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Baby Got
Bach returns
to Princeton

FREE

OCT. 19-25, 2016

Fee may be lifted


for ash tree removal

Whos got spirit?

Council considers change to recently


passed ordinance instating fees,
requirements for resident tree removal

Pianist and founder


discusses what makes
concert so engaging
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA

By ERICA CHAYES WIDA

The Sun

The Sun
When Orli Shahams twin boys
reached the age of 3, she noticed
the kinds of childrens programs
somewhere between the world
of Mommy and Me and preschool
were lacking. As a professional
pianist, she found the level of development for most children her
sons age was a point of being
particularly equipped to understand and build upon new information, such as learning another
language.
Well, music is a form of language, Shaham thought, and she
set out to create an interactive
concert for kids ages 3 to 6 to become educated in classical works
and instruments. From there,
Baby Got Bach was born.
Putting it together was a
learning process, Shaham said.
The first thing I realized is that
kids physically have to participate whether playing a small,
handheld instrument, using body
movements or singing. My goal
through the whole program is to
please see SHAHAM, page 13

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

Princeton High School senior Katie Griffin gets ready for the
school pep rally with the Princeton Tiger. PHS students recently celebrated another week of school spirit. For the full story,
please see page 4.

Princeton council introduced


an ordinance that would exempt
ash trees from the Sept. 12 ordinance instating fees and replacement requirements for resident
tree removal. Council unanimously passed the motion last
Monday Jenny Crumiller was
not present after considering
the effect the Emerald Ash Borer,
a non-native insect infesting ash
trees in North America until the
trees become brittle and die.
According to the Princeton
Shade Tree Commission, the EAB
is highly destructive and was
recorded to have killed tens of
millions of ash trees in Michigan
where it was first discovered in
2002. It has since continued to kill
tens of millions of additional ash
trees in 23 other states across
North America. In New Jersey,
the EAB was first noticed two
years ago in Bridgewater and has
been spotted in Mercer County.
On Princetons municipally-run
streets alone, there are approxi-

INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Merging tech and art
Data and Art Hackathon
approaches. PAGE 7

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

mately 2,000 ash trees. In the community at large, the STC predicts
the loss of ash trees 99 percent
of which are expected to die at
the hands of the EAB to be
clearly visible.
The ordinance, proposed by
Councilman Patrick Simon, will
enable residents to remove ash
tree(s) on their properties at any
point in the trees lifespan without any fees and without having
to replace it. The only stipulation
is that they will have to file a tree
removal permit with the municipal arborist so she can be sure to
monitor that the trees are in fact
ash trees.
Unless trees are treated,
theyre going to die, Simon said.
This will give people the flexibility to take them down while
theyre still alive and without
penalty, which frankly is safer,
and also provides many situations for people to take down the
trees if theyre having other
tree work done that will be more
cost effective.
please see COUNCIL, page 15

MEET THE
CANDIDATES
BOE and Council candidates
answer questions. PAGE 9-11

2 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 19-25, 2016

Exploring connection between art and technology


The Sun hits the streets to find out how Princetonians think technology affects art
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
In the age of online, how does
technology affect art? Is every
person with an Instagram account an artist because they are
given, rather easily, the tools to
make a regular photo into one
that stands out? If the average 13year-old Instagrammer is an
artist, then what of the professional photographer?
To gain insights into how
Princetonians view art and technology whether these areas
should coexist, whether one helps
the other become more powerful,
or if they should remain as separate entities: the artist and the
techie, the canvas and the app
The Sun went for a walk and
questioned passersby.
Eva Reynolds and Olivia
Granzen, seniors at Princeton
High School, sat outside in downtown Princeton enjoying a day off
from school. Both girls are film
buffs and interested in pursuing
filmmaking or screenwriting in
college. Reynolds is partial to hor-

ror flicks, while Granzen enjoys


all sorts of genres, particularly
indies.
I think technology makes it
easier for people to see and express arts and also easier to do
art, Reynolds said. In a way,
since so many people have access
to an app like Instagram, it raises
the standard for what is considered art.
Granzen sees technology as a
way to broaden the types of art
that can be accessed. With the
computer, theres a different
medium available for creators to
utilize.
The online culture of art is
also a huge resource. There are so
many places you can see what
other artists are doing everyone's influencing each other and
creating more things, Granzen
said.
Chris Cornick and Liz Moskus
are a local couple currently planning their wedding. While
Moskus comes from an art background and practices interior design, her fianc works in sales for
construction.

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

Princeton High School film buffs Eva Reynolds, left, and Olivia
Granzen chat about digital art while looking through photos.
Its interesting, the first thing
that comes to mind is our save the
dates. There are all these programs where you can so easily design your invitations. We used
one for the save the date but when

it comes to our actual invitations,


Im hesitant to try it, Moskus
said.
Cornick agreed and elaborated.
Thats the thing about technology. While it makes things a

lot easier to do yourself, when it


comes to quality, you often want
something you can touch and feel.
Doing everything online lacks
that element, he said.
Moskus also argued how advancement in the field of technology can and is enhancing an
artists work, if they decide to utilize it. For example, the
tablet now has a drawing program.
Moskus said she knows of a lot
of artists who will start with a
sketch and then put it into the
tablet where they can use a program to finish it using features
such as shading.
Its all transitioning, Cornick
said. Even in my field, you see
people all the time architects
often who before were just a guy
with a pencil. Now, everything is
changing from drawing and
sketching out blueprints to using
the computer. Its quicker but also
makes it harder for the older generation. Theres been a gap where
technology had to catch up with
art, but that gap is starting to
close.

