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SCREENCASTING:

DIFFERENTIATED TEACHING
AND LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
James Chase-Wegner

GaETC 2016

Screenc sters

ABOUT ME

15 Years in Education
Elementary- K, 2, 4 (3 Years)
Middle- Business and Computer Science 6-8 (5 years)
High- Business and Computer Education 9-12 (5 Years)

ESEP- High School (Small Group Co-Taught) (2 Years)


Department Chair, Leadership Team, Data Team

GOALS EDUCATORS STRIVE FOR


Increase student achievement for all
Engage every student everyday

Build Positive Relationships


Provide alternate teaching and learning opportunities to meet
students at their level of development
Achieve successful TKES evaluations
Grow as teacher leaders

WHAT THIS PRESENTATION


WILL ATTEMPT TO DO?
Part 1: Chemicals, Zones, & Differentiation
Part 2: Problems and Solutions
Part 3: Traditional Screencasting
Part 4: Conquering a Capstone | Sharing a Vision Through Professional Development
Part 5: Screencasting for In-Class Differentiation
Part 6: Screencasting as an Alternate to Traditional Assessment

PART 1: CHEMICALS,
ZONES, & DIFFERENTIATION

Photo Credit: http://southcountychildandfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Studentthinking.jpg

THE BRAIN SCIENCE OF DIFFERENTIATION


Noradrenaline, a natural chemical of the human body, is released when
students are challenged academically.
Lower Level Learners: When students are challenged far beyond their level of
comfort this hormone can lead to frustration and withdrawal from the lesson.
Higher Level Learners: If high level students are not challenged the right
amount of noradrenaline is not released, contributing to a less stimulating
experience (Morgan, 2014).

Are you being


thoughtful of where
each of your students
are joining the learning
curve when you begin
to deliver new content?

It is so important to find that sweet spot where students are entering the curve.
This is where data collection comes in.
Informal data collection can be achieved through a quick online pretest using
Kahoot
Plickers
Quia
Learning Management System (Edmodo, Canvas, ect.)
Many of the above assessment methods allow for a quick download of results via an
excel file and then a quick color coding by tiers to identify your various zones for
that content standard.

USING DATA AND TIERING STUDENTS


Leveling groups is a fluid process and will change from standard
to standard.
Students will move from tier to tier based on:
Data Collection from informal or formative assessments.

Factors effecting these assessments might range from: Prior


Knowledge, Life Experience, and Learning Style.
Success with previous screencasting instruction should also be
considered.

MEETING THE NEEDS OF ALL STUDENTS


Content

Process

Differentiation ensures that what a student learns, how


he/she learns it, and how the student demonstrates
what he/she has learned is a match for that students
readiness level, interests, and preferred mode of
Product
learning (as cited in Tomlinson, 2004, p. 188).
ZDP

Knowing Your
Students

Learning Style

PART 2:
PROBLEMS |
SOLUTIONS

Problems are like


washing machines. They
twist, they spin, they
knock us around. But in
the end we come out
cleaner, brighter, and
better than before.
~Unknown
Photo Credit: http://media.mnn.com/sites/default/files/user/181799/washing-machine-full.jpg

THE DAILY DILEMMA


Teachers face the challenge of teaching many
students at different academic levels and with
different learning needs, but only one teacher to
reach them all at the same time.

We can not be in multiple places at once or can we?

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO BIG QUESTIONS


How do teachers effectively reach and teach students at
different levels?

Possible Solution:
Differentiated screencasts with tiered groups based on
data collection from informal and formative assessments.

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO BIG QUESTIONS


How can students demonstrate their learning in a new technology
driven way that incorporates more learning modalities than
traditional methods?
Possible Solution:

Screencasting allows for the inclusion of student generated


examples, internet captures, recordings of students working
through a process with or without the computer, and multimedia
(audio, video, and pictures).

PART 3: TRADITIONAL SCREENCASTING

SCREENCASTING
Application that provides teachers
and students with the ability to
combine a visual recording of
what appears on the computer
screen with an accompanying
audio track.
Many screencasting applications
are free and have extra features
like a highlighted mouse option.

SCREENCASTING RESEARCH
Research has shown that screencasts improve the
results of both student confidence and learning
(Oehrli, Piacentine, Peters, and Nanamaker, 2011, p.
134).

SCREENCASTING RESEARCH
Research has shown that
students who watch
screencasts perform
better on assessments
(Pinder-Grover, Green,
and Millunchick, 2011).

SCREENCASTING RESEARCH
Increased student achievement,
increased homework
completion, and a decrease in
behavior incidents reflect the
benefits of using new
instructional technology and
forward thinking (Flumerfelt
and Green, 2013).

