Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 10

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

Differentiated Lesson Plan


Assignment #1
Kiley Williams
EDSP 4363
Tarleton State University

Student and Lesson Intro

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

I am differentiating a math lesson that involves putting fractions on a


number line for a student with dyscalculia. Because this student has a hard
time with math, differentiating this lesson plan would be of great benefit to
the student. The student is a very visual and hands on learner because she
has a hard time understanding the math problems when they are just on
paper. She works better when the teacher helps her one-on-one after she
teaches the lesson. The lesson is teaching students how to place fractions on
a number line. The lesson could be adapted so that someone with
dyscalculia could easily learn it.

Use simple fractions to show students on a number line.


Students with a learning disability might not be able to understand how to
place fractions on a number line. In this case, it is best to use simple
fractions like one-half, one-fourth, and three-fourths. This makes it easier for
them to understand basic fractions. This would benefit the students because
they would be able to learn about fractions without having to learn fractions
that are more difficult to understand.

Use pictures to represent the fractions. It helps students to


visualize what the fractions actually look like.
Some students with a learning disability might learn better when they are
able to see pictures. They might not understand what a fraction is when it is
just written in fraction form but if they can see a picture representation then

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

it will help them to understand what they are looking at. Seeing a picture of a
pie cut into pieces is a possible way to help represent fractions. You can
cover some of the pieces and have the student say what the fraction is.
Since the student is a visual learner, she will benefit from seeing pictures of
the different fractions.

Use manipulatives, allows for hands on learning.


Because students with dyscalculia have a hard time understanding math, it
might be easier for them to understand if they are allowed to use
manipulatives. This allows them to be hands on with the fractions. They
might not be able to understand what they are looking at on paper. Using
manipulatives, you can stack them together and use them to represent
fractions. Making four stacks, you could make four different stacks and use
them to show , , and . This would help the student to see which
fractions are bigger. This will help students to be able to place the fractions
on a number line.

Lower the amount of fractions so that it doesnt overwhelm the


student.
Teaching the students only a few fractions at a time can keep them from
being so overwhelmed that they just shut down completely. As a student that
already has a hard time with understanding math, fractions can be really
overwhelming to them. By giving them a smaller amount of fractions to work

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

with, the student will be able to process them easier. If the other students
have to place ten fractions on the number line, then have the student with
dyscalculia only place five numbers on the number line. This way she is still
learning about plotting fractions, but has less problems to be overwhelmed
by.

Work with the students one on one so that they can ask questions.
Some students need one-on-one teaching to be able to understand.
Sometimes the classroom environment is too much for a student with
learning disabilities. It might be more beneficial to the student to work oneon-one with the teacher. They have the opportunity to ask more questions
than they would during the lesson. After giving the lesson to the class, you
should sit down with the struggling student and work through all the
problems with them. When they get stuck you can reteach to just them
instead of having to reteach the entire class. To help the student, the teacher
should help the students to place the fractions onto the number line. If the
teacher reads the fractions out loud to the student, then it would help them
to know what each fraction means.

If they dont understand fractions, then have them place whole


numbers on a number line.

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

For some students with learning disabilities, learning fractions is too difficult
and they cant understand. For these students it might be easier to have
them place whole numbers on a number line. That way they are still
practicing number order and number lines. It might be beneficial to add
halves to the number line so that they can begin to learn fractions. Using
both whole numbers and halves can help introduce fractions to the students
without being too overwhelming.

Allow the students to work as a group or in pairs.


Students might not be able to understand the fractions on their own. It might
be beneficial to have the students work in groups or pairs so that they can
bounce ideas off of each other. If you pair the students up in pairs- with one
student that understands fractions and one that does not, then they will be
able to teach each other. This works because the person teaching the other
student learns more while teaching them and the other student learns from
the student teacher. In a group, multiple students are able to teach
everyone about fractions. They are able to work through problems together,
so they are bound to come up with the right answer together.

Instead of Critical Writing, allow the student to answer the


questions aloud.
Since the student has a hard time understanding math, it would be hard for
them to try to explain them in a written answer. If the student is allowed to

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

answer the questions out loud then maybe she will be able to explain her
answers better. This would benefit her because then you would be able to
actually know what she understands. You could then reteach whatever the
student does not know.

Conclusion
This student with dyscalculia has problems understanding math, therefore
this lesson about putting fractions on a number line needed to be
differentiated. The lesson was adapted so that the student could use models,
work in groups, and answer the questions aloud. As a teacher, you can
change the number of fractions, you can use simplified fractions, and you
can work one-on-one with the student. All of these adaptations will greatly
benefit the student.

