Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 12

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

PRIVATE & INTERNATIONAL


SCHOOL GUIDE

Crafting futures
Weighing the outstanding features and benefits
of different international schools is crucial in
picking one for your child's education.

2 Private & International School Guide

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

Making an
informed decision
ACCORDING to the International
School Consultancy (ISC), there are
more than 8,000 international
schools worldwide this year that
offer an English-medium
education.
More than 100 of these schools
are located in Malaysia.
Traditionally established to meet
the educational needs of children
of diplomats and expatriates living
in the region, international schools
attract both local children and
children of expatriates.
The benefits of an international
school education are many. In
addition to using English as the
main medium of instruction and
communication, international
schools encourage the
development of skills and abilities
beyond academia.
International schools put
emphasis on critical thinking,
transferable skills and nonacademic abilities such as in art,
sports, music, drama and
technology.
However, international
schools in Malaysia differ in
extracurricular offerings, staff and
student composition, boarding
facilities, teaching philosophy and
ethos.
Therefore, it is advisable for
parents to do some in-depth
research on schools before
deciding on one for their children.
Mint Communications saw the
need to educate parents on the
many international school options
offered in Malaysia and launched
the first Private & International
School Fair in Kuala Lumpur in
2012.
Since it was first introduced, the
fairs have consistently attracted
more international schools,
preschools, learning centres and
parents every year.
Co-founder and director of Mint
Communications Nickie Yew says,
As having the option of sending
children to an international school
is a fairly new experience for many
parents, the fairs are essential in
creating awareness and ensuring

Mint Communications' co-founder


and director Nickie Yew.
that parents are well equipped
with the right information to make
the best decision for their
childrens future.
The 8th Private & International
School Fair will take place this
Saturday and Sunday (Nov 5 and 6)
from 11am to 7pm at the Mid
Valley Exhibition Centre, Kuala
Lumpur.
Some of the schools that will be
having exhibitions at the upcoming
fair include the Australian
International School Malaysia,
Epsom College in Malaysia, Garden
International School, HELP
International School, Kingsley
International School, Nexus
International School Malaysia,
Taylors International School,
Westlake International School, Asia
Pacific Schools and St Josephs
Institution International School.

Schedule and speakers


To help parents who are
considering the international
school route, Elizabeth Wong and
Fiona Howells will be sharing their
personal experiences on finding
the right school for their children
and the criteria they looked for in
each school.
Santhi Latha will speak on the
advantages of an international
school education and how it differs
from the national curriculum. Dr
Goh Chee Leong will advise

parents on how to find a school


that fits your childs needs,
personality and interests.
Those who want to learn more
about the different curricula
offered by international schools in
Malaysia should listen to talks by
Ng Kim Huat who will be speaking
on the Cambridge curriculum
while Amy Ward and Ashley
Cornfoot will be speaking on the
English national curriculum.
David Griffith and Claire Waller
will be talking about the
International Primary Curriculum
and how it can improve your
childs learning.
In addition, Richard Castle will
share his expertise on boarding
schools in Malaysia as boarding is
becoming a popular option for
many parents.
Parents can also gain some
inspiration and advice from Dr
Shen-Li Lee as she shares her
opinions on how to raise successful
children in this day and age.
Another highlight of this series
of talks is one by Dr Indra V.
Selvarajah, who will introduce
parents to the use of music in
special needs education.

Learning is fun
The Learning is Fun segment
was introduced at the Private &
International School Fair in
November last year. While the
adults visit school booths and
attend talks, children below the age
of 12 can participate in fun and
engaging workshops and activities.
The aim of the Learning is Fun
segment is to encourage the
learning of different skills in a fun
manner.
Throughout the fair, children
can participate in workshops
where they can learn about art,
music, healthy financial habits,
science and virtual reality.

n For the full list of exhibitors

and sponsors, visit www.


PrivateInternationalSchoolFair.
com.

Comprehensive guidebook
THE Education Destination
Malaysia is a comprehensive
guidebook that is published
annually by Mint
Communications.
This guidebook provides
parents with everything they
need to know about
international schools in
Malaysia.
A highlight of the guide is the
comprehensive directory of
international schools in
Malaysia. This is complemented
by detailed profiles and essential
information of each school.
In addition, Education
Destination Malaysia includes
high-quality content written by
professionals and educators in
the international school
industry.
Parents get to read articles on
a wide range of topics such as
types of curriculum offered,
tuition fees and general
information on international
schools.
There are articles dedicated
to specific international schools
and updates on the latest

developments in
international school
education.
There is ample
information on boarding
and how parents should
approach the idea of sending
their children to boarding
schools.
Another highlight of the
latest issue of Education
Destination Malaysia is the
introduction to special
needs education.
Under the section Other
Learning Opportunities,
there are feature articles
that revolve around the
topic of children with
special educational needs.
This segment
emphasises the need for
early diagnosis for children with
learning disabilities. In this issue,
parents can read about using
music therapy as a way of learning
and what it means to raise a child
with special educational needs.
The Education Destination
Malaysia is sold at selected
bookstores in Klang Valley.