Police: Bomb threat at Princeton High School under investigation


The following reports are provided by the Princeton Police Department.
At 10:07 a.m. on Oct. 11, the
Princeton Police Department received a telephone call from an
unknown male who
stated there was a
bomb inside Princeton
High School. The police responded and secured the area while
the school was evacuated. Bombsniffing K-9 teams were used to
clear the school building. The students were able to re-enter the
building at about 12:20 p.m.

Hiawatha female was found to


have an active warrant for her arrest that was issued by the Montgomery Township Municipal
Court. She was placed under arrest and transported to police
headquarters where she was
processed and later
turned over to Montgomery Township police.

police
report

Oct. 10
Subsequent to a motor vehicle
stop on Washington Road for multiple violations, a 49-year-old Lake

A random license
plate inquiry revealed a 28-yearold Trenton female had an active
warrant for her arrest that was issued by the Hamilton Township
Municipal Court in the amount of
$350. As a result, a motor vehicle
stop was initiated on Mercer
Street. During the stop, the passenger, a 43-year-old Trenton female was found to be a wanted

person out of the Bucks County


Sheriff s Office in Pennsylvania.
She also had active warrants for
her arrest that were issued by the
Trenton Municipal Court with a
total bail of $3,500. Both were
placed under arrest and transported to police headquarters
where they were processed. The
driver was turned over to the
Hamilton Township police and
her passenger turned over to the
Bucks County Sheriff s Office.

Oct. 9
Subsequent to a motor vehicle
stop for careless driving, a 27year-old Hamilton male was
placed under arrest for DWI. He
was transported to police headquarters where he was processed,
issued summonses and released
with a pending court date.

Subsequent to an investigation
into a suspicious vehicle parked
in Smoyer Park, two 19-year-old
males were found to be in possession of marijuana less than 50
grams and drug paraphernalia.
One was also in possession of a
fictitious drivers license. Both
were placed under arrest and
transported to police headquarters where they were processed
and later released with summonses and a pending court date.
Subsequent to a call from the
Ivy Inn stating an underage individual was in possession of a fictitious drivers license, a 20-yearold Maryland male was placed
under arrest for possessing a fictitious drivers license. He was
transported to police headquar-

ters where he was processed and


released with a summons and a
pending court date.

Oct. 7
Sometime between the evening
of Oct. 6 and the morning of Oct.
7, an unknown individual burglarized an unlocked vehicle that
was parked on the 100 block of
Westcott Road. A wallet and credit cards were stolen from the vehicle. The initial investigation revealed the credit cards were used
fraudulently. The investigation
was turned over to the Detective
Bureau for further investigation.
Sometime between the evening
of Oct. 6 and the morning of Oct.
7, an unknown individual burplease see LAPTOP, page 12

OCT. 19-25, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 3

PACF board appoints


Michael H. Ullmann
Princeton Area Community
Foundation
has
appointed
Michael H. Ullmann, a long-time
Princeton resident, to its Board
of Trustees for a three-year
term.
Ullmann is the executive vice
president, general counsel of
Johnson & Johnson and a member of the companys Executive
Committee and Management
Committee. He has worldwide responsibility for legal, government
affairs and policy, global security,
aviation and health-care compliance and privacy. Before assuming that position, he served as
general counsel of the Worldwide
Medical Devices Group for six
years. He also served as corporate
secretary from 1999 to 2006.
Before joining Johnson &
Johnson in 1989 as a mergers and
acquisitions attorney, he practiced law in New York City. He has
been a Princeton resident for
more than 25 years.
Mikes experience in board
governance, his passion for advocating for the needs of children
and his strong ties to central New

Jersey make
him an excellent addition to
our
board,"
said Carol P.
Herring, the
chair of the
Community
Foundations
Board
of
Trustees. "As
ULLMANN
we move forward with our
efforts to improve the lives of
children and adolescents living in
poverty, we will benefit from his
contributions.
Our trustees bring us experience in many critical disciplines,
and Mikes leadership skills and
legal knowledge will strengthen
our board and organization, said
Jeffrey M. Vega, the president
and CEO of the Community
Foundation.
Ullmann serves on the Columbia Law School Board of Visitors,
the Cornell University Alumni
Council and the Rutgers Institute
for Ethical Leadership Executive
Business Cabinet.

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Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com

Wilson-Apple Funeral Home

4 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 19-25, 2016

Another week of school spirit


Between daily themes, pep rally, homecoming and float decorations,
Princeton High School students know how to get spirited
!

# """ "

By ERICA CHAYES WIDA


The Sun

MOTION GYMNASTICS
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Since Princeton High School


hosted its first Friday Night
Lights homecoming football
game two years ago, Spirit Week
has amped up. Students and staff
spent the week indulging in daily
themes including Pajama Day,
Twin Day, Class Color Day, and
Blue and White Day. But the big
bang of school spirit was planned
for Friday with the pep rally, golf
cart float decorating, Spirit Week
Wrap-up Celebration and finally
the football game lights illuminating the PHS turf.
Physical education teacher
Matt Wilkinson, whose daughter
is a third-generation PHS student
Wilkinson is Class of 79 admires how Spirit Week is circling
back to its more traditional roots.
The idea of Spirit Week has
been a fluctuating one in the district, he said. Now, like a thermostat, its getting dialed up. The
Friday Night Lights, the music
festivities its getting to be more
like the school spirit I used to
know. I think the parents are really supportive because they recognize that. Spirit Weeks historical.
Brian Dzbenski, PHS interim
athletic director, helped this year
to make the homecoming football