TRADITIONAL SCREENCASTING USES


Remediation

Extension
Flipped Learning

Screenchomp

Show Me

Explain Everything

Screencastify

TRADITIONAL SCREENCASTING USES


Giving feedback on homework or projects

Model teaching for parents


Relay information to students and substitutes when teachers
and/or students are absent

PART 4:
CONQUERING A CAPSTONE
SHARING A VISION THROUGH
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

A CAPSTONE AND A CAUSE


With my desire to spread the use of screencasting for in-class
differentiation to others, I decided to dive deep into this
concept for my Kennesaw State University Capstone project.
While I was able to locate research on traditional uses of
screencasting and its overall effectiveness, there seemed to be
a gap in the research describing its ability to be used in class
to provide a means of providing multiple pathways of learning
within the same class period.

WHAT? HOW? WHY?


Inform others about how I went about sharing my vision.

Inspire others to put this strategy and its benefits into action.
Inspire others to build the technology skills and confidence
needed to take other educators down this path.
Let you know that this can be done, it works, and it is worth
the effort.

A VISION FOR SCREENCASTING


Using Differentiated Screencasting in the Classroom:
Improve the pace of instruction for all students.

Providing a screencast for higher achieving students allows for students to


finish earlier and move into planned extension opportunities which will
translate into improving scores for your tough to grow (SGP) students.
This method of using one or more screencasts to guide leveled instruction
allows the teacher the opportunity to provide one-on-one or small group
support to students that typically struggle or might slow down traditional
whole group instruction. This means more time to build relationships and
student confidence.

SHARING THE VISION


December of 2015 - Capstone Approval Through
Kennesaw State University

January - February 2016 Institutional Review Board


Approval and Paulding County School District
Approval of Capstone Proposal and intended
research
February 2016- Recruitment of staff from various
content areas to join PLG.

SHARING THE VISION


A PLAN FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
March 2016 - Building Knowledge and Understanding of
Differentiation, Data Collection/Analysis, and Screencasting for
Differentiation.
April 2016 - Cycle 1: Screencasting For In-Class Differentiation
May 2016 - Cycle 2: Screencasting For In-Class Differentiation
August - October 2016 Cycle 3: Screencasting as a means of a
non-traditional student assessment

SCREENCASTING PL SESSIONS
Each Professional Learning Cycles Provided Participants With:
Opportunities to learn new ideas and concepts;
Assistance in data collection and analysis of informal & formative assessments;

Time to brainstorm and plan for differentiation through tiered grouping with
PLG participants;
Time to create teacher screencasts and/or planning for student projects;
Time for implementation of differentiated instruction via screencasting;
A session for post-implementation data analysis and reflection.

Support. Modeling. Peer Coaching. Partners. Patience.

SCREENCASTING FOR DIFFERENTIATION


4 STAGES
Pre-assessment, Data Analysis, and Leveling of Tiers.
Plan and Produce tier specific screencasts to relay differentiated
versions of content, process, and assessment to students at multiple levels.
Implement instruction with the aid of screencasts and facilitate as
needed, providing the highest level of support to the lowest tier.
Reflect on the positives and negatives of implementation and overall
measure of student learning via assessment of student generated
products, quiz, or test. *Make note of opportunities to improve process in
the future.

CLASSROOM TECHNOLOGY NEEDS


Headphones or Ear buds are a must for differentiation where
students may be following multiple learning paths within the
same room.

In-class technology options:


Smartphones
Tablets
Laptops
Desktops
Projector and Speaker System

EXPERIMENTING WITH SCREENCASTING


FOR IN-CLASS DIFFERENTIATION
Teacher made screencasts provide students with the ability to play,
replay, and pause screencasts at their discretion.
This allows for even more differentiated opportunities of instruction.

Students can access screencasts in or out of class when videos are


made accessible via:
Class website PCSD, Weebly, or Wix
Messaging system such as Remind
Learning Management System(LMS) such as Edmodo or Canvas

PLAN TO BUILD ADDITIONAL SKILLS


File Management
Saving files to flash drives or cloud storage
Uploading and downloading files
Mp4 file format
Using content or learning management systems

PART 5: SCREENCASTING FOR


IN-CLASS DIFFERENTIATION

THINGS TO CONSIDER
Things to consider when making screencasts for differentiated instruction in
your classroom:
Plan to assess students to determine where they are on the learning curve
for the current standards.
Create a plan for using screencasting in your class to differentiate
instruction.
How could using this screencast during classroom instruction benefit the
students and you by giving you more time, improving student growth
percentiles, decreasing behavior problems, and/or allowing you to
facilitate certain student directed groups while giving more one-onone attention to others?