Talks
Saturday, Nov 5
Time

Topic

Speaker(s)

Noon to 1pm

Cambridge IGCSE
An Overview/Q&A

Ng Kim Huat, country director (Malaysia


and Brunei) at Cambridge International
Examinations

1.15pm to
2.15pm

Checklist for Deciding


on the Right
International School for
your Child/Q&A

Elizabeth Wong and Fiona Howells of


Malaysia International Schools Parents
Support Group (MISPSG)

2.30pm to
3.30pm

To Board or Not to
Board, that is the
Question

Richard Castle, head of boarding


at Epsom College in Malaysia

3.45pm to
4.45pm

National vs International Santhi Latha, international education


Curriculum: Advantages consultant
of an International
School Education

5pm to 6pm

The English National


Curriculum: A Path to
Mastery

Amy Ward, deputy head of secondary


and Ashley Cornfoot, head of primary
at Garden International School

Sunday, Nov 6
Time

Topic

Speaker(s)

Noon to 1pm

Music in Special Needs


Education An
Introduction

Dr Indra V. Selvarajah, president


of the Malaysian Music Therapy
Association

1.15pm to
2.15pm

How to Choose a School


that Fits My Childs
Needs, Personality and
Interests

Dr Goh Chee Leong, chief executive


officer at HELP Education Services
(HELP International School)

2.30pm to
3.30pm

How the International


Primary Curriculum (IPC)
Helps to Improve Your
Childs Learning

Vice principal David Griffith and deputy


head and director of learning and
teaching Claire Waller at Nexus
International School

3.45pm to
4.45pm

Raising Successful
Children in the 21st
Century

Dr Shen-Li Lee, founder of figur8,


freelance writer and web content
manager

Learning is Fun
Saturday, Nov 5
Time

Activity

Organisation

11.30am to
12.30pm

Musical performance by
Epsom students

Epsom College in Malaysia

12.45pm to
1.45pm

The Castaway

Nutty Scientists

2pm to 3pm

Comedy magic with puppets,


games and balloon sculptures

Uncle Billy

3.15pm to
4.15pm

Play with the Masterpieces

MY Art Studio

4.30pm to
5.30pm

Childrens Choir workshop

Young Choral Academy

5.45pm to
6.45pm

Food for your Brain

JM Nutrition

Sunday, Nov 6
Time

Those who attend the fair can


purchase the latest edition of the
Education Destination Malaysia at a
discounted price.

n For more information, visit


www.privateinternationalschoolfair.
com or to receive updates on this
event, register at www.pisf.asia.

Activity

Organisation

11.30am to
12.30pm

Grow the Goose Kids Money


Habits Programme

Grow the Goose

12.45pm to
1.45pm

Draw the Sound

MY Art Studio

2pm to 3pm

Decorate Your Own Bag Tag

Stitch.A.Giggle

3.15pm to
4.15pm

Robotics competition

My Robot Education

4.30pm to
5.30pm

Musical Storytelling for Special


Children workshop

Music & Me

5.45pm to
6.45pm

Coding and Virtual Reality


workshop

Telebort

Activities and topics of talks that will be held at the Private & International
School Fair at the Mid Valley Exhibition Centre on Nov 5 and 6.

Private & International School Guide 3

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

Inculcating social responsibility


THE concept of social responsibility
as practised today has changed in
line with the rapid development of
society.
At R.E.A.L Schools, social
responsibility is more than just
driving initiatives to benefit the
community. It is an effort to impart
knowledge to others that will result
in long-lasting, sustainable
transformations.
Recognised as an essence built
in its core and name, social
responsibility is practised through
various means that echo R.E.A.Ls
longstanding mission of
transforming lives through
education.
As part and parcel of R.E.A.L
Schools, social responsibility is
viewed as a platform to build
essential 21st century skills such as
leadership, ethics and awareness
in students characters.
R.E.A.L Schools take on social
responsibility is more than just
philanthropy. It is a morally
conscious effort to educate, nurture
and inspire the community.
R.E.A.L firmly believes that
school is not just a place for
studying and achieving good
grades but also an avenue to
empower students via activities
that stimulate self-development
and discovery, says R.E.A.L
International School, Cheras
Campus head of pastoral care Jothy
Gunasaigaran.
At R.E.A.L Schools, the wealth of
knowledge, talent and resources
are maximised for the students
and for those in need, particularly
in the area of education.

R.E.A.L Schools teams up with the Kajang Fire and Rescue Station to address social responsibility where kids learn
about fundamental safety measures.
We believe that the role of a
teacher involves more than just
delivering academic lessons and
completing a course syllabus. It
also covers pastoral care and
responsibility towards the students
well-being, adds Jothy.
One particular method used
by the school is frequent fire
drills. R.E.A.L Schools recently
collaborated with the Kajang Fire
and Rescue Station in hopes of
addressing the simplicity of social
responsibility in which small acts
of kindness such as reminding

others on safety are regarded as an


act of charity.
R.E.A.L Schools does not confine
social responsibility to humanfocused charities. Acts of charity
encompass the environment and
wildlife as well.
To gain a wider outlook on social
responsibility, this year, R.E.A.L
Schools organised a trip to the
SPCA (Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals) centre.
At SPCA, the students cleaned
animal kennels and bird aviaries,
disposed waste and unclogged

drains in the animal shelter.


