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Definition of Cv from Crane TP-410 (p.

2-10):
Rate of flow of water, in gpm, at 60F, at a pressure drop of 1psi across the valve
i.e.
Rate of flow of water, in gpm, at 60F, at a pressure drop of 1 psi for a valve with
effective area, A, and resistance, K
Expression for Cv from Crane TP-410 (p. 3-4):
Cv = Q

P (62.4 )

29.9d 2
f L

29.9d 2
K

Where:
Q flow rate (gpm)
P pressure drop (psi)
fluid density (lb/ft3)
d effective diameter (in2)
K resistance coefficient (non-dimensional)
The following are not specified in TP-410, and these omissions make the equation
confusing:
The units of the 62.4 presented
The units of the 29.9 presented
Rearranging:
Q = Cv
Q=

P (62.4 )

29.9d 2
K

P(62.4 )

I determined that the units of 62.4 are lb/ft3. A similar equation for Cv in the Fischer
Control Valve Handbook (p. 114) uses the specific gravity in the square root term. Since
62.4 is the density of water, /62.4 is the specific gravity.
The 29.9 is less simple. It was more intuitive for me to think of d2 as an effective area
rather than an effective diameter squared. I therefore translated the equation to:

29.9d 2 = 38.08 d 2 = 38.08 A


4
Where A is the area. The new equation becomes:

Q=

38.08 A P (62.4 )
K

Based on the definition of Cv, this means that for water at 60F with a valve that has an
effective area A = 1in2, a resistance K = 1, and P = 1psi, the flow is equal to 38.08gpm
(the specific gravity of water at 60F = 1).
In terms of units, then, the equation looks like:

gpm 2
in
gpm = 2
in psi

( )

psi

So the equation becomes:

gpm
A P 62.4 lb
38.08 2
ft 3
in psi

Q=

K
For the sake of consistency with the established equations, A can be put back in terms of
d2 :

gpm 2
d
38.08 2
in psi 4

Q=
K
gpm 2
d
29.9 2
in psi

Q=
K

lb
P 62.4 3
ft

lb
P 62.4 3
ft

Now this equation can be meaningfully converted to the metric system. The constant
becomes:

3
5
gpm 6.309 10 m s

29.9 2
in psi
gpm

1.550 10 3 in 2

m2

m3

1.204 10 2 psi

2
s

= 3.520 10 2

Pa
m Pa

And the equation therefore becomes:

m3

3.520 10 2 2 s
m Pa
3

m
Q
=
s
K

( )

P(Pa )
Gf

Where Gf is the specific gravity of the fluid.


Just to check my work, I will try a random mix of values for the 2 equations:
For water at 60F, P = 13.2psi, K = 2.27, and d = 1.75in:
13.2psi = 9.101x104Pa
1.75in = 4.445x10-2m

Q=

(29.9)(1.75)2
2.27

13.2 = 220.81gpm

(3.520 10 )(4.445 10 )
Q=

2 2

2.27

220.81gpm = 1.393 10 2

9.10110 4 = 1.393 10 2

m3
s

m3
s

It appears that the translation to metric units worked correctly.