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Name: ___________________________________________

Date: ____________________
4.OA.2 Task 2
Abby and her friend Chris each ran a lemonade stand on their streets.
Abby
lives on a busy street, but Chris does not. When Abby and Chris
compared what they had earned, Chris said, Wow! You made $200!
Thats 4 times as much
as I earned! This made Abby wonder how much Chris earned.
Look at the two models below that Abby drew to figure out how much
Chris earned.
MODEL 1

$200

Abby
Chris

MODEL 2
Abby
Chris

$200
?

$4

Which model best represents the relationship between Abby and


Chriss earnings?
circle one:

model 1

model 2

Explain why you think the model you chose best represents the
relationshhip between Abby and Chriss earnings. Then, identify the
amount of money that Chris earned at his lemonade stand.
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Elementary Mathematics Office Howard County Public School System 2013-2014

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Chris earned $_________ at his lemonade stand.


Teacher notes:
The learning targets for this task may include:
I can explain the different between multiplicative (as many times as) and
additive (more) comparisons.
I can determine when to multiply or divide in word problems
This task uses a diagram sometimes referred to as a bar diagram or a tape
diagram. The students do not need to know the name of the type of diagram.
This type of diagram is an easy way to representing multiplicative (and other types
of numeric) relationships, and it may be helpful to your students to show them how
this type of diagram can be used to help work through various mathematical
situations.
For this task, students should select model 1 as matching the problem situation
and explain how that model relates to the problem situation. Their answer should
show their understanding that Abbys amount is 4 times the size of Chriss amount
not just $4 more than Chriss. The level of specifics in the answer can help
distinguish between full and substantial accomplishment.
For the last part, students should identify that Chris earned $50. Common
incorrect answers could be $196, $204, or $800. If students write $196 or
$204, that will show that they are having trouble distinguishing between additive
and multiplicative comparison and need more practice with those types of
situations. If they write $800, while also incorrect, this will show some level of
understanding that the situation in the task is multiplicative, since $200 x 4 =
$800. Even though $800 is incorrect as well as unreasonable answer in terms of
size, it does show more understanding of the target concept than $196 or $204
would show.

Not yet: Student shows evidence of


misunderstanding, incorrect concept or
procedure.

Got It: Student essentially understands the


target concept.

Elementary Mathematics Office Howard County Public School System 2013-2014

Unsatisfactory:
Little
Accomplishment

Marginal:
Partial
Accomplishment

Proficient:
Substantial
Accomplishment

The task is attempted


and some
mathematical effort is
made. There may be
fragments of
accomplishment but
little or no success.
Further teaching is
required.

Part of the task is


accomplished, but
there is lack of
evidence of
understanding or
evidence of not
understanding. Further
teaching is required.

Student could work to


full accomplishment
with minimal feedback
from teacher. Errors
are minor. Teacher is
confident that
understanding is
adequate to
accomplish the
objective with minimal
assistance.

Excellent:
Full Accomplishment
Strategy and execution
meet the content,
process, and
qualitative demands of
the task or concept.
Student can
communicate ideas.
May have minor errors
that do not impact the
mathematics.

Adapted from Van de Walle, J. (2004) Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. Boston: Pearson Education, 65

Elementary Mathematics Office Howard County Public School System 2013-2014