Social responsibility must be
instilled by embedding the value
through students involvement in
all kinds of academic pursuits.
R.E.A.L Schools advocates
charitableness that goes beyond
donations and fundraisers. During
a recent students excursion to
Rimba Ilmu, a feasible contribution
was made as students constructed
bird feeders for the botanical
garden.
To nurture a civic-conscious
culture within the school

community, R.E.A.L Schools


promotes environmental awareness
projects to educate students on
their crucial roles in the ecosystem.
Although R.E.A.L Schools carries
out social responsibility
programmes frequently, the main
objective of each effort is
sustainability.
This ensures any community
project is evidently productive and
beneficial in the long run. Through
sustainable initiatives, students
gain vital skills that will result in a
long-term, positive impact that will
not only benefit the society but
themselves as a whole.
With 30 years of history in
shaping education excellence,
R.E.A.L Schools is committed to
delivering holistic education
through exceptional academic
standards.
R.E.A.L Schools has six schools
located at three campuses in
Malaysia, offering both
international and national syllabi
ranging from preschool to
secondary levels that aim to
nurture well-rounded students
with outstanding grades, robust
extracurricular activities,
leadership qualities and lifelong
practical living skills. R.E.A.L
Schools is a five-star rated school
as certified by the Education
Ministry.

n For more information, call


03-9021 3601 (Cheras Campus),
03-7842 3228 (Shah Alam
Campus) or 07-386 4468
(Johor Baru Campus) or visit
www.realschools.edu.my.

4 Private & International School Guide


WITH an enrollment of more
than 800 pupils, Marlborough
College Malaysia (MCM) is an
educational establishment that is
continually evolving. A key part
of the school is its thriving MCM
Music Department.
With a curriculum that delivers
practical music from Reception
(age four and above) through to
the Shell (Year 9), an increasing
number of pupils are taking
music as an International General
Certificate of Secondary
Education (IGCSE) option as well
as an International Baccalaureate
(IB) option in the Sixth Form.
This is complemented by
cutting-edge facilities, including
24 individual teaching and
practice studios, three dedicated
music rooms for class teaching,
and a new state-of-the-art
recording studio.
At Marlborough, we are firm
believers that music is an
important aspect of any young
persons upbringing.
It is an activity and academic
subject that can stimulate
creativity and inspire passion.
It demonstrates intellectual

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

A sound education

At Marlborough,
we are firm
believers that
music is an
important
aspect of any
young persons
upbringing. It is
an activity and
academic subject
that can stimulate
creativity and
inspire passion.

Marlborough College Malaysia emphasises music as an integral part of education and encourages students to be
involved in choirs and music ensembles.
competence, independent thinking
and, in many cases, a desire for
integration with others through
ensemble participation.

The college boasts a number of


ensembles, ranging from the
numerous choirs and instrumental
ensembles in the Prep and Senior

Schools to the college orchestra


and more specialised musicmaking of the Baroque ensemble
and several rock bands.
As the director of music,
I am fortunate to have a strong
team behind me: 10 peripatetic
teachers deliver just under
300 lessons each week and
the number is constantly
increasing.
There is also head of Prep
School music Jonathan Ang, who
teaches throughout the Pre-Prep
and Prep Schools as well as
coordinates and leads group
ensembles.
He is supported by a specialist
music classroom assistant to
ensure all classes can be fully
differentiated while being able
to stretch pupils who may have
more musical experience than
others.
Most exciting is the addition
of a musician in residence to the
department, Philip Monk.
This position has been created
in response to the greater uptake
of instrumental and Key Stage 4
and 5 music at the college.
A music teacher at
Marlborough, whether he is
teaching at the Iskandar Puteri
campus or Wiltshire campus in
the United Kingdom, is required
to be an administrator, leader,
organiser, practitioner,
demonstrator and orator, among
other things.
Most importantly, a
Marlborough music teacher
must be a competent and
passionate musician who is
ready to embrace everything

that a busy boarding school life


has to throw at him.
Monk, a music graduate of
high calibre, delivers one-to-one
lessons to flautists, pianists
and, more recently, a ukulele
player.
He assists in a number of
curriculum lessons from the
Lower Prep up to the higher end
of the Senior School, plays for
and assists college ensembles,
accompanies choirs and
congregational singing, and
organises lunchtime concerts and
other performance opportunities
for pupils.
Monk also gives one-to-one
tutorials to all IGCSE and
IB pupils alongside fulfilling
the normal boarding house
duties that any member of the
MCM Common Room counts as
part of their daily lives at the
college.
Music at Marlborough is an
integral part of college life from
our many talented pupils to the
specialist beaks and musician in
residence, we offer more than
just music lessons.
We encourage individuals to
discover themselves and to share
their passion and enthusiasm
through participation in
orchestras, choirs and ensembles.
It is the passionate spirit that
encapsulates the MCM Music
Department. By Geraint
Watkins, director of music at
Marlborough College Malaysia

n For more information, visit


www.marlboroughcollegemalaysia.
org.

As a musician in residence, Philip Monk (left) delivers one-to-one


lessons to Marlborough pupils.

