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Training Manual
Training Manual
Training Manual
Training Manual

Training Manual

Training Manual EX-1 Direct-View LCD Television Chassis Circuit Description and Troubleshooting Guide MODELS: KDL-32VL140

EX-1 Direct-View LCD Television Chassis

Circuit Description and Troubleshooting Guide

MODELS:

KDL-32VL140 KDL-40W4100 KDL-46W4100 KDL-52W4100 KDL40VL160 KDL-32XBR6 KDL-40WL140 KDL-46WL140 KDL-52WL140 KDL46VL160 KDL-37XBR6 KDL-40XBR6 KDL-46XBR6 KDL-52XBR6 KDL-40V4100 KDL-40Z4100 KDL-46Z4100 KDL-52V4100 KDL-40V4150 KDL-46V4100 KDL-42V4100 Course : CTV-45

Chapter 1 – Introduction Overview Features Full HD 1080 Panel Motionflow™ Enhanced Cross Media Bar

Chapter 1 – Introduction Overview Features

Full HD 1080 Panel Motionflow™ Enhanced Cross Media Bar (XMB) HDMI 1.3

Consumer Electronics Control (CEC) xvYCC Deep Color

Bravia® Sync Advanced Contrast Enhancer (ACE) Digital Media Port Digital Media Extender (DMEX) Interactive Program Guide (IPG) Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) 4 HDMI Inputs

Chapter 2 – Overall Block Diagrams Overview Overall Block Diagrams The V Series

32/37-inch Models Overall Block Diagram Board Layout 42-inch Model Board Layout 40 and 46-inch Models

Table of Contents

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

4

6

8

8

11

Board Layout

11

52-inch V Series Models

14

Board Layout

14

The W Series

14

60HZ versus 120HZ TCON

17

40 and 46-inch Models

18

Board Layout

18

Chapter 3 – Video Process Circuits

22

Overview

22

V and W Series Video Process Circuits

22

NTSC Tuner Signals

22

Composite and Y/C inputs

22

Component Inputs

22

HDMI Inputs

22

PC Input

23

Front End Microprocessor and Decoder

23

Back End Microprocessor

23

LCD Panel

23

10-bit Video Processing

25

Ethernet Port

25

USB 2.0 Input

25

Digital Media Port

25

Troubleshooting

27

No Video

27

Video Distortions

27

Troubleshooting Flowcharts

27

Table of Contents (Continued) Chapter 4 – Audio Process Circuits Overview General Audio Processing HDMI

Table of Contents (Continued)

Chapter 4 – Audio Process Circuits Overview

General Audio Processing HDMI USB 2.0 Ethernet (DLNA)

Troubleshooting

Chapter 5 - Power Supply Overview

G1D/G2D Power Supplies

29

29

29

29

29

29

29

31

31

31

Power-Up Sequence

39

Inverter Circuit

39

42-inch Backlighting

42

40/46 V and W Series Backlighting

43

Inverter

43

Balancer

45

40/46 Z Series Backlighting

47

All 52-inch Series Backlighting

47

G5

Board

47

D4

Board

47

D5

Board

47

Power Factor Control (PFC)

31

Troubleshooting

50

Standby Power Supply

31

Inverter Failures

50

Main Switching Supply

31

Inverter Does Not Start

50

IP5 Power Supply and Inverter

33

Inverter Starts and Turns Off

50

Integrated Lamp Inverter

33

Dual Inverter Circuits

51

G4 Power Supply

33

Balancer Errors

51

PFC Output

33

Troubleshooting Flowcharts

52

G5 Power Supply

Troubleshooting

Completely Dead Unit Power Supply Shutdown Power Supply Troubleshooting Flowchart

33

37

37

37

37

Balancer Board Removal

52

Chapter 7 – Protect Circuits

58

Overview

58

Voltage Protection

58

 

DC

Detect (2X)

58

Chapter 6 - Panel Backlight Circuits

39

DC

Alert (3X)

58

Overview

39

Backlight Protection

58

32/37-inch Backlighting

39

Inverter Error (6X)

58

 

Balancer Error (13X)

59

Table of Contents (Continued) Other Protection 59 Troubleshooting a “Dead” TCON 80 Temperature (7X) 59

Table of Contents (Continued)

Other Protection

59

Troubleshooting a “Dead” TCON

80

Temperature (7X)

59

DLNA Overview

82

Speaker Protect (8X)

59

Trident (11X)

59

TCON or HFR (12X 14X)

59

Diagnostics History

61

Troubleshooting Flowcharts

61

Troubleshooting Test Points

61

Chapter 8 – Appendix

69

Software Updates

69

Why Update?

69

Checking the Version of Software

69

Performing the Update

71

Downloading an Update

72

Formatting the USB Device

72

Installing the File(s) to the USB Device

72

Updating the Television

73

Notification of Update

73

FE Micro Update

73

BE Micro Update

73

Update Completion

73

LCD Panel Troubleshooting

76

LCD Panel Basics

76

Panel Failures

77

Physical Failures

TCON Failures

77

79

Chapter 1 – Introduction

Overview

The EX-1 chassis is one of several designs for the 2008 model line of Sony Bravia® LCD televisions. 22 models are available as of this writing ranging from 32” to 52”. The models are grouped in categories beginning with the V series as an introductory product for a full HD 1080 panel. The W series is an intermediate level product and introduces a frame doubling circuit known as Motionflow™ to provide a 120HZ refresh rate. Upgrade level televisions are available in the Z and XBR series models.

NOTE: Although there are 5 XBR models, the 32 and 37-inch models are classified as entry-level models in that they do not contain the features found in the 40, 46, and 52-inch models. When referring to the XBR series, the term “small XBR” and “large XBR” will be used when necessary.

The chassis design revolves around the video processing circuits located on the BU board. It remains relatively the same except for a couple of additional input features and 10-bit video processing found on the upper- end models. The key difference between models is determined by the size of the LCD panel and its manufacturing source. This manual will describe the new circuit features and individually describe the models based on these differences.

Features

Several new features are introduced in the EX-1 chassis model lineup along with some carryovers from the previous year. The included features will vary based on the model series and will be indicated in the following descriptions:

Full HD 1080 Panel

All models have a 1920 X 1080 native resolution panel. All video signals exit the video process circuits as 1080p 60HZ. The V, W and 32/37XBR6 series utilize an 8-bit panel and video processing while the Z and larger XBR6 models use a 10-bit panel and video processing.

Motionflow™

A frame-doubling circuit utilizing proprietary circuitry and algorithms is able

to capture and compare the movement from one frame to another. By anticipating the location of a moving object, an additional frame is inserted to increase the frame refresh rate from 60HZ to 120HZ. The result is an exceptionally smooth picture during fast moving objects and scenes. This feature is available on the W, Z, and large XBR6 models.

The customer has the option of changing the settings of the Motion Enhancement and Motion Compensation circuits to smooth the “judder” inherent with 24-frame film-based content or can choose keep the judder for a film-like experience.

Enhanced Cross Media Bar (XMB)

A new graphics user interface with rich 3-D graphics allowing the user to

customize the setup of the television and to access various adjustments and control of optional devices. Optional external devices can also be detected and displayed. An example would be when a customer plugs

in the Bravia Internet Video Link device to access the internet. When the

device is detected, additional icons appear in the XMB graphics OSD to allow control of the device. Other optional devices will become available and will be described later.

Chapter 1 - Introdcution

Chapter 1 - Introdcution

HDMI 1.3

This new version of HDMI introduces several new enhancements and features and the EX-1 chassis supports 3 of the new features.

Consumer Electronics Control (CEC)

A standardized protocol for the control of consumer electronics devices

allows for communication and control via the HDMI cable on products that have this feature. Any brand of electronic equipment that is CEC compliant can communicate with another to generate operational commands. The Bravia Sync feature uses the CEC format to control other Sony devices

in the system.

xvYCC

The previous color bandwidth limitations applied for compatibility with analog signals are no longer present with digital signals. This allows for 1.8 times more colors.

Deep Color

The previous HDMI specifications limited the RGB sample level to 24-bit. Deep Color expands this up to 48-bit giving the ability to generate a color depth of 2.8 trillion levels.

Bravia® Sync

By utilizing the CEC feature of HDMI 1.3, this feature allows the customer

to easily control the various Sony devices within their home entertainment

system provided that all of the other devices have this feature included.

Advanced Contrast Enhancer (ACE)

By monitoring the overall level of the video signal, the backlights are dynamically controlled and reduced during low light level scenes to enhance the contrast ratio.

Digital Media Port

Found on the high-end models, this port allows for the hookup of optional devices that provide an interface with digital media products such as MP3 players and video cameras.

Digital Media Extender (DMEX)

A USB 1.0 port is provided to supply a digital connection path to optional modules such as the Bravia Internet Video Link. Selected web sites on the internet can be accessed to play video clips or view local news, traffic, and weather. Devices connected will automatically appear on the XMB menu.

Interactive Program Guide (IPG)

An interactive guide is included to provide continuously updated program information at no charge to the customer. The guide (provided by TV Guide) is part of the XMB graphics feature. Program material is updated from the local PBS station when the television is off.

Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA)

An industry standard networking protocol has been developed by leading manufacturers to allow other devices such as a compatible computer to communicate with the television via an Ethernet connection to your home network. This gives the ability to view photos, audio and movie content directly from your computer via the network. If there are any firmware upgrades available for the television, these can be downloaded to the computer and sent directly to the television. The 2008 models in this training manual will only support photos. Music and video media is not supported.

4 HDMI Inputs

3 inputs in the rear and one on the side are available for all models. This increases the available inputs to meet the expanding needs of additional devices.

Chapter 2 – Overall Block Diagrams

Overview

The EX1 chassis for the 2008 model year is found in 22 models as of this writing. The focal point of this chassis is the video processing circuits located on the BU board. The digital decoder for ATSC signals along with the video process IC remains the same among the models. As one moves from the entry level models to the higher end units, additional features are added to the video process circuits to extend the amount of components that the television can interface with. This includes computer networking and digital media devices. The Z models, along with the 40-inch and up XBR6 series, utilize a 10-bit processing scheme for the LCD panel versus 8-bit for the others.

The major factor separating the various models in the chassis line (other than cosmetics) is panel size along with the original source of the particular LCD panel in that model. These factors are what will determine how the overall block diagrams are segregated. Different panel sizes require different inverter circuits to light the backlights and that includes differences in the power supplies.

The EX1 chassis model lineup is separated into 3 categories:

V Series: These are the introductory level models for those wishing to

purchase a full HD 1920 X 1080 panel. It includes all those with a “V” in the model number. Also included in this series is the smaller (32 and 37- inch) XBR6 models.

W Series: Classified as intermediate level units, these models have the 120HZ frame-rate feature (known as MotionFlow™) added to significantly increase the picture quality especially during fast moving scenes. They will have a “W” in the model number.

Z

Series: As upper-level models, additional features are included to

enhance picture quality. This includes 10-bit LCD panels, 120HZ refresh rate and Wide Color Gamut backlights. Additional features include an Ethernet port, USB 2.0 port and Digital Media port to interface with the customer’s computer and portable devices.

Overall Block Diagrams

The following block diagrams illustrate an overall view of the various circuits used and will be categorized based on panel size and video features. Circuit descriptions will begin with the entry-level V series. There are several similar circuits among the entire model line and these descriptions will be discussed. As the diagrams and descriptions progress up the model line, only the differences in boards and circuitry will be explained. More detailed information for each circuit will appear in the chapters to follow.

The V Series

This series consists of the following models:

KDL32VL140

KDL32XBR6

KDL37XBR6

KDL40V4100

KDL40V4150

KDL42V4100

KDL46V4100

KDL52V4100

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

32/37-inch Models Overall Block Diagram

Figure 2-1 illustrates an overall block diagram of the models utilizing the 32 and 37-inch LCD panels. This includes the KDL32VL140, KDL32XBR6 and KDL37XBR6.

BU Board

Essentially the “brains” of the system, this board contains all of the input sources for video and audio information along with an on-board ATSC/ NTSC combination tuner. It also contains all of the video and audio switching and processing circuits. The front-end (FE) and back-end (BE) microprocessors to control the operation of the television and the video processor functions are located here. All video sources exit the BU board at the native resolution of the LCD panel (1920 X 1080, 60HZ).

The BU board used in these models is specifically configured for the panel types and sizes used. This includes physical, electrical and software configurations. Other models will have additional inputs, different processing schemes and different software which make the BU board specific to the panel type being used.

Note that all input sources are directly connected to the BU board. The past use of separate boards for input switching, tuner, ATSC decoder and side video inputs has all been incorporated onto this single board.

Power Supply

The 32-inch models contain a G1D board to provide the main operating voltages for the television. It supplies operating voltages to the BU board along with 24VDC for the inverter. The 37-inch model uses a G2D board which is essentially the same except the circuitry is designed to handle the increased current load of the larger panel.

Inverter

The inverter is mounted on the left side of the LCD panel (as viewed from the rear) and contains all of the circuitry necessary to generate the 1KVAC operating voltage for the fluorescent backlights. It also contains on-board monitoring circuits to maintain even brightness among the lamps and to notify the BE Micro on the BU board if there is a failure of the inverter or if one or more of the lamps fails to light.

H1 Board

Located at the top of the unit, the various user input buttons (power, channel and volume up/down, menu and input selection) are located here. The H1 board is mounted to the switch housing and is referred to as the “switch” or “function” block in the service manual.

H2 Board

The power, timer and standby LED’s are located on this board.

H3 Board

This board contains the IR receiver LED for the remote control. The same LED also serves as an ambient light sensor. All EX1 chassis models have the ability to automatically adjust the picture brightness and contrast level based on ambient lighting conditions. This feature is turned off by default but can be turned on by the customer in the user menu.

LCD Panel

The 32 and 37-inch panels are full HD (1920 X 1080) utilizing Cold Cathode Fluorescent (CCFL) backlights. There are 16 lamps on the 32-inch and 20 on the 37-inch. The TCON board mounted to the panel is responsible for proper timing and allocation of the RGB data to the correct columns of LCD pixels. White balance and Gamma correction data is also stored on this board. This is why the TCON is not available as a separate service item. If there is a failure in the fluorescent backlights, TCON or the LCD panel, they must be replaced as a single unit.

