one of the devices on the
instrument panel in front of the drivers seat of a motor vehicle. Is the speed indicated in the
speedometer an average speed? (No.) The speedometer indicates the instantaneous speed of
the vehicle which means the speed of the vehicle at the instant you were reading the
speedometer.

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2. Explain the standard units of speed.


Since speed is distance divided by time, speed is expressed in terms of the unit of distance and unit
of time. The SI unit for distance is meter, and time is second. Thus, speed is expressed in meters per
second or m/s. For vehicles, the standard unit for speed is kilometers per hour or km/h (kph). In
other countries such as USA, they use miles per hour or mph as unit of speed. What about the
speed of ship? Are they also expressed in kph or mph? (No. Ships speed is expressed in nautical per
hour or knots.)
3. Divide the class into groups. Distribute the activity sheets and materials by group.
4. Assessment:
Rate the groups teamwork using the following rating scale with the equivalent points while the
students are doing the activity.
Points
5
- Excellent
4
- Good
3
2
1
0

- Satisfactory
- Poor
- Very poor

All the members are actively participating in the activity.


Majority of the members are actively participating in the
activity.
At least half of the group is actively participating in the activity.
Most members are not actively participating in the activity.
Little effort is exerted by the group
The group have NOT attempted at all

C. Analysis:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Compare the first runners speed to that of runners 2 and 3.


Did each runner achieve a constant speed during his or her travel?
Show your computation for each runners average speed.
Plot the distance versus time graph of your data.

D. Abstraction
Speed tells how fast an object moves;
it also refers to the ratio of distance covered and the time of travel.
Si Units of speed: m/s, km/hr, mi/hr, knots
Average Speed speed that is not constant
Instantaneous speed refers to speed at any instant. Example speed of a vehicle at the
instant you were reading the speedometer.
Constant speed refers to speed that does not change.
IV. Evaluation
1. Lydia de Vega is a world know Filipino track and field athlete. She can run 100m dash in about
11 seconds. What is her average speed?
2. What distance would be covered by a moving vehicle in 1 minute if its speed is 5m/s?

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Activity 6. How Fast am I?

I. Objective:
After performing this activity, you should be able to compute or calculate the speed of a moving
body.
II. Materials:
Pencil and paper
Ruler
III. Procedure:
1. Study the table below.
2. Determine the average speed of runners 1 to 3 by dividing the distance by the time taken.
Distance
Time (s)
Average Speed (m/s)
(m)
Runner 1
Runner2
Runner 3
Runner 1
Runner2
Runner 3
10
10
15
20
20
25
35
60
30
45
55
100
Note: A body that is able to reach its destination in a shortest time has the greatest speed.
IV. Questions for Analysis:
1. Compare the first runners speed to that of runners 2 and 3. ___________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2. Did each runner achieve a constant speed during his or her travel? ____________________
________________________________________________________________________
3. Show your computation for each runners average speed.
4. Plot the distance versus time graph of your data.

IV. Conclusion

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Day 2
I. Objective(s):
1. Write the correct unit of speed; and
2. Calculate speed, time and distance.

II. Topic: SPEED

III. Learning Tasks


A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation

B. Activity: Board work


Let the students compute or solve the following:
1. A bus travelled 120 kilometers in 3 hours. What is the speed of the bus?
2. If you drive a car at 100 km/hour for 6 hours, how far will you go?
2. A bullet travels at 850 m/sec. How long will it take a bullet to go 1 km?

C. Analysis
1. Based from the data given, what are the units of speed?
2. What is the equation form of speed?

D. Abstraction
Speed (V) = distance travelled
time

IV. Evaluation
1. The fastest train in the world moves at 500 km/hr. How far will you go in 3 hours?
2. The pitchers mound in baseball is 85m from the plate. If it takes 4 seconds for a pitch to reach
the plate, how fast is the pitch?

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Day 3
I. Objective(s):
1. Differentiate speed from velocity;
2. Calculate velocity of a moving object/
II. Topic: Speed and Velocity
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Explain the concept of velocity
Aside from identifying the rate of a moving body, we also take into consideration the direction of
motion. With this, we use the term velocity
Velocity is a vector quantity and it includes not just the rate but also the direction where object
moves. Simply, it is a speed with direction.
In equation, we can express velocity as:

v = d/t

Apply the concepts of velocity to the following sample problems:


1. The car is heading north covering a distance of 500 meters in 20 seconds. What is the cars
velocity?
2. Zyreens house is 5 km away from her school. How long will it take her to go to school, riding a
tricycle if its velocity is 20 km/h?
C. Analysis
1. Differentiate speed and velocity.
2. How do you determine velocity?
D. Abstraction
Velocity tells how fast an objects moves and in what direction.
In equation, we can express velocity as:
v = d/t
IV. Evaluation
A school bus traveling along a straight road from school was found to be 2.0 km, north of the school 4
minutes later. In another 4 minutes, it was 4 km west of the school.
Compare the average speed and average velocity of the bus.
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Day 4
I. Objective(s):
1. Define acceleration;
2. Write the correct unit of acceleration; and
3. Calculate acceleration of an object given the change of velocity at a given time interval.
II. Topic: Describing Motion in terms of Acceleration
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Explain the concept of Acceleration
An objects motion is constantly changing. It cannot achieve a uniform velocity as it travels.
Whenever there is a change in speed, a change in direction, or a change in both, there is a change
in velocity. This change in velocity describes acceleration. Acceleration, just like velocity, is a
vector quantity.
In equation, we can express acceleration = change in velocity / time
In symbols,

a = V ;
T

a = Vf - Vi
t

Where:

a = acceleration
t = time

Vf = final velocity
Vi = initial velocity

Apply the concepts of acceleration to the given sample problem below:


Michael is driving his sports car at 30 m/s. When he sees a dog on a road ahead, He slams on the
brakes and comes to a stop in 3 seconds. What was the acceleration of Michaels car?
C. Analysis
Compute the acceleration of the car?
D. Abstraction
Acceleration is the rate of change of motion or the change in velocity per unit time.
The unit of acceleration is m/s/s or m/s2 .
IV. Evaluation
A cyclist starts from rest and reaches a velocity of 10m/s in 5 sec. What is the acceleration of the cyclist?
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Dec. 1 to 4, 2015
Note: November 30 Bonifacio Day
Day 1
I. Objective(s):
1. Define wave; and
2. Explain how waves carry energy from one place to another.
II. Topic: Demo-Activity (Introduction to Vibrations)
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Show a demo-activity about dancing-salt.
Tell the students to place their fingers lightly on their throat while creating a sound.
C. Analysis
Based from the activity:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

What things are vibrating?


What caused the salt to move?
What do you do when you wave your hand?
Think of a still lake. How would you generate water waves on a basin?
Define wave?

D. Abstraction
Waves are caused by a source of vibration.
Waves can set objects into motion.
IV. Evaluation/Application
Why do we need to study waves? What is the significance of waves to our lives?

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Day 2

I. Objective(s):
1. Observe and draw the two types of waves; and
2. Describe how wave are produced.
II. Topic: Waves
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students do activity 1 on page 15, Grade 7 Learners Material
C. Analysis
Let the students answer the guide questions in the activity.
D. Abstraction
Wave is a periodic disturbance that moves away from a source and carries energy with it.
Wave in a rope are called transverse wave because the individual segments of the rope vibrate
parallel to the direction in which the wave travel.
When each portion of a coil spring is alternately compressed and extended, longitudinal wave
are produced.
Waves on the surface of a body of water are a combination of transverse and longitudinal
wave.
IV. Evaluation/Application
Draw/illustrate the following:
1. Longitudinal wave
2. Transverse wave

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Day 3/4
I. Objective(s):
1. Identify the different parts of wave; and
2. Define amplitude, wavelength, through and crest.
II. Topic: Anatomy of a Wave
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read the information sheet about the anatomy of a wave on page 20, Science
Learners Material.
C. Analysis
1. What are the different parts of wave?
2. Define and identify the different parts of wave:
a. crest
b. through

c. wavelength
d. amplitude

D. Abstraction
Wavelength, crest, through and amplitude are the different parts of sinusoidal wave.
Wavelength refers to the distance between any successive identical parts of the wave.
Amplitude the maximum displacement of a vibrating particle on either side of its normal
position when a wave passes.
Crest the highest point of a wave
Through refers to the lowest point of a wave
IV. Evaluation/Application
Identify the following parts of sinusoidal wave:

1
4
2

3
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December 7 11, 2015

Day 1

I. Objective(s):
1. Write the correct unit of frequency of a wave; and
2. Calculate the wave speed
II. Topic: How to Measure Frequency and Speed of a Wave
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Discuss how to measure the frequency of a wave and the formula in computing the wave
speed.
Let the students study and solve the problem below:
Suppose you observed an anchored boat to rise and fall once every 4 seconds as waves whose
crest are 25 meters apart pass by it. Compute the following:
1. What is the frequency of the observed waves?
2. What is the speed of waves?
C. Analysis
Let the students solve / answer the given problem.
D. Abstraction

The unit of frequency is Hertz (Hz)


1 Hz = 1 cycle/second
Frequency = 1/period
Wave speed = distance travelled per seconds
= frequency x wavelength

IV. Evaluation/Application
Problem Solving:
Waves in a lake are 5m in length and pass an anchored boat at 1.25 seconds apart. Find the speed of the
wave.