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

PHS sophomores Charlotte Walker, Olivia Jaffe, Amanda Godefroy


and Amanda Tenzlinger love Spirit Week and ready for the annual
bouncy horse race.
game truly something to enjoy for were to parade around the track.
all community members. In addiIn addition to activities, Dzbention to supporting the team, visi- ski was also proud to announce
tors were to have the pleasure of the schools new athletics website
indulging in food trucks lined up was up and running the Wednesalong the grass, the band sched- day of Spirit Week a huge plus
uled to play music in front of the for any student, parent or comstands and the float competition, munity sports fan. Dzbenski also
which Dzbenski MCed. Each encourages anyone involved in
class created was to create its own school sports to check out the
floats. Volunteers were to deco- phone application Our School
rate golf carts after school Friday Today, which will easily show any
each class given the same mate- kids sports schedule.
rials but in colors celebrating
please see GODFROY, page 14
their grade. At halftime, floats

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6 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 19-25, 2016

in our opinion

Its almost time to vote

145 Witherspoon Street


Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245

Head to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 8 to elect your leaders


Richard Donnelly

oting is one of the inalienable


rights that our forefathers
fought so fervently for so
many years ago. Many would say that
voting is one of the most important inalienable rights that we have as Americans, if not the most important inalienable right.
Colonial Americans fought for independence in the 1700s based on the rallying cry of no taxation without representation, and they wanted the
right to choose their own representation.
Over the following 200 years, three
major pieces of legislation extended
or ensured voting rights:
The Fifteenth Amendment to the
Constitution gave voting rights to non-

Will you vote?


Do you plan to vote in this years
General Election? Why or why not?
Share your thoughts on this, and other
topics, through a letter to the editor.

white males;
The Nineteenth Amendment gave
women the right to vote;
And The Voting Rights Act of 1965
prevented discrimination in voting.
A lot of time and effort were spent,
and blood was shed, to give all citizens
of the United States 18 years of age
and older the right to vote.
And now, it is up to you to take advantage of that right at the polls. The
General Election will be held Tuesday,
Nov. 8, and in addition to a contentious

and heated presidential election, there


are plenty of important local elections
on the ticket as well.
In upcoming issues of The Sun, you
will find information on exactly what
you are voting for at the polls, when
the polls are open and details on every
polling location in town.
If you have further questions about
the election, you can always find information on the countys website or call
your local clerk.
Whatever your political slant or
whomever you may be voting for,
make sure you make your way to the
polls on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Many people
before us fought for your inalienable
right to do so. It is our responsibility
to exercise that right.

letter to the editor


Writer applauds return
of Civil Rights Commission
I am encouraged to learn that Princeton
Council is poised to pass an ordinance to
reinstate the towns Civil Rights Commission, which has been dormant for nearly 20
years. We should all thank Mayor Lempert
and council for giving the new ordinance
such a thorough review.
We live in a dangerous time when no
municipality dare consider itself exempt
from concerns about civil rights (whether
legal, cultural or ethical). Princeton, especially with its progressive stands on so
many issue, should be a model for the state
and the nation in this matter also.
Civil rights belong to all of us; no person
should be denied adequate access to those
rights. Princeton must put in place adequate structures and procedures for resolving civil rights conflicts: touchy-feely community education and outreach do not
alone suffice. Matters of civil rights should

not be left as simply one of many responsibilities assumed by our Human Services
Department.
What we need is an independent Civil
Rights Commission, whose sole responsibility is to attend to matters of civil rights
in a comprehensive manner. That CRC
should manage conflict resolution through
structured mediation, however informal,
and with an adequate staff of Princeton
volunteer citizens. Under current structures, it is only the (solo) executive director
of the Human Services Department who
deals with matters of civil rights. That person is de facto an employee of the town. To
be effective, the CRC must be perceived as
independent by residents, as well as visitors. In addition, the executive director of
Human Services may be simply be overworked.
Citizens or visitors should be able to register civil rights complaints with either the
revived CRC or the HS Department, as they
choose, according to their needs and temperaments. Establishing this second, inde-

pendent point for intake of civil rights


complaints will give to individuals and the
town alike a profile of impartiality. Intake
forms should be identical for both the
CRC and the HS Department. If possible,
the information should be shared with the
administrator.
Princeton has become a leader as an agefriendly and a bike-friendly community. It
is a state leader in matters of sustainability. None of us can afford to be less than
proud of our community and governance
for our outspoken transparency and vigilance in matters of civil rights.
Daniel A. Harris

ELECTION LETTERS
Letters to the editor regarding
the Nov. 8 election will not be printed
in the Nov. 2 edition. The Oct. 26 edition
will be the last edition before elections
to print these letters.

ceo oF NeWspAper MediA Group

Tim Ronaldson

Joe Eisele

executive editor

publisher

MANAGiNG editor

Kristen Dowd
Erica Chayes Wida
AdvertisiNG director Arlene Reyes

seNior priNcetoN editor

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OCT. 19-25, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 7

Merging art
and technology
Code for Princeton, West Windsor
Arts Council team up for Data
and Art Hackathon on Oct. 23
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
For many Code for Princeton
participants, the organization has
become an outlet, not only for exploring new possibilities in the
world of applications, data and
technology, but also for exercising
their creative sides.
Our work with art is of importance here because we at Code for
Princeton feel that art is a very
critical part of the community
and part of development, said
Hema Waghray, Code for Princeton director. A lot of times, our
data folks work in areas that can
become boring on a day-to-day
basis. The reason they engage in
Code for Princeton is to be creative and engage the right side of
the brain.
For some time, Code for Princeton has teamed up with the
Princeton Public Library and the
Princeton Municipality to host
Civic
Hackathons.
These
Hackathons invite the neighborhood to work together to build

technological solutions and applications that will better the community. It inspires a think tank of
civic hackers, local government,
developers, designers, makers,
kids, adults and hardware aficionados to work on and learn
about technology.
This kind of think tank recently attracted another group of individuals looking to ignite dialogue through creativity: the West
Windsor Arts Council. On Oct. 23,
Code for Princeton and the arts
council will team up to host an
all-day Data and Art Hackathon
combining technology and use of
public data with creativity and
design to make interactive art.
The art pieces will aim to help
bring awareness and positively
impact local communities.
With most all-day hackathons,
Code for Princeton does not discuss any ideas until the day of.
However, since this hackathon is
merging into new territory, there
has been some discussion as to
please see HACKING, page 15