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
RF L VIDEO 1 VIDEO 3 R COMPONENT 1 COMPONENT 2 A/V DECODER HDMI 1
RF
L
VIDEO 1
VIDEO 3
R
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
A/V DECODER
HDMI 1
VIDEO PROCESS
HDMI 3
VIDEO SWITCH
AUDIO PROCESS
HDMI 4
AUDIO AMP
DVI AUDIO
BE MICRO
TCON
INVERTER
PC HD15
L/R AUDIO OUT
OPTICAL OUT
BU
LCD PANEL
USB 1.1
VIDEO 2
HDMI 2
SIDE INPUTS
POWER SUPPLY
IR
SWITCHES
LED
RECEIVER
G1D (32")
H1
H3
H4
G2D (37")

FIGURE 2-1 32/37-INCH OVERALL BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Board Layout

Figure 2-2 shows the board layout for the KDL32XBR6 and Figure 2-3 for the KDL37XBR6. Note that each picture illustrates the unit in assembled form. If the unit requires complete disassembly to replace the LCD panel these pictures provide guidance for the proper placement and routing of the various cables and wire harnesses. It is important that these be routed in their original positions to minimize EMI emissions.

H1 (FUNCTION BLOCK) TCON INVERTER BU G1D H4 H3E
H1
(FUNCTION
BLOCK)
TCON
INVERTER
BU
G1D
H4
H3E

FIGURE 2-2 32-INCH CIRCUIT BOARD LAYOUT

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
H1 (FUNCTION BLOCK) TCON INVERTER G2D BU H4 H3E
H1
(FUNCTION
BLOCK)
TCON
INVERTER
G2D
BU
H4
H3E

FIGURE 2-3 37-INCH CIRCUIT BOARD LOCATIONS

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

42-inch Model

The KDL42V4100 model is unique in that the LCD panel configuration is unlike any of the other models. Referring to Figure 2-4, note that this model uses the same GD2 power supply found in the 37-inch model. The G2D board has an extra connector for supplying 24VDC and is used in this model to supply power to the second inverter board.

2 stand-alone inverters are used to drive the fluorescent backlights. Each inverter board drives 10 of the 20 lamps. The inverter on the left side (as viewed from the rear) is the master and the right side the slave. A communications line is connected to the master inverter from the TCON board. Once the TCON receives RGB data from the BU board the inverters will turn on.

Board Layout

Figure 2-5 illustrates the board layout for the KDL42V4100.

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
RF L VIDEO 1 VIDEO 3 R COMPONENT 1 COMPONENT 2 HDMI 1 HDMI 3
RF
L
VIDEO 1
VIDEO 3
R
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
HDMI 1
HDMI 3
HDMI 4
A/V DECODER
VIDEO PROCESS
VIDEO SWITCH
AUDIO PROCESS
AUDIO AMP
DVI AUDIO
BE MICRO
INVERTER
TCON
INVERTER
PC HD15
L/R AUDIO OUT
OPTICAL OUT
BU
LCD PANEL
USB 1.1
VIDEO 2
HDMI 2
SIDE INPUTS
POWER SUPPLY
IR
SWITCHES
LED
RECEIVER
G2D
H1
H3
H4

FIGURE 2-4 42-INCH V MODEL OVERALL BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
H1 (FUNCTION TCON SWITCH) RIGHT INVERTER LEFT INVERTER G2D BU H3 H4
H1
(FUNCTION
TCON
SWITCH)
RIGHT
INVERTER
LEFT
INVERTER
G2D
BU
H3
H4

FIGURE 2-5 42-INCH V MODEL CIRCUIT BOARD LOCATIONS

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

40 and 46-inch Models

In Figure 2-6, an overall block diagram indicates the boards used in the 40 and 46-inch models of the V and W series models. These models differ from the previously outlined V models in that a stand-alone inverter circuit is used to power the backlights. The boards that differ from the previously covered models will be explained below:

IP5

This board contains the standby power supply, main switching power supply and inverter to drive the backlights. In past years, LCD panels at 40-inches and larger were driven by a stand-alone inverter (or 2 inverters for the 46 and 52-inch models. This year, the 40/46-inch V and W series use a power supply with an integrated inverter to provide the approximately 1KVRMS AC power for the lamps. This circuit will be covered in more detail later in this manual.

Balancer

Since the IP5 board provides a common power source for all of the lamps, a circuit must be used to assure that equal current is drawn by each lamp to prevent unequal brightness . This is one of the functions of the balancer. It is also responsible for distributing the high voltage to the lamps and to insure that all lamps are lit up or “struck” at turn-on. The 40-inch panel uses 20 backlights whereas the 46-inch uses 24.

LCD Panel

The 40 and 46-inch LCD panels are also native 1920 X 1080 resolution. Note that this block diagram also applies to the W series models. The only difference is the use of a frame-rate doubling circuit integrated with the TCON board. The V series do not incorporate this and have a panel refresh rate of 60HZ

Board Layout

Figure 2-7 illustrates the board layout for the 40 and 46-inch V series models. The same boards are used for both sizes although the part numbers differ due to software on the BU board and larger balancer for the 46-inch.

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
RF VIDEO 1 L VIDEO 3 R COMPONENT 1 COMPONENT 2 A/V DECODER HDMI 1
RF
VIDEO 1
L
VIDEO 3
R
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
A/V DECODER
HDMI 1
VIDEO PROCESS
HDMI 3
VIDEO SWITCH
AUDIO PROCESS
HFR*
*NOT AVAILABLE
IN V SERIES
HDMI 4
AUDIO AMP
DVI AUDIO
BE MICRO
BALANCER
PC HD15
L/R AUDIO OUT
TCON
OPTICAL OUT
USB 1.1
BU
LCD PANEL
VIDEO 2
HDMI 2
SIDE INPUTS
POWER SUPPLY
BACKLIGHT INVERTER
IR
SWITCHES
LED
RECEIVER
IP5
H1
H3
H4

FIGURE 2-6 40 AND 46-INCH V AND W SERIES OVERALL BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
H1 (FUNCTION BLOCK) TCON BALANCER IP 5 BU H3 H4
H1
(FUNCTION
BLOCK)
TCON
BALANCER
IP 5
BU
H3
H4

FIGURE 2-7 40 AND 46-INCH V AND W SERIES CIRCUIT BOARD LOCATIONS

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

52-inch V Series Models

Figure 2-8 illustrates the overall block diagram for the 52-inch V series models. Note that this block diagram also includes the W series with the key difference being the use of an integrated frame-rate doubling circuit on the TCON board.

D4 and D5 Boards

The most significant difference is the use of separate inverter drivers and balancer boards. Due to the longer length of the backlight lamps, exterior current leakage occurs along the length of the lamps and they will tend to darken from one end to the other if a common AC voltage is applied to ionize the gasses. This is solved by using separate inverters to supply out-of-phase AC voltage to the lamps. The D4 and D5 boards output approximately 800VRMS of AC for a differential of 1600 volts. This necessitates the use of a separate power supply located on the G5 board.

Board Layout

Figure 2-9 illustrates the board layout for the 52V series model.

The W Series

The following models are included in this series:

KDL40W4100

KDL40WL140

KDL46W4100

KDL46W4150

KDL46WL140

KDL52W4100

KDL52WL140

The major difference between the V and W series (other than cosmetics) is the addition of a high frame-rate circuit within the TCON board. These models utilize 120HZ refresh-rate panels. An additional board labeled as the “Sony Logo Module” contains a row of white LED’s to illuminate the Sony logo on the bottom front of the bezel. This feature can be turned off by the customer in the user menu.

The block diagrams illustrated in Figures 2-6 through 2-8 are drawn to pertain to both the V and W series models with the differences noted in the diagrams.

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
RF L VIDEO 1 VIDEO 3 R COMPONENT 1 COMPONENT 2 HDMI 1 UPPER UPPER
RF
L
VIDEO 1
VIDEO 3
R
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
HDMI 1
UPPER
UPPER
RIGHT
HDMI 3
A/V DECODER
VIDEO PROCESS
VIDEO SWITCH
AUDIO PROCESS
AUDIO AMP
LEFT
HFR*
TCON
BALANCER
BALANCER
HDMI 4
DVI AUDIO
BE MICRO
*NOT AVAILABLE
IN V SERIES
PC HD15
L/R AUDIO OUT
LOWER
LOWER
LEFT
RIGHT
OPTICAL OUT
BALANCER
BALANCER
BU
LCD PANEL
USB 1.1
VIDEO 2
SONY
HDMI 2
INVERTER
INVERTER
LOGO
IR
MODULE
RECEIVER
D4
D5
SIDE INPUTS
(W SERIES
ONLY)
H4
POWER SUPPLY
SWITCHES
LED
H1
H3
G5

FIGURE 2-8 52-INCH V AND W SERIES OVERALL BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
H1 (SWITCH UNIT) TCON UPPER UPPER LEFT RIGHT BALANCER BALANCER D5 G5 UB LOWER LEFT
H1
(SWITCH UNIT)
TCON
UPPER
UPPER
LEFT
RIGHT
BALANCER
BALANCER
D5
G5
UB
LOWER
LEFT
D4
BALANCER
H4
LOWER
RIGHT
BALANCER
H3E

FIGURE 2-9 52-INCH V AND W SERIES CIRCUIT BOARD LOCATIONS

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

60HZ versus 120HZ TCON

TCON boards containing the high frame-rate Motionflow™ feature are easily distinguished by appearance. Figure 2-10 illustrates this. 60HZ TCON boards are smaller in size and the LVDS cable plugs into the bottom of the board. The 120HZ TCON board are longer horizontally and the LVDS cable plugs into the right side.

horizontally and the LVDS cable plugs into the right side. 60HZ TCON 120HZ TCON FIGURE 2-10

60HZ TCON

horizontally and the LVDS cable plugs into the right side. 60HZ TCON 120HZ TCON FIGURE 2-10

120HZ TCON

FIGURE 2-10 60HZ VS 120HZ TCON

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

The Z and Large XBR Series

These are the top-of-the-line models in this chassis series. The following models are included:

KDL40Z4100 (available in black or silver trim)

KDL40XBR6

KDL46Z4100 (available in black or silver trim)

KDL46XBR6

KDL52XBR6

Note that the Z series is not available in a 52-inch size.

40 and 46-inch Models

An overall block diagram of the 40 and 46-inch models in the Z series is shown in Figure 2-11. There are a couple of differences from the V and W series layout and will be explained below.

G4 Board

Unlike the V and W series which use an integrated power supply and backlight inverter on the IP5 board, the Z series contains a G4 board to generate the operating and standby voltages consistent with many previous designs.

D3 Board

The D3 board is a stand-alone inverter supplying approximately 1KVRMS of AC voltage for the panel backlights. It also contains on-board voltage monitoring for excessively low or high backlight voltage along with over- current monitoring. If a problem occurs in any of these circuits the unit will be told to shut down for protection.

BU Board

Although virtually identical to the BU board used in the V and W series

models, the following feature enhancements are included:

10-Bit Panel Processing: The RGB data exiting the board via the LVDS cable is 10-bit versus 8-bit. This increases the color depth from 256 to

1,024.

Digital Media Port: Allows the use of special adapters to integrate portable digital media devices such as camcorders and MP3 players.

Ethernet Port: Allows connection to a DLNA compliant server or devices for media file viewing.

USB2.0 Port: MP3 audio files and JPG photos can be directly input to the television for viewing and listening.

Board Layout

Figure 2-12 illustrates the board layout for the 40 and 46-inch Z series models. The picture is of the 40-inch model. The 46-inch uses the same board layout but they are spaced further apart due to the larger size of the panel.

52XBR Model

Figure 2-13 contains a layout of the overall block diagram used in the KDL52XBR6 model. Note the similarity with the 52-inch models for the V and W series with the exception of enhancements to the BU board as listed above in the 40/46Z and XBR models. The board layout for this model is the same as the 52W4100 shown in Figure 2-9.

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
SUB- RF WOOFER VIDEO 1 DRIVE AWF VIDEO 3 L XBR SERIES ONLY COMPONENT 1
SUB-
RF
WOOFER
VIDEO 1
DRIVE
AWF
VIDEO 3
L
XBR SERIES ONLY
COMPONENT 1
R
COMPONENT 2
HDMI 1
HDMI 3
HDMI 4
HFR
DVI AUDIO
PC HD15
A/V DECODER
VIDEO PROCESS
VIDEO SWITCH
AUDIO PROCESS
AUDIO AMP
BE MICRO
BALANCER
L/R AUDIO OUT
OPTICAL OUT
TCON
USB 1.1
BU
LCD PANEL
DIGITAL
MEDIA PORT
ETHERNET
USB 2.0
SONY
VIDEO 2
LOGO
MODULE
HDMI 2
SIDE INPUTS
POWER SUPPLY
INVERTER
IR
SWITCHES
LED
RECEIVER
G
4 (Z SERIES)
H4
G
6 (XBR SERIES)
D3
H1
H3

FIGURE 2-11 40 AND 46-INCH Z SERIES OVERALL BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
TCON BALANCER D3 G4 BU H1 (FUNCTION BUTTONS) H3 H4
TCON
BALANCER
D3
G4
BU
H1
(FUNCTION
BUTTONS)
H3
H4

FIGURE 2-12 40 AND 46-INCH Z SERIES CIRCUIT BOARD LOCATIONS

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams

Chapter 2 - Overall Block Diagrams
SUB- RF WOOFER DRIVE VIDEO 1 AWF L VIDEO 3 R COMPONENT 1 COMPONENT 2
SUB-
RF
WOOFER
DRIVE
VIDEO 1
AWF
L
VIDEO 3
R
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
HDMI 1
HDMI 3
A/V DECODER
VIDEO PROCESS
VIDEO SWITCH
AUDIO PROCESS
AUDIO AMP
BE MICRO
UPPER
UPPER
HDMI 4
LEFT
RIGHT
HFR
TCON
DVI AUDIO
BALANCER
BALANCER
PC HD15
L/R AUDIO OUT
OPTICAL OUT
LOWER
LOWER
USB 1.1
LEFT
RIGHT
BALANCER
BALANCER
DIGITAL MEDIA
PORT
LCD PANEL
ETHERNET
BU
INVERTER
INVERTER
USB 2.0
VIDEO 2
SONY
D4
D5
IR
LOGO
HDMI 2
RECEIVER
MODULE
H4
SIDE INPUTS
POWER SUPPLY
SWITCHES
LED
H1
H3
G5

FIGURE 2-13 52XBR6 OVERALL BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 3 – Video Process Circuits

Overview

The video process circuits in the EX1 chassis has achieved yet another reduction in the number of boards required. All of the input switching and processing is accomplished on a single BU board. Even the side video inputs have become part of this board. This significantly affects troubleshooting and parts replacement since the main goal of locating video failures is to determine if the problem is located on the BU board or the LCD panel and TCON board.

