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To insert your own running head, double click on the words "RUNNING HEAD" at top left of the page to
open the header box. Highlight the words RUNNING HEAD and type your own brief title, all capitals. To
exit the header box, double click in a white space on the paper outside it.
Page numbers have been inserted and will automatically adjust as you type.
For other questions, call the Writing Center at 612-728-5154 or e-mail tcwrite@smumn.edu
~To delete an information box like this one, click on the outer edge of the box and press the
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Title of Paper
Your Name
Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Schools of Graduate & Professional Programs
Course Name and Number (e.g., PRM 600)
Instructor's Name
Date of Submission (e.g., October 12, 2012)

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Title of Paper
Level 1 Section Heading of Paper

Begin text here or insert a Level 2 heading at the left margin. The major sections of your
paper should contain everything you want to say in your paper. Label the major sections of your
paper with Level 1 headings. These are centered and boldfaced, with the first letter of each
major word capitalized. Avoid abbreviations in headings. The number and levels of headings in
any paper are determined by the author's topic and treatment of the topic, but headings should
make the organization of the paper clear to readers. You may wish to start each Level 1 section
heading of your paper on a new page. For more information on APA headings, see Introduction
to the APA, where you will find examples and cross-references to helpful pages in the APA
publication manual.
Level 2 Major Subtopic Heading
Begin text here or insert a Level 3 heading. Subdivide major sections of your paper into
subtopics, as appropriate, to enhance organization and to help readers locate subtopics in your
paper. Use Level 2 headings if you need to subdivide a major section of your paper into
subtopics. Place Level 2 heading at the left margin, boldface, and capitalize the first letter of
each major word. Remember that you must have at least two headings at each level (you can't
divide a section "into 1").
Level 3 minor subtopic heading. Begin text here and allow subsequent lines to wrap to
the left margin. If necessary, use Level 3 headings to subdivide Level 2 major subtopics into
Level 3 minor subtopics. Note that Level 3 headings are boldfaced and indented 1 Tab space,
and that the paragraph text continues on the same line as the heading. Capitalize only the first
word and proper nouns.

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Level 3 minor subtopic heading. Begin text here and allow subsequent lines to wrap to
the left margin. Remember that you must have at least two headings at each level.
Level 2 Major Subtopic Heading
Begin text here or insert a Level 3 heading. Use as many topic and subtopic headings as
needed to organize your paper and to help your readers organize and locate information. More
examples follow.
Level 1 Section Heading of Paper
Level 2 Major Subtopic Heading
Begin text here or insert a Level 3 heading.
Level 3 minor subtopic heading. Begin text here and allow subsequent lines to wrap to
the left margin.
Level 3 minor subtopic heading. Begin text here and allow subsequent lines to wrap to
the left margin.
Level 2 Major Subtopic Heading
Begin text here or insert a Level 3 heading.
Level 2 Major Subtopic Heading
Begin text here or insert a Level 3 heading.
Level 3 minor subtopic heading. Begin text here and allow subsequent lines to wrap to
the left margin.
Level 3 minor subtopic heading. Begin text here and allow subsequent lines to wrap to
the left margin.

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References

Alred, G. J., Brusaw C.T., & Oliu, W. E. (2012). Handbook of technical writing (10th ed.).
Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martins.
American Psychological Association (APA). (2010). Concise rules of APA style: The official
pocket style guide from the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC:
Author.
Bell, R. (2011). Project delay economics. Appraisal Journal, 79(4), 292-300.
Fleming, Q. & Koppleman, J. (2010). Earned value project management (4th ed.). Newtown
Square, PA: Project Management Institute.
General Accounting Office (GAO). (2005). Capital financing: Potential benefits of capital
acquisition funds can be achieved through simpler means. Retrieved from
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05249.pdf
George, M., Rowlands D., Price, M., & Maxey, J. (2005). The Lean Six Sigma pocket toolbook.
New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Pub.
Gido, J. & Clements, J. (2014). Successful project management. Mason, Ohio:
Thomson/Southwestern.
Guth, S. R. (2009). Project procurement management: A guide to structured procurements.
Alexandria, VA: Guth Ventures.
Kerzner, H. (2009). Project management: A systems approach to planning, scheduling, and
controlling (10th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
Markel, M. (2013). Practical strategies for technical communication. Boston, MA: Bedford/St.
Martins.