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

6 Private & International School Guide


THE SuperCamp is back from
Dec 11 to 17 with its renowned
programme which focuses on
nurturing academic and life skills
that promises to inspire brilliance
in youths aged 10 to 18.
SuperCamp is an academic, life
and career skills development
camp for students and has been
running since 1982.
Having inspired the lives of
more than 70,000 students
worldwide, SuperCamp empowers
teenagers and prepares them for a
life of excellence personally,
academically and in their chosen
path in life.
SuperCamp lays the foundation
for the youths of today to achieve
more than they thought possible.
Instead of hiding behind the
judgments and opinions of others,
they learn to live as who they truly
are by breaking out of their shell
and making the most out of every
moment in their lives.
At SuperCamp, they learn the
power of stepping outside their
comfort zone and experiencing all
the opportunities that life brings.
Along with new confidence and
increased motivation, students
learn a combination of specific
study strategies, time management
and test-taking skills that makes a
big difference in the classroom.
Students discover their personal
learning styles and ways to use this

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

Step up at youth camp


knowledge to their advantage in
school.
SuperCamp gives your child the
opportunity to become a super
learner by using the worlds
leading academic acceleration
techniques.
The seven-day, six-night
SuperCamp is an internationally
diverse camp conducted by
internationally trained
facilitators:
Charles Smith lead
facilitator, SuperCamp
United States
l Full-time SuperCamp
facilitator and curriculum
developer for Quantum Learning
Network
l BA in Liberal Arts and
Science/Math with a
concentration in secondary
education (Ashford University)
l Master of Science specialising
in brain-based teaching and
learning (Nova Southeastern
University)
l Facilitated SuperCamp
programmes in the US, Thailand,
Indonesia, Hong Kong and
Singapore

Dr Cheyenne Foster
facilitator, SuperCamp US
l Full-time life skills specialist
and trauma interventionist
(Colorado)
l Bachelor of arts in early
childhood education
l Masters degree in education
in diversified educational practices
l Masters degree in education
in curriculum and instruction
l Masters degree in licensed
professional counselling
l PhD in naturopathic medicine
Drew Beasley facilitator,
SuperCamp US
l Has been working with youth
for the past 15 years
l Associates degree in general
education
l Bachelors degree in middle
grades education (University of
North Carolina)
Eva Ng facilitator,
SuperCamp Malaysia
l Full-time SuperCamp
facilitator
l Bachelors degree in
communication studies (University
of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

SuperCamp
develops
academic,
life and
career skills
to lay a
solid
foundation
for the
future.
l Facilitated SuperCamp
programmes in the US,
Singapore and Malaysia
Yvonne Joan Chong
facilitator, SuperCamp
Malaysia
l Full-time SuperCamp
facilitator
l Bachelors degree in
public relations
l Facilitated SuperCamp
programmes in the US and
Malaysia

SuperCamp relentlessly pursues


excellence and continually strives
to develop young people. Mentors
are available to guide students in
every aspect of their learning
journey, bringing out the best in
every student and letting them
shine as individuals.

n For more information on the


programme and discounts,
call 03-6203 0525/017-381 7099,
e-mail camp@supercamp.com.my
or visit www.supercamp.com.my.

Rating top criteria


By THERESA BELLE
WITH the growing number of
international schools in the
country today, one could easily
find an institution that offers
strong programmes delivered
by qualified teachers alongside
exciting co-curricular
opportunities.
So how do parents choose?
The International School
Guide carried out a survey on
40 parents in collaboration with
education portal schooladvisor.
my to find out how they rated
aspects of academics, facilities
and culture in considering the
right educational institution for
their child.
Other criteria considered
were fees and expenses,
location and parent community
recommendations.
Expectedly, 80% of the
parents rated fees and expenses
as their highest priority among
the three international schools
are known to have higher fees
than public or private
institutions but parents are
willing to fork out expenses that
match the quality of education
on offer.

Academics
l Quality and qualifications
of teachers Among the four
criteria presented, parents
clearly pay attention to the role
of educators in the delivery of
academic programmes.
It goes without saying that
teachers can make or break a
classroom and parents are
understandably interested in
the calibre of adults their
children spend their schooling
hours with.
International school teachers
are highly qualified individuals
who undergo training
programmes and skills
upgrading to stay updated on
classroom practices and
strategies.
Many come from the native

Academics
22
17
1

Quality and qualifications


of teachers
Curriculum structure and
content
Class size
School size

Numbers indicate parents' votes


on criteria considered most
important.
country of the school
while others come from
predominantly English-speaking
countries or are local teachers
well versed in the international
syllabus they teach.

l Curriculum structure and


content British, American,
Australian and Canadian syllabi
are among the top choices of
international schools in
Malaysia. Structured according
to their home curriculum,
parents can rest assured that
these programmes are of top
global standard and will pave
their childs way to international
institutions of tertiary education.
l Class and school size
Class size ranked significantly
higher than school size, which
indicates that parents are more
concerned about teacher-tostudent ratio than they are
about school capacity.
In international schools,
teachers are assigned to small
classes, ensuring that each child
gets personalised attention and
guidance.
This is a major factor in
accomplishing the individualised
success promised to parents
with children at top educational
facilities.
> TURN TO PAGE 10

Private & International School Guide 7

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

FOR a long time, parents and


teachers were exhorted to praise
children to boost their self-esteem.
It was believed to make children
feel more confident.
In recent years, however, much
of that thinking has been turned on
its head. A great deal of the reason
for that has been the work inspired
by a leading psychology professor
from the Stanford University of the
United States, Carol Dweck.
Her research has largely been in
the field of motivation and what
enables human beings to fulfil
their potential.
When we realise that much of
human happiness in life is tied to
meaning, this reference is far more
than simply of academic interest.
Dweck has been responsible for
focusing our minds on the critical
differences between a fixed
mindset and growth mindset, why
they matter and how we can help
our children develop more of a
growth mindset.
A person with a fixed mindset,
adult or child, sees his or her basic
qualities as fixed traits. This can
include intelligence, skills and
talents.
People with this mindset believe
that their success comes directly
from their talent. This is a rather
fatalistic mindset as it suggests that
an individual either has it or does
not. This means success is largely
driven by chance or fate.
Some of Dwecks experiments
proved that when children held
such a mindset, they were inclined
to avoid challenges or to push
themselves beyond a point.
Such children have an inbuilt
fear of anything that might lead to
failure as it would challenge their
self-perception.
If learning gets tough, they are
more likely to blame the teacher or