The BU board is the one common element among the various models of the EX1 chassis and most of the features located on this board are common. There are added circuits and functions as we move up the model line from introductory to upper level. This applies to the BU board and the TCON board. This chapter will discuss the operation of the video process circuits and outlines the differences encountered between the various models.

V and W Series Video Process Circuits

Referring to Figure 3-1 a simplified block diagram of the circuitry to select and process all video signals is shown. The ATSC/NTSC combination tuner is mounted directly on the BU board. All external input sources are also mounted directly on the board. Descriptions for each of the major components and functions are as follows:

NTSC Tuner Signals

Signals received via NTSC tuner sources are demodulated within the tuner and selected by video switch IC1301. The video signal is then sent to video signal processor IC4700 (Trident). The 480i resolution is processed and up-scaled to 1080p 60HZ for distribution to the LCD panel TCON.

Note that IC1301 has a main and sub video path exiting. All of the models have picture-and-picture capability albeit with limited functionality. When the P&P mode is engaged, only tuner sources are available in the sub-

picture frame. This includes ATSC and NTSC sources. The sub-picture will appear on the right side and is approximately one-half the size of the main picture. Since there is only one tuner in the unit, the input for the main picture will automatically switch to one of the external inputs. Which input is dependent on how the inputs were assigned in the customer setup mode. If all inputs are set for auto-detect, the HDMI 1 input will appear by default. If any other input was set to “always” it will go that input. The main and sub pictures are not scalable.

Composite and Y/C inputs

Only the Video 1 input contains both a composite and Y/C jack. These sources are selected by IC1301 and routed to IC4700 for processing and up-scaling to 1080p 60HZ.

Component Inputs

There are 2 Y/Pb/Pr component inputs on this chassis. They are directly selected by IC4700. All HD formats up to 1080p 60HZ are supported except for 24P content. 24p is only supported via the HDMI inputs.

HDMI Inputs

HDMI input selection is performed by IC5200 and sends the selected input to IC4700. Each HDMI input has its own EDID information stored within a NVM IC. The following IC’s (not shown) are attached to each input:

HDMI 1: IC5101

HDMI 2: IC5191

HDMI 3: IC5131

HDMI 4: IC6161

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Chapter 3 - Video Process

USB1.1 (DMEX)

This USB input is labeled “DMEX” (Digital Media Extender) on the rear of the unit. If the customer chooses to purchase the optional Bravia Internet Video Link box to access the internet, this port will provide 2-way communication with that device and links with the customer GUI interface. This port is also used to input software upgrades to the television via USB storage devices.

PC Input

Analog RGB input from a PC can be connected to the HD15 connector. The video process circuits will support conventional resolutions from 640 X 480 VGA up to 1920 X 1080 HD. EDID information for the PC HD material is contained within NVM IC5000.

Front End Microprocessor and Decoder

IC7000 decodes the MPEG2 compressed ATSC signals received by the tuner and separates the video and audio content. This IC is also responsible for interface control of the video to IC4700. Customer menu graphics are generated within IC7000.

Back End Microprocessor

IC3001 controls the operation of the unit and provides a user interface. It also monitors key areas of the television for voltage, temperature and speaker protection to turn the unit off if a problem is detected. Another function of IC3001 is to control IC4700 and how it handles the various formats of video signals received by the unit.

LCD Panel

The LCD panel receives the 8-bit RGB video data from the BU board via a Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) cable. IC4700 contains the LVDS transmitter within and transmits a video resolution of 1920 X 1080 60HZ to match the native resolution of the panel.

The LVDS data is transmitted to the TCON board where an LVDS receiver is located. The LVDS receiver returns the serialized data to its original 8-bit parallel RGB format. In the V series models the panel has a refresh rate of 60HZ. The RGB data is timed and allocated to the proper column drivers for the LCD pixels to produce a picture. White balancing and gamma correction are also performed to compensate for variances in the LD panel.

The W series models use a TCON board with an additional circuit to double the 60HZ refresh rate to 120HZ. This is a very sophisticated circuit that can compare a previous and future frame to the current one and calculate the motion of objects within each frame in order to generate the additional frames with a with exceptionally smooth movement.

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Chapter 3 - Video Process
ATSC RF TUNER DIGITAL VIDEO ALL V AND 32/ 37XBR SERIES NTSC IC7000 DIGITAL GPX
ATSC
RF
TUNER
DIGITAL VIDEO
ALL V AND 32/
37XBR SERIES
NTSC
IC7000
DIGITAL GPX
AMD
TCON
SUB VIDEO
VIDEO 1
H/V SYNC
IC1301
CC VIDEO
VIDEO 2
VIDEO
SWITCH
VIDEO 3
LCD PANEL
MAIN VIDEO
1080
60HZ
IC4700
COMPONENT 1
TRIDENT
COMPONENT 2
ALL W SERIES
120HZ
HDMI 1
HFR
IC5200
HDMI 2
HDMI
SWITCH
HDMI 3
& EQ
HDMI 4
TCON
USB 1.1
LCD PANEL
PC HD15
IC5000
IC5000
IC5000
IC5000
EDID
EDID
EDID
EDID X4
IC3001
EDID
BE MICRO
EDID 1: IC5101
EDID 2: IC5191
EDID 3: IC5131
EDID 4: IC5161
BU

FIGURE 3-1 V AND W SERIES VIDEO PROCESS CIRCUITS

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Z Series Video Processing

As illustrated in Figure 3-2, the BU board used in the Z and 40-inch and larger XBR models functions in much the same way as the preceding descriptions of the V and W series with the following differences:

10-bit Video Processing

IC4700 on the BU board outputs 10-bit RGB data instead of the 8-bit level as found on the V and W series. This increases the levels of brightness from 256 to 1,024.

Ethernet Port

Devices that are DNLA (Digital Living Network Alliance) compliant can be used in a network setup to view and listen to content from PC’s, mobile devices, gaming consoles, etc. DNLA provides the standards to allow many devices in the home to receive and send content among the network.

Software upgrades can also be located on the internet and downloaded to the television should it become necessary. More information about the DLNA feature is described in the appendix section of this manual.

USB 2.0 Input

USB storage devices that contain pictures in JPEG format or audio content in MP3 format can be plugged directly into the television for photo viewing or listening to music.

Digital Media Port

Optional devices are available to hook up portable digital video and audio devices to the television. Content can be viewed or listened to along with the ability to control the connected device by using the television screen and remote controller as an interface device.

240HZ Refresh Rate

The model KDL52XBR7 introduced in the December of 2008 utilizes a 240HZ Motionflow TCON and LCD panel.

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Chapter 3 - Video Process
ATSC TUNER DIGITAL VIDEO NTSC DIGITAL GPX IC7000 AMD SUB VIDEO IC1301 H/V SYNC CC
ATSC
TUNER
DIGITAL VIDEO
NTSC
DIGITAL GPX
IC7000
AMD
SUB VIDEO
IC1301
H/V SYNC
CC VIDEO
VIDEO
SWITCH
MAIN VIDEO
1080
IC4700
60HZ
TRIDENT
IC5200
HDMI
SWITCH
AND EQ
IC5000
IC5000
IC5000
IC5000
EDID
EDID
EDID X4
EDID
EDID
EDID 1: IC5101
EDID 2: IC5191
EDID 3: IC5131
EDID 4: IC5161
IC3001
BE MICRO
PHYSICAL
INTERFACE
PHYSICAL
INTERFACE
BU

RF

VIDEO 1

VIDEO 2

VIDEO 3

DIGITAL MEDIA

PORT

120HZ HFR
120HZ
HFR
240HZ HFR XBR7 ONLY
240HZ
HFR
XBR7
ONLY

LCD PANEL120HZ HFR 240HZ HFR XBR7 ONLY

COMPONENT 1

COMPONENT 2

HDMI 1

HDMI 2

HDMI 3

HDMI 4

PC HD15

USB 1.1

ETHERNET

USB 2.0

FIGURE 3-2 Z SERIES VIDEO PROCESS CIRCUITS

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Troubleshooting

Since virtually all of the video inputs and most of the video processing is located on the BU board, failures causing a loss of video or distortions in the picture need to be isolated to the BU board or the LCD panel. The combining of all video processing circuitry into 2 major components makes the troubleshooting approach to seem rather simplistic and in most cases it will be just so.

As anyone who has experience servicing electronic products knows, things happen in the real world that can cause failures which do not follow the rules of the academic procedures found in this manual. Always research the latest service bulletins and/or troubleshooting tips on the Sony service website before making the service call.

No Video

If a total loss of video occurs (including OSD graphics) the most likely course of action is to bring a replacement BU board to the service location since the unit is serviced at board-level only. It is unlikely that a loss of voltage from the power supply is the cause since these voltages are monitored and the unit will likely experience a protection shutdown event rather than a no video condition. Although a failure of the backlights to turn on would certainly cause a no video condition, this too would cause the unit to shut down and indicate a failure via the self diagnostics feature. If the replacement BU board does not resolve the issue, the LCD panel is likely defective.

The presence of OSD graphics with a no video condition certainly eliminates the LCD panel as the cause and the BU board will almost certainly fix the problem.

Video Distortions

This is, by far, the most difficult failure to troubleshoot due to the many sources that can cause it. Noise emanating from the power supply, outside interferences, video process failures and even mechanical problems in the LCD panel can cause video distortion.

The up-side to display devices is that they are the most valuable tool in determining the source of the problem so long as one knows the basic theory of how they function. The Appendix section of this training manual contains a section on basic troubleshooting of LCD panel televisions. The primary objective when diagnosing no video or distortions in the video is to eliminate the LCD panel as the cause. Replacement of the LCD panel requires special authorization and, in some instances, will not be allowed due to economical reasons.

Troubleshooting Flowcharts

Due to the reduced number of circuit boards used in this chassis, troubleshooting video problems must focus on whether the problem lies on the BU board or the LCD panel. In a “no video” symptom the flowchart asks if the backlights are lit. Hypothetically, the backlights must light or the unit will shut down and blink a balancer or inverter error but there have been cases in previous chassis designs where the backlights do not light and the unit did not enter the protect mode. The troubleshooting flowchart in Figure 3-3 will provide some guidance in diagnosing a video problem.

Chapter 3 - Video Process

Chapter 3 - Video Process
Yes Distortion No All inputs? BU Board stationary ? Video Failure No Yes Yes No
Yes
Distortion
No
All inputs?
BU Board
stationary
?
Video Failure
No
Yes
Yes
No video or
distorted
video ?
Distorted
Symentrical ?
LCD Panel
BU Board
No
None
No
Multi-colored
Backlights
turning on ?
Lines single or
multi-colored
BU Board
Backlight failure
Yes
Single Color
Yes
OSD graphics
BU Board
LCD Panel
present ?
No
Heartbeat
LED on BU
board flashing ?
Unplug LVDS
connector at
TCON while unit
is running . This
may need to be
done more than
once
Any flashes
No
Yes
seen on
LCD Panel
screen ?
Yes
No
BU Board
BU Board
FIGURE 3-3
VIDEO FAILURE TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART

Chapter 4 – Audio Process Circuits

Overview

All audio processing and amplification are performed on the BU board. The path of the audio processing differs depending on the source. Figure 4-1 illustrates an overall block diagram of the audio circuits on the BU board.

General Audio Processing

All audio processing is selected and performed by IC2002. The IC contains internal switching circuits along with a digital signal processor for equalizer and sound effects control. Analog signals are A/D converted before being processed. Digital audio sources are received via the I2S audio data bus.

Regardless of the audio source type, IC2002 outputs the processed audio as PWM for amplification by IC2005. The selected audio is also output as L/R analog to the rear audio output jacks and the optical output. Audio content from the optical output jack is limited.

Included in Figure 4-1 is a truth table for the optical output. The only time 5.1 channel audio is available is when it is received via ATSC tuner sources. This includes terrestrial 8VSB and QAM from cable systems. If a DVD player is connected via HDMI and the DVD output is set to 5.1, the output from the optical jack will be 2-channel PCM only. All analog sources are output as 48 KHZ 2CH PCM. The only time audio is not output is when digital audio is input via the HDMI connectors from a SACD or DVD-Audio disc.

HDMI

The 4 HDMI inputs are selected by HDMI switch and equalizer IC5200. The serial audio data is received by IC4700 where it is converted to I2S format. The digital audio data is transmitted via this bus to IC7300 and output to IC2002.

USB 2.0

MP3 audio files can be input to the USB side jack. The USB device is detected and a list of the available audio files can be viewed in the XMedia graphics menu. The audio can be listened to via the television speakers or and external amplifier hooked up to the L/R analog outputs or optical output jack.

Ethernet (DLNA)

Audio or video file playback for the DLNA feature is not supported by any of the 2008 EX1 chassis models. Only JPEG files are supported.

Troubleshooting

Since all circuitry involving audio processing and amplification is located on the BU board, troubleshooting audio problems consists of determining whether the failure affects all inputs or it is input specific. Failures affecting all inputs would require changing the BU board whereas input specific problems would require eliminating the input device as the source.

