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READING AND WRITING

CONTENT
CONTENT STANDARDS
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
LEARNING COMPETENCIES
SPECIFIC LEARNING OUTCOMES
TIME ALLOTMENT

Purposeful Writing in the Disciplines and for Professions


The learner understands the requirements of composing academic writing and professional
correspondence.
The learner produces each type of academic writing and professional correspondence following the
properties
The learner produces each type of academic writing and professional correspondence following the
properties of well-written texts and process approach to writing. (EN11/12RWS-IVhj-13)
At the end of the lesson, the learners are able to:
1. Identify the unique features and requirements in composing a professional resume.
(EN11/12RWS-IVhj-13.1)
90 minutes

LESSON OUTLINE:
During the lesson, the learners will:
1. Introduction/Review: Give their thoughts about the Learning Competency (10 minutes)
2. Motivation: Relate the importance of the Resume to their chosen exit point from Senior High School (15 minutes)
3. Instruction/Delivery: Understand why resumes are important, and what the qualities are that make it outstanding (30 minutes)
4. Practice: Critiquing of sample Resumes and identifying qualities which make the resumes either good or bad (35 minutes)
5. Enrichment: Encoding of a resume on the computer following a recommended format (Take home activity)
6. Evaluation: Critiquing of a poorly constructed Resume and editing it, as necessary
MATERIALS

1. Projector and downloaded video clip


2. Copies of the two resumes for critiquing
3. Copy of the list of action verbs in describing accomplishments (See Appendix A)
Spencer, Linda. How to Write a Great Resume and Cover Letter. September 21, 2012.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAthQKLhBTs. Accessed January 6, 2016.
Harvard Law School, Bernard Koteen Office of Public Interest Advising (OPIA) website. Action Verbs.
http://hls.harvard.edu/dept/opia/job-search-toolkit/action-verbs/. Accessed January 6, 2016.

RESOURCES

What Is the Best Resume Font, Size and Format? http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/what-is-the-bestfont-for-your-resume-infographic/. Accessed January 6, 2016.
Writing a Good Resume: Student Critique and Practice Exercise.
http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/writing-good-resume-career-readiness.shtml
Accessed January 6, 2016.

READING AND WRITING


PROCEDURE
INTRODUCTION (10 minutes)
1. Relay the learning competency to the learners and have them copy it in their notebooks:
I will identify the unique features and requirements in composing
a professional resume.
2. Ask the students the following questions:
a. Why do we need to write a resume?
b. What do you think makes a good resume?
MOTIVATION (15 minutes)
1. Inform the students that resumes are, and why they are important:
A resume is a summary of background, skills and qualifications, which is sent to employers
for review. Consider it to be your personal marketing brochure with the goal of gaining the
employers attention and to giving them the information they need to bring you to the next
step in the hiring process, an interview.
Your resume is often the first document that an employer would typically look at, so it serves
as your first impression in the employment process. A well-written and formatted resume
tells the employer a lot about your professionalism, and improves the chances for receiving
an interview. Consider that employers compare resumes to decide who to interview.
2. Remind them that the exit points of Senior High School are to prepare them either for
employment, entrepreneurship, skills development, or higher education. In selecting which of
these exit points they are most likely to consider after Grade 12, they need to make a powerful
resume since each of these exit point would definitely need a resume.
INSTRUCTION/DELIVERY (30 minutes)
1. Tell the students as to how good resumes are written:
a. The best way to begin writing your resume is do a self-assessment. Think of past
successes and achievements that you have experienced and write them down. These
could be related to academics, volunteer activities or work experience and can even
include things like travel, hobbies or any life experience where you learned and grew.
Once you have finished brainstorming, narrow down the points that you want to focus on
and prioritize them based on their applicability to qualities an employer may find
important. You dont have to include every single point on your resume; quality is always
better than quantity.

MEETING THE LEARNERS NEEDS


Teacher Tip:
You may add more questions to the
related guide questions, focusing but
not limited to the following:
a. Format (Font, number of pages,
presence of a picture)
b. Purpose
c. Parts
Teacher Tip:
It is best if the students could
immediately pinpoint their most possible
SHS exit point. Likewise, different types
of resumes could then be fit for each
type of class.
For example, if the student chooses
higher education, the students may be
given a resume that focuses on
preparing a resume for college
application.
On the other hand, if the student
chooses employment, the students may
be given a resume that focuses on
preparing for a job. The classified ads
will come most handy in this activity.
Teacher Tip:
Encourage the students to also ask
some questions about the resume. Their
questions might not necessarily be
answered on the spot, although it would
be good if the questions would be
answered with a thought or so.
If their questions could not be
immediately answered, note these

READING AND WRITING


b.