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Day 2 & 3
I. Objective(s):
1. Demonstrate how sound in produced;
2. Identify factors that affect pitch and loudness of the sound produced.
II. Topic: How is sound produced and transmitted?
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Group Activity
Each group must have drinking straws of different sizes;
Then, flatten the end of each straw; and
Cut both corners of each flat end and then blow into each straw.
Individual Activity
Create a sounding box by doing the activity on pages 32 to 33, G7 - Science Learners Material
C. Analysis
1. What did you observed when you blew into the straw?
2. What is the principle involved in this activity?
3. What produces sound?
4. How does sound travel in other media like solid, liquid and gas?
5. In which media does the sound travel fastest?
D. Abstraction
Any materials that vibrates produces sound;
We are able to communicate with one another and express our ideas because of sound; and
Since solid is best transmitter of sound, sound travel fastest in solids and slowest in gases.
IV. Evaluation
1. In your own word, explain how sound is produced.
2. Can sound travel in vacuum? Why or why not?

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Day 4
I. Objective(s):
1. Describe the characteristics of sound; and
2. Compare ultrasonic frequency from infrasonic frequency.
II. Topic: Properties and Characteristics of Sound
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Let the students read their Science Learners Material on pages 35 to 39. Then, let them define the
following terms:
1. Pitch
2. Ultrasonic frequency
3. Infrasonic frequency

4. Loudness
5. Oscilloscope
6. Decibel (dB)

C. Analysis
1. What are the different properties of sound?
2. Differentiate ultrasonic from infrasonic frequency.
D. Abstraction
Explain the different properties of sound.
Ultrasonic vs. Infrasonic frequency

IV. Evaluation/Application
1. Explain why voices of children, men and women vary?
2. Why are loud and discordant tones irritating to the ear?

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December 14 - 18, 2016


Day 1 & 2
I. Objective(s):
Evaluate students knowledge on the past lesson.
II. Topic: PROBING SOUND
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
1. Giving Instructions
2. Test Proper
I. Identify the correct answer.
__________ 1. It is the type of wave that needs medium to propagate.
__________ 2. It is the unit used to measure frequency of wave.
__________ 3. It is the unit of intensity level for sound.
__________ 4. It is the to and fro, back and forth movement of molecules.
__________ 5. It is an example of longitudinal wave produced by vibration.
__________ 6. It is the highness or lowness of sound.
__________ 7. It is how soft or how intense the sound is as perceived by the ear and interpreted
by the brain.
__________ 8. Body organ that detects sound.
__________ 9. They are vibrational frequency beyond 20,000 hertz (Hz).
__________ 10. They are extremely low frequencies.
__________ 11.
__________ 12.
__________ 13.
Characteristics of sound.
__________ 14.
__________ 15.
__________ 16.
__________ 17.
__________ 18.
Properties of sound.
__________ 19.
__________ 20
__________ 21.
Parts of a longitudinal wave
__________ 22.
__________ 23. It is the material or means where longitudinal wave propagate.
__________ 24. A place where sound cannot travel due to lack of matter.
__________ 25. A special sound that forms pattern and are appealing to our senses.
__________ 26. It is an instrument that is used to measure the intensity of sound.
__________ 27. It is a technology of using ultrasonic frequency to create images of internal
organs for medicinal purposes.
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II. Arrange the following source of sound according to increasing sound levels. (Use numbers 1 - 11)
_________ Normal conversation
_________ Busty street traffic
_________ Library
_________ Threshold of hearing
_________ Close whisper
_________ Normal breathing
_________ Jet engine, 30m away
_________ Threshold of pain
_________ Amplified rock music
_________ Old subway train
_________ Average factory

III. Arrange the following materials according to increasing speed of sound (Use numbers 1 - 8)
_________ Water
_________ Hardwood
_________ Aluminium
_________ Sea water
_________ Air
_________ Hydrogen
_________ Helium
_________ Iron and steel

IV. Draw and label the parts of a longitudinal wave.

V. Tell the difference between noise and music.

VI. Does ultrasonic frequency help us? Explain your answer.

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Day 3
I. Objective(s):
1. Define light;
2. Identify the different sources of light; and
3. Discuss the common properties of light.
II. Topic: Light as a Wave
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Read Science Learners Material on pages 43 to 46.
C. Analysis
Answer the following guide questions below:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

What is light?
What are the common sources of light
Who is James Clark Maxwell?
What is photometer?
What is luminous intensity?