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CALENDAR

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WEDNESDAY OCT. 19
Spotlight on the Humanities: Religion in American Life: "The Legacy of Religious Liberty from
William Penn to the 21st Century.
Princeton Public Library, noon.
Jessica Lang at McCarter: Firebrand choreographer Jessica
Lang brings her company to the
Berlind Theatre with The Wanderer. Playing Wednesday and
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. visit mc
carter.org for more information.

THURSDAY OCT. 20
Barriers To Decision-Making In
End of Life Care: An Introduction
to New Jersey Goals of Care will
be the topic of a presentation by
David Barile, MD; CEO and medical director of New Jersey Goals
of Care, at the meeting of 55-Plus
at 10:00 a.m. at the Jewish Center of Princeton, 435 Nassau St.
Everyone is welcome. Admission
free, with a $3 donation suggested.
Princeton Farmers Market: Sea-

sonal produce from local farmers,


flowers, crafts and a variety of
edibles are available through 4
p.m. at this weekly event. Live
music from 12:30-2:30 p.m. Hinds
Plaza, 11 a.m.

FRIDAY OCT. 21
Job Seeker Sessions: The library
and Professional Services Group
of Mercer County sponsor sessions for professionals who are
seeking new employment and
contracting
opportunities
throughout the region. Please
check the librarys website for
specific topics. Princeton Public
Library, 9:45 a.m.
Acting Out: Students in kindergarten through third grade
engage in dramatic activity
including discussions, games, and
other fun activities. No experience necessary. Princeton High
School drama aficionados will
lead the sessions. Princeton Public Library, 4:30 p.m.
Lobby Hero: A senior thesis show
by Kenneth Lonergan featuring
Princeton University students

Charlie Baker and Stanley Mathabane and directed by faculty


member Mark Nelsonat Princeton University. Oct. 21, 26, 27 and
28 at 8 p.m., Oct. 22 at 3 p.m.
with talkback following. In
advance of show date $12 general admission/$11 students and
seniors; box office on days of performances $17 general admission/$15 students and seniors.
Marie and Edward Matthews 53
Acting Studio, 185 Nassau St.

SATURDAY OCT. 22
Meditation, Kirtan, Bhakti yoga,
Bhagavad-gita - Hidden Treasure of the Sweet Absolute: Enjoy
a discussion, meditation and Indian vegetarian luncheon at the
institute of spiritual culture and
science. Every Saturday. Register
by email: Princeton@bviscs.org.
Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau St. #116, 2 p.m.
Film and Q&A: Jessica Darlings It
List: Based on the series by New
York Times bestselling author
and Princeton resident Megan
McCafferty, this coming-of-age

comedy follows 12-year-old Jessica Darling as she learns that


being herself beats popularity,
prettiness and perfection any
day. Following the screening,
McCafferty will participate in a
Q&A and book signing that will
feature a giveaway and local
treats. For tweens and tweens-atheart. Princeton Public Library, 3
p.m.
Spooky Sounds: Musical Masquerades and Haunted Hunts. There
will be musical masquerades featuring student performances, a
scavenger haunted hunt with
games, and of course, candy!
Students are encouraged to wear
costumes. New School of Music
Study, 5-7 p.m.

SUNDAY OCT. 23
Raconteur Radio: The Strange
Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde:
Metuchen-based
Raconteur
Radio presents a staged radio
play based on the 1886 novella by
Scottish author Robert Louis
Stevenson. It tells the story of a
London lawyer named Gabriel
John Utterson who investigates
strange occurrences between his
old friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and
the evil Edward Hyde. The 90minute production features theatrical lighting, period costumes,
Golden Age radio equipment,
sound effects and vintage commercials.
Princeton
Public
Library, 2 p.m.

MONDAY OCT. 24
Letra Pequea: Through engagement with books, activities and
crafts, these sessions are
designed to help children and
adults improve Spanish language
skills. Sessions are conducted in
Spanish and are intended for parents/caregivers to attend with
babies and toddlers. Princeton

SUN16

6 09 - 5 8 6 - 2 30 0

OCT. 19-25, 2016


Public Library, 11 a.m.
Middle School Math Circle: Princeton High School math enthusiasts show students in grades six
to eight how fun and fascinating
math can be. Lesson plans focus
on applied mathematics and statistics. Princeton Public Library
Study Room 354, 4:30 p.m.
Genty y Cuentos: In discussing Latin American short stories in
Spanish, participants recount
their personal experiences and
how they relate to the characters
in the story. Princeton Public
Library, 7 p.m.
Mic Monday: Enjoy a cup of coffee
and some tunes for Small Worlds
open mic night. Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon St., 7-9 p.m.
Poets at the Library: Featured
poets Judy Rowe Michaels and
Jean Hollander read from their
works followed by an open-mic
session. Princeton Public Library,
7:30 p.m.

