Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 59

Bulerias Handbook for Guitar

by Thomas Whiteley

Table of Contents
Introduction
History
Structure
Handbook
Terms Used

Counting Compas 6 ways

4-5

Chording Patterns 1-40

6-12

Bulerias Introductions

13

6 count - 18 examples

14-16

12 count - 8 examples

17-18

Introduction in A Phrygian

19

Bulerias Al Golpe in A minor 1 and 2

20-21

Falsetas A Phrygian 1-7

22-28

Falsetas A minor 1-4

29-32

Falseta A Major

33

Endings A Phrygian

34-36

Endings A minor

37-40

Endings A Major

41-44

Time to put our knowledge to use

45

Bulerias in A Phrygian 1-2

46-49

Bulerias in A minor

50-53

Bulerias in A Phrygian, to A minor and return to A Phrygian

54-58

Conclusion

59

copyright 2002, 2003


All music notation and tablature created by Thomas Whiteley

Introduction
History
Bulerias was created in Jerez de la Frontera and derived from Soleares. It is the most complex of the
flamenco forms and also the most fun to play. Several other areas of Andalucia have developed their
own version of Bulerias such as Cadiz and Moron de la Frontera . The Jerez style is played rapidly
at about 240 to 270 beats a minute. The style of Moron de la Frontera is sometimes refered to as
Al Golpe and Country style, and is played at about 170 to 200 beats a minute. Other styles fall
somewhere in between these two tempos.
Structure
Today Bulerias is played in any key and is written in 3/4 time. Frequently you will hear traditional
Bulerias being played in A Phrygian, A minor, A major and E major. There are several ways to
mark the music and one way is to accent the The 3rd, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th counts. Another way is
to use what is termed six count compas. In that you often start of beat 12 and count 12, 1, 2, 3, 4,
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11. The accent is on 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10 and 11. Many right hand patterns are
available to play Bulerias. The rules are more open than for other flamenco palos and you can do a
great deal of improvision including when to play a resolution phrase. Melodies can be taken from
popular flamenco cante (called copla) or from any popular music (called cople).

Handbook
The purpose of this document is to provide information for flamenco guitarists interested in Bulerias.
The compas is discussed as well as a number of chording paterns to make the music more interesting. This is followed by examples of introductions, falsetas and endings. Finally several Bulerias
are created from some of the elements presented. By following the structure and using your imagination you should be able to create your own cording patterns as well as a segment or an entire piece.
Terms Used.
Indice = Index = I
Medio = Middle finger = M
Anular = Ring finger = A
Meique = Little finger = m
Pulgar = Thumb = P
Parada = Stop strings
G = Golpe

Counting Compas
The basic chording compas of Bulerias consists of the following.

This emulates Soleares and is the simplest form. You can begin on count 1 or 12 as you like. When
first learning Bulerias it is easier to begin on 1. When you gain experience and it is necessary you
can begin on 12.

By counting in four groups of 3s and accenting 3, 6, 8, 10 and 12 we have this example.

In this example we have two groups of 3s, and three groups of 2s for a total of 12, with accenting 3,
6, 8, 10 and 12.

Now we are going to use 5 as our count. The 5 count falls on beats 1, 4, 7, 9 and 11. You may use a
Golpe, your foot or count internally, and we are accenting 3, 6, 8, 10 and 12.

Here is an example of al golpe. Use the little finger of the left hand to mute the chord. It is a Syncopated rhythm and fun to play.

Another example of al golpe.

Now we use a six count to create our Bulerias.

Another example of six count.

Our final example.

Chording Patterns
Now we will look at 40 chording patterns which will make bulerias more interesting. Practice playing patterns until you can play for five to fifteen minutes without stopping.

10

11

12

Bulerias Introductions
An introduction is useful to create the tempo and feeling of the piece you are playing. The examples,
which follow, are by no means the only introductions to Bulerias. One reason for presenting the
many examples is to give variety and allow the player to build his/her own introduction. The first
examples are given using a six count, which can be used as is or you can repeat one 6 count phrase
or mix several as you wish. Using one to three six count phrases and going into a chording compas
using any of the chording patterns presented is one approach you can take.
Examples of 12 count introductions are also given. You can mix a six and twelve count introduction.
Finally, several complete introductions are presented. By this time you should be able to create your
own variations of Bulerias Introductions.

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

This begins on beat 12 and indicates a 12 count compas. The final 12th beat is silent and at this
point you may begin the first note of a falseta or continue with chording compas.

20

In this example we have a six count compas. The final 6th beat is silent and at this point you may
begin the first note of a falseta or continue with chording compas. You can use 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 as
I have done or 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 12 to indicate a six count compas.

21

Falsetas

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

A Culpe uses a familiar or popular melody as its theme.

33

Endings

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

Time to put our knowledge to use.


For our first Bulerias we will use elements from what we have presented thus far to form a short
piece of music. The idea is to play something that is simple to learn and yet correct. You can replace
the introduction, falseta and ending as you wish. In addition you can add as many falsetas as you
would like.
Our first example will be in A Phrygian. Then a longer piece also in A Phrygian will be introduced.
Next a piece in A minor will be shown.
Finally, a piece in A Phrygian which changes to A minor and return to A Phrygian will be presented.
Examine the point where the change of modes occurs. This is not uncommon with some singers and
goes well as a guitar solo as well. One term used for this technique is Cambio to change.
Change can refer to mode or tempo.
Additional sources and examples of Bullerias may be found in the following publications:
1. El Arte Flamenco - Jack Buckingham - U.C. Berkeley - Spanish Music Center
2. Flamenco Guitar - Ivor Mairants - Latin American Publishing Company.
3. Escuela del Flamenco - Mariano Cordoba
4. Flamenco Guitar - Mariano Cordoba - Oak Publications
5. Traditional Flamenco Guitar Volume I - Mariano Cordoba
6. Flamenco Guitar Basic Techniques - Juan Serrano - Mel Bay MB93632BCD
7. Sabor Flamenco - Juan Serrano - Mel Bay MB95321
8. Systematic Studies for Flamenco Guitar Juan Serrano - Mel Bay MB96871
9. Flamenco Concert Selections Juan Serrano - Mel Bay MB93698CD
10. The Keys to Flamenco Guitar - Dennis Koster - PJN Publications
11. You Can Teach Yourself Flamenco Guitar - Luigi Marraccini - Mel Bay MB95358BCD
12. El Arte Flamenco de la Guitarra Volume I & II - Juan Martin - United Music Publishers Ltd.
13. La Guitarra Flamenca Video II Lesson 4 - Juan Martin - Patrick Campbell & Cordhart Ltd
14. Manual Didactico de la Guittara Flamenca Volumes 1 & 2 - Manuel Granados - Ventilador
15. Flamenco Guitar 4 CD version - Chuck Keyser - http://members.aol.com/buleriaChk/private/
flamenco.html
16. Hechizo - Libro de Partituras - Oscar Herrero - RGB Arte Visual
17. Solos Flamencos - Juan Martin - Mel Bay MB99825SET (DVD) or MB99825BCV (VHS)

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

Conclusion
Try listening to different guitarists to get ideas for flasetas. Learn to play as many patterns as you can. You can obtain additional introductions, falsetas and endings by reading other literature, and listening. Listen to singers and use the melodic line of a song for
a falseta. Change a falseta to suit yourself and what you hear. Hearing one piece of
music often gives you a new idea. For years I wrote down musical ideas on a piece of
paper. Today I like to use TablEdit to write down my ideas and modify them. Bulerias is
fun to play and I hope you enjoy yourself with this flamenco form.

59