Power of growth mindset


A person with a
fixed mindset, adult
or child, sees his or
her basic qualities as
fixed traits. This can
include intelligence,
skills and talents.
Mark Parkinson

The child who grows up with a growth mindset is likely to be more successful, enjoy better interpersonal relations
and find more meaning and happiness in life.
an external factor. An interesting
piece of research in Germany
followed young athletes from
school to adulthood.
It determined that the ones who
went on to achieve more success as
adults were not the ones who
exhibited the most latent talent at
an early age.
Instead, they were those who
might have been described at

school as second tier, coming in


behind their talented peers.
Those children were more likely
to have grown up with a growth
mindset. This gave them a set of
beliefs about how their levels of
intelligence, skills or competencies
can be grown and expanded
through hard work, practice and
stretching challenges.
These children tend to be far

more resilient in the face of


challenges, obstacles and
failures. They believe their
talents can be grown and revel
in the possibilities.
Nobody is entirely one thing
or the other. However, praise
that focuses on ones talent alone
can increase the propensity of a
child to develop a more fixed
mindset.

Like intelligence, growth


mindset can be learned through
practice, the right focus and
appropriate praise.
This is the kind of praise that
recognises efforts in trying
different ways to solve a problem
or bouncing back from failure.
It goes without saying that I
believe todays schools should be
infected with a growth mindset
and educators who know how to
recognise the clues of a fixed
mindset and steer children down
a more positive path to effective
beliefs.
A child who grows up with a
growth mindset is likely to be
more successful, enjoy better
interpersonal relations as well as
find more meaning and
happiness in life. These are
benefits way beyond any
academic qualification or
certificate. By Mark Parkinson,
chief executive officer of Tenby
Schools

8 Private & International School Guide


THE key aim for any educational
establishment is for students to
achieve excellent academic grades.
At Epsom College in Malaysia, a
co-educational boarding school
located near Kuala Lumpur based
on the British public school
tradition, this is no different.
The teaching staff members,
have high academic expectations
of their students and push them
consistently to achieve their
potential.
However, building on the culture
of the best of British boarding
schools, Epsom College in Malaysia
expects more than just a good set
of A-Levels results from its Sixth
Form students. It aims to train
them for their university life and
the world beyond.
Starting in September, the Sixth
Form team at Epsom has
developed a number of innovative
initiatives that encourage students
to look beyond the A-Levels
syllabus.
These initiatives are part of the
aptly named Horizons Programme,
which aims to enrich students
college experiences beyond simply
studying for their A-Levels
qualifications.
It seeks to create critical thinkers
who will engage fully in the world
around them and challenge
conventional thinking.
The Horizons Programme
encompasses students being
trained in teaching methods during
the school day, which is akin to
university study rather than
traditional classroom methods.
Epsom is piloting an Oxbridgestyle tutorial system for teaching in
some of its top-performing
subjects. The tutorial is a teaching
method used at Oxford and
Cambridge universities, which
involves students researching a

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

Looking beyond the horizon

The Horizons Programme aims to build critical-thinking students who


challenge conventional views and involve themselves in academic
conversations as active participants.

Epsom College in Malaysia encourages its students to look beyond the


A-Levels syllabus, equipping them for university life as well as life beyond
Epsom.

topic and engaging with their tutor


in an in-depth discussion about
what they have discovered.
This way, students are
encouraged to take part in
significant academic conversations
as an active participant rather than
a passive learner.
Lectures and talks run
throughout the term during lunch
breaks, encouraging students to
engage with their academic
subjects beyond the taught
component of their courses.
The speakers come from a
range of backgrounds, from both
inside and outside Epsom, and are
encouraged to take controversial
stances to challenge students
thinking.

which breaks down the barriers of


the traditional student-teacher
academic relationship.
Students take inspiration not
only from the teaching staff but
also from visiting student mentors.
Undergraduate students from a
range of higher education
institutions in the United Kingdom
can apply for intership at Epsom.
Their time at the college is spent
supporting the academic
development of the topperforming students through
running one-on-one tutorials,
giving feedback on university
applications and involving the
students in their particular areas
of research.
This allows students access to

Both students and staff deliver


talks on areas of their academic
interest, focusing on topics that
range from feminism in the 21st
century to the biochemistry of the
human brain.
Students exposure to intellectual
ideas and discussion does not
finish at the end of the school day.
In the evenings, the Sixth Form
team runs regular screenings of
documentaries and televised
debates.
Students are encouraged to
challenge the viewpoints presented
to them and develop their own
position on important issues.
The aim is to build a learning
community within the Sixth Form
Centre for both students and staff,

invaluable experience of
individuals who have first-hand
information about the challenges
of successfully applying to and
achieving at top educational
institutions.
Epsom College passionately
advocates the idea that a good
education is about more than just
good A-Levels results.
The January intake is in
progress. Visit the Open Day on
Nov 12. The Tune Libra
Scholarship is available for
deserving students.

n For more information, visit


www.epsomcollege.edu.my or
e-mail enquiries@epsomcollege.
edu.my.

