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Periodic Table of Carbon Nanotubes

zigzag (m=0)

(n,m)

(1,0)

(2,0)

(3,0)

(4,0)

(5,0)

(6,0)

(7,0)

(8,0)

(9,0)

(10,0)

(11,0)

(12,0)

(13,0)

(14,0)

(15,0)

(16,0)

(17,0)

dt ()
d:dR
Eg (eV)
T ()

0.78
1:1
5.484
4.26
0
4

1.57
2:2
8.717
4.26
0
8

2.35
3:3
0.740
4.26
0
12

3.13
4:4
1.494
4.26
0
16

3.92
5:5
2.570
4.26
0
20

4.70
6:6
0.185
4.26
0
24

5.48
7:7
1.087
4.26
0
28

6.27
8:8
1.463
4.26
0
32

7.05
9:9
0.082
4.26
0
36

7.83
10:10
0.827
4.26
0
40

8.62
11:11
1.017
4.26
0
44

9.40
12:12
0.046
4.26
0
48

10.18 13:13
0.663
4.26
0
52

10.97 14:14
0.778
4.26
0
56

11.75 15:15
0.030
4.26
0
60

12.54 16:16
0.552
4.26
0
64

13.32 17:17
0.629
4.26
0
68

(1,1)

1.36

1:3
0.0

2.46

ch

a1

30
4

arm

aC

air

(2,1)

(3,1)

(4,1)

(5,1)

(6,1)

(7,1)

(8,1)

(9,1)

(10,1)

(11,1)

(12,1)

(13,1)

(14,1)

(15,1)

(16,1)

(17,1)

2.07
1:1
2.523
11.28 19.1
28

2.82
1:1
3.594
15.37 13.9
52

3.59
1:3
0.267
6.51
10.9
28

4.36
1:1
1.319
23.74
8.9
124

5.14
1:1
1.821
27.95
7.6
172

5.91
1:3
0.110
10.73
6.6
76

6.69
1:1
0.947
36.42
5.8
292

7.47
1:1
1.188
40.67
5.2
364

8.25
1:3
0.058
14.97
4.7
148

9.04
1:1
0.737
49.16
4.3
532

9.82
1:1
0.877
53.42
4.0
628

10.60
1:3
0.036
19.22
3.7
244

11.38
1:1
0.603
61.92
3.4
844

12.16
1:1
0.693
66.18
3.2
964

12.94
1:3
0.024
23.48
3.0
364

13.73
1:1
0.510
74.69
2.8
1228

(2,2)

2.71

(n=

m)

2:6
0.0

2.46

30
8

(3,2)

(4,2)

(5,2)

(6,2)

(7,2)

(8,2)

(9,2)

(10,2)

(11,2)

(12,2)

(13,2)

(14,2)

(15,2)

(16,2)

3.41
1:1
1.975
18.58 23.4
76

4.15
2:2
2.146
11.28 19.1
56

4.89
1:3
0.114
8.87
16.1
52

5.65
2:2
1.139
15.37 13.9
104

6.41
1:1
1.380
34.89 12.2
268

7.18
2:6
0.067
6.51
10.9
56

7.95
1:1
0.836
43.26
9.8
412

8.72
2:2
0.990
23.74
8.9
248

9.50
1:3
0.041
17.23
8.2
196

10.27
2:2
0.665
27.95
7.6
344

11.05
1:1
0.766
60.14
7.1
796

11.83
2:6
0.027
10.73
6.6
152

12.61
1:1
0.553
68.61
6.2
1036

13.39
2:2
0.623
36.42
5.8
584

(3,3)

4.07

3:9
0.0

a2

2.46

30
12

metallic
tubes

semimetallic
tubes

semiconducting
tubes

(4,3)

(5,3)

(6,3)

(7,3)

(8,3)

(9,3)

(10,3)

(11,3)

(12,3)

(13,3)

(14,3)

(15,3)

(16,3)

4.77
1:1
1.509
25.93 25.3
148

5.48
1:1
1.529
29.84 21.8
196

6.22
3:3
0.057
11.28 19.1
84

6.96
1:1
0.980
37.89 17.0
316

7.72
1:1
1.104
41.99 15.3
388

8.47
3:3
0.043
15.37 13.9
156

9.24
1:1
0.744
50.26 12.7
556

10.00
1:1
0.844
54.43 11.7
652

10.77
3:9
0.030
6.51
10.9
84

11.54
1:1
0.604
62.80 10.2
868

12.31
1:1
0.678
67.00
9.5
988

13.09
3:3
0.021
23.74
8.9
372

13.86
1:1
0.510
75.42
8.4
1252

(4,4)