TUESDAY OCT. 25
Chess: Children can learn to play
and practice chess at these weekly drop-in sessions led by Princeton High School Chess Club members. Princeton Public Library, 4
p.m.
Film and Discussion: The Differences Between Us: A screening
of Chapter 1 of Race: The Power
of an Illusion, the three-part
documentary about race in society, science and history will be followed by a discussion. Free and
open to the public. Princeton Garden Theatre, 160 Nassau St., 6:30
p.m.
Film and Discussion: "The Pursuit:
50 Years in the Fight for LGBT
Rights:" The complexities of contemporary LGBT life are explored
in this documentary that provides a thoughtful look at the
past half-century of the fight for
LGBT rights. Judy Jarvis, director
of Princeton Universitys LGBT
center, will lead a post-screening
Q&A. 56 minutes. Princeton Public Library, 7 p.m.
Write Space: Led by local author
Christina Paul, these drop-in
workshops focus on the encouragement of writing, finding your
voice and the producing of words
through guided prompts and other writing exercises. All levels of
writers are welcome. Princeton
Public Library, 7 p.m.

OCT. 19-25, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 9

CANDIDATES

MEET
THE

Every week, The Sun will ask the candidates in the Nov. 8 election for
mayor to respond to questions pertinent to local issues. You can find
responses online at www.theprincetonsun.com. This weeks questions:
1.) What are some innovative ideas you will bring to the table as Princeton
mayor and how will these ideas benefit the community? 2.)How will you
work to balance the small town characteristics Princeton residents love
while accommodating the demand of a growing population?
1.) As mayor, Ive
process to make it
worked to incorporate
more user friendly.
technology into govImproving the qualiernment operations to
ty of daily life within
help us be more effiour community by adcient and effective at
dressing transportadelivering services to
tion and environmenresidents. One examtal and social sustainple is Access Princeability has been anothton, the one-stop call
er top priority.
To
center and mobile app,
make streets safe and
LIZ LEMPERT
which makes it easier
usable for everyone,
for residents to confrom motorists to bicynect with town servicclists, pedestrians and
es. To make our local govern- those with disabilities, Princement more accountable and ton adopted a Complete Streets
transparent, we began posting policy in 2012. To that end, the
full agenda packets online, in town is creating a comprehenadvance of council meetings, sive Bicycle Master Plan
as well as recorded videos of thanks to funding from the
Planning and Zoning Board state Department of Transmeetings.
portation. We also received a
To engage more young peo- grant to fund a joint bike share
ple in civic life, we established program with the University.
a Youth Advisory Committee, The municipal portion will
and held our first municipal launch this spring.
hackathon, where computer
Last year, Sustainable Jersey
programmers and designers awarded the town Silver Certimost new to the political fication, and work began on deprocess devised creative solu- veloping a solar farm on top of
tions to municipal challenges. the old landfill. We are partnerWe are partnering with Prince- ing with the library to explore
ton University to engage stu- the feasibility of installing
dents in municipal projects. A solar on the deck of the Spring
team of students is applying Street Garage. We also worked
the latest in design thinking together with the Arts Council
theory to revamp our afford- to build Princetons first
able
housing
application parklet by temporarily con-

verting two parking spots on


Witherspoon Street into a welcoming public space.
I will continue to work with
municipal staff, my colleagues
on council and members of the
community to bring innovative
ideas to government operations and services.
2.) Managing this balance of
growth and preservation infuses nearly every policy discussion that council has. Together
with the Planning Board, we
launched the Neighborhood
Character and Zoning Initiative to address the growing
teardown trend and examine
zoning and building regulations and determine how they
might be modified to protect
neighborhood character. Council recently passed a more
stringent shade tree ordinance
to better protect our invaluable
tree canopy.
The municipality continues
to invest in infrastructure that
enhances walkability and
makes our streets safer for bicyclists. The municipality now
pays the full cost of new sidewalk construction in recognition of their importance to the
entire community. In addition,
a
comprehensive
bicycle
route plan is nearing completion.

1.) The solution is


the Mt. Laurel decinot innovation (there
sion.
is, after all, nothing
And instead of canew under the sun). It
pitulating obsequiousis rather alerting peoly when prominent enple to the contradictities seek zoning varitions implicit in their
ances and/or amendexisting policy choices.
ments to our master
Instead of whining
plan, we should enact
about county taxes, we
and enforce zoning
should elect freeholdthat preserves the
PETER MARKS
ers who will work to resmall town character
duce county spending.
that makes our town so
Instead of complaindistinctive.
ing about school taxes, we
2.) I will work to ensure that
should seek to overturn some Princeton remains a small
of the state mandates that limit town. Growth is neither inour choices and drive up school evitable, nor desirable. I would
costs.
contest the idea that we have
Instead of arguing about a an
affordable
housing
supposed affordable housing obligation and I would resist
obligation, we should work the
universitys
efforts
with other municipalities to to impose its expansionist
overturn some of the more un- dreams on our little communirestrained interpretations of ty.

After enjoying The Sun,


please recycle this newspaper.