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Mersino, A. (2013). Emotional intelligence for project managers: The people skills you need to
achieve outstanding results. New York, NY: AMACOM.
Porter-Roth, B. (2002). Request for proposal: A guide to effective RFP development. Boston,
MA: Pearson Education.
Pritchard, C. (2010). Risk management: Concepts and guidance. Arlington, VA: ESI
International.
Project Management Institute (PMI). (2009). Practice standard for project risk management.
Newton Square, PA: Author.
Project Management Institute (PMI). (2011). Practice standard for earned value management
(2nd ed.) Newtown Square, PA: Author.
Project Management Institute (PMI). (2013). A guide to the project management body of
knowledge (PMBOK Guide) (5th ed.). Newton Square, PA: Author.
Rose, K. (2005). Project quality management: Why, what and how. Fort Lauder-dale, FL: J.
Ross..
Salazar, J., Husted, B., & Biehl, M. (2012). Thoughts on the evaluation of corporate social
performance through projects. Journal Of Business Ethics, 105(2), 175-186.
doi:10.1007/s10551-011-0957-z
Schwalbe, K. (2013). Revised an introduction to project management, fourth edition: With a
brief introduction to Microsoft Project 2013. Minneapolis, MN: Kathy Schwalbe LLC.
Turner & Townsend revitalizes Nissan North America's brand through best project management
practices. (2010, December 15). Business Wire.

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Reference Page
Begin the references on a new page under the centered title "References" (no boldface, no quotation marks). The
automatic hanging indents have already been set for this template, but if you need more help, see Introduction to the APA
for formatting guide and for content guide. Sources not mentioned below are resources needed in PRM courses.
Guide to Some of the Template Examples
Bell (2011) is an article from a journal retrieved from a database accessed from the SMU library. No doi
number was provided.
General Accounting Office (2009) is a document retrieved from a government website.
Markel (2013) is a book (print, not electronic).
Project Management Institute (2013) is a book from PMI, published PMI.
Salazar et al. (2012) is an article from a journal retrieved from a database accessed from the SMU library. A
doi number was provided.
Turner & Townsend . . . (2010) is an article from an electronic journal that does not use volume and issue
numbers. It was accessed from ProQuest Newspapers database on the SMU library website. No doi number was
provided, and no author was named. When the author's name is not provided, move the title to the author location on
the reference page. The in-text citation for this source would be ("Turner," 2010).

Appendix A: References and In-text Citations


Listings on the Reference Page
The References begins on a separate page after the last paper of the paper's. Begin the
page with the title "References" without boldface (or quotation marks. Each reference has four
elements: Author, Publication Date, Document Title, and Publisher Information. These four
elements are always separated by a period.
The authors are listed in the same order as they appear in the original source. Authors are
listed on the reference page by last name, then by initial. Authors may be organizations (e. g.,
The American Cancer Society) or corporations (e.g. Microsoft, Inc.) as well as individuals. The
Publication Date is always enclosed in parentheses (year). If no author is named, then move the
title into the Author location and alphabetize on the reference list by the first major word of the
title. Document titles require special formatting with regard to capital letter and italics. For
guidelines on this and other reference page information, see Introduction to the APA, where you
will find cross-references to the APA publication manual as well as a sample reference page.

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You can also search for answers to reference and other APA questions directly from the source at
the APA Style Blog.
In-text Citations
Within the body of the paper, you must cite the source each time you use information
from that source. It is possible to cite a source more than once in a paragraph. In the text cite by
author's last name only, followed by the publication date in parenthesis. Do not separate the date
and name by other text. The author's name may appear either in the running textfor example,
"Lindley and Hayes (2011) proposed two options . . . "or in parentheses, as in this example:
"Twenty percent of voters claimed to be undecided (Liu & Wang, 2010), but those voters held
strong tendencies to reject the measure (Phillips, 2010)." Sources cited in the text, except for
personal communications, must have a full listing on the reference page. For additional
information on in-text citations, see Introduction to the APA, where you will find crossreferences to the APA publication manual as well as a sample reference page. You can also
search for answers to reference and other APA questions directly from the source at the APA
Style Blog.