5.43

4:12
0.0

2.46

30
16

(5,4)

(6,4)

(7,4)

(8,4)

(9,4)

(10,4)

(11,4)

(12,4)

(13,4)

(14,4)

(15,4)

6.12
1:1
1.206
33.30 26.3
244

6.83
2:2
1.191
18.58 23.4
152

7.56
1:3
0.032
13.70 21.1
124

8.29
4:4
0.852
11.28 19.1
112

9.04
1:1
0.919
49.16 17.5
532

9.79
2:6
0.028
8.87
16.1
104

10.54
1:1
0.668
57.35 14.9
724

11.30
4:4
0.734
15.37 13.9
208

12.06
1:3
0.022
21.88 13.0
316

12.83
2:2
0.553
34.89 12.2
536

13.59
1:1
0.606
73.96 11.5
1204

(5,5)

6.78

5:15
0.0

The semi-empirical bandgap Eg is calculated following H. Yorikawa and S. Muramatsu, Phys. Rev. B 52,
2723 (1995) for the semiconducting tubes (no curvature effects; |Vppp|=2.7 and g=0.43) and A. Kleiner
and S. Eggert, Phys. Rev. B 63, 073408 (2001) for the semi-metallic tubes (includes curvature; |Vppp|=2.7).
All other values are evaluated from the expressions below.

2.46

30
20

(6,5)

(7,5)

(8,5)

(9,5)

(10,5)

(11,5)

(12,5)

(13,5)

(14,5)

(15,5)

7.47
1:1
1.000
40.67 27.0
364

8.18
1:1
0.978
44.51 24.5
436

8.90
1:3
0.020
16.14 22.4
172

9.63
1:1
0.749
52.38 20.6
604

10.36
5:5
0.788
11.28 19.1
140

11.11
1:3
0.020
20.15 17.8
268

11.86
1:1
0.604
64.51 16.6
916

12.61
1:1
0.649
68.61 15.6
1036

13.36
1:3
0.016
24.24 14.7
388

14.12
5:5
0.508
15.37 13.9
260

(6,6)

8.14

6:18
0.0

2.46

30
24

(7,6)

(8,6)

(9,6)

(10,6)

(11,6)

(12,6)

(13,6)

(14,6)

8.83
1:1
0.853
48.04 27.5
508

9.53
2:2
0.830
25.93 25.3
296

10.24
3:3
0.013
18.58 23.4
228

10.97
2:2
0.667
29.84 21.8
392

11.70
1:1
0.689
63.66 20.4
892

12.44
6:6
0.014
11.28 19.1
168

13.18
1:1
0.550
71.71 18.0
1132

13.93
2:2
0.581
37.89 17.0
632

(7,7)

9.50

7:21
0.0

2.46

30
28

2006 Atomistix A/S

(8,7)

(9,7)

(10,7)

(11,7)

(12,7)

(13,7)

(14,7)

10.18
1:1
0.743
55.42 27.8
676

10.88
1:1
0.722
59.22 25.9
772

11.59
1:3
0.009
21.03 24.2
292

12.31
1:1
0.600
67.00 22.7
988

13.04
1:1
0.613
70.95 21.4
1108

13.77
1:3
0.011
24.98 20.2
412

14.51
7:7
0.505
11.28 19.1
196

(8,8)

(9,8)

(10,8)

(11,8)

(12,8)

(13,8)

10.86
8:24
0.0
2.46
30
32

11.54
1:1
0.658
62.80 28.1
868

12.24
2:2
0.639
33.30 26.3
488

12.94
1:3
0.007
23.48 24.8
364

13.66
4:4
0.545
18.58 23.4
304

14.38
1:1
0.552
78.26 22.2
1348

(9,9)

(10,9)

(11,9)

(12,9)

(13,9)

12.21
9:27
0.0
2.46
30
36

12.90
1:1
0.590
70.18 28.3
1084

13.59
1:1
0.573
73.96 26.7
1204

14.30
3:3
0.005
25.93 25.3
444

15.01
1:1
0.498
81.67 24.0
1468

(10,10)

(11,10)

(12,10)

13.57 10:30
0.0
2.46
30
40

14.25
1:1
0.535
77.56 28.4
1324

14.95
2:2
0.520
40.67 27.0
728

(11,11)

(12,11)

14.93 11:33
0.0
2.46
30
44

15.61
1:1
0.489
84.94 28.6
1588

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Bloch function of a (4,4) carbon nanotube,


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