Private & International School Guide 9

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

Australian
education
as an asset
COME and see how the
Australian education has helped
produce more than its fair share
of the worlds best and brightest
minds at Australian
International School Malaysia
(AISM).
The principal and heads of
school will be delivering a
presentation about the schools
student-centred teaching and
learning methods that emphasise
the building of life skills such as
resilience, communication,
creativity, collaboration and
critical thinking.
During school tours, witness
how the latest thinking strategies
are nurtured in an open,
collaborative classroom
environment and discover how
independent learning can
transform your childs learning
outcomes.
Families with children below
the age of six will be treated to a
storytelling and play session with

the Early Learning Centre


teachers during tours.
There are numerous fun
activities in store for your
children who are below the age
of 12 as well while you attend
talks.
Experience the Australian
style of teaching and learning
during the trial classes where
children above the age of 12 will
be able to join and interact with
teachers and students in a
classroom.
Visitors will be amazed
by the schools Creative Arts
Week, featuring art and
photography exhibitions around
the school displaying
outstanding artwork from
students.
The application fee will be
waived for all applicants during
Open Week.
Besides that, the school is
offering an exclusive 50%
discount on admission fees for

Australian International School Malaysia


AISM is the only international
school in Malaysia offering an
Australian curriculum that
follows the Australian school
year and is delivered by
Australian teachers.
Growing steadily over the
years since its inception in
2000, the school caters to
children from age three
(nursery) to 18 (Year 12).
Located in a secure, gated
community in Seri
Kembangan, AISM overlooks
the picturesque South Lake of
Mines Resort City, a short
drive from Kuala Lumpur
City Centre.
The school houses its
primary and secondary
school on one campus and

Performing arts is
offered as part of the
curriculum at AISM.

has more than 600 students


represented by 37
nationalities.
Australian education has
produced 15 Nobel laureates,
Olympic gold medallists,
scientists, inventors and
business leaders who have
made a big impact on a global
stage.
Get a taste of the Australian
education right here in
Malaysia during AISMS Open
Week from Nov 21 to 26 and
28 from 10am to 1pm.

n For more information or to


register, visit www.aism.edu.
my/open-week, call
03-8949 5000 or e-mail
events@aism.edu.my.

Resilience, communication, creativity, collaboration and critical thinking are some of the key aspects of the education
offered by Australian International School Malaysia (AISM).
students entering Year 11 after
their Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia
examinations. Registeration for
the January 2017 intake is now
open.
The scholarship programme is
offered to Malaysians and expatriate

students aged 11 to 18.


Successful applicants will receive
a 30% or 50% discount on admission
and tuition fees for the entire
duration of their schooling at
AISM with a waiver in application
fees, annual technology fees and

yearly deposit.
Shortlisted candidates will be
required to attend an interview
and assessment.

n For enquiries, call 03-8949 5000

or e-mail paprincipal@aism.edu.my.

10 Private & International School Guide


AS students enter St Josephs
Institution International School
(SJIIM) in the morning, they are
greeted by principals and teachers,
who are also the last to see them
off at the end of the day.
This places head of school Stuart
Glascott in a perfect position to
monitor student satisfaction and he
is proud to report a positive
response for SJIIMs first month.
We started academic and
co-curricular activities right away
since the school is already
equipped with all the elements of a
long-established institution, he
says.
The students have settled in well,
which is a testament to the warm
and inviting environment that so
importantly characterises the
Lasallian experience.
This could not have been
possible without the keen support
of SJIIMs parent community, for
whom a Parent Support Group is
being set up to allow for seamless
parent-school interaction and
cooperation.

Encouraging response
The schools successful opening
is also largely attributed to the
well-prepared and highly skilled
educators of SJIIM, who underwent
a two-week orientation programme
prior to the opening and are
able to help transitioning
students adjust to SJIIMs
curriculum structure and demands
regardless of their educational
backgrounds.
Glascott says the staff were
overwhelmed with the response to
SJIIM so far and have been tireless
in their efforts to meet the
expectations of the 440 new
students and their parents.
This number of new students,

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

Raising the benchmark


member of the schools pioneer
batch of scholars.

True to its ethos


SJIIM is a school of the
De La Salle Brothers and, as such,
is a values-driven, holistic
education school.
This Lasallian spirit was very
much alive at the recent inaugural
school assembly and School
Blessing event where students had
the opportunity to meet and thank
the members of the school board
who had worked hard to set up the
institution as well as experience
the traditions and culture of a
Lasallian school.
The action-packed beginning to
the first term exemplifies the
founding staffs commitment to its
holistic education promise of
delivering first-class, rigorous
academic programmes that go
hand in hand with a values-driven
environment.
Holistic education is at the heart
of the school and we use this
philosophy to raise academic
standards and expectations. This
means developing students
approach, conduct, work ethic and
decision-making skills, Glascott
says.
It is without a doubt that the
foundation of faith, service and
community, which the school is
built on, will prove central to the
long-term development of its
students.
Visit SJIIMs Open Day from
10am to 3.30pm on Nov 13 at its
Tropicana PJ Campus and meet the