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Quantify your accomplishments and help the reader to understand what you are capable
of. It is not just what you are able to do, but how well you can do the job being pursued.
By presenting specifics, the reader will gain a much better picture of your skill set and add
to your credibility. Ask yourself questions like: How did I improve something? What did I
learn and how did I grow? What skill did I demonstrate? How did my employer benefit
from my work?
c. Position your resume by considering the qualifications and requirements for the job being
pursued and addressing those in the resume. For example, if you are seeking a position
that requires strong analytical skills, you will need to write about your analytical skills and
how you use them to resolve problems. One technique for doing this is called C.A.R.,
which stands for Challenge, Action and Result. Write about a challenge you had, the
action you took to meet that challenge and what the result was.
d. Resume writing is an ongoing process and will likely continue throughout your career.
Gain feedback from employment professionals, peers, industry insiders, friends and
family and always keep your resume up to date.
Show a sample of a good resume.
Inform the learners that they will be watching video, and that they will only view it once.
Play the video once. (Spencer, Linda. How to Write a Great Resume and Cover Letter. Sep 21,
2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAthQKLhBTs. Accessed January 6, 2016.)
After playing the video, ask the students to write down important points they got. Allow them to
jot down these points in their notebooks. Give them a minute to do this.
Call three to five students to share their insights to the class.

PRACTICE (35 minutes)


1. Provide two sample resumes for students to review. One comes from a high school graduate
with little motivation, job experience or sense of professionalism. The other is from a sharp
student who graduated from a state university and has been active acquiring several skill sets.
2. Go over both resumes as a class. First, have students spend a few minutes writing down errors
and needed improvements in the first resume.
3. Next, go over the second resume. Compare and contrast the two resumes, explaining why the
second students is better and writing these aspects and reasons on the board or chart
paper. Students also can suggest improvements the second student could have made.
4. You may want to note that there is no single best way to structure a resume. Additional sections
that could have been included in the samples are Computer Skills, Honors and Awards, and
School Activities. Ultimately, the resume should be tailored to the specific job for which one is
applying.

questions on the board and have the


students, and you yourself, research
answers to these questions.
These questions may fall under tips to
writing a good resume, or why a singlepage resume is better than a three-page
one, or the best format in writing a good
resume.

Teacher Tip:
Students may seek existing copies of
actual resumes, either from friends or
their family members, and have them
gloss over these copies. They may then
use these versions for Practice.

READING AND WRITING


Here are some points to cover when reviewing the sample resumes.
Sample missteps in the first resume:
a. Unprofessional, cutesy email address.
b. The Statement of Objective and Summary are unprofessional and not workplace-relevant.
Photography might be a skill for her, but she has not emphasized how she has used this
skill professionally.
c. Time availability should not be included on a resume.
d. There are several typos.
e. Uses unprofessional wording (e.g., "awesome," "cool," "cute," "pics"), as well as
inappropriate clipart and exclamation points, which have no place in a resume.
f. No date is listed for her high school diploma; there is no description of coursework that
might be relevant to the workplace.
g. Her work history isnt in order (jobs should be listed in reverse chronological order), and
she included a questionable volunteer experience (cupcake tester) under Work
Experience.
h. Her descriptions of past job duties fail to emphasize skills gained (e.g., "flip burgers and
fill condiment containers"), and also reflect negatively on her customer service skills (e.g.,
"deal with annoying customer requests").
i. Includes information that doesnt pertain to job skills (hobbies should only be listed if they
are highly related to the job for which one is applying) (ex. Eye color, height, religion)
Sample good qualities in the second resume:
a. Based on the professionally stated objective, there are listed skills that are relevant to his
chosen career field.
b. Had no spelling errors or inappropriate/unprofessional wording.
c. Arranged his work history in reverse chronological order.
d. Described past job duties in a way that emphasizes his skills and leadership qualities.
ENRICHMENT (Take home activity)
It would be great to have the students create their own resume and encode it directly on a computer. If
ever the students would have access to a computer, remind them of the following format in creating a
good resume:
Resume fonts & sizes:
a. The most common font to use is Times New Roman, in black and size 12 points.
b. Other serif fonts (with tails) to consider that are easy to read include: Georgie, Bell MT,
Goudy Old Style, Garamond.
c. Popular sans serif (no tails) fonts include: Arial, Tahoma, Century Gothic and Lucida
Sans.