Chapter 4 - Audio Process

Chapter 4 - Audio Process
HDMI 1 IC 5200 HDMI 2 HDMI IC 4700 I2S SWITCH & TRIDENT HDMI 3
HDMI 1
IC 5200
HDMI 2
HDMI
IC 4700
I2S
SWITCH &
TRIDENT
HDMI 3
EQ
HDMI 4
USB2.0
ETHERNET
ATSC/NTSC
TUNER
ATSC
Z MODELS
AUDIO
ONLY
IC 7000
NTSC
AMD
AUDIO
FE MICRO
SPDIF
I2S
I2S
IC7500
D/A
COMPOSITE 2
COMPOSITE 3
IC 2005
IC 2002
PWM
CLASS D
COMPONENT 1
AUDIO SW
AUDIO AMP
DSP
COMPONENT 2
IC 2004
PC
LINE OUT
AMP

HDMI 4 ANALOG

Y/C_COMPOSITE 1

FIGURE 4-1 AUDIO PROCESS CIRCUITS

Chapter 5 - Power Supply

Overview

Several power supplies are used in the EX1 chassis. The type of power supply is determined by LCD panel size and the type of inverter circuit used to power the backlights.

All of the power supply designs contain on-board over-voltage and over- current monitoring to stop the switching supply if a problem is detected. If the main switching supply is stopped, the unit will shut down and the time LED will blink in groups of 2. This feature will be discussed in further detail in Chapter 7 where the protection and self-diagnostics features are explained.

G1D/G2D Power Supplies

In Figure 5-1, an overall block diagram is shown for the G1D and G2D power supply circuits. These power supplies are used on the smaller V series models. The G1D is used in the KDL32L140 and KDL32XBR6. The G2D is used in the KDL37XBR6 and KDL42V4100 models. They are virtually identical in design with the G2D have a larger current producing capacity for the larger LCD panel backlighting. Both power supplies are used in models to provide power to what is known as “indirect inverters”. These inverters contain all of the necessary circuits for generating the high- voltage AC to power the backlights along with current and lamp detection circuits. These inverters will be discussed in detail in Chapter 6.

The power supply consists of 3 major circuits:

Power Factor Control (PFC)

The inductive load of the switching power supply circuits causes the voltage and current to be 90 degrees out-of-phase. The PFC circuit compensates for this and makes the power supply appear as a purely resistive load and to use the AC input power more efficiently. This circuit is only present because of requirements by the Western European countries and Canada so they are included on all power supply designs.

By using a PWM generator, switching transistors and coils, the PFC circuit pumps up the rectified 160VDC to approximately 395VDC. This voltage supplies continuous power to the standby supply. Note that even when the main relay RY6101 is open at turn-off, the thermistor NTC01 is passing AC voltage to the bridge rectifier B01. The PFC circuit is turned off but the coils will pass the 160VDC to the standby power supply. PFC activation is accomplished by the power on command entering at pin 1 of CN602 which is high (3.3V) at turn-on.

Standby Power Supply

This supply runs continuously whenever AC power is applied. It generates 12VDC for the relay RY6101 and 3.3VDC for the microprocessors on the BU board, IR receiver on the H4 board and function LED’s on the H1 board.

Main Switching Supply

The main switching supply is activated when the power on high command is received at pin 1 of CN602 from the BU board. This also activates the PFC circuit and the DC voltage feeding the main supply rises to approximately 395V. The main switching supply generates 24V for the inverter board(s), unregulated 13V for the audio circuits, and regulated 12V for the BU board.

Note that the KDL42V4100 has dual inverters and that CN603 is used in this model to provide an additional 24VDC source for a second inverter board.

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits
G2D ONLY CN603 AC (42") IN PFC NTC1 F1 1 UNREG_24V IC801 4A T Q800
G2D ONLY
CN603
AC
(42")
IN
PFC
NTC1
F1
1
UNREG_24V
IC801
4A
T
Q800
6
GND
Q802
BD1
AC
L800
IN
CN601
1
UNREG_24V
6
GND
PRIMARY
RY6101
POWER
SUPPLY
CN602
IC601
4
UNREG_13V
Q601, 602
T600
6
AU GND
11
REG 12V
8
GND
3 STBY 3.3V
STANDBY
1 POWER_ON
POWER
SUPPLY
STBY
12V
STBY
STBY
12V
3.3V
IC305
Q805
Q901
Q302
Q303
G1D (32")
G2D (37")

TO

INVERTER

TO BU

BOARD

FIGURE 5-1 G1/G2D POWER SUPPLY BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

IP5 Power Supply and Inverter

New to the 2008 EX1 chassis models, this combination power supply and inverter is found in 40 and 46-inch V and W series models and is illustrated in Figure 5-2. The basic functions of the PFC, standby and main switching supply are the same as the previously described circuits of the G1D and G2D power supplies with the following exception:

Integrated Lamp Inverter

The PFC circuit also supplies approximately 395VDC to an inverter circuit consisting primarily of an oscillator/drive circuit and high-voltage step up transformer and switching transistors.

Approximately 5 seconds after the unit is turned on, a high (3.3V) is received via pin 4 of CN6154 from the BU board. This causes the inverter to output approximately 1KV of 51KHZ AC to drive the fluorescent backlights. The lamp voltage consists of 2 180 degree out-of-phase voltages which are sent to the balancer board. This AC voltage is not continuous. The duration of the AC varies depending on the brightness setting of the backlights. This is controlled by the dimmer line at pin 5 of CN6154. The dimmer control is a negative going PWM signal that varies between approximately 6% at full brightness to 70% at minimum brightness.

Operation of the inverter, along with example waveforms, is covered in more detail in Chapter 6.

G4 Power Supply

This power supply is used in the 40 and 46-inch Z and XBR6 models and is shown in Figure 5-3. The standby and main switching supplies operate in the same manner as the previously covered power supply circuits.

PFC Output

These models use a stand-alone inverter located on the D3 board. The inverter requires 395VDC and this is supplied by the PFC circuit via CN6502 to the D3 board.

Warning: When the unit is turned off while still connected to AC power, the rectified 160 volts will pass through the PFC circuit and always be present. This voltage is referenced to hot ground. Use caution when near this circuit and make sure to use an isolation transformer when using grounded test equipment.

G5 Power Supply

Figure 5-4 illustrates the block diagram for the G5 power supply board used in the 52-inch V and W series models (including the 52XBR6). This power supply has a larger current capacity and dual PFC outputs. The 52-inch panels use 2 inverter boards (D4 and D5) requiring the dual PFC lines.

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits
CN6502 F6001 6.3A 1 HV+ OUT R6009 IC6701 3 HV- OUT AC Q 6706, 6707
CN6502
F6001
6.3A
1
HV+ OUT
R6009
IC6701
3
HV- OUT
AC
Q
6706, 6707
IN
T6800
395VDC
Q
CN6154
PFC
6602, 6603
AC
T6600, 6601
3
INVERTER_ERR
D6000
IN
INVERTER
4
BACKLIGHT_ON
5
DIMMER
RY6000
IC6100
CN6151
Q6100
1
REG 12V
Q6101
T6100
3
GND
PRIMARY
CN6150
POWER
SUPPLY
4
UNREG 15V
6
UNREG 15V GND
11
REG 12V
STBY
IC6200
12V
8
GND
T6200
STBY
12V
9
GND
STANDBY
10
GND
POWER
SUPPLY
3
STBY3.3
2
AC_DET
PH6300
1
PWR_ON
Q6303
Q6304
Q6404
IP5

TO

BALANCER

FROM BU

BOARD

NOT USED

FROM BU

BOARD

FIGURE 5-2 IP5 POWER SUPPLY/INVERTER BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits
CN6501 395VDC 1 PFC OUT F6000 2 PFC GND 6.3A R6009 AC IC6200 IN T6200
CN6501
395VDC
1
PFC OUT
F6000
2
PFC GND
6.3A
R6009
AC
IC6200
IN
T6200
STBY
395VDC
12V
PFC
STANDBY
AC
STBY
D6000
IN
POWER
3.3V
SUPPLY
RY6000
IC6100
CN6202
Q6100
13
REG12V
Q6101
8
REG12_GND
RLY_VCC
T6101
(REG 12V)
6
UNREG_GND
PRIMARY
4
UNREG_15V
POWER
SUPPLY
3
STBY3.3
2
AC_OFF_DET
STBY
12V
1
POWER_ON
PH6300
Q6303
Q6304
Q6407
G4

FIGURE 5-3 G4 POWER SUPPLY BLOCK DIAGRAM

TO D3

BOARD

TO BU

BOARD

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits
CN6501 1 PFC OUT F6000 2 PRI GND 6.3A R6009 CN6500 AC IC6200 1 PFC
CN6501
1
PFC OUT
F6000
2
PRI GND
6.3A
R6009
CN6500
AC
IC6200
1
PFC OUT
IN
T6200
STBY
2
PRI GND
390VDC
12V
PFC
STANDBY
AC
STBY
D6000
POWER
CN6100
IN
3.3V
SUPPLY
1
REG 12V
3
GROUND
RY6000
CN6154
5
DIMMER
4
BACKLIGHT
3
INV_ERR
1
BALANCE_ERR
RLY_VCC
(REG 12V)
CN6153
7
BALANCE_ERR
4
INV_ERR
3
BACKLIGHT
2
DIMMER
6
REG12V
IC6100
CN6150
Q6100
13
REG12V
Q6101
T6101
8
REG12_GND
STBY
12V
6
UNREG_GND
PRIMARY
POWER
4
UNREG_15V
SUPPLY
3
STBY3.3
2
AC_OFF_DET
PH6300
1
POWER_ON
Q6303
Q6304
Q6407
G5

FIGURE 5-4 G5 POWER SUPPLY BLOCK DIAGRAM

TO D5

BOARD

TO D4

BOARD

TO TCON

TO BU

BOARD

TO D4

BOARD

TO BU

BOARD

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Troubleshooting

In order to properly diagnose a potential problem with the power supply it is important to determine if the power supply is completely dead or will not turn on when commanded to do so. There are a couple of important items to be aware of when first examining the unit.

In a properly functioning unit the standby 3.3V line will remain at this voltage for approximately 2 ½ minutes after the AC source is removed. This is part of the AC detect routine and allows the BE Micro to remain running and clear the operational routines to prevent lockup because of a decaying standby voltage.

If the unit was not in the “on” position before AC power was removed and has not had AC power applied for approximately 2 ½ minutes, the BU board will output a power on command to turn on the relay as soon as AC power is returned. The power LED will not light. The distinct click of the AC relay can easily be heard and it will remain engaged for approximately 30 seconds before turning off. This is very important to know when determining if the standby supply, AC relay and BE micro on the BU board is functioning. If has been less than 2 ½ minutes since AC power was disconnected the relay will not perform this routine. If the unit was turned on when the AC power was disconnected, it will power up completely regardless of how long AC power was disconnected.

When the television is working properly the AC relay will not disengage at turn-off until approximately 20 seconds has elapsed.

The following troubleshooting procedures will deal with general approaches to locating the problem. The troubleshooting flowcharts at the end of this chapter are created to specifically address the unit based on what power supply is used,

Completely Dead Unit

Since the EX1 chassis models do not use a power standby LED, it becomes necessary to determine if the standby power supply is operating. Unplug the unit from the AC source and wait for 3 minutes. Plug the unit back in and listen for the sound of the relay clicking. If it does, the standby supply is operating. This also confirms that the BE Micro is able to turn on the relay. At this point it is confirmed that the main switching regulator is probably at fault although it is unusual for this to happen without the 12V LVP circuit detecting it and shutting the unit down with a 2 blink diagnostics indication.

Power Supply Shutdown

If the power supply manages to turn on and then turns off, there are a couple of reasons that could cause this. If the main switching regulator does not turn on, the loss of REG12V will be detected and the unit will shut down and the standby LED will blink in sets of 2.

The same event occurs when there is excessive current being drawn on the secondary supply lines from the main switching regulator which has its own over-current detection circuit. This causes the switching oscillator to stop and one of the results is the loss of the REG12V line.

Power Supply Troubleshooting Flowchart

The troubleshooting flowchart in Figure 5-5 will assist in determining the cause of a no power condition.

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits

Chapter 5. Power Supply Circuits
No Power Unplug unit from AC and wait 3 minutes. Re- apply AC power .
No Power
Unplug unit from
AC and wait 3
minutes. Re-
apply AC power .
STBY3.3V
Relay click
No
Yes
POWER_ON
3.3V CN1411 -1
BU Board?
Yes
Replace Power
heard ?
CN1411 -3 on
BU board?
Supply
No
Yes
No
Replace Power
Replace Power
Replace BU
Supply
Supply
Board

FIGURE 5-5 NO POWER TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART

Chapter 6 - Panel Backlight Circuits

Overview

All models in the EX1 chassis series use fluorescent tubes to provide the backlighting necessary for the LCD panel. The Z and W series models use conventional cold-cathode fluorescent (CCFL) lights while the Z series utilize Wide Color Gamut lamps (WCGCCFL). The lamps on all panels are arranged horizontally and evenly spaced from top to bottom. The number of lamps ranges from 16 for the 32-inch panels to 24 for the

52-inch.

The primary difference among the various panel sizes and designs is the type of backlighting circuitry and monitoring that is used. The following diagrams and circuit descriptions will be covered separately based on these differences.

32/37-inch Backlighting

Figure 6-1 illustrates a block diagram of the circuits involved in generating the backlight voltage for the lamps. The smaller 32 and 37-inch panels use a single inverter board to supply an AC voltage of approximately 1000-volts RMS at 57KHZ.

Power-Up Sequence

Once the power on command is received at CN602-1 on the G board from BE Micro IC3001, the power supply starts and, along with other secondary voltages, outputs 24VDC to CN001 on the inverter board.

Approximately 5 seconds after turn-on, the backlight on command goes high at CN1401-4 on the BU board. The oscillator on the inverter will start and the drive circuits for each pair of lamps will begin generating the necessary lamp voltage.

Inverter Circuit

Note that each inverter-drive circuit feeds a pair of lamps. Since each pair of lamps is connected to the opposite end of a transformer they are driven with out-of-phase AC voltage. This is necessary to prevent parasitic capacitance between the lamps to prevent brightness fluctuations.