Founding board members of SJIIM joined students and staff members for
the inaugural whole school assembly.
which is an impressive figure for a
new school in the Tier One
category, is significantly greater
than the 275 students initially
forecasted for the founding cohort
of students.
We expect to reach 500 students
in January and will continue to
deliver the promises made to our
parents in terms of academic and
moral achievement for every single
one of these children, says
Glascott, who explains that this
is a mammoth task for a new
school, which would not typically

have more than 100 students in


its first enrolment.
SJIIMs smooth beginning for its
inaugural term was also felt by its
founding students.
A founding Year 12 International
Baccalaureate Diploma Programme
(IBDP) scholar speaks highly of her
educational journey so far, saying,
From meeting new friends to
participating in school and
outreach activities, my
journey at SJIIM has been a
phenomenal experience. I am
proud to be a Lasallian and

Brother President, principals, staff


and students to learn what
Lasallian education is all about.
Registration for its January 2017
(selected year groups only) and
August 2017/2018 intake is now
open.

n For more information, visit


www.sji-international.edu.my.
Students have a strong connection
with the Lasallian community
where outstanding academic
standards go hand-in-hand with
value-driven development.

Complementary
features and facilities

> FROM PAGE 6

In the second part of the survey, parents


rated the features and facilities of a school
based on order of importance.
Facilities
22
6
7
5

Security and safety


Gyms, fields, sports courts and amenities
Auditoriums, laboratories, libraries
School grounds and set up

Numbers indicate parents' votes on criteria


considered most important.
l Security and safety Top-class
facilities are points of pride for many
international institutions, but based on the
survey, parents are most concerned about
the security and safety of the environment
their child is in.
This would include preparedness for
emergencies, smooth day-to-day school
management as well as constant
maintenance and supervision of all areas
and facilities. Every block should be guarded
with every visitors identity and purpose
recorded.
Safety also extends to face-to-face and
technologically assisted interaction,
especially among peers an environment
conducive to learning should be free of
negative behaviour, bullying or ragging.
Teachers and staff are also expected to be

positive nurturers who protect the interest


of the child at all times.
It is crucial that foolproof security
measures are in place but what is perhaps
more important is that students feel safe in
their school environment.
Only then can they develop the
motivation and confidence to begin taking
risks in their learning and push the
boundaries of conventional education.

l Other fixtures Parents rated gyms,


fields, sports courts and amenities slightly
higher than auditoriums, laboratories,
libraries as well as school grounds and
set-up.
All of the above are viewed as necessary
facets of leading institutions around the
country.
Expansive school grounds are equipped
with gyms, fields, sports courts and
amenities to facilitate a host of
co-curricular and after-school
programmes.
These are complemented by fixtures that
facilitate academic events and activities
such as auditoriums, laboratories and
libraries. Several institutions also have
special rooms for music, drama and the
performing arts.
Naturally, the quality of a schools
infrastructure should be of utmost priority.
This directly relates to the safety and
satisfaction of students, teachers and the
entire school community, which sets the
tone for academic and co-curricular
participation as well as the quality of
education available at the institution.
All students should be afforded equal
access to these spaces to pursue their
interests.
> SEE NEXT PAGE

Private & International School Guide 11

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

QUALITY education, international


standards and holistic learning are
all upheld by the Beaconhouse
School System.
Beaconhouse is one of the
largest, most established school
networks in the world with more
than 247,000 students in eight
countries.
Established 40 years ago, the
Beaconhouse Group is dedicated
to providing quality education.
Today, the group operates
schools in different parts of the
world Malaysia, the United
Kingdom, Oman, the United Arab
Emirates, Pakistan, the Philippines,
Belgium and Thailand.

A network of excellence
Established
40 years ago, the
Beaconhouse Group
is dedicated
to providing quality
education from
preschool to the
postgraduate level.

Beaconhouse Malaysia
Beaconhouse Malaysia owns
and operates 12 schools within the
Klang Valley. They comprise eight
preschools, two private primary
and secondary schools that offer
the national curriculum, and two
international schools offering the
Cambridge International General
Certificate of Secondary School
programmes.
Beaconhouse prepares students
for their future by empowering
and inspiring them to reach for
excellence and become
independent global learners.
It provides a solid foundation
from preschool through to senior
school, allowing children to
harness their individual character
and talent in the pursuit of
educational success.
Beaconhouses core focus is to
deliver high-quality academic

The Beaconhouse School System is committed to offering holistic education that encourages young individuals to
become independent global learners.
programmes that enable students
to achieve their intellectual
potential, develop confidence
and nurture life skills to improve
their prospects beyond school.
Trained, caring and highly
motivated teachers provide
students with effective teaching
as well as the personal attention,
advice and support needed.
High teaching standards and a

Culture builds
character
> FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

one area.

The third part of the survey


required parents to rate aspects
of school culture.

l School spirit The social


element of schooling plays a
large part in whether or not a
child enjoys his education.
This is often dictated by the
sense of camaraderie and
community in the school that
can spur a certain esprit de
corps and lifelong pride in
having attended a particular
institution.
Aside from being a good
motivator, a strong school spirit
also speaks about the cohesion
and support within the school
community leaving no doubt
as to why parents rated this
criteria second highest.