10 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 19-25, 2016

CANDIDATES

MEET
THE
BOE

Every week, The Sun will ask the candidates in the Nov. 8 election for the
Princeton Board of Education to respond to questions pertinent to local issues.
You can find responses online at www.theprincetonsun.com. This weeks questions: 1.) What is your opinion on standardized testing? What will you do as a
board member to facilitate healthy student and teacher practices to prepare and
cope with rigorous testing under current state regulations? 2.) What do you think
is the best way to accommodate the needs of students and how will you help exercise solutions to the issues they find most important?
1.) We need to have
2.) One major idea to
a standardized test
accommodate the needs of
that measures what
the students is to hear
our students have
what is troubling them.
learned. We should
This might be easier at
not have tests that test
PHS, where we could set
the students on subup an online questionjects and information
naire that the students
they have not been
could anonymously antaught. The PARCC
swer with their phones.
put too much pressure
We could install feedback
on our students to be DEBBIE BRONFELD boxes throughout the
able to take the test on
schools where students
the computer, without
can give feedback on isfocusing on the content of the sues that bother them, and on
tests. So many students were things they like. At JW, Id like to
hung up on using the computer hear if the students would like
that they did not focus on the more clubs, or sport opportunisubject matter. PARCC was not ties, or music and drama opporadministered well by the state tunities. We need to focus on the
and has upset many communi- students, and find out what
ties, teachers, parents and stu- makes them tick and what they
dents. PARCC was also very ex- want to be part of, so they can
pensive and was not a good fit feel connected to their schools
for Princeton.
and peers and teachers and comBOE members and teachers munities.
need to work together to emAt the elementary schools, we
brace a process meaningful to need to create workshops and asour students. Many students semblies where we can talk
opted out of PARCC in our town, about respect. Students need to
therefore it is very difficult to learn to respect their teachers
know if the scores that were re- and their peers. They also need a
ceived represented our students. place where they can talk about
We need to find tests that test their feelings and feel that someour students on what they have one is really listening to them.
been taught.
For JW, Id like to create peer

groups in each grade. The peer


groups would be a place that
middle schoolers feel protected
and able to talk about their feelings. The groups will be run by
PHS students who are interested
in helping other students. I want
to empower all our students, and
middle schoolers sometime feel
like no one cares about them or
is listening to them. As parents,
BOE and the community, we
need to show the students at JW
that we truly care about their
well-being and want to hear
what they have to say.
At PHS, we need to offer more
independent study programs for
juniors and seniors. A four-year
college program is not for everyone, therefore we need to offer
different paths for our students
to take advantage of. We want
our PHS students to feel like individuals, and not make each
student feel like they have to fit
into the same mold. Another
idea is for service learning to
starting freshman year and be
part of the curriculum through
senior year. This exposes our
students to things outside of
their own inner circles, and will
start to give them a better view
and appreciation of the world
around them.

1.) Some form of


logue with all stakestandardized testholders on how to reing has its place,
duce the overall testbut unfortunately
ing burden.
between statutory
2.) Student feedrequirements and
back is critical; Id
university expectawork closely with the
tions, the quantity
student liaison to
has spiraled out of
make sure that the
control. As a board
most important ismember, I am cersues raised by the
ALEX MARTIN
tainly in favor of
students are adopting out wherevdressed by the board
er possible, and having a dia- and/or the administration.

OCT. 19-25, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 11

1.) While most people have strong feelings about standardized testing, my feelings instead are mixed. On one side, I
dont like using standardized tests to determine teacher pay. While teachers certainly have some impact on standardized test results, I believe the biggest influence is the parents of the test takers
and the home life they create. Teachers
should not be judged on factors outside
their control.
At best, standardized test results can
be useful for parents in tracking their
own kids relative performance and how
they are tracking compared to norms.
While class grades are one indicator
that can be monitored and used to help
parents and teachers intervene with a
child on a daily or weekly basis, I personally have appreciated using standardized test results, such as the NJASK
and ERBs, to track my own kids
progress. With the standardized test results, parents and teachers together can
determine if a particular child needs

help in a particular subject. In


they were the necessary gates I
spite of this reliance for meashad to pass through to progress
uring trends over time, I personto the next step. The moral of
ally dont agree with relying on
this? I wish I had been taught at
standardized tests to provide
a younger age how to take stanany absolute measure of intellidardized tests. We all remember
gence.
kids in school who were skilled
On the other side, I view stanat taking standardized tests but
dardized tests with a pragmatic
didnt necessarily get the best
view. Many professions require
grades in class. If our kids are
practitioners to pass one or
required to take standardized
BILL HARE
more standardized tests. As a
tests (and they will even if we
patent attorney, I had to pass a
eliminate these test in the K-12
state bar exam, a legal ethics exam (I grades), lets give them the boost of
know, an oxymoron!) and the U.S. Patent helping them learn test taking skills.
Office bar exam, and this was after
To facilitate healthy student and
graduating from law school. To get into teacher practices for preparing and copcollege, I had to take the SAT, to get into ing with standardized testing, I would
graduate school I had to take the GMAT want to provide special sessions for
and to get into law school I had to take tests such as PARCC and the SAT. Such
the LSAT. At least six significant stan- reviews exist for numerous standarddardized tests were critical to where I ized tests, and some may be applicable
am today. While I dont judge the merits to the PARCC test. If feasible, I would
of any of these tests, or the accuracy of want to do the same for the various AP
the abilities they purport to measure, exams. If our kids feel prepared for and

confident in taking these various tests,


the pressure on them will be reduced.
2.) Once the board knows the issues
the students find most important, the
board should work with the school administration and student representatives to the board to address the issues.
For example, if an important issue identified in high school is stress from the
university admissions process, we
should invite admissions personnel
from various universities to speak to
the students to clarify the process and
how their various universities make decisions. Seeing how the sausage is made
may not be pretty, but hopefully it will
be valuable. Similarly, if an important
issue in middle school is the transition
to high school, we should set up a program for PHS students to speak at JW
about their experiences and answer
questions. The key to my process is
finding out the needs and working with
the administration and students to address them.