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

MATH TEKS Standard(s):


Readiness Standard
3.3F represent fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using a variety of objects and pictorial
models, including number lines.
3.3H compare two fractions having the same numerator or denominator in problems by reasoning about
their sizes and justifying the conclusion using symbols, words, objects, and pictorial models.
Supporting Standard
3.3A represent fractions greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6,
and 8 using concrete objects and pictorial models, including strip diagrams and number lines;
3.3B determine the corresponding fraction greater than zero and less than or equal to one with
denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 given a specified point on a number line
3.3C explain that the unit fraction 1/b represents the quantity formed by one part of a whole that has been
partitioned into b equal parts where b is a non-zero whole number
3.3D compose and decompose a fraction a/b with a numerator greater than zero and less than or equal to
b as a sum of parts 1/b
3.3E solve problems involving partitioning an object or a set of objects among two or more recipients
using pictorial representations of fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8
3.3G explain that two fractions are equivalent if and only if they are both represented by the same point
on the number line or represent the same portion of a same size whole for an area model
3.7A represent fractions of halves, fourths, and eighths as distances from zero on a number line.
Pay special attention to this processing TEKS:
3.1A Apply mathematics to problems arising in everything life, society, and the workplace.
3.1B Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan
or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and
the reasonableness of a solution.
3.1C Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil and technology as appropriate,
and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
3.1D Communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations,
including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
3.1E Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas.
3.1F Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
3.1G Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical
language in written or oral communication.

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN


We Will: represent
fractions with
denominators of 2, 3, 4,
6, and 8 using a variety
of objects and pictorial
models, including
number lines.
Monday:
I will: show how to
divide a number line
from 0 to 1 into equal
parts and then represent
fractions on the number
line.
Tuesday:
I will: create and identify
fractions on a number
line.
Wednesday
I will: write the unit
fraction that represents
each part of the length.
Thursday-Friday:
I will: identify how to
write the fraction of the
length using a number
line or any line segment.

Essential Questions/Question Stems:


- What are different interpretations of a fraction?
- How can you show and name part of a region (whole)?
- How can a fraction name part of a group?
- How can you record fractions on a number line?
- How can you name points on a number line?
- How can a fraction name part of a length?
- How can you show a fraction as a sum of its parts?
- How can you share items equally?
- How can you analyze given information to solve a problem?
- How can you compare fractions with the same denominator?
- How can you compare fractions with the same numerator?
- How can different fractions name the same part of a whole?
- What do equivalent fractions look like on a number line?
- How can you use reasoning to solve a problem?
Academic Vocabulary:

fraction
unit fraction
numerator

denominator
equivalent fractions
region

set
whole number
consecutive

Guided Math Rotations for the Week:


Teacher Table: Students should work with teacher on skills they
need to focus on based on the unit tests weve had so far.
Technology: Rexflex Math or IXL Math
Math Facts/Review: Either a review of a skill your class is low in,
or continue working on multiplication fact mastery.
Journal: Students should be writing critically about determining
parts of a whole or set.
Independent Practice: various word-problems from task cards,
worksheets, or Fast Focus
Homework this week will be various word problem worksheets you
feel would best suit your students. Another suggestion for
homework would be the Fast Focus pages for specific TEKS in
Heathers room. YOU CAN ALSO CUSTOM-MAKE HOMEWORK
FOR STUDENTS BASED UPON THEIR NEEDS.
Monday: Fractions on a number line
Introduce fractions on a number line by posing the solve and share
scenario on page577. You can give students a piece of paper and
have them fold to show them how to divide rectangle into halves
by drawing a line through the middle of the rectangle, then divide a
length into halves by making a tick mark halfway between one end
of the length and the other. Review the vocabulary: fraction and
number line. It is wise to discuss whole and part at this point as
well.
Explain that they will begin learning about how to divide a number
line from 0 to 1 into equal parts and then represent fractions on

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN


the number line.
Show the Pearson video for lesson 11-3 and complete the Do You
Understand? part of the introduction. Be sure to discuss the
vocabulary words, numerator and denominator at this point.
Have students practice how to show and name part on the number
lines using either the textbook or various handouts provided.
Critical writing: Have students explain what the different
vocabulary words mean we have discussed so far. Have them
draw an example in their journals of each of the words.
Tuesday: Fractions on a number line
Pass out a long piece of paper (or sentence strip) and have the
students complete the activity on page 583. This shows them how
fractions can be represented on a strip and also the
representations of parts of a whole need to be equal.
Show the Pearson learning video for lesson 11-4 and do the Do
You Understand? part of the introduction. The Do You
Understand? part will count as their critical writing for today. The
students can write how to identify the fractional parts of a number
line and how to identify them.
For our boys you could use a football field to show a number line
(just change the numbers on the yard lines to fit our needs). :)
Do a lot of practice either using the book, or the various handouts
provided.
Wednesday: Fractions and Length
Complete the solve and share. The teacher could fold a long
piece of paper and have the students tell her to fold it to represent
4th and 8th. Complete the question on page 589 and you could
use the explain part of the question as your critical writing for the
day.
Show the Pearson learning video lesson 11-5 if could also be a
good idea to have the students draw the missing pieces to make
the whole unit fraction. (this could be good visual for the kids to
see how all the parts on the fraction connect).
Do a lot of practice either using the book, or the various handouts
provided.

DIFFERENTIATED LESSON PLAN

10

Thursday-Friday: Fraction Practice


Please use this time to reteach your students and make sure
understand about number lines and how to represent the fractional
length. The extending questions at the end of the problem solving
practice are really good to extend the concept because the
students are able to practice two step problems with the questions.
Use the various handouts, fraction games, and resources we have
at our disposal to expose students to as many types of these kinds
of questions as possible.
Also please make sure you are looking at the unit assessment for
backwards design. :)
Critical Writing: Provide an opportunity this week for students to
explain fractions on a number line or fractions and length.