The

AC voltage supplied to the lamps is not a steady voltage. The lamps

are

provided with a variable duty cycle of AC bursts. This is how the unit

is able to vary the brightness of the backlights. The duty cycle of these

burst will vary from 30% at minimum brightness up to 95% at maximum. The lamp brightness is controlled by the dimmer line exiting the BU board at CN1401-5. This control line is a negative going PWM signal that will vary its duty cycle from approximately 70% negative at low brightness to approximately 10% at high brightness. This duty cycle change affects the

DC voltage at this point and it can be read with a DVM. The DC voltage

reads 0.8 volts at low brightness and 3.1 volts at full brightness. Typical

waveforms for the inverter output and dimmer PWM signals are shown in Figure 6-2.

The inverter board also contains monitoring circuits (not shown) to detect

a failure of one or more of the inverters or if one or more of the lamps fails

to light. If either one of these situations occurs, the inverter will send out

a high on the INV-ERR line to CN1401-3. This is detected by BE Micro

IC3001 on the BU board. IC3001 will shut the unit down and the standby

LED will blink in groups of 6.

NOTE: Whenver an inverter error is detected, the unit will make 3 attempts to start the inverter. The AC relay will be heard cycling on and off during these attempts.

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
INVERTER LCD PANEL INVERTER DRIVE INVERTER DRIVE APPROXIMATELY IKV RMS CN001 INV_ERR (NORMALLY LOW) BACKLIGHT_ON
INVERTER
LCD PANEL
INVERTER
DRIVE
INVERTER
DRIVE
APPROXIMATELY
IKV RMS
CN001
INV_ERR (NORMALLY LOW)
BACKLIGHT_ON (3.3V ON)
DIMMER (PWM)
CN1401
GND
2
INV_ERR
3
IC 3001
BACKLIGHT_ON
4
DIMMER
5
BE
MICRO
CN601
CN 602-1
CN1411
PIN 1~5
1
POWER_ON
POWER_ON
1
24VDC
POWER _ON
3.3V = ON
BU
G1D (32")
G2D (37")

FIGURE 6-1 32/37-INCH PANEL BACKLIGHT DIAGRAM

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
2ms 1V/div
2ms
1V/div

DIMMER MAX BACKLIGHT PWM

2ms 1V/div
2ms
1V/div

DIMMER MINIMUM BACKLIGHT PWM

2ms 10V/div Indirect coupling
2ms
10V/div
Indirect coupling

MAX BACKLIGHT AC DUTY CYCLE

2ms 10V/div Indirect coupling
2ms
10V/div
Indirect coupling

MINIMUM BACKLIGHT AC DUTY CYCLE

FIGURE 6-2 INVERTER WAVEFORMS

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

42-inch Backlighting

The KDL42V4100 is unique in that this model is the only one that uses this panel design and backlighting scheme. The board layout is shown in Figure 6-3. The G2D power supply used in the 37-inch panel contains an extra connector for an additional 24VDC source and this is used to power the additional inverter board found on this model.

Power-up and protection functions very much the same way as the system used in the 32/37-inch panels with the exception of the additional inverter. Due to the longer length of the backlight tubes, differential AC is applied to both ends of the fluorescent lamps instead of using a common ground reference.

INVERTER INVERTER DRIVE
INVERTER
INVERTER
DRIVE
INVERTER DRIVE
INVERTER
DRIVE

INVERTER

INVERTER DRIVE
INVERTER
DRIVE
INVERTER DRIVE
INVERTER
DRIVE

CN24

CN26

LCD PANEL

INVERTER DRIVE INVERTER DRIVE CN24 CN26 LCD PANEL APPROX IKV RMS CN23 CN25 CN001 CN001 INV_ERR
INVERTER DRIVE INVERTER DRIVE CN24 CN26 LCD PANEL APPROX IKV RMS CN23 CN25 CN001 CN001 INV_ERR
INVERTER DRIVE INVERTER DRIVE CN24 CN26 LCD PANEL APPROX IKV RMS CN23 CN25 CN001 CN001 INV_ERR
INVERTER DRIVE INVERTER DRIVE CN24 CN26 LCD PANEL APPROX IKV RMS CN23 CN25 CN001 CN001 INV_ERR
INVERTER DRIVE INVERTER DRIVE CN24 CN26 LCD PANEL APPROX IKV RMS CN23 CN25 CN001 CN001 INV_ERR

APPROX

IKV RMS

CN23

CN25

CN001 CN001 INV_ERR (NORMALLY LOW) BACKLIGHT_ON (3.3V ON) DIMMER (PWM) CN1401 GND 2 INV_ERR 3
CN001
CN001
INV_ERR (NORMALLY LOW)
BACKLIGHT_ON (3.3V ON)
DIMMER (PWM)
CN1401
GND
2
INV_ERR
3
IC 3001
BACKLIGHT_ON
4
DIMMER
5
BE
MICRO
CN601
CN 602 -1
CN1411
PIN 1~5
24 VDC
1
POWER_ON
POWER_ON
1
POWER _ON
3.3V = ON
BU
CN603
G2D

FIGURE 6-3 42-INCH PANEL BACKLIGHT DIAGRAM

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

40/46 V and W Series Backlighting

These LCD panels have a considerably different backlighting arrangement than those seen in the previous circuit descriptions. High voltage for the lamps is generated on a separate inverter circuit that is part of the power supply board. A balancer circuit has been added in addition to the inverter and will be explained separately. A basic block diagram is shown in Figure

6-4.

Inverter

Once the IP5 board receives a power on high at CN6150-1 the power supply begins generating the necessary voltages. The PFC circuit increases the rectified 160VDC to approximately 395VDC to supply power for the inverter switching transistors. The oscillator provides the necessary 41KHZ drive for the inverter switching transistors. The inverter stage outputs approximately 1000VRMS at 2 output lines that are 180 degrees out-of-phase.

Note the inverter detect stage. The detector consists of small-value capacitors and diodes to detect the AC voltage. If either AC line fails to output the inverter detect circuits will output a high to CN6154-3. This will be detected by BE Micro IC3001 on the BU board and the unit will shut down and blink the standby LED in groups of 6. The event will also be registered into the diagnostics menu for viewing when entering that mode. This will be covered in Chapter 7.

The inverter also has over-voltage and over-current detection circuits (not shown). If either circuit detects a malfunction the oscillator will stop and create an inverter detect failure.

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
BALANCER LCD PANEL BALANCE ERROR DET 1000 VRMS 1 – BALANCER ERROR (NORM LOW) 2
BALANCER
LCD PANEL
BALANCE
ERROR
DET
1000 VRMS
1 – BALANCER ERROR (NORM LOW)
2 – GROUND
3 – INVERTER ERROR (NORM LOW)
4 – BACKLIGHT (3.3V ON)
INVERTER
5 – DIMMER (0.8 ~ 3.1VDC)
INV
CN6701
DET
12V
1
OSC/
FB
2
DRV
GND
4
LD
6
CN6154
1
BALANCER_ERR
2
GROUND
1
– 12VDC B+
3
INVERTER_ERR
CN1401
2
– FB (FEEDBACK)
IC3001
4
BACKLIGHT ON
7.2VPP
5
DIMMER
BE
4
– GROUND
PFC
MICRO
6
– LD (LAMP DET)
NORM HIGH (12V)
CN6150
1
POWER_ON
CN1411
IP5
BU

FIGURE 6-4 40/46-INCH V AND W SERIES PANEL BACKLIGHT DIAGRAM

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Balancer

The problem that arises when feeding high voltage to parallel arranged

fluorescent lamps is making sure all of the lamps are “struck” or, in other words, ignited to their ionization point. When the inverter is initially turned on it generates a brief period of approximately 2 to 3 times the operating voltage to strike the lamps. If one or more of the lamps does not ignite, the remaining lamps that did will clamp the initial strike voltage and that lamp will not light. The other issue is maintaining even current draw among all

of the lamps during normal operation to ensure even backlighting of the

panel. A circuit that is designed to balance the current among the lamps

is necessary.

The balancer performs several distinct functions and a basic block diagram

of the type used in a 40” model is illustrated in Figure 6-5.

Distribution of the high voltage: The 2 out-of-phase high voltage lines are applied to each lamp with one line each feeding every other lamp. The lamps are driven with every other lamp out-of-phase in order to localize the high voltage field around each lamp and keep them from causing brightness fluctuations in adjacent lamps and minimize interference to the LCD panel.

Maintaining Lamp Current Balance: Since the lamps are being driven by a common power source and are arranged in a parallel configuration, variances in lamp tolerances and aging of the lamps requires that the current drawn by the lamps be maintained steady to achieve balanced brightness (hence, the name “balancer board”). Each lamp is supplied with high voltage through the primary winding of a transformer. The secondary windings of each transformer are connected in series to form a closed loop. The circulating current in the secondary loop is what maintains the balance of the current being drawn by the lamps.

As long as all of the lamps are drawing acceptable current, the magnetizing energy between the primary and secondary of each transformer cancels each other out and prevents an inductive flux from being generated. If

a lamp’s current draw drops, a differential in current will occur and the

secondary will induce the difference into the primary and maintain balance

in the current among the lamps. The circuit also helps during the initial

“strike” of the lamps at turn-on since any lamp that does not light in unison

with the others will receive a “kick” due to the imbalance on its transformer. In theory, assuming all of the lamps are identical and consuming exactly the same amount of current, the voltage in the secondary winding loop would be near zero. In reality, there will be some voltage in the loop as it performs its job of maintaining balance among the lamps and this is acceptable to a certain point. This is where the secondary loop functions as a protect circuit.

Open Lamp Protection: If one or more of the lamps fails to draw adequate current, the unit must go into protect mode since an out of balance condition can damage the other lamps and also cause damage to the circuit board due to arcing. This generally occurs when a lamp has weakened to the point where it will not turn on when struck. In this situation, there will be little or no current in the primary winding of that lamp and the current differential will cause an induced voltage between the primary and secondary windings. Once the secondary loop induces into the primary winding of the defective lamp, the primary begins to induce back into the secondary. This causes the voltage level to rise in the loop.

4 sampling “taps” are taken along the secondary windings consisting of a resistor divider network and a diode. If an imbalance occurs, the current loop of the secondary windings will now function as a voltage loop. One of the taps will detect a rise and the rectified voltage will exceed the zener diode rating (7 volts). A comparator detects the zener diode firing and sends a high to an inverter. Under normal conditions, the Lamp Detect (LD) line will be high (12VDC) and goes low if one or more open lamps are detected. This is defined as a balancer error and the unit will shut down and blink the standby LED in groups of 13.

Feedback: The final function of the balancer circuit is to provide feedback to the inverter circuit in order indicate overall current draw by the lamps and maintain steady drive voltage. An additional transformer is included in the loop to provide an overall sample. This feedback signal is approximately 7.2VPP. This signal is sent back to the primary inverter (the one with the oscillator) to keep the overall lamp brightness steady.

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

TO

LAMPS

HV IN + HV IN - REF LD (LAMP DETECT) NORM HIGH (12V) - +
HV IN +
HV IN -
REF
LD (LAMP DETECT)
NORM HIGH (12V)
-
+
FEEDBACK

FIGURE 6-5 40-INCH BALANCER DIAGRAM

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

40/46 Z Series Backlighting

The LCD panels in the Z series models include the KDL40Z4100, KDL40XBR6, KDL46Z4100 and KDL46XBR6. All functions previously described for the V and W series backlight circuits apply except that the inverter is not integrated with the power supply.

These models use a G4 power supply and a separate D3 board that contains the inverter circuits. The balancer circuit is identical. A block diagram of the backlighting circuits for this series is shown in Figure 6-6.

All 52-inch Series Backlighting

All 52-inch EX1 chassis models utilize the backlighting circuitry illustrated in Figure 6-7. The longer backlights require the use of a floating AC power system to prevent exterior current leakage along the lamps. If a common ground connection is used with a single phased AC at one end of the lamp, brightness would be less in the middle of the lamp than at the edges. This requires the use of a different power supply board and 2 inverters. Since AC is applied to both ends of the lamps, separate balancers are required on the left and right side of the panel.

G5 Board

Operating the same as the G4 board previously mentioned for the 40/46Z models, the G5 power supply provides an additional PFC 395VDC output for the second inverter board.

D4 Board

This board is similar to the D3 board used in the 40/46Z series models in that it generates dual out-of-phase AC voltage for the lamps. It also contains the master oscillator and drive circuits for the on-board inverter switching transistors. This oscillator and drive circuit is responsible for driving the switching transistors on the D5 board.

D5 Board

This board drives the opposite side of each lamp with 180 degree out-of- phase AC. Since the D4 board contains the master oscillator and drive circuits, this is how the 2 inverters are able to maintain their out-of-phase condition to drive the lamps.

Note that the D5 board also contains an inverter detect circuit should one or more of the AC output lines fail. Although the intention is to warn the unit and shut it down when the inverter fails, this will not happen if the D4 board is still operational. The inverter detect circuit on the functioning D4 board will keep the inverter-error line low and prevent an inverter failure warning from being detected. The balancer error detect circuits will activate and shut the unit down with a 13-blink error instead. This subject, along with how to isolate it, will be covered in the troubleshooting section in this chapter.