1.) I support measuring the progress of


all our students after all, that is what our
teachers do so admirably every day. However, I am troubled by how much time and
resources we are devoting to assessing
such progress via standardized tests: a
2015 report by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
found that U.S. students take an average of
113 mandated standardized tests between
pre-kindergarten and 12th grade, the
equivalent of one standardized test every
month.
Do we need this many standardized
tests? The cost of all these tests includes
increased spending for materials; a larger
share of our teachers time and effort, diverted from teaching their actual subject
matter; and, most importantly, the stress
we are placing on our students, in what
has truly become a Race to Nowhere.
I believe that we as a nation can do better. As a member of the school board, I
would enthusiastically support Superintendent Cochranes call to develop innova-

tive new means of assessing our


up the PARCC consortium, only
students, in ways that may have
six still use the test; furthermore,
more real-world relevance. As
our state is one of only two to
just one example, a consortium of
mandate that students (beginNew York State public schools
ning with the Class of 2021) must
has been granted waivers from
pass PARCC to graduate from
state standardized tests, so that
high school. If elected to the
they instead can assess each of
board, I would work with other
their students individually via
school districts to urge the state
end-of-year portfolio reviews of
to replace PARCC in its current
all their work. Each student
form, given that: this test has not
GREG STANKIEWICZ yet been fully validated; has not
must prepare, present and defend
his or her portfolio in front of
proven to be useful as an individteachers and outside evaluators. While ual assessment tool (results are not relabor intensive, this form of assessment turned until the following school year);
allows students the opportunity to sum- and has generated so much resistance
marize everything they have learned over from students, parents, teachers and adthe course of a full academic year, while ministrators.
strengthening their presentation skills.
Finally, I want to praise the districts
More specifically, I support the dis- wellness initiatives (one of the superintricts, boards and teachers unions ef- tendents five new strategic goals). These
forts to highlight problems with the new initiatives, such as the new policy of a
state-mandated PARCC assessment. New number of homework-free weekends and
Jersey finds itself out-of-step with the rest Option II (providing our school athletes
of the nation: of the 24 states that made with additional free periods during the

school day), help reduce some of the


stress on our students. If elected, I pledge
to work with the district on exploring
other initiatives, such as later start times
for our middle and high school students
and re-structuring the school schedule, to
allow students even more of an opportunity to find a better balance
between school and the rest of their busy
lives.
2.) Students are one of the critical
stakeholders in our public schools. I
pledge to listen carefully to any concerns
brought to the school board by the student
liaisons. Moreover, if I were to be elected,
I would maintain an open-door policy for
any student or family with concerns or
ideas. The quality and democracy of our
schools are dependent on making sure
that all stakeholders are represented I
intend to be as transparent as possible in
fulfilling my obligation to represent the
students, families, teachers, administrators and residents of this great community.

12 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 19-25, 2016

Laptop stolen from unlocked


Clarke Court home
LAPTOP
Continued from page 2
glarized a vehicle on Westcott
Road and stole change
and a Princeton Parking Smart Card. The
vehicle was unlocked
at the time of the burglary. The investigation was turned over
to the Detective Bureau for further investigation.

year-old juvenile was also taken


into custody for juvenile delinquency disorderly conduct. Both
were transported to police headquarters where they were
processed. The elder was given a
summons with a pending court date. The juvenile was released to
a guardian.

police
report

Oct. 5
Subsequent to a call regarding
a defiant trespasser on the 100
block of Nassau Street, a 19-yearold Lawrenceville male was arrested for defiant trespass. A 15-

Oct. 4

Sometime between
10 p.m. on Oct. 4 and 6:45 a.m. on
Oct. 5, an unknown individual entered an unlocked rear door of a
residence on Clarke Court and
stole an Apple Macbook Pro
valued at $1,000. The investigation was turned over to the Detective Bureau for further investigation.

Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com

PRINCETON DAY SCHOOL

opportunities

Open House Dates


Lower School Grades PreK 4
Tuesday November 15, 9:00 11:00 a.m.
Middle School Grades 5 8
Tuesday, November 1, 9:00 11:00 a.m.
Upper School Grades 9 12
Sunday, November 20, 1:00 4:00 p.m.

www.pds.org

of a lifetime. every day.

609-924-6700 x1200
school for students from
from PreK
PreK through
through Grade
Grade 12.
An
A
n independent, coeducational
coeducational school

OCT. 19-25, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 13

Shaham writes own stories


SHAHAM
Continued from page 1
encourage and reward good listening. For children to, say, participate in a piece, theyll have to
have their ears open.
Now in its seventh year, Baby
Got Bach has a permanent
venue at the 92nd Street YMCA in
New York City, where Shaham
hosts a three-part series of concerts. On Nov. 5, Shaham will return for her second year to
Princeton University Concerts
All in the Family series at
Richardson
Auditorium
in
Alexander Hall.
We had absolutely a wonderful time in Princeton last year. I
have to say, I think it was a thrill
for the musicians and audience
alike. What set Princeton apart
was that the parents were just as
engaged and encouraging, Shaham said. Im really looking forward to the show and hoping lots
of Princetonians come.
In Princeton, to accommodate
the setup of a large venue, the
show will begin with pure listening Shaham will play a short excerpt of Bach on the piano to
draw childrens attention to the
stage. Then, they will begin to
hear
several
members
of
WindSync Ensemble, the five-person group playing wind instruments. The musicians will continue to play as Shaham narrates a

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story. Throughout the show, children will be led in interactive activities to connect with each instrument and what it does.
Often, Shaham writes her own
stories always lacing music
throughout. This year at Princeton, however, she will present the
tell-tale story of Peter and the
Wolf.
As Baby Got Bach continues,
the audience becomes the musicians themselves learning to rehearse and play. The performance
finally culminates with a jam session where all the kids are invited
on stage to perform alongside the
professional musicians.
One thing I love about this
program is that Im not a 3- to 6year-old, but the show is so enjoyable. I love to incorporate ways
for adults to become just as involved as the children, and I find
it works. It makes it rewarding for
everybody, Shaham said.
Tickets for Baby Got Bach
are $5 for kids approximately between the ages of 3 to 6 and $10
for adults. Last year, the show
sold out, so families are encouraged to purchase tickets early via
princetonuniversityconcerts.org
or by phone at (609) 258-9220.