School culture
16
7
9
8

Philosophy and vision


School spirit
Religious and moral values
Graduate track record

Numbers indicate parents' votes


on criteria considered most
important.
l Philosophy and vision
Any respectable institution of
learning has a solid philosophy
and vision that drives the efforts
of its staff and student body
this is what parents primarily
look for.
Focus on the development of
the whole child surfaced as a
result of the changing
understanding of the nature and
purpose of education.
Holistic education, wellrounded development and
growth mindset are some of the
buzzwords in line with this, but
they are not philosophies
without merit.
A holistic approach to
education is greatly preferred
by parents today, many of
whom encourage their children
to pursue careers based on
interests and passions and
develop expertise in more than

l Religious and moral


values An international school
education promises more than
good examination grades.
Teachers and facilitators
concentrate on forming a solid
foundation from which a child
develops his ideals, values and
worldview.
Parents are all for an
institution that has clearly
outlined its values and beliefs
and is able to transmit these to
its students through everyday
lessons and interactions.
l Graduate track record
Considering past achievements
and graduates university
acceptance track record can
paint a picture of what the
future could hold for your child
if he joined a particular school.
Parents can also talk to
alumni or other parents to get
an idea of whether or not an
international school would be
the right fit for their child.

range of challenging programmes


bring success within the reach of
every Beaconhouse student.

Beaconhouse Newlands
Early Years
This month, Beaconhouse
Malaysia is introducing a new
international preschool named

Beaconhouse Newlands Early


Years (BNEY). BNEY provides
high-quality education based on
the best international practice
the UK Early Years Foundation
Stage combined with the
Beaconhouse School System
Curriculum.
BNEY is based on international,
developmentally appropriate
practices to provide a dynamic

start in a childs early years.


The structure for BNEY
embraces the philosophy of
constructivism, where children
are natural leaders of their own
learning experiences. BNEY aims
to create opportunities to excite
and nurture children to build
upon their natural enthusiasm,
curiosity and creativity.
Imaginative play as well as
designing and constructing
through physical play are
encouraged to help children
explore and discover that
learning is fun.

n For more information on BNEY


or any of Beaconhouses schools,
call 03-5632 2100 or e-mail
marketing@beaconhouse.edu.my.

12 Private & International School Guide


SUNWAY International School (SIS)
built its success by offering one of
the most highly respected curricula
in the world, the Ontario
Secondary School programme.
In the fifth Programme for
International Student Assessment
(PISA) under the aegis of the
Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development
(OECD), Canada ranked first in the
world for reading, mathematics
and science in the testing of
15- and 16-year-old students from
65 English-speaking countries.
Building a strong foundation in
these critical aspects has provided
SIS students with a springboard to
launch individual strengths and
reap academic excellence
throughout their secondary school
careers. The unique Ontario
approach focuses on students
continuous development with
formative assessment that is
cumulative and consistent, derived
primarily from coursework and
a final portion allotted to an
end-of-semester evaluation.
Early exposure to this style of
practical assessment endows
students with smart study skills,
real-world knowledge to develop
critical thinking and an
experiential reflection as well as
consistency in their responsibility
as students.
SIS has recently received the IB
(International Baccalaureate)
World School status and will be
offering the International
Baccalaureate Diploma Programme
(IBDP) by next year in the Bandar
Sunway campus.
With this status, not only will SIS
incorporate two of the worlds
most esteemed curricula in its
programme offerings but, more
importantly, it will expand the
pre-university qualifications

THE STAR, WEDNESDAY 2 NOVEMBER 2016

Paving a pathway

A strong foundation in the areas of reading, mathematics and science allow SIS students to expand individual
strengths and experience academic excellence throughout their secondary school education.
available to students.
Many of the goals in the IB
programme, including to develop
inquiring, knowledgeable and
caring young individuals to
positively impact the communities
they live in, parallel the objectives
in the Ontario Secondary School
curriculum practised at SIS.
The IB programme requires
students to study multiple subject
disciplines, which eventually lead
to their examinations after two
years of rigorous study.
Students explore the connections

between these areas through an


international perspective, reflect
critically on aspects of knowledge,
pursue independent research as
well as have the opportunity to
apply their knowledge and skills
through local and community
service.
This complements SIS Ontario
curriculum in significant ways. SIS
is an adroit administrator of the
multiple course combinations as
this method is the default
framework practised with its
students in secondary school

towards strengthening their


capabilities and discovering their
talents.
The individual course
Independent Study Unit, a project
with 30% weightage that requires
students to apply the theories
learnt and expound it further with
external research, gives SIS
students a comparative advantage
to take on the extended essay and
Theory of Knowledge components
of IB.
This course requires students to
produce a completed mini thesis,

which the students then present to


their peers.
The CAS (creativity, action and
service) elements in IB mirror the
existing tenets prevalent in the
Ontario curriculum and are geared
to arrive at similar outcomes for
students, which are to achieve
personal growth, foster
collaboration and teamwork as
well as provide an avenue for
students to express themselves
through creative arts.
As the overall education
philosophies, curricula content and
delivery model of both the IB and
Ontario programmes are
substantially similar, compatible
and interchangeable, students may
transfer from one programme to
the other with relative ease.
In this curriculum delivery
model, all students can continue
accumulating credits and be
eligible to receive the Ontario
Secondary School Diploma while
those who choose otherwise may
pursue the IB Diploma.
Both these programmes assure
students progress to higher study
as the global recognition of these
qualifications pave the way for
students to pursue specialisations
in their chosen field of study at
prestigious institutions anywhere
in the world.
Meet the dedicated SIS team at
the Mid Valley Convention Centre
at the Private & International
School Fair this Saturday and
Sunday (Nov 5 and 6).

n For more information, visit


www.sis.sunway.edu.my.