THINGS TO CONSIDER
Things to consider when making screencasts for differentiated instruction in your
classroom:
How will you group students if at all during activities involving screencasts?
What is your plan for managing students using technology in my classroom?
(Equipment, Vision, and Behavioral Expectations)
No one knows your students better than you. What things have you considered that
could go wrong and how have you planned for them?

MEET THE CAST


P.B. RITCH MIDDLE
SCREENCASTING PLG

SCREENCASTING FOR
DIFFERENTIATION ESEP
MATH
Before this class, differentiation was always something that I
did not like planning for because I knew it was going to be a
struggle. Screen casting has really changed that for me. It
allows me to extend learning for accelerated learners and it
frees me up to be more one-on-one with my low level
learners. Parents love the screencasts because they feel like
they have a better understanding of what is being taught in
the classroom. When students are absent all they have to do is
watch a screencast in order to get caught up and it doesn't
waste instructional time. The possibilities are endless.
~Ginna Stokes, 6th Math

SCREENCASTING FOR
DIFFERENTIATION GENERAL
ED MATH
Learning how to use Screencast and then applying
it in the classroom to differentiate instruction was
very beneficial. Also, I also learned how to use Jing.
Another positive was that I was provided with the
tools (document camera and microphone) to use
these programs at my leisure.
I used a split screen to show how to solve
inequalities and write explanations. It worked well
with the class and some students used the
screencast on their technological devices at home
and at school. I posted the screencast to my school's
webpage.
~Dennis Casey, 6th Grade

SCREENCASTING FOR
DIFFERENTIATION
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
ARTS
Frankly, screencasting is pushing me to
view differentiation in its purest form. In
other words, it was hard for me to truly
have multi-leveled activities occurring
simultaneously within a class period prior
to screencasting, which has allowed me to
give various groups feedback.

This screencast video is meant to lead


classroom instruction while I work with a
few students that I have identified through
data analysis as needing more direct
instruction. After the screencast I will be
available to work with all students on this
topic.
~Sylvia Draughn, 8th ELA

SCREENCASTING FOR
DIFFERENTIATION SOCIAL
STUDIES
Screencasting has allowed me more
flexibility in my classroom to work with
students that need more teacher-directed
assistance. It also allows me the opportunity
to assess my students more often and provides
them with a positive learning experience.

~ Jennifer Godbout, 8th SS

SCREENCASTING FOR
DIFFERENTIATION FAMILY
CONSUMER SCIENCE
I'm using my screencasting to differentiate content, mostly how
students are accessing the information and the pace at which they
can work. Most of my students are at different places in regards to
the 3 units we cover this 9 weeks.

I made laptops available to the students so they could access it


on their own after we started the project.
I also find it useful in remediation and in talking to parents
because many students who might get frustrated about
completing the project and not turn it in had access at home and
had no excuses because I presented the information in so many
ways.
If I could estimate I would say at least 70% of my 120 students
have made use of the videos to complete work in class and at
home. I would say at least 20% make regular use of them by
going back and re-watching videos.

~Latrina Thompson, 6-8th FACS

SCREENCASTING FOR DIFFERENTIATION


PHYSICAL SCIENCE
My intention is to utilize screen casting to implement a 3 level
differentiated plan of how students will interact within Physical Science
material. Initially I will be focusing on the Scientific Method and
Dependent and Independent variables.
Level I:
This screen cast recovers basic information that was taught in
previous grade levels and emphasizes critical vocabulary. Students
fill in a Frayer model while utilizing the screencast, allowing them to
pause and review, as I cover more synonyms and tiered examples
flowing from basic understanding to more complex ideas letting
them choose the most appropriate examples as possible.
This level will have a second screencast video identifying the steps
of the Scientific Method with 3 basic examples. The students may
then utilize the screen cast after their initial viewing as many times
as necessary while working through several application examples
on a work sheet.
~Christina Aiken, 8th Physical Science

SCREENCASTING FOR DIFFERENTIATION


PHYSICAL SCIENCE
Level II:
This screencast gives an overview of the vocabulary and basic information that was taught in previous
grade levels. The students may utilize the screen cast as many times as necessary while working through
several applications of the Scientific Method and Dependent and Independent variables through examples
on a work sheet, once the sheet has been completed and checked by myself the students move on to the
second portion of their work.
The second screencast focuses on having students create their own example of the Scientific Method
where they identify and explain each step of the scientific method as well as the independent and
dependent variable in their own words.
~Christina Aiken, 8th Physical Science