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
BALANCER BALANCE ERROR DET LCD PANEL 1 – BALANCER ERROR (NORM LOW) 2 – GROUND
BALANCER
BALANCE
ERROR
DET
LCD PANEL
1 – BALANCER ERROR (NORM LOW)
2 – GROUND
1000 VRMS
3 – INVERTER ERROR (NORM LOW)
4 – BACKLIGHT (3.3V ON)
5 – DIMMER (0.8 ~ 3.1VDC)
CN6701
12V
1
FB
2
INVERTER
INV
GND
4
CN6702
DET
LD
6
1
BALANCER_ERR
2
GROUND
OSC/
3
INVERTER_ERR
CN1401
DRV
4
BACKLIGHT ON
CN6701
5
DIMMER
1
– 12VDC B+
D3
2
– FB (FEEDBACK)
7.2VPP
CN6600
IC3001
4
– GROUND
BE
6
– LD (LAMP DET)
MICRO
NORM HIGH (12V)
CN6502
CN6600
CN6150
AC_RLY
1
POWER_ON
CN1411
1
– 395VDC
PFC
3
– HOT GND
BU
G4

FIGURE 6-6 40/46-INCH Z SERIES PANEL BACKLIGHT DIAGRAM

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
UPPER AND UPPER AND LOWER LEFT LOWER RIGHT BALANCERS BALANCERS BALANCE BALANCE ERROR ERROR DET
UPPER AND
UPPER AND
LOWER LEFT
LOWER RIGHT
BALANCERS
BALANCERS
BALANCE
BALANCE
ERROR
ERROR
DET
DET
LCD PANEL
CN6706
12V
1
800VRMS
FB
2
INVERTER
INV
INV
INVERTER
GND
4
DET
DET
LD
6
OSC /
DRV
CN6703
CN6950
1
– 12VDC B+
2
– FB (FEEDBACK)
7.2VPP
D4
D5
4
– GROUND
CN6600
CN6702
CN5900
6
– LD (LAMP DET)
NORM HIGH (12V)
CN
6500
CN6153
CN6600
CN6501
CN6154
1
BALANCER_ERR
1
– 395VDC
2
GROUND
3
– HOT GND
3
INVERTER_ERR
CN1401
IC3001
PFC
4
BACKLIGHT ON
CN6154
5
DIMMER
BE
6
REG_12V
MICRO
CN6154
1 – BALANCER_ERR (NORM LOW)
CN6150
2 – GROUND
1
POWER _ON
CN1411
3 – INV_ERR (NORM LOW)
4 – BACKLIGHT_ON (3.3V ON)
G5
BU
5 – DIMMER (PWM)
6 – REG_12V
FIGURE 6-7
52-INCH PANEL BACKLIGHT DIAGRAM

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Troubleshooting

Failures that occur in the backlighting circuits that cause the unit to shut down can be caused by one or both of the following reasons:

Inverter Failures

Backlight Balancer errors

Inverter Failures

The following description will involve the single inverter panel. Panels using dual inverters have a slightly different reaction to inverter issues and these will be discussed separately.

If the inverter fails to turn on, or if it turns on and goes into protective stop, the unit will shut down and the standby LED will blink in groups of 6 after the unit has made 3 attempts to start the inverter. Inverter circuits contain the necessary components to detect the presence of the high voltage AC generated by the switching transistors and transformer. If one or both of the differential phased AC lines fails to output, the inverter detect circuit will cause the normally low inverter error line to go high. This event is detected by IC3001 on the BU board. The event will also be recorded into NVM for display when the diagnostics page is called up and this feature will be covered in Chapter 7.

Inverter Does Not Start

If the inverter fails to start, this is easy to detect. The backlights should turn on approximately 5 seconds after the unit is powered up. Except for extremely high ambient lighting conditions, you should be able to detect the lighting of the backlights. Many of the newer panels have multiple holes in the rear of the panel where the backlights can be viewed even if the rear cover is on. If the backlights never turn on and the unit shuts down with a backlight failure indication it is safe to assume one of the following circuits is the cause.

Inverter: Check for the presence of 395VDC at CN6600 on the DF1 board. This voltage line is referenced to hot ground so you will have to read across pins 1 and 3 of the connector. There is a fusible resistor

(0.1 ohm, 1/2 watt) in line with this voltage on the power supply and they occasionally open. Check for the backlight on command at CN1401-4 on the BU board. It should go high to around 3.3VDC about 5 seconds after the unit is turned on. It is extremely rare for this to be the cause but if it does not go high, There is a connection problem at the power on line or the BU board is defective. If all of the above checks out OK, replace the inverter board.

Power Supply: If the power supply is not outputting the 395 volts, replace the board if the unit is under warranty. Models using the IP5 combination power supply and inverter would simply require replacing that board under this and the previous condition.

BU Board: If the BE Micro on the FB board fails to send a 3.3V backlight on command the unit will shut down as if the inverter had failed. Be certain to record the serial number of the unit so the correct version of FB board can be ordered. The version of FB board is determined by which LCD panel was installed during the manufacturing process.

Inverter Starts and Turns Off

This is easily identified by the brief presence of backlighting before the unit shuts down. The EX1 chassis will attempt to run the inverter 3 times before shutting down. The inverter board contains over-voltage and over-current detection circuits. These circuits usually activate because of a problem on the inverter board. On units that have balancer circuits, one item that can cause an over-voltage shutdown of the inverter is the feedback from the balancer board. If this feedback line fails, the inverter regulation line will apply full power in an attempt to get a feedback reading. This excessive voltage will activate the OVP circuit located on the nverter board. You will need an oscilloscope to check the feedback line at pin 4 of CN6702 on the DF1 board. It is normally around 7.2VPP a will have the same wave shape as the AC power driving the lamps. If it is very low or not present, the balancer is the most likely cause of the problem.

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Dual Inverter Circuits

The use of dual inverters can produce symptoms that will not be seen on single inverter designs. Note that the DF4 board contains the oscillator to drive the inverter on both the DF4 and DF5 boards. The common oscillator and drive circuits are needed to keep the lamp voltages out-of-phase at the opposite ends of the lamps. In this design a unique situation occurs if the inverter fails on the DF5 board.

Note that both inverters have a detect circuit. Both detect lines actually tie together on the DF4 board. The problem with this design is that if only the inverter on the DF5 board fails, the inverter on the DF4 board will still be functioning because that is where the oscillator/drive circuits are located. This will cause the functioning inverter on the DF4 board to keep the inverter error detect line from activating since the common point of both inverter detect lines are not or-gated to isolate them from one another. The unit will never go into inverter protect shutdown. The balancer error detect circuits will activate and the unit will shut down with 13 blinks instead of 6.

Since the DF4 board is operating, the backlights will light momentarily but if one observes the screen closely, you should notice that the right side is backlit with a little more intensity than the left side. It is subtle, but you should be able to detect it. The same symptom could appear if the inverter were to fail on the DF4 board with the oscillator/drive circuits still functional. This would keep the DF5 board active and the symptoms and shutdown events would be the same except the left side of the screen would have a little brighter backlighting than the right before the unit shuts down.

Balancer Errors

When a balancer error occurs, we at least have the ability to observe the lighting of the lamps before the unit shuts down. The unit must a have a correctly functioning inverter to start the lamps and allow the balancer detect circuit to function. In some cases, the lamps may light long enough to see active video or snow for a couple of seconds. Observing the backlighting of the panel at this time is a great tool in determining what is causing the shutdown.

NOTE: Unlike an inverter error where the unit will make 3 attempts to start the inverter, a blanacer error will cause the unit to cycle 2 times before the protect shutdown occurs.

Remember, the purpose of the balancer detect circuit is to monitor a lamp that will not startup. Unless a particular model has a history of a related component causing balancer error shutdowns to occur, it will usually be a defective lamp and that will require replacement of the entire LCD panel. A lamp that is not lighting is difficult to spot due to the efficiency of the diffuser panel to spread the light.

In models that use inverter boards on both sides, observe the screen for uneven lighting from one side to another. This indicates a faulty inverter board and the side that is darkest is where the failed inverter resides.

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Balancer Board Removal

A new High voltage connector is used to secure the wires from the inverter to the balancer board(s). It contains an integrated locking device that must be released before the connector can be pulled loose. This procedure is illustrated in Figure 6-8. Once the lock is released, grasp the connector as shown and pull it straight out of the socket. Do not rock the connector to attempt to loosen it or you may damage the connector and/or circuit board.

As noted in Figure 6-9, once the screws securing the plastic or metal cover on the balancer board are removed there is usually no more screws securing the balancer board. On some panels there may be an additional screw securing the board once the cover is removed.

Do not remove the screws securing the long black plastic strip near the edge of the panel. This contains the sockets for the tabs protruding from the balancer board. The other side of these sockets secures a pin on the end of each fluorescent lamp. If this socket strip is loosened, damage to one or more of the lamps is likely.

The balancer board is removed by pulling it sideways and out of the sockets. This may require some effort and “rocking” of the board at the top and bottom ends.

Troubleshooting Flowcharts

Due to the various LCD panel designs used in the EX1 chassis it becomes necessary to create troubleshooting flowcharts that are specific to the type of inverter system used. Most balancer errors will end up being caused by a defective lamp in the panel but there is a possibility of an inverter related failure and this is especially true for the 52-inch panels using dual inverters.

Failures within the inverter circuit(s) will require the use of a DVM to assist in isolating the cause. The Flowcharts contained within Figures 6-10 through 6-13 are specific to panel size and design and should prove to be a useful tool when troubleshooting the unit on-site or in the shop.

SLIDE LOCKING TAB IN DIRECTION OF ARROW TO RELEASE
SLIDE LOCKING
TAB IN DIRECTION
OF ARROW TO
RELEASE
SQUEEZE BOTH SIDES OF CONNECTOR AND PULL STRAIGHT OUT
SQUEEZE BOTH
SIDES OF
CONNECTOR AND
PULL STRAIGHT OUT

FIGURE 6-8 HIGH VOLTAGE LOCKING CONNECTOR

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
COVER REMOVAL SCREWS
COVER REMOVAL
SCREWS
PULL BALANCER BOARD IN DIRECTION OF ARROW TO REMOVE
PULL BALANCER
BOARD IN
DIRECTION OF
ARROW TO
REMOVE

DO NOT REMOVE THE SCREWS UNDERNEATH THE COVER. THESE SECURE THE LAMP SOCKETS TO THE PANEL. IF THEY ARE REMOVED, DAMAGE TO THE BACKLIGHT LAMPS WILL OCCUR IF THE BALANCER BOARD IS MOVED.

BACKLIGHT LAMPS WILL OCCUR IF THE BALANCER BOARD IS MOVED. VIEW OF OTHER SIDE OF BALANCER
BACKLIGHT LAMPS WILL OCCUR IF THE BALANCER BOARD IS MOVED. VIEW OF OTHER SIDE OF BALANCER

VIEW OF OTHER SIDE OF BALANCER SOCKETS SECURING BACKLIGHT LAMP

FIGURE 6-9 BALANCER BOARD REMOVAL CAUTION

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
32/37" V SERIES PANEL BACKLIGHT ERROR 6X CN1401-3 ON BU BOARD GOES HIGH Yes LCD
32/37" V SERIES
PANEL
BACKLIGHT
ERROR 6X
CN1401-3
ON BU BOARD
GOES HIGH
Yes
LCD Panel
(3.3v)?
No
BU Board
Backlights Light
At turn-on ?
Yes
No
No
24VDC at
CN601-1 on G 2D
Board ?
Yes
3.3VDC at
CN1401 -4 on BU
Board ?
Yes
32" Panel?
Inverter Board
Yes
No
No
G1D Board
BU Board
24VDC at
CN601 -1 on G 1D
Board ?
Yes
3.3VDC at
CN1401 -4 on BU
Board ?
Yes
Inverter Board
No
No
G 1D Board
BU Board

FIGURE 6-10 32/37” BACKLIGHT TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits 3.3VDC 7.2VPP momentarily at Backlights Light Yes Yes Yes CN6154 -3 IP5
3.3VDC 7.2VPP momentarily at Backlights Light Yes Yes Yes CN6154 -3 IP5 Board At turn-on?
3.3VDC
7.2VPP
momentarily at
Backlights Light
Yes
Yes
Yes
CN6154 -3
IP5 Board
At turn-on?
IP5
Feedback
CN6701-4 on IP5
Board?
Board?
No
No
No
BU Board
Balancer
3.3VDC
momentarily at
Yes
CN6154 -4
IP5 Board
IP5
Board?
No
BU Board

40/46" V AND W SERIES PANEL ERROR BACKLIGHT 6X BALANCER 13X

6X OR 13X?
6X OR 13X?

13X

6X

Backlights Yes light at CN6701 -1 on IP5 board goes low ? Yes LCD Panel
Backlights
Yes
light at
CN6701 -1 on IP5
board goes low ?
Yes
LCD Panel
turn-on?
No
No
IP5 Board
IP5 Board

FIGURE 6-11 40/46 V SERIES BACKLIGHT TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
3.3VDC 7.2VPP Backlights Light At turn-on ? Yes momentarily at CN6154 -3 G4 Board ?
3.3VDC
7.2VPP
Backlights Light
At turn-on ?
Yes
momentarily at
CN6154 -3
G4 Board ?
Yes
Feedback
CN6701 -2 on D3
Board ?
Yes
D 3 Board
No
No
No
BU Board
Balancer
3.3VDC
395 VDC across
CN6502 on G 4
Board ?
Yes
momentarily at
CN6154 -4
G4 Board ?
D 3 Board
No
No
G4 Board
BU Board

40/46" Z SERIES PANEL ERROR BACKLIGHT 6X BALANCER 13X

6X OR 13X?
6X OR 13X?
Z SERIES PANEL ERROR BACKLIGHT 6X BALANCER 13X 6X OR 13X? 13X 6 X Backlights light

13X

6X

PANEL ERROR BACKLIGHT 6X BALANCER 13X 6X OR 13X? 13X 6 X Backlights light at turn
Backlights light at turn -on ? Yes CN6701 -6 on D3 board goes low ?
Backlights
light at
turn -on ?
Yes
CN6701 -6 on D3
board goes low ?
Yes
LCD Panel
No
No
D3 Board
D 3 Board

FIGURE 6-11 40/49” Z SERIES BACKLIGHT TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits

Chapter 6. Backlight Circuits
3.3VDC 7.2VPP Backlights Light At turn-on ? Yes momentarily at CN6154 -3 G4 Board ?
3.3VDC
7.2VPP
Backlights Light
At turn-on ?
Yes
momentarily at
CN6154 -3
G4 Board ?
Yes
Feedback
CN6706 -2 on D3
Board ?
Yes
D 4 Board
No
No
No
BU Board
Balancer
3.3VDC
395 VDC across
Yes
Yes
CN6500
on G 5
D 4 Board
Board ?
momentarily at
CN6154 -4
G5 Board ?
No
No
G5 Board
BU Board

ALL 52-INCH PANEL ERROR BACKLIGHT 6X BALANCER 13X

6X OR 13X?
6X OR 13X?
ALL 52-INCH PANEL ERROR BACKLIGHT 6X BALANCER 13X 6X OR 13X? 13X 6 X Backlights light

13X

52-INCH PANEL ERROR BACKLIGHT 6X BALANCER 13X 6X OR 13X? 13X 6 X Backlights light at

6X

Backlights light at turn -on ? Yes CN6706 -6 on D3 board goes low ?
Backlights
light at
turn -on ?
Yes
CN6706 -6 on D3
board goes low ?
Yes
LCD Panel
No
No
G 5 Board
D4 or D5
Board

FIGURE 6-12 ALL 52” PANEL BACKLIGHT TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART

Chapter 7 – Protect Circuits

Overview

Key areas of the television are monitored for protection and, in all cases, will shut the unit down. Once a fault has been detected and the unit has shut down, the BE Micro IC3001 on the BU board will blink the standby LED in repetitive sequences to indicate which fault was detected. The fault will also be recorded into NVM so that the number of times the event occurred can be displayed in the self-diagnostics mode. Figure 7-1 illustrates a simplified block diagram of the various circuits monitored for protection.