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Appendix B: Using Tables and Figures
Using Tables

Tables are used to present columns of data. Although APA prohibits vertical lines in
tables, PRM curriculum strongly encourages you to use them. Although APA suggests that tables
be placed at the end of the document, PRM prefers that short tables be inserted in the paper as
closely as possible to the point in the text in which related information is mentioned (in other
words, at the point where you want readers to refer to the table). At that point in the text, insert a
"callout" (e.g., "See Table 1") to alert readers to the table's existence and help them associate it
with the appropriate text. PRM suggests that you use single-spacing in tables.
As illustrated below, tables are numbered in the order they appear in the paper (tables
and figures are numbered separately) and labeled both by number (not italicized) and by title
(italicized) above the table itself. Each column in the body of the table must have a column
heading.
Table notes may be provided below the body of the table. If information for the table was
taken from another source, cite the source in the table notes (see example below). Do not
include the source on your reference page unless you cited that same source elsewhere in your
text. Text inside tables may be reduced and single-space in necessary to improve readability. If
text is reduced below 11 pt., switch to a sans serif font like Arial.

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In order to keep all table elements on the same page, you may need to leave some blank
space on the page. Try to avoid breaking a table across pages. For more help with tables,
contact the Writing Center. You can also use your word processor's Help button

.. A sample

table appears below.Table 1


Title of Table
Column heading

Column heading

Column heading

Table body

Table body

Table body

Table body

Table body

Table body

Table body

Table body

Table body

Note: [If explanatory notes to the table are necessary place them herewithout bracketsbefore
any citation that may be needed.] Adapted from Title of work by X. Author, year, p. X, URL if a
web source. Single space table notes to distinguish them from the rest of your text.
Resume the text of your paper here, indenting if you start a new paragraph, or place your next
heading here.
Using Figures
Figures are used to present graphical information. If you create your own figure, you
may use whatever font (usually sans serif) and size that make it readable. Although APA
suggests that figures be placed at the end of the document, PRM prefers that they be inserted in
the paper as closely as possible to the point in the text in which related information is mentioned
(in other words, at the point where you want readers to refer to the figure). At that point in the
text, insert a "callout" (e.g., "See Figure 1") to alert readers to the figure's existence and help
them associate it with the appropriate text.
As illustrated below, figures are numbered in the order they appear in the paper (tables
and figures are numbered separately) and labeled both by number (italicized) and by title (not
italicized) below the figure itself.

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Figure notes may be provided below the body of the figure. If the figure was copied or
adapted from another source, cite the source in the figure notes (see example below). Do not
include the source on your reference page unless you cited that same source elsewhere in your
text.
In order to keep all figure elements on the same page, you may need to leave some blank
space on a page. Try to avoid breaking a figure across pages. For more help with figure, contact
the Writing Center. You can also use your word processor's Help button
. A sample figure
appears below.

Figure 1. Type a brief description of the contents here. If necessary, provide a citation here as
follows: Adapted from Title of work by X. Author, year, p. X, URL if a web source.
Resume the text of your paper here, indenting if you start a new paragraph, or place your next
heading here.

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Appendix C: About APA Appendixes

Place supporting and bulky groups of information in an appendix. If you have multiple
groups of information, create multiple appendixes. Documents placed in an appendix do not
have to follow APA style. As shown above, title each appendix with a capital letter (e.g.,
Appendix A) and a descriptive word or phrase.
Begin each appendix on a separate page, continuing the page numbering sequence from
the rest of your document. If an appendix is taken from another document and does not have a
space to include the appendix title, insert a "cover page" for the appendix and type the appendix
title on that page.