Teacher Tip:
Students may cite a specific job or
university they want to apply for from an
announcement
in
the
Classified
Advertisement
section
of
the
newspaper. You may want to have them
do a simulation where students create
their
own
resumes,
given
the
advertisement
as
a
prospective
opportunity.

READING AND WRITING


d. Any of the above fonts would be reasonable for a resume as long as you consistently use
one font only.
e. Make your headings and name stand out, think of your resume like a blog post or
newspaper article.
f. Make headlines bold, Italicize, capitalize or underline. And feel free to increase the font
size to 14-16 points.
g. Try and keep your resume to one page, leave the reader wanting to know more.
Resume formats:
Resume formats are a bit more debatable than resume font or size. But, obviously you want the most
important information first.
a. Contact information. List your full name, address and contact information at the top of the
page. You should center the information and be sure to bold and capitalize your name.
b. Value statement. State the role you are applying for and what values you bring to the job.
Objectives state what you are trying to accomplish, value statements explain why you
should be hired.
c. Core strength. List industry keywords and specific skill-sets that pertain to your job and
industry. This is a high level overview of your qualifications and industry knowledge.
d. Experience. However, if education is not the strongest component of your resume, go
ahead and list your experience first, starting with your most current job and all your
responsibilities.
e. Education. Clearly state your schooling from the most recent institution youve attended,
with all dates, locations and certification received.
f. Honors & awards. After education and experience, you can list your professional skills
and any relevant awards or certifications.
EVALUATION
Provide the students with a sample of a resume for critique. They are needed to highlight the areas for
improvement and the strong points of the resume. They will then rewrite the sample resume in a
separate sheet of paper. (See Appendix B at the end of this lesson.)

Teacher Tip:
It is better to have quantitative
comments than qualitative grades for
this evaluation. Students might have
different takes on editing the resumes
(they might not be able to see all strong
points and areas for improvement). The
important thing is that they start to
recognize the importance of the resume,
and how it can be improved.

READING AND WRITING


APPENDIX A: From Harvard Law School
Bernard Koteen Office of Public Interest Advising (OPIA)
Below is a list of action verbs to assist you in describing your experiences and accomplishments:
accelerated
accomplished
achieved
acquired
activated
adapted
adjusted
administered
advised
allocated
analyzed
annotated
anticipated
applied
appraised
arranged
articulated
assembled
assessed
assigned
authored
balanced
briefed
budgeted
built
catalogued
categorized
chaired
clarified
cleared
coded
collaborated

compared
compiled
completed
composed
computed
conducted
consolidated
constructed
contacted
continued
contracted
convened
conveyed
coordinated
corresponded
counseled
created
critiqued
decided
defined
delegated
delivered
demonstrated
derived
designed
detected
determined
developed
devised
directed
distributed
drafted

edited
educated
effected
elicited
encouraged
established
evaluated
examined
executed
exhibited
expanded
expedited
experienced
experimented
explained
explored
facilitated
figured
financed
focused
forecasted
formed
formulated
fostered
founded
functioned
generated
governed
grouped
guided
helped
identified

illustrated
immunized
implemented
improved
increased
informed
initiated
instituted
instructed
interpreted
interviewed
introduced
invented
investigated
judged
led
listened
maintained
managed
marketed
mastered
measured
mediated
modeled
modified
molded
monitored
motivated
named
negotiated
observed
obtained
wrote

operated
ordered
organized
originated
outlined
oversaw
perceived
performed
persuaded
planned
planted
presented
presided
printed
produced
protected
provided
publicized
questioned
raised
recommended
recorded
recruited
reduced
rendered
repaired
reported
represented
reproduced
researched
resolved
responded
verified

restored
retained
retrieved
reviewed
revised
rewrote
routed
scheduled
searched
selected
served
shaped
shared
showed
simplified
solicited
solved
specified
spoke
stimulated
structured
studied
supervised
supported
synthesized
targeted
taught
tested
trained
translated
tutored
updated
utilized

READING AND WRITING


APPENDIX B: Sample Resume for Evaluation