Voltage Protection

Low-voltage protection is monitored at 3 locations and over-voltage protection at 2 places. The unit will shut down if a failure occurs at any of these monitoring points.

DC Detect (2X)

The regulated 12V line from the power supply enters the BU board at pin 1 of CN1411. This line is monitored directly by BE Micro IC3001 as DC_DET. If the REG12V line fails, the unit will shut down and the standby LED will blink in groups of 2.

DC Alert (3X)

This line monitors 3 potential events:

Over-voltage of the REG5V from IC7132.

Low voltage of the REG5V from IC7132

Low voltage of the REG 3.3V

Backlight Protection

The inverter circuits are monitored to protect the lamps and the backlight circuits themselves. Monitoring of current drawn by the lamps is also important to protect the inverter and balancer boards.

Inverter Error (6X)

Entering the BU board at pin 3 of CN1401, the inverter error line is normally low. This line goes high whenever the inverter loses one or both of the AC lamp drive outputs. This may occur because of a failure of the inverter or when the inverter is stopped because the OCP or OVP circuits on the inverter board have detected a problem.

If IC3001 detects a high on the inverter error line the unit will make 3 attempts to get the inverter to start running. In almost all cases, the backlights will never light. The exception to this is if the inverter is starting but it’s over or under-voltage circuits are stopping it. During this cycle time the clicking of the main relay will be heard as the unit turns on and off. If the unit was last set to an input with active audio you may hear this for a moment.

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Balancer Error (13X)

This protect feature is not utilized in the models using the 32 and 37-inch panels although it appears in the diagnostics screen. Only models that use balancer boards have this feature.

If one or more of the backlight lamps fails to light, the balancer loop will cause the BAL_ERR line at pin 1 of CN1410 to go low from its normally high state (11.5VDC). In virtually all cases you will see the backlights turn on before the unit shuts down. Once a balancer error is detected the unit turns off and blinks the standby LED in groups of 13. Unlike the inverter error detection, the unit will not make another attempt once it shuts down.

This event is most likely caused by a defective lamp. In the models that use 52-inch panels it is possible that one of the 2 inverter boards has failed and can be detected by one side of the screen appearing slightly darker during the brief period before shutdown.

Other Protection

Power supply, Inverter and balancer errors are the most likely to be remedied outside of the BU board. The remaining protection circuits involve devices mounted on the BU board.

Temperature (7X)

IC3502 located on the BU board is a digital thermometer that sends data directly to IC3001 regarding temperature within the television cabinet. If the specified temperature is exceeded, the unit will shut down with a 7- blink error.

If the unit shuts down immediately after turn-on, suspect a defective IC3001 or an interruption of data on the I2C bus. Shutdown after extended periods of operation may be caused by excessive ambient temperatures or insufficient ventilation.

Speaker Protect (8X)

Any DC detected on the speaker lines will cause this event. It is usually caused by a failed audio amplifier and since all audio components are located on the BU board, this is the component to replace to resolve the issue.

Trident (11X)

If a data reading error occurs between BE Micro IC3001 and Trident video processor IC4700, the data read will be attempted 2 more times and if still unsuccessful, the unit will shut down and blink the standby LED in groups of 11. Replacement of the BU board is recommended.

TCON or HFR (12X 14X)

A communication error has occured from the TCON board. If the LVDS cable is not defective or loose both conditions require the replacement of the LCD panel.

# BLINKS

PROBLEMDETECTED

POSSIBLE SOLUTION

2

LOSS OF REG 12V

G BOARD

3

5V OR 3.3V OVP OR LVP

BU BOARD

5

LOSS OF PANEL 12V

NOT USED IN CHASSIS

6

INVERTER NOT WORKING

INVERTER OR G BOARD

7

EXCESSIVE TEMPERATURE

IF OCCURS IMMEDIATELY REPLACE BU BOARD

8

DC DETECTED ON SPEAKER

BU BOARD

11

TRIDENT IC PROBLEM

BU BOARD

12

TCON ERROR

LCD PANEL

13

BALANCE ERROR (NOT USED IN 32 /37XBR6 MODELS)

LCD PANEL

14

HIGH FRAME RATE ERROR

LCD PANEL

SELF DIAGNOSTICS TABLE

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

FROM

POWER

SUPPLY

FROM

INVERTER

DC_DET (MAIN _POWER) 2X REG 3.3V CN1411 DC_ALERT 3X IC7132 REG 12V 11 5V REG
DC_DET (MAIN _POWER)
2X
REG
3.3V
CN1411
DC_ALERT
3X
IC7132
REG 12V
11
5V REG
Q3415
D7101
Q7101
CN1401
BALANCER ERROR* 13X
BAL_ERR
1
INV_ERR
3
INV_ERR 6X
IC3001
IC2005
8X
BE MICRO
AUDIO
AMP
IC3502
7X
*NOT USED IN
TEMP
32/36XBR6
SENSE
MODELS
11X
IC4700
TRIDENT
12X or 14X
HFR OR TCON
ERROR FROM
LCD PANEL
BU

FIGURE 7-1 PROTECT CIRCUIT BLOCK DIAGRAM

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Diagnostics History

Whenever a problem is detected by the self-diagnostics feature that causes the unit to shut down, the event is recorded and stored in NVM. This is particularly helpful when dealing with intermittent failures but not so helpful if the unit is always shutting down.

The diagnostics history pages are retrieved by pressing the “DISPLAY”, “5”, “VOL –“ and “POWER“ buttons in sequence on the remote commander when the unit is off. The diagnostics history page will appear as shown in Figure 7-2

There are 2 pages containing failure history. Press the “1” key on the remote to view the second page. Pressing the “4” key returns to the first page.

Note that a running count is kept anytime one of the detection circuits is activated. This running count will continue until it is reset. This is performed by pressing the “8” key on the remote followed by the “0” key. This should always be done in order to clear the history and provide a clean table for future use.

The diagnostics page also contains 4 sets of 5-digit numbers. The first set, beginning at the left, indicates the number of hours, in decimal format, that the set has been operating. The next set is the boot count. This is the number of times the unit has been turned on. The third set is the number of hours the panel has been operating. This number can be reset to zeros by pressing the “7” key followed by the “0” key. Only the panel hours will be reset. The last group is not used in the EX1 chassis.

Troubleshooting Flowcharts

The troubleshooting flowchart found in Figure 7-3 will assist in determining what component is the likely cause of the protect shutdown. Due to the large variances in panel backlight circuitry, shutdowns resulting in 6 or 13 blinks will refer you to another set of flowcharts found in Chapter 6. These flowcharts will steer you in the right direction based on the model of the unit you are servicing.

Troubleshooting Test Points

Figures 7-4 through 7-9 contain illustrations pointing to the important and easily accessed test points for checking voltages and logic levels of protect lines. They are grouped according to panel size and backlight circuitry design.

# EVENT BLINKS COUNT
#
EVENT
BLINKS
COUNT

DIAGNOSTICS HISTORY (PAGE 1)

OPERATING BOOT PANEL NOT USED HOURS COUNT HOURS
OPERATING
BOOT
PANEL
NOT USED
HOURS
COUNT
HOURS

DIAGNOSTICS HISTORY (PAGE 2)

FIGURE 7-2 SELF-DIAGNOSTICS PAGES

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits
No Immediately ? Check for possible ventilation problem C Yes Yes 7X Red Standby Temperature
No
Immediately ?
Check for possible
ventilation problem
C
Yes
Yes
7X
Red Standby
Temperature
LED Flashing
BU Board
No
Yes
2X
POWER SUPPLY
(SEE POWER SUPPLY
TYPE IN APPROPRIATE
TRIAGE SHEET)
8X
Yes
MAIN POWER
Speaker
BU Board
Protect
No
No
Yes
3X
BU Board
DC ALERT
Yes
11X
BU Board
TRIDENT
No
No
5X
Yes
NOT USED
TCON
Yes
12X or 14X?
LCD PANEL
No
No
No
6X
Yes
BACKLIGHT
Go To Inverter
Troubleshooting
Flowchart
Yes
13X
No
Balancer
Go To Inverter
Troubleshooting
Flowchart

FIGURE 7-3 PROTECT TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHART

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits
CN1401 TO INVERTER 1 NOT USED 2 GROUND 3 INV_ERR (NORM LOW) 4 BACKLIGHT ON
CN1401 TO INVERTER
1 NOT USED
2 GROUND
3 INV_ERR (NORM LOW)
4 BACKLIGHT ON (3.2V)
5 DIMMER (PWM)
CN601
1~5
24VDC
6~8
GND
CN3201
TO H1, H3 AND
H4 BOARDS
CN602
1
PWR_ON
2
AC_OFF_DET
3
STBY_3.3
4,5
UNREG 13V
CN1411
6~10
GROUND
TO G1D BOARD
11,12
REG_12V
CN2001
TO SPEAKERS

FIGURE 7-4 32-INCH TEST POINTS

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits
CN601 CN1401 1 ~ 5 UNREG 24V 1 NOT USED 6 ~ 10 GROUND 2
CN601
CN1401
1
~
5
UNREG 24V
1 NOT USED
6
~ 10
GROUND
2 GROUND
3 INV_ERR (NORM LOW)
4 BACKLIGHT ON (3.2V)
5 DIMMER (PWM)
CN3201
TO H1, H3 AND
H4 BOARDS
CN1411
TO G2D BOARD
CN602
1
POWER ON (3.3V ON)
2
AC_OFF_DET (NORM HIGH)
3
4, 5
6 ~ 10
11 ~ 13
STBY 3.3V
UNREG 13V
GROUND
CN2001
TO SPEAKERS
REG12V

FIGURE 7-5 37-INCH TEST POINTS

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits
CN100 CN24 CN601 CN1401 1 ~ 5 UNREG 24V 1 NOT USED 6 ~ 10
CN100
CN24
CN601
CN1401
1
~ 5
UNREG 24V
1 NOT USED
6
~ 10
GROUND
2 GROUND
3 INV_ERR (NORM LOW)
4 BACKLIGHT ON (3.2V)
5 DIMMER (PWM)
CN603
1
~
5
UNREG 24V
CN1
6
~ 10
GROUND
CN1411
TO G2D BOARD
CN23
CN602
1
POWER ON (3.3V ON )
CN2001
2
AC_OFF_DET (NORM HIGH)
TO SPEAKERS
3
4, 5
6 ~ 10
11 ~ 13
STBY 3.3V
UNREG 13V
GROUND
REG12V

FIGURE 7-6 42-INCH TEST POINTS

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits
CN6154 1 – BALANCER_ERR (NORM LOW) 2 – GROUND 3 – INV_ERR (NORM LOW) 4
CN6154
1 – BALANCER_ERR (NORM LOW)
2 – GROUND
3 – INV_ERR (NORM LOW)
4 – BACKLIGHT_ON (HIGH ON)
5 – DIMMER (PWM)
CN102
LAMP HIGH
CN1401
VOLTAGE !
TO IP5 BOARD
CN6150
1 – PWR_ON
2 – AC_OFF_DET
3 – STBY_3.3V
CN6701
1 – REG_12V
2,3 – FEEDBACK
4,5 – GROUND
4,5 – UNREG_13V
6,7 – LD (BALANCER_ERR
NORM 11.7VDC)
4,5 – UNREG_13V
6~10 – GROUND
11,12 – REG_12V
CN3201
TO H1, H3 AND
H4 BOARDS
CN104
TO BU BOARD
CN1411
TO IP5 BOARD
CN101
LAMP HIGH
VOLTAGE!
CN2001
TO SPEAKERS

FIGURE 7-7 40/46-INCH V AND W TEST POINTS

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits
CN6700 CN6103 CN6600 1 – PFC 395V 2 – PFC GROUND CN1401 TO D3 BOARD
CN6700
CN6103
CN6600
1 – PFC 395V
2 – PFC GROUND
CN1401
TO D3
BOARD
CN3201
H1, H3,
H4 AND
LOGO
BOARDS
CN6702 FROM BU BOARD
1 GROUND
CN6202
CN1411 TO
CN6706 TO BALANCER
2 DIMMER (PWM)
1
POWER_ON
1 REG 12V
G4 BOARD
3 BACKLIGHT_ON (3.3V ON)
2
AC_OFF_DET (NORM 3.3V)
2,3 FEEDBACK
4 INV_ERR (NORM LOW)
3
STBY 3.3V
4,5 GROUND
5 REG 12V
4
NC
6,7
LD (INV_ERR NORM LOW)
6 BALANCER_ERR (NORM LOW)
5
6~10
11~13
UNREG 13V
GROUND
REG 12V
CN2001
TO
SPEAKERS

FIGURE 7-8 40/46-INCH Z SERIES TEST POINTS

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits

Chapter 7 - Protect Circuits
CN65 CN6501 1 – PFC 395V CN6153 TO D4 BOARD 2 – HOT GROUND 1
CN65
CN6501
1 – PFC 395V
CN6153 TO D4 BOARD
2 – HOT GROUND
1
– GROUND
2
– DIMMER (PWM)
3
– BACKLIGHT_ON (HIGH ON)
4
– INV_ERR (NORM LOW)
CN53
6
– REG_12V
7
– BALANCER_ERR (NORM LOW)
CN6600
CN6500
CN6950 FROM
D4 BOARD
CN6700
3 – INV_DRVL
5
– INV_DRVH
6
– GROUND
CN6150 TO TCON
8
– V-FB1
1, 2
REG_12V
10 – REG_12V
3, 4
GROUND
CN6150
CN1401
1
PWR_ON (3.3V ON)
TO G5 BOARD
2
AC_OFF_DET (NORM HIGH)
3
STBY_3.3V
4, 5
UNREG_13V
6~10
GROUND
11,12
REG_12V
CN3201
TO H1, H3
CN58
CN6154 TO BU BOARD
AND H4
FROM G4
1 – BALANCER ERROR
BOARDS
BOARD
(NORM LOW)
2 – GROUND
CN1411
CN6702
3 – INVERTER ERROR
(NORM 3.1V HIGH)
FROM G5
TO G5 BOARD
4 – BACKLIGHT (3.3V ON)
BOARD
5 – DIMMER (0.8 ~ 3.1VDC)
CN6703
CN56
TO D5
TO LEFT
BOARD
BALANCER
CN6706 TO BALANCER
1 – REG_12V
2, 3 – FEEDBACK
4, 5 – GROUND
6, 7 – LD (BALANCER_ERR
NORMALLY 11.7VDC)
CN2001
CN62
TO SPEAKERS

FIGURE 7-9 52-INCH MODELS TEST POINTS

Chapter 8 – Appendix

Software Updates

Sony televisions have become much more reliant on software and firmware over the last couple of years. Digital processing such as decoding the MPEG2 video and Digital Dolby® signals along with scaling of the video signals to the display resolution requires program routines to perform these functions. Add control and protection of the television along with fancy GUI graphics and interfacing with other devices and you can see that these software and firmware files are becoming more complicated.