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14 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 19-25, 2016

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Godefroy likes pep rally because


it brings whole school together
GODEFROY
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Katie Griffin, a PHS senior,


said as with many school activities there was a certain sentimental factor to this being her
last celebration of school spirit.
I just think this such a great
opportunity for the student body
to unify as a community and
work together to decorate the
halls, to choose a twin to dress
alike. It brings a lot of positive energy into the halls all of which
is a great lead up into the weekend, Griffin said Thursday, representing her class in an orange
and black t-shirt. My favorite
part is the football game. Its a
rare occasion to see so many people with so many different interests all rooting for the same team,
all on the same page. Its really

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

Spencer Jordan (left) and Jerry Zangs opinions on Spirit Week are a
toss up, but they enjoy playing some ball regardless.
special. Last year was incredible.
There was such a big turnout,
people were standing on the side
because the bleachers were full. It
says a lot.
Griffin, while not involved in
sports this year, is heavily involved in the PHS musical theater
program, on the student council,
in the Big Brother Big Sister program and a volunteer at Corner
House outside of school.
Sophomores Charlotte Walker,
Olivia Jaffe, Amanda Godefroy
and Amanda Tenzlinger were all
happy to be joining in on their
second year of school spirit.
Spirit Week is just really fun,
Walker said.
Jaffe, who plays field hockey
with Godefroy was most excited
to have the whole team get a spot

on the bleachers during the pep


rally, during which most athletes
represent their sport in jerseys or
handmade t-shirts.
I like it because it really gets
the whole school together, Godefroy said.
All girls agreed the homecoming game was the highlight of the
weeklong festivities.
Jerry Zhang, a sophomore, didnt mind the week of activities
but didnt feel it really reflected
what school spirit was about.
It may be an unpopular opinion, he said humbly.
Spencer Jordan disagreed with
his comrade as they tossed a soccer ball back and forth.
I think Spirit Week is a
morale booster, he said catching the ball with a smile.

PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.

OCT. 19-25, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 15

Hacking to kick off at 9 a.m.


HACKING
Continued from page 7

what kinds of data can be used


with art to affect the community.
One idea that has come to the
forefront and will likely be incorporated into the hackathons
gallery at days end is a project to
open a dialogue about West Windsors self-segregated community.
A community member moved
from Alabama to West Windsor
and said she had never seen so
many neighborhoods that were
segregated like this, Waghray
said. The creative director of education at the arts council expressed how this is a matter of
concern in West Windsor and
wondered if the hackathon could
be used to help talk about it.
To prepare for the hackathon,
Code for Princetons techies are
looking into publicly available

data regarding which ethnicities


are most populated in various
areas of West Windsor. This data
will then be relayed to the artist
and his or her team to convey this
information in an artistic way to
make people think.
Waghray is interested to see
what kinds of stories and artistic
works are portrayed at the
hackathon and emphasized that
the topics do not have to be political or social commentary.
The event, which will be held
from 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the West
Windsor arts council, is open to
anyone in the community who
would like to participate, regardless of experience in technology
or art. Teams will be made shortly after 9 a.m. and individuals are
welcome to show up and join
without registering until the
hackathon starts.
The hacking and creating will
finish by 5 p.m., when Steven Fragale, researching artist at the

Metropolitan Museum of Arts


Digital Media Lab, will give a
keynote speech. At 6 p.m., the
teams will give presentations of
their works, followed by the judging and announcement of winners at 7 p.m. Whether youre interested in staking out the whole
day or would just like to see the
final projects at 5 p.m., all are welcome.
The essential thing to remember is the Data and Art
Hackathon is primarily for opening dialogue and engaging diverse skillsets, looking at what is
going on around us and engaging
with the issues and the data,
Waghray said.

SPORTS SCORES
Did you know The Sun will
print sports scores, free of
charge? Send them on in.

Council discusses
towns new streetscape
COUNCIL
Continued from page 1

The Shade Tree Commission


presented a recommendation to
council that would suggest residents make a goal of a 10 percent
replacement rate.
Were not requiring it, were
suggesting it, STC member
Janet Stern said. Because of the
tree canopy, because of aesthetic
considerations, because of environmental considerations, we
have to keep the canopy going.
People who do take their ash trees
down, wed like them to also think
about replacing 10 percent of the
trees with a minimum of one
tree. The purpose of the Shade
Tree Commission is to keep the
canopy going.
This suggestion will encourage
residents to plant one tree for

every one to 10 trees they remove.


A public hearing for this ordinance is scheduled for Oct. 24.
In other news:
Town Administrator Marc
Dashield reported on the five-year
financial forecast including budget drivers jumpstarting Princetons 2017 goals and priorities
meetings, which also began last
week.
Princetons Chief Financial
Officer Sandy Webb reported on a
Best Practices Inventory. Princeton met all practices but two, one
of which was not passing the 2016
budget early enough.
Council held a work session
to discuss design standards for
the towns new streetscape, which
can be viewed at princetonnj.gov.
Council recognized Princeton college students who volunteered throughout summer to assess how many street trees were
ash trees so the Shade Tree Commission could update its data.

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