SCREENCASTING FOR DIFFERENTIATION


PHYSICAL SCIENCE
Level III:
This screencast gives an overview of the vocabulary and basic information that was taught in previous
grade levels. After reviewing the video one time students will take an in depth quiz that not only focuses
on mastering the vocabulary but also the application of skills involved in the Scientific Method and
Dependent and Independent variables. If students score above 85% they move on to the second
assignment and if they score below they will move to the Level II activity.
The second screencast for this Level III focuses on having students create a video example that will
implement an explanation of the scientific method and how it can applied differently. The focus of the
video will be to integrate vocabulary, identify independent and dependent variables in a scientific
experiment, as well as demonstrate how to apply the scientific method.
~Christina Aiken, 8th Physical Science

PART 6: SCREENCASTING AS AN
ALTERNATE TO TRADITIONAL ASSESSMENT
Presenting information in multiple formats all at once gives
screencasting an edge over traditional presentations and gives

students with learning disabilities opportunities to learn and


create in a new way (Gormely and McDermott, 2011).

SCREENCASTING AS A MEANS OF
NON-TRADITIONAL ASSESSMENT
Most commonly used formats by P.B. Ritch PLG members:
Project walkthroughs

Reflections over student learning


Description of a learned process
Students interviewing each other over standards based topics

TEACHER FEEDBACK
STUDENT CREATED SCREENCASTS
The students enjoyed using the screencasts and I told them that
I would make future projects involving the use of screencasts.

I shared some of my student screencasts with all of my classes


and the math teacher next door shared it with her classes too.
I think the students really enjoyed the activity. In fact, I am
planning to complete another screencasting activity with the
same students.

STUDENT CREATED SCREENCASTS


Set up Screencast-o-matic application on each desktop or mobile laptop stations
prior to teacher/student use.
Work with your media center to acquire microphones and document cameras for a
regular computer lab. If students are using a mobile lab, most laptops have these
tools built into them.
Create a plan for managing the equipment and students while using technology.

Spend a day teaching them the basic skills needed to create screencasts using
various forms of media.
Allow students to work in groups of 2 or more to assist each other.

STUDENT CREATED SCREENCASTS


Have clear expectations in the form of a rubric and discuss how your intentions are to
publish their products. Find ways high quality productions can be used to teach,
inspire, or persuade others. Real world use = Real world product.

Create manageable benchmarks for your students to meet and hold them to those
benchmark deadlines.
Facilitate design and creation processes. Be thoughtful that some groups will need
more direction and plan for that with pre-planned project ideas, alternative project
variations, and/or planned daily support.
Plan for extended technology access hours before or after school so students can
gain additional access to technology.
Celebrate successes with students and school-wide community.

WHATS IN IT FOR ME?


Daily satisfaction of knowing your students needs are met

Advancing your high achievers


Supporting your struggling students
Students find that they are gaining confidence
Behavior is managed because student engagement is at the correct
level for all

Teacher Keys Evaluation System (TKES) Got it covered!

SCREENCASTING: DIFFERENTIATED TEACHING


AND LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
RELATIONSHIP TO TKES STANDARDS DISCUSSED IN THIS PRESENTATION
Standard 3 Instructional Strategies
Standard 4 Differentiated Instruction

Standard 5 Assessment Strategies


Standard 6 Assessment Uses
Standard 7 Positive Learning Environment
Standard 8 Academically Challenging Environment
Standard 9 Professionalism
Standard 10 - Communication

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

http://screencasting-jcw.weebly.com/

REFERENCES
Flumerfelt, S., & Green, G. (2013). Using lean in the flipped classroom for at risk students.
Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 16(1), 356-366.
Gormely, K., & McDermott, P. (2011). Do you Jing? How screencasting can enrich classroom
teaching and learning. Language and Literacy Spectrum, 21, 12-20.

Morgan, H. (2014). Maximizing student success with differentiated learning. Clearing House,
87(1), 34-38.
Oehrli, J. A., Piacentine, J., Peters, A. and Nanamaker, B. (2011). Do screencasts really work?
Assessing student learning through instructional screencasts. ACRL Conference. 127-144

Pinder-Grover, T., Green, K. R., & Millunchick, J. M. (2011). The efficacy of screencasts to
address the diverse academic needs of students in a large lecture course. Advances in
Engineering Education, 2(3), 1-28.
Scott, Katy. (2011, February 28). Reverse and improve your Instruction with screencasts:
Lecture at home, practice at school. [Web log comment]. Retrieved from
http://digitaldollar.edublogs.org/2011/02/28/reverse-and-improve-your-instruction-withscreencasts-lecture-at-home-practice-at-school/