The files containing operating commands within a television’s CPU or micro-controller are technically known as “firmware” since the information is stored within the controlling devices and may also reside in external NVM or flash memory. Some of the information could be classified as “software” since it can be changed to customize the unit. The word “software” appears on the television screen whenever one wants to check the current version in the unit and also appears whenever an update is being installed. For this reason, the word “software” will be used in this article when referring to any updates.

Why Update?

In some cases, updates are necessary to resolve a “glitch” that may have appeared in the operating routine of the television. As mentioned in the beginning of this article, software programs have become quite complex and use of the product in the field can sometimes expose a minor error in the routine of these programs.

It should be noted that most software updates are not provided to increase the picture quality of the television. Proper handling of the video processing tends to be rather accurate at the time the units begin production. A majority of software updates are used to compensate for problems that are not necessarily the television’s fault.

An example would be an issue that arose in one state where an over-the-

air television station was failing to transmit a proper piece of information

in the overhead data packet in its digital channel. When the customer

performed the initial setup routine on their television (which includes the “auto program” to add available channels) the channel search would stop

at this station and fail to continue scanning the OTA bands. The television

would display most of the analog NTSC stations detected but no digital channels. A software update was provided to the customer to ignore this glitch in the station’s data packet and continue the channel search. This incident affected an isolated region of the country that does not require an update be made available for all models sold.

The software updates tend to be cumulative, in other words, the previously mentioned incident with the television station could arise somewhere else

in the country and may be included in future update packages to keep all

televisions from running across this problem.

Checking the Version of Software

In certain cases it may be necessary to check which versions of software

are currently installed in the unit. The best way is to enter the service mode by pressing “DISPLAY”, “5”, “VOL+” and “POWER”, in sequence, on the remote controller while the unit is off. The installed version of the FE and BE Micros are listed on the first page.

Another method is to enter the customer setup graphics and locate the “Product Support” icon at the upper left of the group. When the “Software Update” icon is selected the current installed software is displayed in

a coded format that can be mathematically converted to the software

version. This method is used by the initial tiers of customer support to

determine if the unit should receive an update.

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Chapter 8 - Appendix
Chapter 8 - Appendix FIGURE 8-1 SOFTWARE VERSION CHECK VIA XMB MENU FIGURE 8-2 SOFTWARE VERSION
Chapter 8 - Appendix FIGURE 8-1 SOFTWARE VERSION CHECK VIA XMB MENU FIGURE 8-2 SOFTWARE VERSION
Chapter 8 - Appendix FIGURE 8-1 SOFTWARE VERSION CHECK VIA XMB MENU FIGURE 8-2 SOFTWARE VERSION

FIGURE 8-1 SOFTWARE VERSION CHECK VIA XMB MENU

8 - Appendix FIGURE 8-1 SOFTWARE VERSION CHECK VIA XMB MENU FIGURE 8-2 SOFTWARE VERSION CHECK

FIGURE 8-2 SOFTWARE VERSION CHECK VIA SERVICE MODE

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Performing the Update

Sony televisions manufactured in the last 3 years contain a USB port located on the rear of the unit. On 2007 and 2008 models this port is labeled “DMEX/SERVICE”. DMEX (Digital Medial Extender) is used for optional devices such as the Bravia Internet Video Link to allow the television to access selected internet websites. It also serves as the input port for software updates via a USB storage device. Units manufactured prior to 2007 have a hidden USB port that is accessed by removing a small cover on the rear of the unit.

In situations such as the television station issue described above, Sony can send a USB device pre-loaded with the necessary software to update the unit to resolve the issue. This is one way for customers to receive an update for their television. The update will be supplied with full instructions on how to install the file(s). Another way to receive updates is for the customer to download the required file(s), place them on a USB device, and then perform the update.

The 2008 model lineup includes a feature that can allow the television to automatically receive updates should they become necessary. One feature uses a selected local channel to provide the data for the update via the onboard tuner. When the television is turned off, the tuner continues to operate in standby and extracts update information in small groups. Once the entire file has been extracted, the update can be installed by the customer via the user menu.

Another option that is found on some of the upper-end models is the use of an Ethernet port located on the rear of the unit. This allows the television to be connected to a home network. This feature only works with networks and devices that are set up to be DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) compliant. Information on this system can be found at www.dlna.org. The customer can download the update and retrieve it directly from the computer on the home network. Be aware that although these features are present on selected models, their practical use has not been finalized as of this writing and will be covered if and when they become fully functional for this year’s applicable models.

NOTE: Most updates are performed by the customer. In certain cases where access to the service mode is required, the technician will perform the update and then access the service mode to change or adjust any additional items. Always verify whether an update is required by a technical person. Failure to do so will result in a rejected warranty claim.

technical person. Failure to do so will result in a rejected warranty claim. FIGURE 8-3 DMEX/SERVICE

FIGURE 8-3 DMEX/SERVICE USB PORT

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Downloading an Update

Updates can be downloaded in several ways. The customer may be given

a specific URL to do this or, if the update is required for all units, may be

located on the Sony customer support website. If the update requires the expertise of a service technician it may be located in the ASC service website (currently ESI). The location for downloading an update will also contain documentation with the proper instructions for the install. Read this information very carefully. Some televisions have the update file located

within a folder and others do not. If the television requires a folder, this is the first item the unit will look for on the USB device. The file will be in zip format with the folder and update file included. If the update has a single file and a folder is not required it can be sent without having to compress

it to a zip format.

Formatting the USB Device

It is important that the USB device not contain any additional files or folders before placing the update information on it. The best way to do this is to right click on the device in Windows Explorer and select “format” from the dropdown menu. Make sure the file format is set for FAT32. If the USB device is more than 2GB Windows Explorer will force FAT32. Formatting the device will remove any hidden files or partitions that may reside on the device.

Installing the File(s) to the USB Device

If the update information is in zipped format it is best to download the file

to your computer’s hard disc. When the file is opened, unzip its contents directly to the USB device. This assures that the folder (if used) is properly

placed on the device with the update files inside the folder.

assures that the folder (if used) is properly placed on the device with the update files

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Updating the Television

The new 2008 EX1 chassis will be used as an example in this writing. Procedures vary with chassis designs. Some require inserting the device with the television off and then booting the update by turning it on. Most of the units will read the device when it is inserted while they are powered on. Updates for the EX1 chassis are performed by inserting the USB device while the unit is turned on. The update may require up to 10 minutes. The total update time in this example took 7 minutes and 20 seconds. The following sequence of events will occur and is shown in the succeeding illustrations:USB Detection and File Loading

Once the USB device is inserted it will be detected. A blue splash screen will appear with the graphics at the upper left of the screen will displaying a toolbox and the words “Software Update”. The file(s) are then copied from the USB device.

Notification of Update

This information will appear on 2 pages. The first will indicate that a mandatory update will occur and the current software version is shown along with the version that will be installed. The second page explains the procedure and the approximate time it will take along with a warning not to interrupt or turn off power to the television during the procedure.

FE Micro Update

If active video was present before the USB device was installed it will return for several seconds. Another splash screen will appear with a moving progress bar. The FE Micro is contained within the AMD decoder IC. The BE Micro and video processor are still functioning and this is why graphics can be generated. This process may continue for several minutes. Once complete, the screen will return to active video (if present) for several seconds before the BE Micro begins its update.

BE Micro Update

Since the BE Micro controls the video processor, the screen will go blank with no video or graphics displayed. The Standby LED on the lower right corner will light a steady red while the PIC OFF/TIMER LED lights amber colored with a slow blink rate. This is the only indication that the update is still in progress.

Update Completion

Once the unit has completed the BE Micro update, active video and audio will once again appear followed by an indication that updating is being finalized. The last screen will indicate a successful install of the update and prompt the removal of the USB device. Press the center joystick button on the remote controller to clear the screen.

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Chapter 8 - Appendix
Chapter 8 - Appendix SOFTWARE FILES UPLOADING INFORMATION PAGE UPDATE PROCEDURE INSTRUCTIONS FE MICRO (AMD) UPDATING

SOFTWARE FILES UPLOADING

Chapter 8 - Appendix SOFTWARE FILES UPLOADING INFORMATION PAGE UPDATE PROCEDURE INSTRUCTIONS FE MICRO (AMD) UPDATING

INFORMATION PAGE

8 - Appendix SOFTWARE FILES UPLOADING INFORMATION PAGE UPDATE PROCEDURE INSTRUCTIONS FE MICRO (AMD) UPDATING FIGURE

UPDATE PROCEDURE INSTRUCTIONS

UPLOADING INFORMATION PAGE UPDATE PROCEDURE INSTRUCTIONS FE MICRO (AMD) UPDATING FIGURE 8-3 SOFTWARE UPDATE SEQUENCE

FE MICRO (AMD) UPDATING

FIGURE 8-3 SOFTWARE UPDATE SEQUENCE

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Chapter 8 - Appendix
TIMER LED WILL BE BLINKING STANDBY LED STEADY RED
TIMER LED WILL
BE BLINKING
STANDBY LED
STEADY RED

BE MICRO UPDATING

WILL BE BLINKING STANDBY LED STEADY RED BE MICRO UPDATING FINAL INSTALLATION SOFTWARE INSTALL COMPLETE FIGURE

FINAL INSTALLATION

STANDBY LED STEADY RED BE MICRO UPDATING FINAL INSTALLATION SOFTWARE INSTALL COMPLETE FIGURE 8-3 SOFTWARE UPDATE

SOFTWARE INSTALL COMPLETE

FIGURE 8-3 SOFTWARE UPDATE SEQUENCE (CONT)

Chapter 8 - Appendix

Chapter 8 - Appendix

LCD Panel Troubleshooting

When a customer calls and is complaining of “poor picture quality”, “colored lines”, or no picture at all, it is very important that the technician rule out the LCD panel assembly as the cause. Technicians should be using the triage system found on the ASC Portal site and in the back of the training manuals to assist on which parts should be brought to the location to service the unit. LCD panels are not suggested to be brought to the service location based on the customer’s description of the problem. They are expensive to ship and prone to damage. The technician must diagnose the unit and obtain special authorization before the panel can be replaced. In certain cases it may be determined that it is not economically feasible to replace an LCD panel for a particular model and that replacement of the unit would be the best option.

The purpose of this article is to assist the technician in determining if the LCD panel is defective as efficiently as possible. In many cases, failures of the physical aspects of the panel (panel glass damage, tab bonding issues) are easily recognized. Failures of the TCON board (which is considered part of the panel) can sometimes lead the technician to erroneously change a video process board and have wasted time only to find out that panel is the cause of the failure.

LCD Panel Basics

LCD panels have steadily evolved over the last several years. New designs of the physical structure of the LCD crystals have greatly improved the contrast ratio and viewing angle. Quicker response times and increased refresh rates have helped to reduce the motion “smear” associated with LCD displays. Backlighting design has also aided in producing a picture with color temperatures to make the images as true as possible. With all these design improvements, one aspect of the LCD panel remains relatively the same: Processing of the video signal.

Figure 8-4 illustrates a typical LCD panel and the associated video processing circuits as found in the WAX3 chassis. The various formats and resolutions of video signals are processed on the BU1 board. All video signals exit the video processor in the native resolution of the LCD panel. In this design, the resolution is for a 1280 by 768 at 60HZ refresh rate panel. 48 horizontal lines are discarded to match up to the 720p resolution of the ATSC specifications so the video will exit as 720p.

The LCD panel used in this model processes 8-bit RGB video data. Before the video information can be sent to the TCON board it must be converted to a format that allows for practical and noise-free transmission. The large number of parallel lines to transmit the 8-bit RGB data would need to be sent on differential lines for noise reduction. This would require 48 lines just for the video. The TCON circuit also requires B+, ground connections, a communications bus, sync, and a clocking line transmitted differentially so we can see that up to 100 lines would be required. The practical way to transmit this information is to convert the parallel video data to a serial stream and this is accomplished by the Low-Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) transmitter.

The LVDS transmitter contains a circuit to serialize the parallel data. The parallel video information along with sync and clocking data are transmitted via twisted line pairs. Depending on the logic level, current is sent along one or the other of the twisted pair of wires. The receiving end of the wires is loaded with a resistor (usually around 100 to 120 ohms). The receiver detects the polarity of the voltage drop across the resistor to determine the logic level. The current level swings in the wire are about 3ma with a voltage differential of around 350mv. This allows for transmission of the video signal with minimal EMI.