D. Abstraction
Light is an electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength that travels in vacuum with a speed of
about 186, 281 miles or 300,000 km/seconds, specifically visible to human eye.
Natural and artificial light are the 2 sources of light.
James Clark Maxwell discovered Electromagnetic Theory of Light.
Brightness can be expressed as luminous intensity with a unit known as candela.
The brightness of a light source is called luminous intensity.
IV. Evaluation
1. Define light.
2. Give 3 examples of sources of light.
3. Who discovered the electromagnetic theory of light?

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Day 4
I. Objective(s):
1. Describe color spectrum wheel; and
2. Explore the characteristics of color light.
II. Topic: Characteristics of Color of Light
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Using a color spectrum wheel, fill in the table on page 54, G7 - Science Learners Material.
C. Analysis
Study the table on characteristics of color of lights and answer the guide questions (Q1 to Q6) on
page 54.
D. Abstraction
Color spectrum wheel shows the characteristics of color lights based on its energy, frequency
and wavelengths.
Violet has a highest frequency but it has a shortest wavelength.
Red, however, has the lowest frequency but have a longest wavelength.
Based on the color spectrum wheel, the speed of all color light in air is constant and equal to
the speed of visible light.
IV. Evaluation
1. What color has a highest frequency?
2. What color has the longest wavelength?
3. What is color spectrum wheel?

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January 4 -8, 2016


Day 1 & 2
I. Objective(s):
1. Define heat; and
2. Identify what are the modes of heat transfer.
II. Topic:
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Read unit 3, Module 5, G7 - Science LM on pages 58 to 70. Then, find the meaning of the following
words:
1. Thermal energy
2. Heat transfer
3. Temperature
4. Conduction

5. Conductor
6. Insulator
7. Convection
8. Radiation

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C. Analysis
1. You have used the word heat many times in your life. You have experienced it and have
experience its effect. But have you ever wondered what heat really is?
2. How is heat transferred between objects or places?
3. Do all objects equally conduct, absorb, or emit heat?
D. Abstraction
Heat is a form of energy that refers to the thermal energy that is in transit or in the process
of being transferred.
Heat transfer is related to change in temperature or change in the relative hotness or coldness
of an object.
Methods by which heat can be transferred:
1. Conduction heat transfer takes place between objects that are in contact with each other.
heat transfer by conduction can take place in solids and in fluids
2. Convection takes place only in fluids because it involves the movement of particles
themselves from one place to another
3. Radiation heat transfer even without the material or it takes place in the absence of
material.
IV. Evaluation

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Day 3
I. Objective(s):
1. Identify some basic concepts of heat transfer; and
2. Give examples of different kinds of heat transfer.
II. Topic: How does heat transfer?
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Draw on a bond paper an illustration or situations that involve any method of heat transfer (Refer to
page 68, G7 - Science LM)
C. Analysis
Based from their drawing, fill in the table below:
Description

Object that gives


off heat

Objects that
receives heat

What is the method


of heat transfer

D. Abstraction
Heat transfer is evident everywhere and there are several methods of heat transfer such as
conduction, convection, and radiation
Some examples of heat transfer are melting of ice cream, boiling of water, broiling of fish or
meat, toasting bread, soup in a bowl etc.
IV. Evaluation
Identify the process of heat transfer (conduction, convection & radiation) taking place in the following
situation:
1. Melting of ice
2. Drying of clothes
3. Cooking of rice

4. Boiling water
5. Broiling fish
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Day 4
I. Objective(s):
1. Define electricity;
2. Identify the different types of charges; and
3. Differentiate discharging from grounding
II. Topic: Electricity: Another Type of Energy
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
Read G7-Science LM on pages 71 and 76. Find the meaning of the following words:
1. Electricity
2. Law of Conservation of Charges
3. Electrostatic Law

4. Discharging
5. Grounding

C. Analysis
1. Differentiate discharging from grounding.
2. What are the two types of electrical charges?
3. How is electrostatic law different from law of conservation of charges?
D. Abstraction
Electricity is the energy required to operate appliances, gadgets and machines.
Positive and negative are the two types of electrical charges
The process of removing charges on an object is called discharging while grounding could take
place when the discharging is done by means of providing a path between the charged objects
and a ground.
IV. Evaluation
1. What is electricity? (2pts)
2. What are the two types of charges?
3. ________ is the process of removing charges on an objects.

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January 11 - 15, 2016

I. Objective(s):
Evaluate students knowledge for the third quarter.
II. Topic: Energy in Motion
III. Learning Tasks
A. Daily Routine
Checking of attendance
Recall and motivation
B. Activity:
THIRD PERIODICAL EXAM (2 days exam)
(See attached test paper)
IV. Checking and Recording of Test Paper

Note:
December 14 16, 2015 : Class were suspended due to Typhoon
December 18, 2015: Christmas Party
December 21, 2015 to January 3, 2016: Christmas break

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